How to Train a Rottweiler Puppy to Stop Biting

Medium
3-7 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

You love to play with your Rottweiler puppy. Your new friend is a furry, energetic roly-poly and you have loads of fun playing with them. But every once in a while, they get their sharp puppy teeth on your hand and it really smarts! Even as a puppy, your Rottweiler has a strong grip. Now think of how that same nip will feel when your tiny pup is 75 to 130 pounds of full grown dog. Training your Rottweiler puppy to stop biting is not only good for you now. It is an investment in a well-behaved adult dog in the future.

Defining Tasks

Some owners fear that a few nips and bites from their Rottweiler puppy mean they are destined to be vicious. Biting is actually a natural behavior for puppies and is an important part of their development process. With their siblings, puppies play fight to learn skills and the reactions of their littermates teaches them how to play without hurting the other person. Rottweilers are energetic and loyal. If your puppy is biting you, it probably just means they are bored and want to play. By working with your puppy early to stop biting, you can prevent issues with aggression and dominance down the line.

Getting Started

The only truly effective way to stop your Rottweiler puppy from biting is to be consistent with how you react to the biting. Whoever interacts with your pup needs to follow the same rules so your Rottie can learn what is and isn't allowed. During training sessions, you can use rewards like treats or chew toys. In cases of stubborn biters, you may need additional tools, like a squirt bottle with water or a shake can.

The Bite Means No Play Method

Most Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Play with your pup
Start a game with your Rottweiler puppy and while you are playing, let your pup gnaw on your fingers a bit. Pay attention to the amount of pressure they use and wait for a moment when they bite too hard.
Step
2
Imitate a puppy yelp
When puppies play, they let out a yelp when their playmate bites too hard. As soon as your Rottweiler puppy bites hard enough to hurt you, imitate a high-pitched puppy yelp. Let your hand go limp at the same time.
Step
3
Give your puppy an opportunity to be gentle
After a second, return to playing with your puppy. Allow them to bite gently on your hand again and pay attention to the pressure just as before. If they get too rough, yelp again and let your hand go limp.
Step
4
Walk away
After the second time, stop the game, get up, and walk away. Leave your puppy alone for 15 to 20 seconds before returning to the game.
Step
5
Reward good behavior
Repeat these steps several times. At first, try to go five minutes without your Rottweiler puppy biting you. If they make it, give them a treat. Then, try for 10 minutes. Then 15. Any time your puppy slips up and bites too hard, stop the game. Make sure everyone else in their life follows the same rules and your puppy will learn to play gently in no time.
Recommend training method?

The Spray Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Get a spray bottle
Fill a small spray bottle with water and keep it with you whenever you play with your puppy. You should try the 'No Play' method first to see if you can train your Rottweiler puppy not to bite without using a spray bottle.
Step
2
Play with your puppy
While you are playing with your puppy, let them chew on your hands and nip. As soon as the pressure becomes uncomfortable say "ouch, no bite!" Then stop the game by letting your hand go limp.
Step
3
Give them a squirt
Use your free hand to grasp the spray bottle and give your Rottweiler pup a gentle spritz from the water bottle. The spray will surprise your dog and they probably won't like being wet. This physical correction should come close after the biting so your puppy associates the bite with the spray.
Step
4
Start the game back up
After a couple of seconds, return to playing with your puppy as before. Follow the same steps each time they bite by saying "ouch" and giving them a quick squirt. Be careful not to squirt your pup in the eyes or nose so as not to hurt them.
Step
5
Transition away from the water bottle
As your puppy starts learning to be gentle, stop using the squirt bottle to correct them. Try saying "no bite" instead and giving them a chance to correct on their own. If biting returns back to the same levels, you can add the squirt bottle in temporarily as a reinforcement.
Recommend training method?

The Scruff Shake Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Try less aggressive methods first
Physical correction, like with the scruff shake, should only be used if your Rottweiler puppy resists the other methods of learning to not bite. For some dogs, this method can backfire and make them more aggressive, so keep a close eye on changes to your puppy's behavior and stop using this method if biting increases.
Step
2
Start a game with your puppy
As with the other methods, begin your training session by playing with your puppy and letting them chew on your fingers. Wait for them to bite too hard.
Step
3
Use a verbal correction
Start off with a verbal correction when your puppy bites on your hand with too much force. Tell them "no bite" or say "ouch."
Step
4
Add in a physical correction
After your verbal reaction, gently but firmly grab the loose skin on the back of your puppy's neck and give him a little shake. It shouldn't be enough to scare or hurt him. Instead, you're mimicking the actions of a mother dog who is fed up with her pup biting her.
Step
5
Phase out the physical correction
Only uses the scruff shake a few times and quickly transition it out. This reaction should be enough to quickly teach your Rottweiler puppy that rough play is not tolerated. Make sure to reward gentle play as well to show your puppy what actions you do want, rather than only the ones you don't.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Christina Gunning

Published: 04/03/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Rustess
Rottweiler
7 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Rustess
Rottweiler
7 Weeks

Our new pup is still new to the family. We only got him a week ago. He sleeps in bed with us, winter season. His bites is sometimes constant and I don't think by hitting him will stop it. Can you suggest any options?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
914 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lee-Ann, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Once pup is a little older, enrolling puppy in a puppy class or free puppy play group, or inviting friends with puppies over, to allow puppies time for moderated off leash play, can also help puppies develop softer mouths. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Punisher
Rottweiler
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Punisher
Rottweiler
2 Months

Bites hand alot
Pee on bed
When we show palm to stop he growls and run to bit

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
914 Dog owners recommended

Hello Chirag, I highly suggest switching training methods for the biting. Crate training pup and crating him at night so he doesn't have access to the bed at this age while not potty trained - this is also extremely important for when he gets older and enters a destructive chewing phase where he can chew apart and eat things- which could be life threatening. For introducing the crate use the Surprise method from the article linked below. Once the crate is closed and they are getting used to being in there, most puppies adjust within 3 days, and almost all puppies within 2 weeks. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate When he cries in the crate, ignore the crying until he falls asleep or calms down. The first few days be prepared for hours of crying. Many only cry for thirty minutes then fall asleep, but hours is not unusual - so stay consistent and calm, and wait until you get that quietness before you let him out of the crate unless he needs to go potty. Do be aware of when they have to go potty. At 8 weeks a puppy will need to go potty every 2-3 hours, and every 1 hour when not in the crate. Every month you can add one hour to that number during the day. The amount is different overnight because they are asleep. With an older puppy you can discipline the barking at the same time to help train, but an 8 week old puppy simply needs time in the crate to realize that nothing bad happens to them while they are in there, that you always return, and that they can just sleep or rest and it will be okay. This involves letting them cry at first until they learn to sleep or chew a chew toy. I highly recommend feeding pup part of his meals kibble via a dog-food stuffed hollow Kong in the crate at this age - to help with crate training and keep them soothed and entertained. For the biting, be patient. Honestly, this takes weeks and sometimes a couple of months to teach. Biting is completely normal, nothing is going to work completely instantly; it will take consistency over a period of weeks. With that said, there may be a better method for your pup! Check out the article linked below and follow the Leave It method. Once pup clearly understands "Leave It", then you can gently use the Pressure method found in the same article linked below as a follow through if puppy disobeys Leave It once they understand that command. It's important to teach Leave It first though because when you use the Pressure method, puppy needs to understand that they were told to stop and disobeyed and the consequence is because of that...Without that understanding many puppies will just think you are roughhousing and will fight back. Puppies naturally bite other puppies to communicate, learn how to control the pressure of their bites, and learn...They have to be taught that people are different than dogs. Leave It method, then Pressure method for the biting: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the growling, it sounds like pup may be afraid of hands. If you are using any methods that involve physical roughness with your hands, then I would switch to a different method. Also, work on getting puppy used to touch and handling. Use puppies daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Touch his tail gently and give a treat. Touch his belly, his other paws, his chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Finally, I suggest joining a puppy play group or kindergarten class that has time for moderated off-leash play with other puppies under 6 months of age. Puppies play differently than older dogs and one of the best ways for a pup to learn how to control how hard they bite is through playing with other puppies. Such a class is also great for socialization with people and dogs. Check out this article about when to attend and what to look for - if you can't find all of these things than a group where puppies just play together is still beneficial - interrupt puppies whenever one starts to get too rough or overwhelmed and wait until they calm down a bit before releasing them again to play in the fenced area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Simba
Rottweiler
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Simba
Rottweiler
7 Weeks

My rottweiler male puppy is 7 weeks old..his ribs are showing .his body weight is 3.5 kgs..what should i do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
914 Dog owners recommended

Hello Suraj, I highly suggest consulting your vet. I am not a vet. The issue could be the type of food, something preventing pup from eating, digesting, or getting the nutrients from their food, the food amount. Puppies need to be wormed several times and certain diseases can cause digestive issues, ect...Consult your vet for guidance on this matter. Sometimes ribs showing a little isn't a bad thing depending on puppy's breed and overall health - dogs like whippets are genetically less fatty, but for other breeds that's an issue. I am not a vet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sally
Rottweiler/Lab
13 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sally
Rottweiler/Lab
13 Weeks

She bites EVERYTHING ,and has even bruised and cause myself and siblings to bleed idk what to do at this point shes so aggressive, but she knows how to sit ,lay down ,and jump.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Sally is most likely teething. Provide her with textured teething toys that will soothe the gums and teeth. In the meantime, she is old enough to learn No along with the other commands you have taught her. The No Method is taught here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-husky-to-not-bite. You have got to keep working on it and using your words and actions to show her this is not acceptable. Use the Hey, That Hurts Method as well. The lineage of your pup is of working dogs so this means that she will need lots of exercise in the form of walks, games of fetch and catch. She will need mentally stimulating toys like interactive puzzle feeders to keep her mind busy, too. Once the vet says her vaccines are up to date, enroll her in puppy school. Good luck!

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Tony
Rottweiler
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Tony
Rottweiler
2 Months

He bites everything and likes to bite leg how should i train him not to bite

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Cute photo! Puppies of this age are often teething. Buy Tony a dog teething toy and whenever he wants to bite, offer him the toy instead. To make the toy interesting to him, smear a tiny bit of peanut butter on the toy (NOTE: Make sure the peanut butter is all natural and with no xylitol - it is highly toxic to dogs). As well, work on the Leave It Method described here:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. Make sure that Tony is getting lots of outdoor exercise - long walks and playtime outside every day to tire him out. When at home, offer him interactive toys like puzzle feeders that mentally challenge him. As soon as he is old enough (your vet can let you know when the vaccines are up to date) sign him up for puppy obedience. Good luck!

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Sky
Rottweiler
1 Month
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sky
Rottweiler
1 Month

My puppy almost everytime i play with her she bites my hand but not hard , how can i stop this

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Very cute! Puppies this age love to bite and a lot of the time it is because they are teething. If you have not purchased any teething toys for Sky, now is the time. Toys with different textures will soothe the gums. As well, pent up energy can bring on biting - Rottweilers are a busy breed which needs lots of exercise - right from puppyhood and beyond. Games of fetch, ball, and plenty of walks are needed. Buy her interactive toys for in the house to keep her mentally challenged. As well, try teaching her the Leave It Method here, and also work on the Bite Inhibition Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. The Redirect Attention Method is also effective - you are essentially directing Sky to better habits: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite. Good luck!

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Jj
Rottweiler
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Jj
Rottweiler
7 Months

Jj always wants to bite me when I go out to feed her. There is 2 times she bite me so hard she made my arm bleed.and now I have scars from her.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I suggest that you contact a trainer in your area who is used to working with dogs with issues. I can't stress this enough because this is unacceptable behavior and certainly not pleasant for you. JJ seems to have food aggression problems - I assume everything else is good? Until you speak with the trainer, do not put yourself in danger. Perhaps prepare JJ's food when he is not within your reach, leave the bowl, and not be present when he comes into eat. This is a temporary measure to keep safe. Take a look here and begin trying some of the detailed training steps: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-food-aggression/. But also, contact a trainer for help. Good luck!

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Question
Floki
Rottweiler
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Floki
Rottweiler
3 Months

Floki gets too bitey when playing, he literally gets his mouth around my whole forearm and today it was too far. He doesn't realise how hard it is and when you yelp or say leave he doesn't stop. He just sits with your arm in his mouth and today I had scream in his face because it hurt too much and it made me upset. I hate getting mad but it did really hurt. How can this be stopped?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Adorable! Yes, this has to stop now - before his bites get too severe. This breed has powerful jaws - I know because I have a Rottie mix. Based on experience, lots of exercise and obedience classes are key to a well-behaved Rottweiler. I would start him in obedience classes as soon as the vet says Floki's vaccines are up to date. Take him on long walks a few times a day - tire him out! In the meantime, provide interactive puzzle feeders to keep him busy, chew toys like a kong with a bit of mushed kibble inside (freeze it first to keep him busy longer). Train him to listen:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you/. Take a look at the no-bite training methods here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite/. Good luck!

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Question
Ivy
Rottweiler
15 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ivy
Rottweiler
15 Weeks

We are having difficulties with Ivy biting females.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Question
Rocky
Rotterman
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Rocky
Rotterman
9 Weeks

He has very much energy, he bites ankles of everyone. I would like him to stop biting ankles when people walk by him.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Question
Cesar
Rottweiler
1 Month
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Cesar
Rottweiler
1 Month

How to stop my pup from biting.It is very playful and bites clothes,shoes,wood l and sometimes floor tiles. How do my train my pup who is just 2 months not to bike

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
914 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Nala
Rottweiler
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Nala
Rottweiler
9 Weeks

Very Bitey

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Daisy
Rottweiler
1 Month
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Daisy
Rottweiler
1 Month

How should i train her to obey me?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello. You can get started with training as soon as possible. Teaching one to two commands per week over the next couple of months, and spending about 20 minutes per day working on commands is all you really need to do to get the basics learned. The internet is full of great information for training. You can search "teach my dog sit, positive reinforcement" and you will find great articles. Do that for every command you want to teach your dog.

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Kizzy
Rottweiler
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Kizzy
Rottweiler
12 Weeks

Hi
I am in need of advice about my rottweiler pup.
Shes a lovely, fun, energetic pup.
Since we brought her home 3 weeks ago she has been consistent with her mouthing.
But now she is doing it very hard to the point she has made my children cry and cut my own skin.
The problem I am having in particular with her is that she listens to my partners every command, she is almost a completely different pup when hes around.
He can say stop and shes stops. He can say out and she drops anything in her mouth.
But she does not obey my commands no matter how strict I am with her.
I have tried the yelp training when she mouths but it doesnt work, if I remove my hand away from her she actually growls and pounces towards my hand to grab it again.
I am worried now if shes showing signs of potential aggression.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Nala
Rottweiler
9 Weeks
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Nala
Rottweiler
9 Weeks

I’ve had my pup for 2 weeks now, she was from a litter of 1 and I’ve found she’s really aggressive (hard to believe I know) when it comes to her food, picking her up and she easily switches to biting on the neck/face. Is there anything I can do to help this? We’re currently hand feeding to try help the problem. We’ve got another rottie called bear who’s 9 months and we never had this issue with him and was wondering if it’s because she’s from a litter or 1?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Lilly
Rottweiler
12 Weeks
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Lilly
Rottweiler
12 Weeks

She will not sleep through night. She wines if I try to put her to sleep in her pin. She pees so much still. She will not stop peeing on floor even after she has peed outside. She wines all night long to go outside. HELP. I have not had a decent sleep in the 4 weeks give had her. She will not listen and is driving me into crazy house. I love her and do not want to give her away. Please please help. Call Caesar if you have too but please help me.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Question
Diamond
Rottweiler
8 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Diamond
Rottweiler
8 Months

She's bitting really hard and playing agressive she's bitting everything we moved to a new house and she's already bit up the baseboards the wall and she keeps peeing and pooping on the carpet I take her out and she stays out for a long time and comes back in and pees and poops on the carpet I don't know what to do

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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bruno
Rottweiler
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
bruno
Rottweiler
5 Months

my dog is really aggressive and i've tried all the methods suggested above but he just won't listen.he constantly tries to bite everyone in my house can pls suggest something to correct his behavior

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
234 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies or older dogs may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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