How to Train a Husky to Stop Whining

Medium
1-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

If you have a whiny Husky on your hands, it can be frustrating. If the problem goes on, it can even interfere with your relationship with your dog. Luckily, training your Husky to stop whining is a fairly easy job, although it will require some consistency and the right tools.

This guide will give you three methods, best used in conjunction, to make sure you are not only letting your Husky know that you do not like the whining, but also that you love peace and quiet.

By working in plenty of reinforcement to your training program, you will make sure that your Husky continues to trust you as you give him space to learn to stop whimpering, and the confidence that comes with it.

Expect your training to take a week or two, longer in problem cases where the whining has been persistently reinforced in the past. 

Defining Tasks

Sometimes whimpering may be your dog’s way of letting you know there is a problem that needs to be addressed. It is important that you eliminate the possibility that something else might be going on. Although it is typical for puppies to have a whiny stage right around four to six months, of age, any sudden start to whining behavior with adult Huskies could be a sign of something more serious.

Make sure that before you start training your Husky to stop whining she doesn’t have an illness or injury that could be causing her pain. In addition, check to be sure she has fresh water. If she is in her teething stage, whining is pretty typical. Make sure she has plenty of soft chew toys to help with the pain of new teeth coming in.

If whining is happening in conjunction with other behaviors such as licking, scratching, restlessness, or refusal to eat or drink, be sure to get in to see your veterinarian ASAP. This could be a sign of a more serious problem that requires veterinary attention.

Getting Started

The first step in training your Husky to stop whining is to make a mental note of the things that he likes most. That is, what is a reward in his eyes? Does he love some belly rubs, a treat, a toss of the ball or a quick game of tug of war? When you have a solid understanding of what counts as a reward to your dog, you have a great deal of power to influence his behavior with nothing more than being the gatekeeper to all of the things he loves.

Start to become aware of when you are rewarding your dog. Is he coming up to you and whining, and then you reward him with an ear scratch or other attention?

Often owners unwittingly make problem whining worse, simply by responding to it and trying to make it stop. If this is the case with you, your Husky has been training you. Take back control of the relationship by being more aware of the kinds of behavior that you want to be reinforcing. 

The Day to Day Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Ongoing process
The most important method for training your Husky to stop whining is to start to be more aware of when he is quiet and then reinforcing that behavior, while making sure that whining is not rewarded. This is an ongoing process that is not part of a formal training session, rather an approach to dealing with your dog from day to day.
Step
2
Random
The most powerful rewards are those that are unexpected and random. Want to play a game of tug with him? Wait until he is lying down quietly and then call him over for a game.
Step
3
Pay attention to rewarding
Make sure that the everyday things your Husky enjoys are given only when he is not whining. For example, do not put the food bowl down, or let him outside, or let him up on the couch if she is whining. Wait for even 3-5 seconds of not-whining before giving access to these good things.
Step
4
Hard ignore
Use a “hard ignore” for the whining behavior when it pops up (only after you have eliminated the possibility that the whine might be a warning sign of something that needs to be addressed). Turn your face away, do not make eye contact, walk away. Do what you need to do to stop even acknowledging problem whining.
Step
5
Practice quiet time
Several times a day, call your dog to join you for some quiet time pets. This is a chance to work on whining more directly. As soon as she starts whining, look away and stop petting. The instant she stops whining, even for a second, start petting her again. Gradually add more time, expecting a few more seconds of quiet before returning your attention to her
Recommend training method?

The Time Out Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Why use time outs
If you have started to reward quiet time throughout the day, it is time to start adding a consequence for problem whining. This method will use one of the most effective punishments that does not require you to physically assault your dog – the dreaded “Time Out.”
Step
2
Set up
Set up a crate, room or pen that is a place you can put your Husky in a short “Time Out” where he will be left alone. He should not have toys or access to other people or dogs while in time out.
Step
3
Too bad!
When your Husky starts whining, try a “hard ignore” first. This means you do not even look at your dog or you walk away from him. If this stops the whining, even for a few seconds, turn to give your pup some praise. If it fails to stop the whining, wait 10-20 seconds then say “Too bad!” and immediately take him to time out.
Step
4
Time out
Leave him in time out for 2-3 minutes. It is likely he will be whining, just ignore that. Wait for 10 seconds of no whining before letting your dog out of the time out.
Step
5
Be consistent
Although it is tedious, repeat the process vigilantly, especially when you first introduce it. Your Husky will learn within 5-10 repetitions that whining just doesn’t pay off. It will take a week or so for it to really sink in but stay consistent.
Recommend training method?

The 'Speak' and 'Quiet' Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Putting it on command
Another great way to stop problem whining is to put both 'speak' and 'quiet' on command. It may seem counter-intuitive to reward vocalizing. However, by putting it on command and rewarding it only when it is asked for, and meanwhile rewarding quiet when asked for, you are gaining a language to communicate with your dog and getting a 'quiet' command that will work to stop problem whining once and for all.
Step
2
Marker
First, decide on a “marker” word or sound. This can be a simple “Yesssss!” or a special quick whistle. Or, you can get a clicker, a small and inexpensive training tool that makes a quick click sound when you squeeze the button. This “marker” should always be followed by a small, pea-sized, food reward. For this training method, use it each time the instructions say to mark/reward.
Step
3
Reward a sound
Get your treat bag in hand and sit in front of your dog. Wait for her to vocalize – even if it takes a minute or two for her to get frustrated enough to make a sound. Or, start this training session at a time when she is already being vocal. Mark/reward any vocalization, including a whine, 5-10 times in rapid succession.
Step
4
Add "Speak!"
She will probably be immediately offering a vocalizing now that you are rewarding it rapidly. This is exactly what you want. Now add the command “Speak”, knowing she will give you a sound. Mark/reward in as rapid a rate as she offers the sounds. Repeat 10-20 times.
Step
5
Add "Quiet!"
Now it is time to introduce the opposite, that is, 'quiet'. Say “Quiet!” (it usually helps to say it in a long drawn out tone for some reason) and then give her a chance to stop whining. Take even a second of not whining, and be sure to mark during the silence, followed by a reward.
Step
6
Alternate
Alternate between 'speak' and 'quiet'. Give her time to “guess” at first, taking any success you can get. Over time you can extend the duration of the quiet after she seems to understand what it means.
Step
7
Practice day to day
Eventually you will want to take 'quiet' out of the training session and start using it day to day… keeping rewards random, but often enough that she hopes to be rewarded for the quiet behavior. Use a "time out” if she persists on whining after you have asked her for 'quiet'.
Recommend training method?
author-img

Written by Sharon Elber

Published: 03/20/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Rose
Siberian Husky
2 Years
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Rose
Siberian Husky
2 Years

Why does my husky whine all of a sudden? She plays with her ball and whines, then today I gave her food, she was pushing it around the bowl with her nose then continued to whine.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Melissa, I suggest a trip to your vet, especially to get her mouth checked out. I am not a vet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

He has been to the vet many and many of times now what do I do? What is plan B?

Add a comment to Rose's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Ajax
Husky
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ajax
Husky
2 Months

My Papillon died about a year and a half ago and life just hasn't been the same for me. I've been wanting a puppy for months and months but haven't had the right one come along.

When I met Ajax I just connected with him right away. I live in an apartment, so this wasn't my ideal kind of dog to get, but I couldn't leave him where he was. He was infested with fleas and ticks and when I took him to the vet he ended up also having Coccidia (parasites). The owner before me was obviously VERY horrible and irresponsible.

I've done some research and have come to understand that huskies are high energy. This is not a problem in the sense of getting out and burning the energy. I actually wanted this in a dog while I was looking. I'm a VERY active person also and love to go on runs and hikes. The issue is the whining. I live with 3 other people who don't want to hear him scream on and on and on. I was just wondering if there are any tips and tricks I can employ to get him to learn not to scream without leaving him in the crate where he will distrub my room mates and neighbors. Starting next week he will be going to stay at my friend's house during the day two days a week. Is this a good time to try the "hard ignore?" Can I do that in combination with other tactics? He also screams like crazy when he sees I'm mixing his food. Any help would be SO appreciated!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brittany, See if your roommates will agree to let you try ignoring him for one week to two weeks, to see if he will learn to be quiet in the crate during that time. This will be a loud week but you will need to be extremely consistent and practice time in the crate a lot! During that time you can do a couple of things to speed up the process. Explain to them what your plan of action is to show them that you will be training him proactively to stop his barking faster, if you feel like that will help them understand and be supportive. First, purchase several large Kong's and put his dog food into a bowl and cover it with water. Let it sit out until the food turns into mush, then when it is mushy and puffy, mix a little bit of peanut butter, or liver paste or squeeze cheese if anyone is allergic to peanut butter, into the food mush. Very loosely stuff the Kongs with the mush mixture, place them into zip-lock bags, and freeze them. Check your peanut butter and make sure it does NOT contain the artificial sweetener Xylitol. Xylitol is extremely toxic to dogs. More so than chocolate. Second, create a "Bonker" by filing a sock with something heavy like beans and something fluffy like fabric or stuffing, until you get a stiff, soft, and heavy bumper looking thing. Normally this would only be used for older puppies, but in your case you need to teach him faster so we will use a bonker. Third, place him into the crate with one of the food stuffed Kongs and leave the room. If he cries, then enter the room without speaking to him and hit the back corner of the crate with the bonker, enough to startle him a little bit without really scaring him, then leave the room again. When you hit the corner also say "Ah-Ah!" in a firm but calm tone of voice so that you can later use just that verbal correction in place of the bonker if he starts whinning. If he stays quiet for a minute after you leave, then go back into the room, and quietly and calmly praise him and drop several treats into the crate, then leave again. Keep your praise soft and very calm and boring. Otherwise it can make things worse. Repeat the correction whenever he cries and the treat sprinkles whenever he is quiet for two minutes. As he gets better, then wait until he is quiet for five minutes, then ten minutes, then fifteen minutes, and so forth, before going in to sprinkle treats. You will be potty training him also at this time. Try to time it so that you go to him and let him out to go potty while he is being quiet for a few seconds. This will not always be possible but try your best without running the risk of an accident in the crate. To speed up potty training I suggest you also use the crate for that during this time and after he learn to be quiet also. Put him into the crate for one and a half hours, and then while he is quiet go to him and take him outside to go potty. While he is outside, tell him "go potty", and when he goes, give him three small treats, one at a time. If he goes potty, then let him be free and out of the crate for forty-five minutes if you are able to watch him. At the end of the forty-five minutes, place him back into the crate for another forty-five minutes, until it has been a total of one-and-a-half ours since he last went potty. At one-and-a-half-hours take him back outside to go potty again. If he does not go potty when you take him outside, then take him back inside after five to ten minutes of letting him try, and place him back into the crate. After thirty-minutes in the crate, while he is being quiet for a couple of seconds, go to him and take him back outside to try going potty again. Repeat crating him, taking him outside, and crating him again if he doesn't go until he goes potty when you take him and you can give him the forty-five minutes of freedom. You will be doing all of this while also going to him periodically while he is in the crate to correct him with the bonker and reward him with the treats. Expect this to be very time consuming at first. It should teach him to be quiet and potty train him more quickly though. While you are gone, he can be crated for 2-3 hours during the day, and longer at night, but when you are home take him out more frequently to speed up the process of potty training and prevent as many accidents as possible. One advantage of potty training him with the crate this way is that he will get a lot of practice being in the crate without being in the crate without a small break for too long. This will help him get comfortable with the crate faster and learn to entertain himself with the Kong toy instead of cry. Make sure you do not skip giving him a food stuffed Kong toy whenever you place him into the crate. You can feed him all of his meals in Kongs right now to give him something to do in the crate and decrease his crying. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Ajax's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Dudey
Husky
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Dudey
Husky
1 Year

I live in GR MI I am sick and bought a husky that was in my moms care for a year due to my health problems.

I am on a limited income I need help please I love him so much but he is not a good boy can anyone help me I really need help.


Can anyone please do this free of charge I truly am living on less than 900 a month and the only thing that has kept me fighting for my life is my dog.

Please help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emily, Check out Meetup.com, your local dog club, and rescues in your area. Some of those places might have events where pet parents get together and help each other train, offer classes for a very low rate, or can connect you with hobby trainers who would be willing to assist you for free or cheap for the experience. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Dudey's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Hades
German Shepherd Siberian Husky mi
Ten Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Hades
German Shepherd Siberian Husky mi
Ten Months

My puppy is my service dog. After I spent 40 days straight in the hospital he developed a bit of separation anxiety. He loves his job and looks forward to riding in the car, he loads up smiling like a pro. With in a few minutes he starts whining. He wants the window open not all transport vans have that option. If they do and the air is on I tell the driver no Hades will get over it. Some open the window anyway if they can and lately he still whines.
Once we get to the doctors office if s person ask I will let them pat my dog. Hades will sometimes whine wanting attention, I give him the me command while his eyes are on me he still whines.
Sometimes as soon as we get into a room he starts to whine. This behavior is driving me crazy.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tammi, First, the behavior is accidentally being rewarding - which will have to stop first. When he whines in the car, insist that the windows NOT be rolled down for him. Every time they are rolled down when he whines, in his mind the whining is rewarded, so he will be even more persistent whining to get them rolled down the next time. Instead, work on teaching a Down Stay while in the car and have him ride in the Down position. If you have access to someone's car to practice in, practice in a stationary car often so that the car will loose some of the excitement associated with it now - you want it to become a calmer thing again, for Down to be reinforced while riding, and whining not to be rewarded by rolling down the window. Second, when he is out working with you, as hard as it may be, discourage others from petting him. While he is working technically he shouldn't be petted because it's a distraction, but in this case he is anticipating the attention and whining hoping for it, so it's even worse for him. He needs to learn to expect people not to pet him while he is out with you in public working - so that others become more boring to him. Other people need to become boring to him, plus strangers shouldn't expect to be allowed to pet a service dog because it distracts the dog from their job. Simply tell people politely, "Sorry, he is working right now and it's not good for training and will distract him from his job" or a similar short answer. Most people will accept that type of answer. Third, teach a Quiet command. Set up a scenario where he will whine a bit, such as a stranger he likes coming to the door. Command "Quiet" and wait until he stops whining (this will probably take a long time at first, up to thirty minutes possibly). When he starts to get bored and finally quiets down, calmly praise by saying something calm like "Good" in an even tone voice, then reward with a treat. Have your friend do something to excite him again like knocking, command Quiet, then wait until he becomes quiet again. The more times you practice this in a row the more boring the person or thing should become and the sooner he should stop whining each time. If he is really struggling and won't get quiet even for a couple of seconds after thirty minutes, try triggering the whining with something less exciting first. You can also create a distraction to "trick" him into stopping whining long enough to reward the quiet. A small noise usually does the trick for a distraction. As he improves, gradually work up to practicing Quiet in various situations that he normally whines in, starting with easier situations first and progressing to harder ones as he improves. Reward simply getting quiet at first. As he improves, only reward him when he stays quiet for a certain length of time, shorter periods at first and longer periods gradually as he improves - so that he won't just learn to whine, stop, whine stop...but to stop whining completely. Working on structured obedience again and impulse control exercises can also help with overall anxiety - he may already know the following, but doing a brush-up obedience course and implementing some of the following exercises into his day may also help. Place - work up to 1-2 hours on Place gradually: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Hades's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Balto
Husky
10 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Balto
Husky
10 Months

Hi I’m having serious problems with my dog he’s whining it’s bad he’s destroying my house he has toys and attention from all of us we feel desperate sometimes we feel like giving him away it’s to much for us we need help we don’t want to give him on adoption but he’s out of control

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Isabela, It sounds like pup generally needs training, structure, and boundaries in life. None of the issues you described are huge things by themselves but it will take time and commitment to work on training him in general. Pup needs to be crate trained - he is going to cry at first but that's normal and you need to be willing to let him. Surprise method for introducing the crate; https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate manners for teaching better self-control, respect and calmness also: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Destructiveness in the house - needs to include crating pup better! https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ General overview on crying when alone: https://www.solidk9training.com/sk9-blog/2013/02/21/separation-anxiety-im-not-seeing-it-at-my-place Adding more structure to pup's life to deal with overall attitude, lack of focus on you, respect issues, and needing more calmness: Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Balto's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Kane
Husky
13 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Kane
Husky
13 Years

Hi, I have a very beautiful husky Kane and he’s getting old. He’s got very poor vision in he’s eye due to caterax and has been of late loosing he’s hearing.

The problem I have is when I work away my partner gives in to he’s constant whining interrupting her sleep, because it gets to much she lets him inside to sleep at night. I’ve done it once or twice when home over the past 6 months.

When I’m at home he know I’m he’s master and generally tends to listen to me.

I Thinks it’s more is a separation thing I believe, as when I’m not home and she does let him in, he forgets he’s inside and come to her to make sure she’s there though out the night, cause he didn’t need to wee or anything.

I’m very annoyed that he’s been able to get what he wants while I’m away and get inside.

But he just passes around and get worked up, cry’s a lot and heavy rapid breathing. The vet said it’s due to separation and eyes and hearing. Never ever really in 12 years heard a peep but it’s getting worse, as we are in a rental and he’s meant to be a out side dog.

Any help would be much appreciated

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Kane looks very content and comfortable on the couch, as he should at his advanced age. It's very understandable that Kane is developing some separation issues. I expect it is a lot different for him with his loss of hearing and vision. I have to say, if it were me, I would be letting Kane in every night so that he can sleep inside where he feels safe and loved. This may not be the advice you hoped for but I really think that at this point, if you take extra care to keep the rental clean and free of dog hair that all will be well. It's the only advice I feel comfortable giving due to my personal beliefs. And I can tell you and your partner care about him, too. All the best and enjoy Kane in his old age - he looks like a sweetheart.

Add a comment to Kane's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Babs
Husky/pitbull mix
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Babs
Husky/pitbull mix
2 Years

Babs is overall well behaved but she whines very frequently. We've run into an issue where she whines when she needs to go potty, but also for no reason at all, or to get attention. We've been using a combination of the hard-ignore and timeout method. The timeout method seems to work but I'm worried that we may put her in a timeout when she actually needs to go to the bathroom. We've only had her for about a month and during the stay-at-home-order so our schedule is a bit different than normal and so is her potty schedule so it's hard to tell if she actually needs to go or not. Any advice?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kailey, I suggest teaching her to ring a bell when she needs to go potty. Once she knows that well and understands to alert that way, then you can use the methods that seem to be working for the whining at potty times too, and have her ring the bell rather than whine when she needs to go outside. For now, start teaching the bell using one of the methods in the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/ring-a-bell-to-go-out For now, ignore or time out for any whining that happens before its been at least three hours since she last went potty (unless she hasn't pooped yet during that part of the day and needs to do that). You will need to take her potty when she whines at times that could be related to that - but when you take her, keep the potty trip boring without playing. Have her ring the bell on her way outside, before you open the door for her, even if you are taking her due to whining. Teach her to ring the bell when you say "Bell" or point to it, and have her ring it in response to your instruction, not by just lifting her paw to make her - if she has to move toward the bell on her own and think about it she will learn faster. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Babs's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Koda
Husky
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Koda
Husky
8 Weeks

How do I get the husky use to his cage for sleeping ?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Hello! Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

Add a comment to Koda's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Luna
Siberian Husky
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Luna
Siberian Husky
8 Weeks

We are having trouble with getting Luna to stay in her crate/playpen enclosure for any length of time. She whines and cries LOUDLY and for long periods of time. And sometimes she jumps up and hits her head on the crate. She also goes out into her pen and tries jumping onto the crate there. We're worried she might hurt herself. But we need to be able to get her to stay by herself, so that we can go to the bathroom, go into another room, just do other things. Right now, she needs our undivided attention. Do you have any advice for how to train her? She's brand new, and we understand that it might take some time, but we just want to make sure we're doing all the right things. Thank you!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aneesh, I suggest following the Surprise method from the article linked below, and practicing that during the day to help her adjust sooner. I also recommend giving her a dog food stuffed chew toy in there to keep her more preoccupied. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Luna's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Saga
Siberian Husky
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Saga
Siberian Husky
2 Years

Uncontrolable whining when she knows we are almost going, when arriving at the house and until we get dressed off+cleaned&the regular treat is served, and a little but not much in other general situations.
Also acting out in first time dogmeetings (but also with old dogbuddies not seen for awhile) that many times result in physical conflict, so her social life has been limited close to nothing at the moment and each time a new meeting opportunity arrives even harder.

/jokko.nygren@gmail.com

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joakim, First, I would stop giving the treat when you get home, since that may be adding to pup's over-excitement, anticipating that. Instead, when you first arrive home, completely ignore pup for ten minutes at least. Once pup walks away or goes to lie down, and their body language gets calm, calmly say hello very calmly - almost monotone. The first week, expect pup to be very persistent and possible even more rude about it. After a few days of being consistent and not getting the treat or any attention until they calm down, most of the time pup will improve. Second, I recommend working on commands that teach pup to respect space, like Place, Out, Leave It, and Down. Use those commands, once taught, to calmly give pup directions in general. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Off- section on The Off command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-train-dog-stay-off-couch/ With other dogs, I recommend recruiting friends to practice the Passing Approach method from the article linked below - the goal is to pass the other dog so much that they become boring to your dog - right now pup is becoming over-aroused and that's leading to a lot of issues once the dogs finally meet. Interrupt pup fixating on the other dog - before an outburst even. Reward calm body language, focus on you, and ignoring the other dog. Don't let the dogs meet nose to nose though if pup is still likely to react poorly at that point, and whenever pup meets any other dog, keep the greetings to no more than 3 seconds, then tell pup "Let's Go!" and walk away. When pup follows, give a treat from your pocket so they learn to follow quickly when you say "Let's Go". https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs I recommend avoiding the dog park and similar environments right now because that will increase arousal and likely make this issue worse due to the type of climate usually at a dog park. Instead, pursue activities like structured heeling walks and hikes with others and their dogs, where you can practice obedience around other dogs and pup be exercised in a calmer way around the dogs to keep arousal lower, and create a pleasant association with the dogs. Obedience classes, obedience practice with friends, G.R.O.W.L. class, and certain canine sports are also good for similar reasons. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Saga's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
zues
Huskie
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
zues
Huskie
2 Years

So my dog has been having seizures lately and now he wont eat his dog food and won't stop crying. It is so Loud. So could you just give me some ideas? Thanks!!!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

This sounds like something you need to discuss with a veterinarian. He is likely experiencing discomfort and it could be due to the seizures he is having.

Add a comment to zues's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Rita
Siberian Husky
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Rita
Siberian Husky
2 Months

How cani train my puppy to stop biting me? She refuses to let me go even when i try to distract her with a toy or something.
Also how can i make her to stop whining when she's left alone at night and accept the fact that it's time to sleep we can't be with her the whole time..

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Rita's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Sól
Husky
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sól
Husky
9 Weeks

She is yelling the whole time in her play pen despite having a bed, plenty of toys and water. She will keep yelling for well over half an hour if ignored, during the day and at night.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emily, At 8 weeks of age I am guessing that you recently brought pup home? If that's the case, then know that what you are experiencing is completely normal. Pup is getting used to sleeping and being alone and that's an adjustment. Usually the first five days are the worst. It typically takes about two weeks for most pups to adjust completely; however, you can help that adjustment be as smooth as possible by doing the following. Thirty minutes is actually a very good amount of time compared to how long many puppies will cry during the early weeks. 1. At night, when pup cries but doesn't have to go potty (like after you return them to the crate when they just went potty outside) be consistent about ignoring the crying until they go back to sleep. The more consistent you are the quicker the overall process tends to take even if it's hard to do for the first couple weeks. Some pups are very persistent and do cry for hours on and off the first three nights especially. You are not alone in this but almost all improve soon if you can stay consistent early on. 2. When pup does truly need to go potty at night (when it's been at least 2 hours since pup last peed), take pup to go potty outside on a leash to keep pup focused and things calmer. Don't give treats, food, play, or much attention during these trips - boring and sleepy is the goal, then right back to bed after. This helps pup learn to only wake when they truly need to go potty and be able to put themselves back to sleep - helping them start sleeping longer stretches sooner and not ask to go out unless they actually need to potty. Pup will generally need 1-2 potty trips at night even after trained for a couple months though due to a small bladder. 3. Wait until pup asks to go potty by crying in the crate at night before you take them - opposed to setting an alarm clock, unless pup is having accidents in the crate and not asking to go out. This gives pup the chance to learn to start falling back to sleep when they wake in light sleep if they don't really need to go potty, instead of being woken up all the way when they could have held it a bit longer. 4. Practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below to help pup get used to crate time during the day too. Practice during the day should also help nights improve sooner too. Surprise method - only give treats during daytime practice, not at night though: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Sól's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd