How to Train a Weimaraner to Not Bite

Medium
3-8 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

For the most part, your Weimaraner is a well-behaved and loving dog. But when they get excited or scared, suddenly their teeth come out. Maybe it's just a little nip this time, but training your Weimaraner to not bite is crucial at any stage of life. A bite from a set of puppy teeth may be no big deal. But a fully grown Weimaraner has an impressive set of jaws, and you do not want to be on the receiving end of a serious bite.

Defining Tasks

In general, Weimaraners are loyal, loving dogs who just want to be part of your family. They are also known for trainability,  meaning you can feel confident that, with some consistent training and positive reinforcement, you can teach your pup not to bite. Keep in mind that biting is a part of your dog's natural instincts, so you shouldn't expect a change in behavior overnight. If possible, it is best to start training your dog not to bite while they are still a puppy. However, adult dogs can learn to not bite as well.

Getting Started

When you start working with your Weimaraner on this behavior, you will need to be consistent about how you react to biting. Make sure everyone your pup interacts with follows the rules you have set for your dog as well. If one person lets your pup nibble on their fingers, it can interfere with your overall goal. For most of these methods, you only need a toy to use to play with your dog. However, for persistent biters, you may also need a spray bottle filled with water.

The Ouch! Method

Effective
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Step
1
Figure out what makes your pup bite
This method works best on young dogs who are still developing, though you can try it with an adult dog as well. To start out, figure out what prompts your Weimaraner to bite, so you can use the natural trigger for training purposes.
Step
2
Play with your pup
Start a game with your Weimaraner using a toy. You should know now what makes your pup nip or bite, so during your game use that action to prompt your dog to use their teeth.
Step
3
Say "ouch!"
As soon as your pup nips at you, say "ouch!" in a loud, high-pitched voice. This sound should startle your Weimaraner into letting go of you, as it mimics the reaction of another dog to a bite.
Step
4
Wait for a bit before restarting the game
Give your Weimaraner 30 seconds or so to calm down and then start playing with them again. Repeat the same steps as before to prompt your pup to bite and then respond immediately.
Step
5
Keep practicing until biting stops
Continue to work with your Weimaraner until you can play together without them using their teeth on you at all. Have friends or other family members work with your pup as well so they can learn that biting people is never acceptable.
Recommend training method?

The Time Out Method

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Step
1
React when your dog bites you
Biting can occur at any time, though it often is prompted by excitement during play or fear. When your pup bites you, react strongly by yelping or saying "no" in a firm voice.
Step
2
Ignore your dog
Turn away from your dog dramatically and cross your arms over your chest. If your dog continues to try to bite you, get up and leave the room.
Step
3
Leave your pup in 'time out'
For at least 15 to 30 seconds, refuse to acknowledge your Weimaraner. Stick to a short period of time though, because your dog will quickly forget what you are mad at them about, especially if they are young.
Step
4
Return to the previous activity
Whatever you were doing with your Weimaraner before, return to that activity. Go back to playing or petting them as if nothing happened.
Step
5
Repeat as needed
Every time your dog bites or nips at you, repeat the same series of actions. Over time, your Weimaraner will realize that biting means the fun time is over, while playing gently keeps their human in the room.
Recommend training method?

The Startle Method

Effective
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Step
1
Try other methods first
For this technique, you will use a spray bottle or another device to startle your Weimaraner and interrupt their biting. Since this method involves a negative response, it is best to try other methods first and reserve this one for serious issues.
Step
2
Play with your pup
For many dogs, play time is when biting occurs most often. When they get excited, many dogs cannot control themselves and will nip or bite at your hands. Start a game with your Weimaraner.
Step
3
Startle your dog
As soon as you feel your Weimaraner's teeth on you, spray them with a water or use a device that makes a loud noise. This action should startle them into stopping their biting.
Step
4
Start the game again
Return to your game and wait until you feel teeth again. Repeat the same action as before, making sure that your dog is currently in the act of biting when you do so. You want them to connect the action of biting to the negative reaction.
Step
5
Repeat until you can phase out the startle
Try not to use the spray bottle or loud noise for very long. You don't want your Weimaraner to associate play time with a negative reaction. However, if biting persists, continue using the startling device until your pup learns that biting is a bad move.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Christina Gunning

Published: 04/20/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Astra & Luna
Weimaraner
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Astra & Luna
Weimaraner
3 Months

Hi! Im Anna. My girls, Astra & Luna are 3 1/2mo old, weimaraner sisters. They have a slight tendency to nip as they give kisses to my fiance, or in my case~its to my hands.(I really don't like being licked in the face-so afford them little opportunity. Once in a while they get me, but I don't mind as long as its only occasional & its on the cheek-just not the mouth/nose. Ive never cared for the feeling; & every dog I've ever had have not been "face lickers". Well occasionally to me but that's it, & not often. Anyway, its getting better with simple NO correction, & pulling away~& as they're growing. But our biggest issue has got to be the jumping up. On us when excited, when getting their food ready, when walking up/down the stairs(which scares me & I feel likeone of these days we'll all end up tumbling down & all get hurt!) Ive been making them sit & be calm before I'll give them their bowls. I try keeping them down & especially going down the steps try keeping them forward focused when they do get in front of/ahead of me. Its getting a little better. But its a constant, daily problem with them jumping, & more & more with them raising up on hind legs with front paws hitting the top drawers in the kitchen, just below the counter tops. Regardless of what I'm doing, they still are trying to pull up to see, &/or get to whatever they can or I have-even my coffee cup! I know that curiosity is very natural, & I'm glad they're inquisitive about things. I also know they want to know what I'm doing, because I'm "mom" & they do watch me all the time. I understand all of that. But how do I effectively correct this unwanted/unacceptable behavior? Ive been taking their paws, & setting them back down on all 4s, while trying to say no firmly, yet not sound aggressive at all. I look for the tone that says Im serious, but not threatening, or in away that puts stress into it if at all possible. But it seems like it's not working. I guess it has somewhat, because as soon as one of them raises up to the counter, table, shelves, etc.~I tell them NO,& To Get Down. Which they do. But they repeat the action multiple times before finally stopping..for that specific time, or instance. Next time we're in a situation where they can't see everything, or I'm doing something on a counter,table,my desk, a shelf-surfaces over their heads that I'm doing anything-food related or not. I stay consistent, as does my fiance. I just don't know how else I should approach things to be successful in stopping this behavior, or increasing their response to commands in general. They're so smart! I know they are, I see it 24/7! I know they're still young, but I'm unsure if they're old enough that they should be listening &/or responding by now, or at least better than they do at times. Ive never had weimaraners, & while I've been doing my homework, I'm still very much in new territory being my 1st experience with the breed. Thank you so much for reading all of that #1,lol-but also for any advice or tips you may have to offer. Thank you again!
Anna

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
210 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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