How to Train an Australian Shepherd Puppy to Not Bite

Medium
2-6 Months
Behavior

Introduction

Imagine playing with your adorable Aussie puppy. You are having a great time tossing toys around and enticing her with a favorite tug toy. You end the play session after thirty minutes, and then go get ready to go out for the evening. As you are washing your hands and getting dressed up you notice your hands. They look like you stuck them into a briar patch and then struggled to pull them back out again. They are covered in red scratches, look a bit puffy, and in a couple of places, there is even a bit of broken skin. You sigh and continue to get ready, wondering what to do about your puppy's biting.

If that scenario sounds familiar then you are not alone. Almost all puppies bite when they are young. It's called mouthing, and when your pup plays with another pup, if he bites too hard, the other puppy will let out a yelp and stop playing with your puppy. This teaches your puppy to be gentle and to control the pressure of his bite. Your puppy, like most puppies after eight weeks of age, probably does not live with a litter of puppies anymore though, so it becomes your job to teach him how to control his mouth. 

Defining Tasks

Training your Australian Shepherd not to bite you is important because biting hurts and can be annoying. It might also scare children and those who not used to it. One of the most important reasons to teach your puppy not to bite, though, is the fact that your puppy will not stay a puppy forever. Around five months of age, your puppy's jaws will begin to strengthen and he will have more adult teeth. At that point, the biting is no longer just annoying but can be dangerous if your pup bites hard.

If your pup is young still then you can help your puppy to learn to control the pressure of his mouth by taking him to play with other puppies. Make sure that the interactions are supervised though, that any attempts to bully each other are stopped, and that all of the puppies are having fun and not becoming frightened or too pushy. Puppies are great at giving one another feedback and helping to teach one another self-control. Although your puppy might learn how to be gentler with his mouth while playing with other puppies, he will still need for you to train him not to bite you.

If your puppy is young then using the 'Ouch! Method' can teach him to not only stop biting but also to be more aware of how he is using his mouth, and to have more control over the force of his bite. This might make him safer as an adult dog, in the event of a bite due to injury, fear, or the unexpected. This method is only appropriate for young puppies, though, because it can take time and you want your puppy to reach the point where he is not biting at all, or is extremely gentle with his mouth, by the time that he reaches five months of age.

If your puppy is young then you can work on the 'Ouch! Method' at the same time as the 'Leave It Method'. Doing both methods together can help your puppy to learn great self-control. You can go through the steps of the 'Ouch! Method' and then when you get to there point where you want to teach your puppy to not bite you at all, you can use the 'Leave It' command that you have been practicing with other objects while doing the 'Leave It Method'.

The simplest of all the methods is the 'Pressure Method'. If your puppy is sensitive or not very mouthy then this method is probably all that you will need in order to teach him not to bite. It is a relatively easy method to follow. It will require you to come into contact with your puppy's mouth though, so if your puppy is older and has his adult teeth and adult jaw strength, then the 'Leave It Method' might be a better choice. To save yourself from being scratched you can also perform this method while wearing a thick, leather type glove. You will need to keep the glove with you though, for unexpected bites.

Getting Started

To get started, if you are using the 'Leave It' method, then you will need small treats that your puppy loves. You will also need a glove or a sock, and other items that your pup loves to bite, to attach to yourself during the training. You will also need some of your puppy's favorite toys. If you are using the 'Ouch! Method' then you will need confidence, perseverance, patience, calmness, and the ability to say "Ouch!" in a loud and high pitched voice that sounds like a dog's yelp. If you are using the 'Pressure Method', you will need some of your puppy's favorite toys, a firm resolve, a confident attitude, patience, and persistence. If your hands are sensitive then you will also need a glove to practice this.

The Leave It Method

Most Recommended
6 Votes
Step
1
Grab treats
To begin, grab some treats and place them where you can grab them during the training but your puppy cannot reach. Call your puppy over to you.
Step
2
Add command
When your puppy comes over, place several treats inside your hand and close your fingers around them. Allow your puppy to sniff your hand and tell him to "Leave it". When he stops sniffing your hand and trying to get the treats out, praise him and give him a treat from a different location. Do not let him have the treats in your hand at any point during the training. Always reward him with a treat from somewhere else.
Step
3
Repeat
Practice 'leave it' until your puppy will leave your hand alone as soon as you tell him to. When he will do that then place the treats on the floor and cover them with your hand. Practice with the treats on the floor until he has mastered that too. Continue to make 'leave it' harder as he improves. To make it harder, cover the treats with your foot instead of your hand, stand farther away from the treats while they are on the ground, and eventually tossing the treats onto the floor while telling your pup to 'leave it'. Be ready to block your pup or cover the treats though, in case he tries to get them.
Step
4
Add a glove
When your pup has mastered 'leave it' with treats then grab a glove or a sock and place it on your hand. Show your pup the glove or the sock on your hand and practice 'leave it' with the sock or the glove. Praise and reward him with a treat when he leaves your hand, wearing the glove or the sock, alone.
Step
5
Entice your pup
When your pup will leave the glove or the sock on your hand alone, then find other objects that your puppy likes to play with and bite, such as ribbons, clothing articles, or paper wads. Attach those articles to yourself, where your puppy can reach, and practice 'leave it' with those articles too. Do this until he will leave those articles alone also when told to.
Step
6
Redirect
After your puppy can leave the tempting objects attached to you alone, whenever your puppy begins to bite you freeze to remove any excitement from the situation, and tell him "leave it". When he does so then offer him one of his own toys, so that he will learn to grab his own toys when he gets excited, instead of biting you.
Recommend training method?

The Ouch! Method

Effective
4 Votes
Step
1
Say "Ouch!"
To begin, whenever your puppy bites you hard enough to cause pain, say "Ouch!" in a loud, high pitched voice, that mimics a yelp. When you do so, immediately stop playing with your puppy, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore him for five minutes.
Step
2
Call your puppy back
After five minutes, if he has left you alone, then call him over and resume playing with him. If he knows how to sit then tell him to sit when you call him over, before you resume playing with him again.
Step
3
Repeat
Practice yelping by saying "Ouch!" in a loud and high pitched voice whenever he bites you hard enough to cause pain. Do this for a couple of weeks, until he bites less hard.
Step
4
Require less pressure
When your puppy begins to control the force of his bite after a couple of weeks of practicing, then say "Ouch!" and ignore him if he applies any pressure when he bites you. When you ignore him this time, leave the room for five minutes to make the point more strongly. Return at the end of the five minutes, and call him over to you, so that you are the one to initiate the interaction again.
Step
5
Repeat "Ouch!"
Practice saying "Ouch!" in a loud and high pitched voice and leaving the room for five minutes whenever your puppy applies pressure when he bites you. Do this for at least a couple of weeks, until your puppy no longer applies pressure when he bites you, but uses his mouth more gently instead.
Step
6
Require no pressure
When your puppy does not apply pressure when he bites you, then say "Ouch!" whenever he presses his teeth into you at all, or does anything other than barely touching you with his mouth. When you say "Ouch!" ignore him for ten minutes this time. When you return, call him back over to you and tell him to sit if he knows how to, before resuming playing again.
Step
7
Repeat again
Practice saying "Ouch!" whenever your buddy puts his mouth on you in any way that is not extremely gentle. Also practice ignoring him or leaving the room for ten minutes if he is not gentle. If you stay in the room during the ten minutes, while you are ignoring him, and he tries to bite your leg or bark at you while you are ignoring him then leave the room.
Step
8
Require no biting
When your puppy has learned to be very gentle with his mouth then you can teach him to stop biting you completely. To teach him to no longer bite at all, whenever he tries to put his mouth on you, say "Ouch!" in a high pitched, loud voice, and ignore him for ten minutes, like you did in the past. Do this is to teach him that even touching you with his mouth hurts you, and that biting ends all of his fun.
Recommend training method?

The Pressure Method

Least Recommended
4 Votes
Step
1
Play
To begin, grab some of your puppy's favorite toys. Call your puppy over to you and begin to play with him.
Step
2
Add pressure
Whenever your puppy bites your hand, tell him "Aha!" while pressing your flat hand into the back of his mouth, so that you are pressing onto the area where his jaws meet each other. Do this until he tries to spit your hand out.
Step
3
Repeat
If your puppy tries to grab your hand again as soon as you remove it, then repeat pressing your hand into the back of his mouth until he tries to spit it out again. Repeat this until he leaves your hand alone.
Step
4
Give a toy
When your puppy leaves your hand alone then praise him and hand him one of his own toys to bite on.
Step
5
Practice
Practice pressing your hand into the back of your puppy's mouth and telling him "Aha" whenever he bites you. Continue to praise him and offer him one of his own toys whenever he stops trying to bite you. If your puppy tries to bite an area of your body besides your hand, then block that area with your hand, tell him "Aha!", and then press your hand into his mouth if he bites your hand while you are blocking him. When he stops trying to get to the other part of your body to bite you, then praise him and give him a toy to bite instead.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Caitlin Crittenden

Published: 04/11/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Luna
Australian Shepherd
8 Months
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Luna
Australian Shepherd
8 Months

Luna bites. A lot. Still. She will bite our faces, hands, ankles, and everything in between. The problem is she has many if not all of her adult teeth, so she draws blood. Is there any way we can get her to stop biting so much? Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marisa, First, I do suggest hiring a professional trainer who uses both positive reinforcement and fair corrections to come to your home and assess the biting. I am assuming the biting is out of excitement but without more details I can't say for sure what you should do. If the biting is in response to you doing something that she does not like, that is a respect issue and probably a learned behavior, possibly fear also - that type of biting is more related to aggression and sometimes a lack of trust. If the biting is in response to movement - because she is a herding breed, then you need to deal with her desire to control things. At her age, I am assuming based on what I know that the biting is due to excitement and she simply doesn't have good bite-inhibition - which is where she controls the pressure of her mouth. If the issue is excitement, then it's time to correct harder than you would with a young puppy at this point. I suggest teaching a 'Leave It' command and using that command when she starts to get too rough. Once she understands 'Leave It' fully, then you may also need electric collar training to give you the amount of non-physical correction with the consistency that you need. For this, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced with e-collars and has excellent reviews and experience with this type of behavior. Here is a link to the 'Leave It' command. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite The 'Leave It' command is a first step because she needs to clearly understand what she is supposed to be doing instead of biting when you tell her to stop by saying 'Leave It'. Understanding gives her a chance to obey and succeed. If she doesn't obey even though she understands - which it sounds like may happen, then an electric collar e-collar is usually what I recommend to enforce your 'Leave It' command. Doing it this way disciplines her disobedience and not something more obscure that could be confusing. It may sound harsh but a high quality electric collar will have at least thirty different levels, letting you adjust the level to just what she needs in order to respond and not too high. It will also let you correct her without touching her - the touching will probably get her more wound up when she is in that state. You want something that will 'snap her out of it' and interrupt what she is doing without physically harming her. Once she stops, then you can give her something else to do instead, like 'Come', 'Sit', 'Down' or focus on a toy. She likely needs to be given direction with a command when she gets worked up like that. Do not buy a cheaply made e-collar. Poorly made (which are often less expensive too) e-collars can be dangerous due to malfunctioning. Garmin, E-collar Technologies, SportDog, and Dogtra are good brands. Find a trainer who can assess why she is biting, teach you how to properly use the electric collar, and figure out what level to set it to (called her working level - a good trainer will know what that term means. If they don't know what a working level is, then don't use that trainer). If she is biting due to herding or true aggression, then you will need to tackle that in some other ways too. Biting at this age like you described is most commonly associated with excitement and plain rudeness though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

My puppy is almost 3 months old and she is an australian shepard as well! She has the same problem, she gets really aggressive and nips and bites on our ankles, face and tugs at our clothes.

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Little Anne
Aussie
8 Weeks
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Little Anne
Aussie
8 Weeks

My little girl will not stop biting our ankles and hands. We have tried giving her a used sock to chew one, many toys, and snacking her nose. But she will not stop. When we try correcting her she begins to get very aggresive and bite more..please help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lynsay, It is completely normal for puppies to do a form of biting called mouthing. That's how they learn, relieve boredom, and sooth themselves. It's also how they learn how to control how hard they press down with their teeth - if they learn that now, then they will actually be safer later as an adult. Puppies learn how to control how hard they press (called bite inhibition) by playing with puppies and getting feedback from people. Check out the article that I have linked below. Starting today, follow the "Bite Inhibition" method and use the yelping to help her learn. Also, start teaching her "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method found in that same article. When she gets good at the "Leave It" command and can leave clothing articles alone even when you are moving, then you can transition to having her "Leave It" when she wants to bite you. Stop giving her sock as well - that will cause confusion. When she is older and understands what "Leave It" means, then you can use the "Pressure" method to gently discipline her when she does not obey your leave it command and keep biting or start to bite. Biting article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite It's important to teach leave it before disciplining because when you discipline her now, she either thinks that you are rough-house playing also, or she is probably getting defensive because she doesn't understand why you are doing it. You need to engage her brain and help her learn what she is supposed to be doing (controlling how hard she bites - through the Bite Inhibition method, and stopping biting completely - through the leave it method). Once she understands the rules, then when you discipline her, she will understand the correction and be able to respond correctly. Some dogs have a defense drive, and the more rough you get and pressure you apply, the more they fight back - it's a natural response, and you need to engage their brains instead of just doing something physical on it's own. Puppies are mouthy for several months. The training will help her learn by five months not to bite anymore, and how to do it gently while she is little and learning still, but do not expect the training to work overnight. This takes time. Puppies need to use their mouths. They just have to learn how to control the amount of pressure and what to bite and when (toys and other puppies during play - gently). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Finn
Australian Shepherd
9 Weeks
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Finn
Australian Shepherd
9 Weeks

Austrian Shepards are herding dogs, so they will typically nip at your heals; however, our Aussie, Finn, has not done the typical nipping, he continues to jump up and bite us. We have tried the Ouch! method and have used clickers and treats, but neither of those seemed to help at all. What do you recommend we do now?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessie, Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Leave It" method. After you have taught leave it, give him the leave it command when he tries to bite or looks like he is thinking about biting. There are two other methods in that article that you can try as well, but I suggest trying each method for at least a month because no method will stop the biting immediately for most puppies. They have to learn to control their mouths gradually during the first six-months of puppihood. Biting is natural - control is learned, but do help him learn by teaching him "leave it". You should see gradual improvement and be able to tell that he is understanding the command with practice, if it is working. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the jumping, take a step toward him when he jumps and cross your arms and act really boring. When he stops jumping and calms down or sits, then reward him with a treat for being calm. Jumping is an attention seeking behavior typically so the goal with jumping is to show a dog that you want them out of your space (by stepping toward them), to not give them any attention for jumping, and to give them attention when they do something nice instead (like sitting - which a dog conveniently can't do while jumping)...teach him the "Sit" command and when you first practice with the jumping, tell him to "Sit" when he stops jumping - to help him learn what to do instead of jumping. When he gets good at sitting when you tell him to, then simply remain quiet when he stops jumping and let him start guessing what to do, until he guesses that he should sit and does it. When he sits, reward him right away. This will teach him to automatically sit for attention instead of having to be told to do it first. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Charlie
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks
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Charlie
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks

Hi there.
We have a mixed Australian Sheppard with black lab. He is very active, jumping and nipping. We’ve used you Ouch method. However we are having to reinforce it everyday and it doesn’t seem to stick more than 24 hrs. When can I assume he’s got the training down and won’t hurt guests or strangers. I want to use a trainer but we can’t start training until he’s 14 weeks. Is this too late to train?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Helen, Teaching puppies not to bite is something that takes closer to three months not days or weeks. He should be gradually improving and the biting should be getting softer and softer as you work on it. Check out the article that I have linked below and also work on the "Leave It" method. Leave It will take time to teach for him to get to the level of self control needed so use the Ouch method still while teaching it, but leave it tends to work well when they get a bit older to stop the biting completely. The article linked below was written for Shih Tzu's but the training is the same for other breeds too. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nova
Australian Shepherd
3 Months
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Nova
Australian Shepherd
3 Months

My Australian shepherd puppy always nips my other golden retrievers legs. Is that just a puppy thing? Will she outgrow it? How do I stop this from happening all the time?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thanks for the question. I have no doubt that Nova will outgrow the behavior - she has herding in her lineage after all, so is doing this for natural reasons. Australian Shepherds are dogs that love to be busy both mentally and physically, so enjoy this trait and enroll her in agility, flyball, or another sport. Take her through as many obedience levels as you can - she'll love every minute and will also learn to listen to you. Take a look at this Wag! article for more detailed advice. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-nip All the best and good luck!

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Riley
Aussie-border collie
9 Weeks
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Riley
Aussie-border collie
9 Weeks

My puppy responds okay to the ouch method when biting and calm, but as soon as she gets excited, the ouch method seems to make her bite harder. She also bites my fingers when I’m giving her treats while doing moving commands like heel. How do I reward her for heeling but not for biting?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lauren, First, if you can find a free puppy play date class or kindergarten class with time for off-leash puppy play, attend one of those with her so that she can learn how to control the pressure of her bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Check out this article on what to look for in a class, especially what safety measure you can take and a class should take to minimize the dangers of puppy contracting diseases like Parvo and Distemper. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, continue using the "Ouch" or "Yelp" method (same basic method just different articles). Use the "Yelp/ Ouch" method so that pup is still getting some type of feedback from you. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method from the article I have linked below. As soon as pup is good at the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when she attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if she makes a good choice. If she disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method found in the article below also, to gently discipline pup for biting when you told her not to. Know that it takes a puppy a lot of practice to develop impulse control in general though - it's normal for progress to be very gradual with this, keep practicing and it should pay off! The order of all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, she probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed durable chew toy like a Kong for a bit to help her calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Another good thing to do at this age that can help is to get pup used to being touched and handled calmly. Use pup's daily meal kibble to practice with. Gently touch pup somewhere like an ear and feed a treat at the same time. Practice this with ears, paws, the collar, opening mouth gently, belly, tail, ect...Rewarding with a treat each time and being very gentle. You can have other gentle people do the same thing with pup to help with pup's socialization also. As far as the heeling and mouthing, I suggest two things in addition to what I wrote above. 1. When pup gets too mouthy, briefly pull your hand back for a second without giving the treat, then try offering it again - do this over and over until pup tries to take it a bit more gently - and give it then. Don't expect perfection, but look for more gentleness and require more and more gentle treat takes as pup improves at this. This will take practice but the consistency should show pup that they need to take it gently and they will automatically adjust habitutally with practice overtime. 2. Try holding the treat a bit differently to keep your fingers more tucked in. Pup encountering a fist holding the treat helps naturally discourage the mouthing a bit. Tuck your fingers in like a fist and hold the treat between your thumb and fist. Check out the image linked below for a bit of a visual. Anything where fingers are tucked in can help though - so that pup is encourage to lick more to get the treat instead of bite at your hand. https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FQvBAVdrIlic%2Fmaxresdefault.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DQvBAVdrIlic&tbnid=PI1tCwLYZk40EM&vet=12ahUKEwjz9-Xar6LoAhUPD60KHb5uAfoQMygAegUIARDZAQ..i&docid=GDycuoRFi9CKEM&w=1280&h=720&q=how%20to%20offer%20a%20puppy%20a%20treat%20to%20avoid%20mouthiness&ved=2ahUKEwjz9-Xar6LoAhUPD60KHb5uAfoQMygAegUIARDZAQ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Winston
Australian Shepherd
17 Months
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Question
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Winston
Australian Shepherd
17 Months

Dog (male-neutered) does well at home with family however if neighbor child comes over he will bite (aggressive, not herding) - we can't have this - what training can we give him to stop

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sue, I suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in aggression and comes well recommended by their previous clients whose dogs worked through aggression issues. Ask questions, especially about their experience with aggression related to kids and whether they have the resources to work with that specific type of aggression - which is going to involve desensitizing around dog-savy kids. Because of safety issues, I do not recommend pursuing the training on your own. You can however begin working on building pup's respect, trust and responsiveness to you through obedience commands. Place - gradually work up to pup staying on place for up to an hour at a time - this is a good respect, impulse control, and calming exercise: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When working with a trainer, I suggest under their guidance and supervision pursing training lke the following. First, using measures like crating and desensitizing him to the muzzle are important first steps - the kids are first priority and need to be kept safe, and being allowed to act aggressive toward them will make the behavior in him worse, so don't feel bad about doing those things. Those are responsible first steps. Check out the videos linked below on desensitizing aggressive dogs to kids. Notice the safety measures always taken though and be sure to implement similar measures - crates, back tie leash, lines for the kids not to cross, constant adult supervision anytime there is an interaction between the kids and dog, and a basket muzzle. You can work on teaching pup to respect the kids and be more comfortable around them via desensitizing and their respect for you and your rules. Once pup is doing well, I still would not allow him to be around the kids without a lot of structure and precautions in case since pup does have a history of biting - but training needs to be in place so that bites are no longer the norm. Just know that even when pup does well, they shouldn't be completely trusted still since they have shown a lack of impulse control around kids and could bite. Explanation of why dogs often bite kids (the dog in this video who is closer to the kids doesn't have aggression issues - which is why you don't see the extra precautions taken, like in the rest of the videos I have linked - extra safety measures will be needed when practicing with a known biter - such as a muzzle, back tie leash, crate, and greater distance between pup and kid): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7_0ZqiJ1zE&t=122s Use of crate, Place and tether leash: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n0_27XY3z4 The dog is attached to the pole with a secure leash while on Place - notice the tape on the ground the kid knows not to cross - to keep the kid out of the dog's reach in case the dog lunges: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gblDgIkyAKU Teaching dog to move away from kids when uncomfortable: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYs76puesAE Later stage, up close desensitization - even though kids are close, there is still a line and pup is still on a back-tie leash so that pup can't actually get to kids to bite if they tried...This is a later stage exercise for pup once they can do well with the other above scenarios: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIJoEJfTS-E Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Andy
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks
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Andy
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks

Two challenges: Andy is having a tough time learning his name or he’s not listening to the call command when we do use his name. He seems to be selective...

Second: he loves his pen during the day however at night, he resists falling asleep in there. We have to wait until he’s asleep elsewhere and carry him in which I don’t want him to learn as a growing puppy.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mewa, To help pup learn their name say their name and toss a treat or piece of kibble. Practice during sessions often. When pup is responding well, say pup's name at times when they aren't expecting it and say their name then toss a treat at random times throughout the day. As they improve, wait until pup takes a few steps toward you before tossing the treat. Finally, wait until pup comes all the way up to you to get the treat before giving it after saying their name. At 11 weeks of age, protesting the crate at bedtime is normal. It takes time for a puppy to adjust to being in the crate for longer periods of time. It's not fun, but ignore any crying when you know they don't need to go potty. When you first have them go into the crate for the night, you can sprinkle a couple of small treats in there. Practice having pup go in and out of the crate during the day, saying "Room" or a similar command. Practice this at non-crating times especially so that pup starts to feel like entering the crate on command is not a big deal - because they will be getting back out soon. Reward pup for going into the crate voluntarily. Practice this with pup on leash so that you can use pup's momentum toward the crate to get them into the crate before they even think to put on the breaks at first - then reward once they are in there. Close the door, wait until pup is quiet. When pup gets quiet, periodically sprinkle in treats at times and open the door to let pup back out at times - rewarding the quietness also. Make pup wait patiently for permission before allowing them to exit through the doorway - to encourage further calmness. Close the door again any time they rush the opening, each time until pup is waiting calmly, then happily tell pup "Okay!" or "Free!" and allow them to come out when you tell them they can once they are waiting for permission. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jovi
Australian Shepherd
5 Months
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Jovi
Australian Shepherd
5 Months

Is there a way to stop I’ve had her for 5 months now and she won’t stop please help

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Remi
Australian Shepherd
5 Months
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Remi
Australian Shepherd
5 Months

Hello! Remi has also been having a slight problem with biting and barking, but instead of biting our ankles he will usually aim for our shoes, legs( he likes to latch on to our pants and pull, he has been known to rip holes in a lot of clothing), any loose or dangling articles of clothing, or he will just jump right on us while barking and try to bite. He mostly does this to the 2 kids of the house whenever they run, jump, make a loud noise, or drop something. He will also occasionally do it to my mother while she is exercising or when she is just standing around. We have slowly started to try the method of just standing there and ignoring it, but so far that has not been working. We have also tried telling him to stop, trying to keep him distracted, giving him his toys( which has sometimes worked), and tried calming him down by petting him. Thank you for your help:)

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! So it sounds like his herding instinct is coming out in full force! Herding behaviors are corrected completely different from normal puppy nipping/mouthing. Because teaching dogs to have other responses to their urges is quite the process, I am going to send you a link. There is way too much info to share and it won't fit in this box! https://wagwalking.com/training/not-herd-1

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Mazie
Australian Shepherd
6 Months
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Mazie
Australian Shepherd
6 Months

Biting
chewing
jumping

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you information on the nipping/biting, as well as jumping. Both of these behaviors are attention seeking/play engaging behaviors. The best you can do for both is to completely ignore. But I am sending information with much more detail than that! Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Rocky
australian shepherd mix
8 Weeks
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Rocky
australian shepherd mix
8 Weeks

Hello, I have a 2 month old Australian Shepherd/ Golden retriever mix and I have been teaching him to potty and poop on puppy pads when I'm not home to take him outside due to work. I have been taking him outside religiously every couple hours to when I'm home. He has the hang of peeing on the puppy pad when I put him on there and sometimes he will go to it and pee, but when he gets playful he seems to forget and just pee anywhere he is standing. He pees even little sometimes. He won't poo on it though. I got this puppy spray to put on it to attract him to the smell. Its been a few weeks I have been working with him. He has the idea of it, but forgets sometimes. When will that register in his head to go on it every time? Is he to young to train at the moment? Thanks so much! ♡Ali♡

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Astro
Australian Shepherd
4 Months
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Astro
Australian Shepherd
4 Months

My dog is always biting me and everyone. I try to train him but he doesn’t listen or pay attention. I also want to train him to follow my commands but I don’t know how to.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Rowdy
Australian Shepherd
5 Months
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Rowdy
Australian Shepherd
5 Months

My dog will not stop chasing my cats around, keeps jumping on me, and won't stop biting my ankles and legs. It's getting to the point where it leaves marks and I want to start to stop him from this before he gets older.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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onikamarajsaylortwift
Toy aussie
6 Months
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onikamarajsaylortwift
Toy aussie
6 Months

she bites in cursive.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello, It looks like there may have been a spelling issue. Did you mean to say cursive or something else? For a pup their age I generally recommend teaching the Leave It command. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite If pup is acting aggressively and not just doing normal puppy mouthing excitedly or playfully, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues to help you at home, since 6 months is very early to be seeing true aggression - and I would generally recommend getting someone to help as soon as possible, who can watch pup's body language, observe the routines of your home and your relationship with pup and create a training plan based on seeing more of what's going on. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocky
Australian Shepherd
3 Months
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Rocky
Australian Shepherd
3 Months

I trained him to go potty when I'm gone at work on the pads, but he just won't go poo on them. I'm so frustrated and i keep putting him on there if I catch him trying to go poo. He doesn't get it. Please help!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Some dogs often need to sniff around quite a bit and find the perfect spot to go poo. If you haven't already, you might want to make the potty space a bit bigger. Putting down 3-4 pads in the location so he has room to sniff around.

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Coby
Australian Shepherd
9 Weeks
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Coby
Australian Shepherd
9 Weeks

Coby bites and nips us (play biting) whenever we pick him up, try to put on his harness or collar, pat him around his face, or hold onto a toy for too long when playing and he wants it. He also barks excitedly whenever we pet him or play with him. He is not aggressive and has been socialised and is good with people and other dogs. Please help!!!!!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Dakota
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks
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Dakota
Australian Shepherd
11 Weeks

He loves to bite everything. I know he is a puppy but he keep biting my other dog in the neck and also his private part. I am scared letting him play with my other dog Woody is going to cause Dakota to be aggressive. And when I try to calm him down and grab him, he goes even more crazy and I can’t control him. He also loves to eat everything he finds on the floor. He started choking on a small stick today and it scared me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mary, For the biting, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area, and using the section on how to use out to deal with pushy behavior, and you enforce Out on behalf of the older dog so they don't have to deal with pup. This helps pup learn respect for them as an extension of pup respecting you, and takes the pressure off the older dog to handle things. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Finally, when you aren't supervising pup with the older dog, I also recommend confining pup to an exercise pen or crate with a dog food stuffed chew toy, to give the older dogs a break and keep pup out of trouble, like chewing. The Surprise method can be used to teach pup to handle some alone time. When you are home, you can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (add a carabiner to a normal leash for a cheap option), to keep pup closer to you and not bothering the older dogs as needed too. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ For the chewing, check out the article I have linked below: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ When you are supervising I would also keep a drag leash on pup so that you can lead them away from things they are chewing and your older dog when they are having a hard time listening and over-excited. Only leave it on when you are there in case it catches on anything though. Finally, check out the free PDF Ebook download After You Get Your Puppy, at the link below for more general tips and management at this age. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Loki
Australian Shepherd
2 Months
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Loki
Australian Shepherd
2 Months

Biting/nipping
Obeisance
Leash

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Chloe
Australian Shepherd
7 Months
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Chloe
Australian Shepherd
7 Months

How do I break her of biting me? She has actually brought the blood a few times. I know she just does it playing but when I try to correct her she just keeps doing it; and she will also tug at my clothes when she is biting me and wants me to get up and play with her. She has actually tore a few articles of my clothing up trying to play with me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
823 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rachael, For the biting, I recommend teaching pup the Leave It command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend teaching pup Out - which means leave the area. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sketch of smiling australian shepherd