How to Train Your Dog to Use a Pee Pad

Medium
4-8 Weeks
General

Introduction

There may be many reasons a dog needs to be trained to pee on a pee pad. Dog owners who are immobile may not be able to take their dog outside often enough for the dog to eliminate. Some owners train puppies on pee pads before training the dog to go outside. City dwellers without yards might decide to use a pee pad for their dog inside the apartment. Moreover, older dogs who might not make it outside may find their last years easier using a pee pad. Small breed dogs are often taught to use pee pads because the outdoor elements may be difficult for them to handle as the seasons change. Teaching your dog to use a pee pad could eliminate stress for you as well as your dog. He will not be left fearing punishment after having an accident, and you will not have to worry about messes to clean from carpets and floors.

Defining Tasks

Using a verbal command such as “potty” will help teach your dog where to go. Pee pad training your dog is not difficult, but it does require patience. To be successful, someone will have to be with your dog for long periods of time over the first few days to show him your expectations for using the pee pads. Puppies will be easier to train to use pee pads, however, adults can be trained as well. It just may take more time and patience, as you are not only teaching him a new skill but potentially changing previous habits. If you want your dog to eliminate on a pee pad always, be prepared for the materials you need and have a space partitioned off within your home to do the training. Keep the pads in the same place, because moving them may require retraining for your dog.

Getting Started

You will need a few items on hand before you begin to train your dog to pee on pee pads.

  • Pee pads
  • Treats for rewards
  • Patience
  • Time with the dog to encourage eliminating every hour or two

The Room of Pee Pads Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Room of Pee Pads method for Use a Pee Pad
Step
1
Set up
Place pee pads across the entire floor of a small room. When possible, use a hard surface floor instead of carpet.
Step
2
Introduce command
As your dog is learning to use the pee pads, place him in the room with a “potty” command or another verbal cue.
Step
3
Get acquainted
Each time you visit the room with your pup, let him sniff around without allowing him to play.
Step
4
Reward
Once the dog eliminates, use the command word again and offer your dog a treat.
Step
5
Timing
While training, be sure to visit the room often. About ten minutes after eating, visit the pee pad room with your dog, repeating the steps above.
Step
6
Monitor and reinforce
Keep a close eye on your dog as he trains to use the pee pads. Reward for positive behaviors and redirect if he has an accident elsewhere.
Step
7
Keep it up
Keep actively training your dog until he can go into the room by himself to eliminate.
Step
8
Reduce pee pads
As he learns what the pads are for, you can remove some pads and keep only what you need in that room instead of covering the entire floor.
Recommend training method?

The Keeping a Pee Pad Method

Effective
3 Votes
Keeping a Pee Pad method for Use a Pee Pad
Step
1
Location
Keep your puppy partitioned off and confined to a small area, either a room or a crate large enough for your dog to have a sleeping area separate from her potty area.
Step
2
Set up
Cover the entire potty area with pee pads and leave your dog.
Step
3
Introduce command
Take your dog to the potty pad often and use the “potty” command.
Step
4
Reward
Reward good behaviors while on the pad.
Step
5
Redirect
If your puppy begins to play or does not eliminate after a few minutes, remove him from the pad and place him back in his sleeping or playing area.
Step
6
Repeat
Repeat these steps often, keeping in mind a puppy can typically hold his bladder one hour for every month he is old.
Step
7
Redirect
If your dog has an accident, blot the urine onto a paper towel and place the paper towel on the pee pad to attract your dog’s sense of smell.
Step
8
Reduce pads
Over time, as your dog learns to use the pee pad, you can decrease the number of pee pads in your dog’s space and open his space to include more of the house.
Recommend training method?

The Keeping Your Dog Away from Pee Pads Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Keeping Your Dog Away from Pee Pads method for Use a Pee Pad
Step
1
Monitor
Keep a close eye on your dog as you bond and play together.
Step
2
Go to pee pad
Every few minutes, leash walk your dog to a pee pad you have in a separate place within your home.
Step
3
Introduce command
Place your dog on the pee pad and say a command such as “potty,” so he can associate the word with the action of eliminating.
Step
4
Redirect
Only keep your dog on the pee pad for a few minutes. If he does not eliminate, do not allow him to play.
Step
5
Leave potty area
Leash walk him back to the area where you two play and bond.
Step
6
Repeat
Continue this process with the understanding that once he goes, he should be able to hold his bladder one hour for every month he is old.
Step
7
Reward
Once he is successful, use the command and treat reward for praise.
Step
8
Continue
Repeat this process until your dog begins to lead you on his leash to the puppy pad himself. Remember to reward your dog each time he uses the potty on the pee pad
Step
9
Train with accidents
Try to catch him in an accident and take him to the pee pad with command words and a treat if he is successful.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Amy Caldwell

Published: 09/27/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Rocky
Cocker Spaniel
6 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Rocky
Cocker Spaniel
6 Weeks

I want to train him to potty inside his crate, located in the living room, and sleep on a little bed, also located in the living room. How can I do so efficiently?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alexandra, First of all unless that was a typo on your request, I STRONGLY recommend that you do NOT teach Rocky to use the potty INSIDE of a crate. That will make all future crate training and possibly potty training attempts, as well as the ability to travel with your dog, board your dog, and possibly re-home your dog if needed almost impossible. A dog has a natural instinct to hold his bladder in a confined, den-like space, which a crate resembles. This instinct can be utilized for potty training and teaching a dog to keep his areas clean, which many dogs are able to eventually generalize to the rest of your home, for potty training. A crate is also an important tool for dealing with separation anxiety, preventing destructive chewing, boredom barking, self-soothing, self-entertainment, and for confining him to keep him safe. Teaching a dog to pee in a crate prevents you from using the crate for any of those purposes. If you wish to train this, then I suggest using a litter box without a lid instead, so that you will still be able to use a crate for other things later on. The litter box will also be more open so that it should not interfere with the instinct to hold his bladder in a confined space, since he will not be locked in an enclosed, den-like area, but will instead be in an open box type area. To litter box train, check out the article that I have linked below. You can use a real grass pad or another potty material inside the litter box structure in place of the litter if you wish. Just make sure that the potty material does not resemble other materials in your home, like fabric and carpeting and rugs. If it does resemble those things, then you might end up with a puppy who pees on rugs and fabric too because she does not understand the difference. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy To teach him to sleep on his own bed check out the article that I have linked below. Anytime that you catch him laying on his own bed without being told after you have taught him to go there using one of the methods from the article, then randomly go over to him without saying anything and place a treat between his paws to encourage him to lay on his bed more in the future by choice. https://wagwalking.com/training/sleep-in-a-dog-bed Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Boots
Miniature Australian Shepherd
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Boots
Miniature Australian Shepherd
12 Weeks

My boy will go to the piddle pad, but only puts his front feet on the pad. He has the idea so I don't want to discourage him by scolding. Please note that he does everything in a hurry.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Meody, I suggest teaching pup to stand with all four paws on the pad. Practice with praise and treats leading pup over to the pad and giving a treat as soon as pup steps all four paws onto the pad. At this age, if you can I suggest even more, transitioning to outside potty training if you plan to train pup to use the potty outside in the future and your schedule will allow you to teach pup now. It will be far easier to teach pup to go potty outside now and get rid of the pee pads completely at this age, then continue them and make the transition later. If you need to use the pads for a bit longer but don't want to use them to forever, I suggest looking into using real-grass pads in place of pee pads - since the grass pads will make transitioning to outside easier and cause less confusion with things like rugs and carpet. real-grass pad brands: www.porchpotty.com www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com Most of these brands can be found on Amazon also. I suggest starting with a less expensive brand first - especially if you don't plan to use them long-term (although these are a good long-term option in place of pee pads for those who plan to use pee pads). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Izzy
Pug-Zu
8 Weeks
4 found helpful
Question
4 found helpful
Izzy
Pug-Zu
8 Weeks

My puppy is doing really well with peeing on her pee pads but not so well with pooping. She will do it almost anywhere besides the pads. Is there anything I can do to make her more sucessful with this? Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kate, The first thing that you can try to help Izzy poop on the pad is to purchase a spray designed to encourage elimination. This spray can be found at most large pet stores or online. It is typically called "Hurry Spray", "Training Spray", "Puppy Training Spray", or something similar. Spray the spray onto the pad and lead her over to the area. Encourage her to sniff the pad by keeping her on a leash near the pad or by placing the pad into an exercise pen so that she cannot wander off. Also, make sure that you lead her over to the pee pad fifteen minutes after she eats, in addition to normal potty break times, because most puppies this age need to poop after eating. Keep her by the pee pad for up to thirty minutes after you take her, after she has eaten. Tell her to "Go Potty" so that she will learn that phrase overtime. If she goes, then praise her when she finishes and give her five small treats that she likes, one treat at a time. Whenever she is free, supervise her closely, and if she tends to wander away from you and have accidents, then attach her to yourself when she is free for as long as she is still potty training, with a light weight leash. If you see her squat down or begin to sniff around to find an area to poop, then quietly and quickly rush her over to the pee pad and tell her to "Go Potty" there. If she gets distracted again, then spray the spray onto the pad and let her sniff it to remind her what she is supposed to be doing. After she is pooping on the pad regularly, then you can leave one small poop on the pad rather than use the spray, to encourage her to continue pooping there, until she is potty trained. If you prefer the spray, then you can continue to use that instead though. The key with all of this is to encourage her to eliminate on the pads with scent, to prevent her from being allowed to eliminate anywhere else by supervising her closely, and to reward her when she goes so that she will want to poop on the pad in the future. Be sure to clean up an accidents with a pet safe cleaner that contains enzymes because only enzymes will break down the poop enough to remove the smell for a dog. Any remaining smell will encourage her to poop in that same location. If none of that works, then you will need to use a crate for a little while. To use a crate, follow the "Crate Training" method found in the article bellow. Instead of taking your puppy outside like the method describes, when it is time for her to go, lead her over to the pee pad instead. Once she is consistently pooping on the pee pad and not in other places, then you can stop using the crate if you wish. Here is the crate training article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Another option is to utilize an Exercise Pen when you cannot supervise her, so that she cannot wander away from where the pee pad is. To use an Exercise Pen follow the "Exercise Pen" method in this article bellow, and simply substitute the litter box in this method for a pee pad, unless you would prefer to switch to a litter box in general. Here is the Exercise Pen method article: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If you are still having issues after trying all of that, they you might need to consider switching to a litter box or to taking her outside to eliminate. She might have an aversion to pooping on the soft, fabric type material of the pee pads. I would not worry about that possibility until she is closer to twelve weeks and showing no improvement at all in this area despite you following the training, unless you simply want to make the switch. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Missy
Shihpoo
10 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Missy
Shihpoo
10 Years

Only had her for two months. Sleeps on my bed with me. Jumps down when she wants to go outside. Usually works fine.
But she had some loose stools last night and I found them in the adjoining bathroom on the scatter rugs. Thought maybe I should use the pads every night in the bathroom just in case? She jumped off the bed every hour or so in a 4 hours period. I'm getting zero sleep!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Judy, It sounds like she might be at the age where you need to change her nighttime setup. Many dogs start to struggle with incontinence for pee and/or poop around this age. When that starts to happen I generally recommend having them sleep in an exercise pen with an indoor potty at night, so that when they wake up to go the potty it is really close by and everyone gets more sleep - including pup since it's closer for them. If pup has previously been trained to go potty outside, then I suggest using a real grass pad instead of a pee pad for this because that will be easier for pup to learn and feel okay about pottying on - plus it will be less likely to lead to accidents in other areas of the house that are due to confusion. To get her used to being in the Exercise Pen, have her spend a couple of hours in it during the day and reward her with treats whenever she gets quiet and stays for several minutes while in there. Gradually space your rewards further apart as she improves - you may be able to skip this part if she is already used to being confined. Give a fun new chew toy, like a dog-food stuffed hollow classic kong. Once pup is more familiar with the pen, then use the Exercise Pen method linked below to train her to go potty on the grass pad (the method mentions a litter box but you can use a grass pad instead - be sure the pad is real grass not astroturf). You can also use the Crate Training method from the article linked below if you find that easier. Exercise pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - most can able be purchased on amazon.com www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Stella
Yorkie
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Stella
Yorkie
6 Months

My dog is very stubborn and does what she wants. HELP

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with her to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Question
Bella
Shih Tzu
8 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Bella
Shih Tzu
8 Years

I adopted my dog about 2 months ago and she is settling in great. The only issue is she has accidents when I’m at work. Not every time, but I’d say a majority of the time. I want to train her to use pee pads when I’m at work and she can’t hold it. How do I go about training her? I’ve been trying to bring her on it when she has to go but she doesn’t want to and just whines at me while sitting on it until I let her out. How can I fix this?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alisha, Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Exercise Pen" method. You can also follow the "Crate Training" method but that method requires being home during the day, so the "Exercise Pen" method will probably work better for you. If she has used the bathroom only outside all of her life, then I actually suggest using real grass pads instead of pee pads. She may be intentionally avoiding peeing on the pads because she associates the pads with carpet and rugs which she is not supposed to pee on. The grass pads are disposable and made of real grass - making them easier for older dogs to transition to. The article below mentions using a litter box but the training is the same for both pee pads and real grass pads, so simply use a real grass pad or pee pad in place of the litter box mentioned in the article and follow all of the other steps. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass Pad (real grass pads are more expensive but they are advertised to last up to two weeks each). Here is one brand. Look for those made out of real grass to make the training easier for her. https://www.amazon.com/DoggieLawn-Disposable-Potty-Real-Grass/dp/B00EQJ7I7Y/ref=asc_df_B00EQJ7I7Y/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309806233193&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16975675753296178593&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=pla-572651300532&psc=1 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Frank
Dachshund
9 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Frank
Dachshund
9 Weeks

The first few days we brought frank home, he did really well going to the bathroom on his pee pads. Now it seems every day he is getting worse. Having more “accidents”and deliberately not going on them. I will take him to the pad and say “potty” every hour or when he looks like he needs to go and he won’t go then will go immediately once he hits a soft surface. Today he went in his bed twice and his crate once within minutes after i took him and he would not go on the pad. Sometimes he even looks me in the eye as he goes where he knows not to. He never has gone in his bed or crate before. Everyday seems to get a little worse and further away. What is going wrong

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amy, I suggest switching from using pee pads to using a real grass pad or a litter box. Some puppies have a very hard time differentiating pee pads from other surfaces like rugs and carpets. They naturally do not feel like they should be peeing there. Once you make the switch, if you want him to use an indoor toilet, then follow the "Exercise Pen" or "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If you want him to learn to go potty outside later, then go ahead and start that process by following the "Tethering" method or the "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Also, here is a link to a real grass pad. They are more expensive but each one is advertised to last two weeks. https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
lex
King Charles Spaniel
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
lex
King Charles Spaniel
2 Months

uses puppy pads SOMETIMES gets praise and treat. Other times makes on blanket/bed, What to do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lily, Check out the article linked below for how to train. Puppy needs to be in an exercise pen with a potty area in there unless bladder is empty, in a crate unless bladder is empty, or tether to you with a leash unless bladder is empty. Also, pee pads can cause confusion for some dogs because they are made out of fabric, a real grass pad or litter box will probably be easier for pup to learn the difference between where to potty and where not to. A real grass pad is usually the most natural feeling for pup. Potty training article: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If puppy doesn't do well with cat litter, you can also purchase doggie litter made out of paper instead of clay. Real grass pad brands - can also be purchased on Amazon: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Lola
Dachshund mix
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lola
Dachshund mix
2 Months

Hello, I need help training my puppy to use the pee pads. She does
Not want to use the pee pad. I put her many times over the pad but she cries and then pee somewhere else. How can I do it? I also spray the training spray over the pad but still not working.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Liz, Check out the article linked below and follow the "Exercise Pen" method. At first add extra pee pads and make the pen small enough that her only option is to pee on the pad (and not right beside it. Place her on there with the exercise pen door closed. Tell her to "Go Potty" and wait - ignore her crying. At first this might take a very long time. When she finally goes potty, praise her and reward her with several treats, one at a time, then let her out of the pen. Repeat this process until she starts to quicky go potty on the pads when you place her there. At that point remove one of the pads or make the exercise pen a bit bigger to see if she will still go on the pad. I also suggest using a real grass pad instead of a pee pad. Many dogs naturally prefer the grass pads and they are less likely to cause confusion with other fabric type items like rugs - since they are not made out of fabric like pee pads. Check out the "Exercise Pen" method from the article linked below. It mentions litter box training but can follow the same steps with real grass pads or pee pads instead of a litter box. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=106890599448301024&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=aud-643330155750:pla-568582223506&psc=1 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Faith
Shar-Pei
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Faith
Shar-Pei
3 Months

I've had my dog for about two weeks. We have been trying to teach her how to do her business on the pee pads, but she still hasn't gotten the hang of it. I have a question to ask. How long would it take for my dog to be able to learn to pee and poop on the pad?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Gabriela, It takes most puppies about 3 months to be potty trained where they will initiate going to the right spot (or alert you when they need to go) and not have accidents inside. If done correctly, most puppies should be pottying in the right spot (pad or outside) about 95% of the time because you are supervising or confining them and taking them often. You cannot expect a puppy not to need your help at this point though. Check out th article linked below. If you are not home to give the amount of supervision or potty trips necessary, I suggest following the "Exercise Pen" method so that she is always close to a potty area. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If you plan to transition her to going potty outside, I suggest transitioning to Crate Training and taking her potty outside and get rid of the pee pads immediately (pee pads can lead to accidents on rugs and can later if you remove them because they are made from fabric. If you are gone too long to take her potty often enough, then I suggest using the "Exercise Pen method from the article linked above, and a disposable real grass pad (linked below). Crate Training method for pottying outside: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Real grass pad: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14683449166463762672&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=aud-643565131866:pla-568582223506&psc=1 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buster
Chihuahua
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Buster
Chihuahua
7 Weeks

My puppy isn’t doing too well on they puppy pads, as i’m trying to train him inside until he can go outside. He also throws a fit when i don’t let him sleep with me, and when he does he ends up peeing in my bed. How can i fix this?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Breanna, Check out the "Exercise Pen" method from the article linked below. Instead of a litter box like the method mentions you can use real grass pads or pee pads. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Some puppies also benefit by switching to a real grass pad. https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16975784713143448161&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=aud-643330155750:pla-568582223506&psc=1 At 7 weeks of age he simply does not have the bladder control to potty train well. The goal at this age is to familiarize him with it and encourage potty training but be patient and realize that he needs to mature more before he can hold it well enough to control where he pees and when. Limit his freedom to when you know his bladder is empty from already peeing recently. His ability should improve gradually over the next month as you practice. Also, most puppies cry at night for the first two weeks. I suggest crate training or having him sleep in the exercise pen at night. Every time you give in and let him sleep with you when he cries when he does not need to go potty it makes adjusting to sleeping in the right spot take longer because he is being rewarded for crying. Stay strong and ignore the crying until he tires and goes to sleep. He is young now so will have to fall asleep at some point. He should learn after a few nights that he is safe where he is and should go to sleep where you put him. A crate should eventually make him feel safer at night - once he adjusts. If he wakes up at night needing to pee, take him potty to the exercise pen, then bring him back to the crate but keep the entire experience calm. Since you will be using the Exercise Pen method you can also let him sleep in the exercise pen. Put a non-absorbent bed, like www.primopads.com, on one end, or attach a crate on one end of the exercise pen and put a real grass pad or pee pad on the opposite end. Expect crying at night in the pen also, like the crate, stay strong and give him time to fall asleep and adjust. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sam
Pomeranian
3 Months
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Sam
Pomeranian
3 Months

Hi! For the past few days since I got him I already started training him for doing his business on the potty pad, but as time passed by he started to just pee everywhere else and just pee on the potty pad when he wants. What do you suggested me to do? Would you suggest me to do the leash method?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Danielle, Check out the article linked below. If you are at home often during the day I suggest using the "Crate Training" method. Switching the pee pads out for a real grass pad would also probably make training him easier, but you can continue trying the pee pads for longer if you feel strongly about using them. The natural feel and smell of grass tends to be preferred by many dogs and is less confusing than the fabric of a pee pad - which resembles rugs and carpet. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If you at not at home often enough to use the Crate Training method from the article I have linked above, then I suggest using the "Exercise Pen" method also found in the article I have linked above and switching to real grass pads. The article I have linked above mentions litter box training but you can use pee pads or real grass pads instead of a litter box and follow the same steps to teach those also. Real grass pads (each one is advertised to last two weeks): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07K3WS97D/ref=sspa_dk_detail_0?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07K3WS97D&pd_rd_w=kaWAj&pf_rd_p=733540df-430d-45cd-9525-21bc15b0e6cc&pd_rd_wg=FBYRb&pf_rd_r=CG1XFFWYNCDBW1YMA1Q3&pd_rd_r=13e6f5fc-58e1-11e9-96c4-2d30919d7fd2 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leo
Mixed
6 Weeks
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Leo
Mixed
6 Weeks

I’m trying to potty train using pee pads and going outside, but he prefers going outside and won’t pee or poop in the pad, any advice?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! If you’ve decided that pee pads are right for you and your dog, here are some training tips to get you started: Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Aron
Maltese
1 Year
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Aron
Maltese
1 Year

he was initially trained to pee outdoors, and now since we adopted him wewanted to teach him to pee indoors. we use drops that will make him pee on mat but he doesnt react.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the article linked below. I suggest using either the Exercise Pen method or Crate Training method found there. If pup is really struggling with pee pads, I would also consider something like a disposable real grass pad - which will be more familiar to pup and not as confusing with other fabrics like carpet and rugs. Exercise Pen and Crate Training methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy www.porchpotty.com www.Freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Severus
French Bulldog
18 Weeks
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Severus
French Bulldog
18 Weeks

My dog is kept in a playpen while my husband and I are at work. He has toys, his crate, water and a potty pad. He will usually use the pad when he is locked in the playpen. However, he will sometimes pee on his bed, and when we are home he will go pee wherever he wants to. Potty attractant/replant sprays have not worked as he doesn’t sniff around before pooping or peeing. We have also tried to take him outside to potty and he doesn’t like the grass. We have tried tons of things to try to get him to train but we feel we’ve hit a brick wall... what else should we do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jenn, The pee pad may be causing confusion. Pee pads are made out of fabric and some dogs have a hard time telling the difference between pee pads and rugs and carpet and other soft things. First, you can try switching to using a real grass pad or a litter box. Check out the article linked below and be sure to spend time rewarding him for going potty in the right place when you are home - this will mean intentionally keeping him in the exercise pen some when you are home at first, but watching him carefully so that you see when he goes potty and can reward him for it. Exercise pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy For the training to work you also need to remove anything absorbent from the exercise pen area during potty training - which means no soft bed. Look into a cot type bed or www.primopads.com for a non-absorbent bed instead. If the above isn't helping you will need to use the crate training method from the same article linked above/below when you are home, so that he will only have the option of peeing on the pad/litter box when his bladder is full and will hold his bladder between trips. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy When he is free, until he improves at peeing in the right place and holding it better when loose, he will need to stay tethered to you with a 6 or 8 foot leash so that he cannot sneak off to pee, and be taken back to the exercise pen to potty every hour. Tethering method - instead of taking him outside when following this method you will take him to the exercise pen to pee on the pad/litter box: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Real grass pad: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o4&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14309293369678908651&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010791&hvtargid=aud-643565131866:pla-568582223506&psc=1 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leo
York-Chon
4 Months
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Leo
York-Chon
4 Months

I have had Leo for about 2 1/2 months now and I’ve then tried every method I can think of to train him to puppy pads. He does uses it to poop almost all the time but he picks and chooses when he wants to pee on there. Sometimes he will use the pad other times he uses the floor. I currently do the playpen method you have recommended to others and it seems as if it’s not working. I have also tried the crate method and it seems as nothing is working. At times it seems as if he’s progressing and then there’s times were it seems as if its a setback. I need help desperately!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, I highly suggest switching to using real grass pads. Some dogs confuse pee pads with other things your your home because they are made out of fabric so they struggle to differentiate them from other areas. Real grass pads are also disposable (they are advertised to be used for two weeks then you throw them away), but they are more obviously different than other surfaces and smell more natural. I suggest switching to a real grass pad and then using the Crate Training method from the article I have linked below until he starts doing well peeing and pooping quickly on it, then you can switch to the Exercise Pen method from the same article I have linked below for maintenance to make it easier on you - the Crate Training method at first will ensure that he only pees on the grass pad at first - stopping the accidents, which has to happen for this to move forward. Crate Training method first, then Exercise Pen method for maintenance: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocky
Pug-A-Mo
5 Weeks
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Rocky
Pug-A-Mo
5 Weeks

How can I stop my puppy for bitting and nipping

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, First, if you can find a free puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Milo
Japanese Spitz
3 Months
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Milo
Japanese Spitz
3 Months

1. He has been biting our hands a lot. Other than giving him a toy, how can we prevent it from happening?
2. He has been sleeping on his pee tray. How can we move him away, and make him not sleep on his pee tray?
3. He has been peeing everywhere, around the pee tray and on the pee tray, how can we train him to pee on his pee tray?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sihui, First, for the biting check out the article linked below and follow the Bite inhibition method while also teaching Leave It from the Leave It method at the same time. Leave It will take time to teach so use the Bite Inhibition method right now - but to stop the biting completely you will transition to using Leave it once he becomes good at that command. If he disobeys Leave It once he knows that command well, then you can use the Pressure method from the article as a mild discipline to enforce the Leave It command he should understand well by then: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the peeing, I suggest using the Crate training method from the article linked below until he starts to pee on the pad. Once he is consistently peeing on the pad, then you can switch to the Exercise Pen method from the article if that method is easier for your schedule. Crate Training method, then the Exercise pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Once he learns to pee on the tray by using the Crate Training method from the article linked above, he will mostly likely stop sleeping on the tray when it's associated with peeing. You can also add something uncomfortable to the tray, like a couple of large rocks that are too big for him to fit his mouth around - no choking hazards though. You may also want to consider giving him a non-absorbent bed to sleep on such as www.primopads.com or a cot type bed. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Molly
Shitzu
1 Year
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Molly
Shitzu
1 Year

Molly is not pee or potty trained yet. Her pee pad is next to her bed in the pen. When she is inside the pen, she pees/poops on the pad but when she is left open in the house, she does anywhere and everywhere. Please help how to train her.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Palliva, It sounds like you have just started potty training? If so, the reason that pup goes potty in the rest of the house even though she does well in her pen is quite simply that she doesn't understand the difference yet - especially if she is primarily having accidents on rugs and carpet. If the accidents are consistently on rugs and carpet and not hard surfaces, then you may need to switch to real grass pads so that the toilet area is more clearly different than other surfaces (both pee pads and rugs are made out of fabric type material so this confuses some dogs. I wouldn't feel too worried yet though - her having accidents in the rest of the house is normal still early in potty training. The goal is to make sure that she consistently pees on the pad for 3-4 months BEFORE giving her too much access to the rest of the house. You want to minimize accidents to help her learn faster and at first that is simply done through supervision, confinement, or keeping her near you using a leash. You need her to form a really strong habit of peeing on the pads so that they become the preferred go to, AND she begins to associate the rest of the house with cleanliness - which often takes an average of 3-4 months to fully happen. When you know her bladder is empty, you can give her 45 minutes of freedom out of the pen, but after 45 minutes she needs to go back until she pees again. Check out the article linked below. I suggest using the Exercise Pen method since it's so similar to what you are already doing - it will also cover how to transition away from using the Exercise Pen when she is ready too. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy The article linked mentions litter box training but the same training can be used with pee pads and real-grass pads too. If you find that she is confusing the pee pads specifically with other fabric type material and you need to switch to something else, I have included a few real-grass pad brands below - they are disposable like pee pads but are abvertised to be used for up to two weeks before needing to be replaced. Some brands may differ though so read instructions on the one you purchase (or replacing the top part as with porch potty). www freshpatch.com www doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com I suggest starting with one of the cheaper options first if porch potty interests you - train her on a cheaper option like freshpatch, then switch to porch potty once she is doing well - just because it costs more and is more permanent, or stay with a cheap brand forever. Most of these brands can also be found on Amazon, and I recommend real grass over AstroTurf because AstroTurf tends to be harder to train and more similar to carpet than real grass. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buddy
Pug
2 Months
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Buddy
Pug
2 Months

Hi I got buddy as a birthday gift for my son I’m trying to get him to potty on dog pads. He only pees on the pad when I put him there after he wakes up but if I don’t put him there he won’t pee there he’ll pee somewhere else.I wait for him to poop but he just sits there trying to get away. When I’m not watching him he does his business anywhere except in the pads. When I see he’s sniffing around or getting in the positing to poop I grab him and put him on the pad but he don’t do nothing.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maria, First, understand that to pup the pad is no different than any other surface in your house so he is simply going to go wherever he is until he learns. To teach him I suggest following the Exercise Pen method or Crate Training method from the article linked below. These methods mean more supervision and confinement during the learning process because half the battle with potty training is preventing accidents in the wrong place - the more accidents you avoid the quicker a dog will learn. The article below mentions using a litter box but the methods can also work with pee pads or real grass pads. A real grass pad is actually less likely to cause confusion with carpets and rugs so that might be an option also. Exercise Pen method or Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - also found on Amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ollie
Cavapoo
10 Weeks
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Ollie
Cavapoo
10 Weeks

Hello,

I have had Ollie for a little over a week now and he has been generally very good at going potty on his artificial grass pad, however two issues seem to be arising. (1) He will sometimes go right next to the grass pad or within close proximity of the pad but not on the pad itself, and (2) I want to eventually transition him to going outside but he will not go outside. I have spent a fair amount of time with him outside, including right after him spending time in his crate for an hour and a half, and yet he won't go outside and instead waits until we return to the apartment and goes on the grass pad. I have even tried spraying "go here" spray on the ground and consistently take him to the same spot but still nothing. Do you have any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emily, Continue to get him used to being outside in general - outside can be very distracting and sometimes overwhelming for a puppy at first so lots of pleasant exposure is good. Check out the crate training method from the article linked below. When he doesn't go potty when you take him outside, put him straight back into the crate, then take him again in thirty minutes. Repeat this every thirty minutes until he goes potty outside. You may need to carry or hurry him outside so he doesn't have an accident on the way. To transition him away from the grass pads switch completely to using the crate training method. If you still wish to use the grass pads for a bit longer, then the solution to him pottying next to the pad is actually similar to teaching him to potty outside - crate him and take him to the grass pad on leash every hour, then thirty minutes, until he goes potty on the pad. When he does go potty on the pad (or outside) praise and give a treat to help motivate him to go there instead of another location. At this point since you want to train him to potty outside I do suggest simply switching to crate training and taking him outside and get rid of the grass pads - that will make potty training a lot easier in the long run even though it will take a bit more work right now. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Benji
Malti-Poo
7 Weeks
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Benji
Malti-Poo
7 Weeks

Hi! I have a 7 week old puppy and would like to train him to use a particular room in the house (guest bathroom - located in one of the bedrooms) as his potty. I bought pee pads and that potty training fake grass mat, but don't seem to be having much luck. We dont have a crate for him so at I adapted the the shower area in the guest bathroom with him bed and toys and stuff, and usually set a pee pad on the other side of the room at night for him. I've noticed he does seem to use the pee pad at night when he's closed in there, but ignores them during day when he's wandering all over the house. The fake grass matt he's only used a couple of times and mostly prefers to bite it.Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Barbara, Check out the exercise pen method. You can essentially apply all the same tips to a small room area. That method talks about how to teach pup to potty on the toilet and how to gradually transition to more freedom as pup learns - the main issue is probably that you are giving puppy too much freedom too soon. The only time pup should be free in the rest of the house is when you can watch puppy 100% and puppy went to the potty during the 45 minutes prior. After 45 minutes, pup needs to be close to their potty again until they pee on the pad again. The article linked below mentions litter box training, which is an option, but the exercise pen method can also be used for pee pad or grass pad training. Between a grass pad and a litter box, I suggest grass pads because you are less likely to have issues with accidents on rugs and carpet later if you start with real-grass pads and limit the potty area to that one toilet room - and not put pads in other locations in the house. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kobe
Mixed
5 Years
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Kobe
Mixed
5 Years

How do I train him to go on the pads?? He would hold it all day from morning all the way through the night....I have the pads and fake grass on my patio I even sit out there for hours..

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Cute photos! Is Kobe already trained for outside? Some dogs prefer that and do not want to go inside - or feel they may be doing something wrong because they have been trained to go out. Please do not let Kobe hold the pee for hours and hours; it may result in a bladder infection or something similar. As far as the grass pad on the patio, that is probably the best option because it is similar to outside. Try the Shrinking Area Method, transitioning the smaller section to the patio afterward: https://wagwalking.com/training/use-indoor-grass. You can also try buying a Potty Training spray (from the pet supply store) that has an odor that encourages dogs to pee and spray the grass pad with it. As well, take a bit of dirt and grass from outside and put it on the grass pad. If he still will not go potty, keep up the training but take him outside, too. He needs the exercise and change of scenery - as well as the opportunity to pee. All the best!

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milo
Shih Tzu
1 Year
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milo
Shih Tzu
1 Year

hello i have a problem going on for a while. my dog is not a puppy anymore, and he has been train to pee and poop at the pee pad. going outside for potty is never an option for me because i like to keep my dog clean since he sleeps in my room and pratically live inside the house. it has been going on great for a while but lately when i left him in my room alone he tend to shred the pee pad. i don't have a crate or an exercise pen. so i figure i bought a pee tray to hold the pee pad in place and avoid it getting shred. i put it in the spot exactly where the pee pad use to be. but he would just pee beside the pee tray in the floor. i tried to use a puppy traid attractant spray inside the pee tray and still no result. help what can i do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Felivia, This isn't want you want to hear I am sure, but you need to start over with potty training - using something different than a pee pad. Since pup was already trained and has a much larger bladder capacity now, the process should go a lot faster. Pee trays are harder to train because the surface is so unnatural, nonabsorbent, and cold. I would honestly try a litter box with doggie litter (made out of paper pellets) or a real grass pad first. If pup tries to destroy those also (which is far less likely than with a pee pad), you will have to try the tray, but using a real grass pad or litter box will probably be a quicker, easier transition away from pee pads than a tray. www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com Check out the article linked below and follow the Crate Training method - since pup is going next to the pad and not on it, you will need to physically take pup to the potty using the crate training method. Pup is older than the puppy the method was written for however, so you can take pup potty every 3-4 hours when you are home (unless pup has accidents that soon, then take sooner), and give pup 2 hours of freedom out of the crate after pup goes potty, taking potty again then or crating for another 1-2 hour before taking potty again to ensure they go potty that time. Crate pup for another hour whenever they don't go potty when you take them, trying again at the end of the hour. When you are away at work, pup should be able to hold it in he crate for up to 8 hours at this age. Taking pup sooner while home will make the process more pleasant for pup and quicker though. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cali
Yorkshire Terrier
5 Years
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Cali
Yorkshire Terrier
5 Years

I am disabled and have a 5 year old Yorkie who I've since she was a puppy. I had totally trained her to go on the pee pee pads. She is basically an indoor dog. All of a sudden a few months ago, she decided she will not go poop on the pads anymore and sneaks around the house and does it in places I won't see easily. I never catch her in the act. I think once she did it on the paper and I made a huge thing out of it, praising her and giving her special treats. Now, she has started peeing off the paper sometimes too. I can't figure out why because she was totally trained. I don't know what else to do. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Annette, I would try switching to real grass pads and using the exercise pen method from the article linked below. Do that strictly as a sort of potty training refresher course. You will have to be consistent enough to stop the current accidents from happening to change the bad habit - the more consistent you are, the sooner it will likely improve. Pup should always either be in the exercise pen right now - she she will be close to the real grass pad and can't have other accidents, or attached to you with a leash while in other parts of the house, to prevent sneaking off to go potty. Exercise pen method - follow that method but use a real grass pad instead of pee pad or litter box: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - needs to be real grass not astroturf...these brands can also be purchased on amazon. www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jax
Miniature Goldendoodle
2 Months
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Question
2 found helpful
Jax
Miniature Goldendoodle
2 Months

Hi there. I have a question about pee pad training. I live in a small apartment in NYC and will be using pee pads until the dog is fully vaccinated because we have heard recommendations not to let the dog down outside until he is vaccinated. We do not have a separate room to make a "pee pad room". Would you suggest the leash pee pad method is the best? Also to then transition the dog to outside training once he is vaccinated? If we use the leash method, will the dog eventually know to go to the pee pad to eliminate even if he does not have the leash on him?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Zoey, I actually suggest a completely different approach for potty training right now since you want to train Jax to pee outside when he is older. Using pee pads and then later removing the pee pads and transitioning to outside can cause many dogs to have accidents on rugs and carpet because pee pads are made out of fabric and resemble rugs to dogs. You essentially end up accidentally training the dog to pee on rugs when he cannot find a pee pad to go on. To avoid that I suggest using real grass pads and exercise pens for puppies. Real grass pads as disposable boxes of grass. Using grass teaches the puppy to prefer peeing on grass - which makes transitioning to outside easier later. Grass also does not closely resemble anything in your home, so when you remove the grass pad later it will be less confusing for the puppy. Putting a grass pad in a sturdy exercise pen serves two main benefits. 1. It gives your dog a specific area to pee in - like a bathroom, rather than teaching your puppy that he can pee anywhere in your home. When you remove the pad later, you can also remove the exercise pen, removing both the toilet (grass pad) and bathroom (exercise pen), so that the only toilet and bathroom option is outside on that grass. 2. It allows you to confine your puppy in the exercise pen when you have to leave or cannot supervise him, so that he will not be loose in the house, having accidents and getting into mischief. If you plan to crate train later, you can either use a combination of the "Exercise Pen" method and the "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked below now to start the training, or you can use the "Exercise Pen" method but attach the crate to the side of the pen as part of his exercise pen area, so that he simply gets used to sleeping and hanging out in the crate right now. Doing this will make the transition to crate training for potty training easier later. Make sure that there is not anything absorbent in the crate or exercise pen, other than the grass pad. If you need a bed for the crate, I suggest using a primopads.com. The article that I have linked below mentions litter box training for the "Exercise Pen" method and the "Crate Training" method, but you can use grass pads in place of the litter box and still follow all the same steps. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pads: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EQJ7I7Y/ref=sspa_dk_detail_3?psc=1 Each pad is advertised to last two weeks. You can also make your own grass pads by purchasing a shallow wide storage bin and a piece of grass sod and cutting the sod to size, just make sure that the sod has not been treated with chemical recently though. When you get ready to transition to potty training outside, I suggest using the "Crate Training" method from the article I have linked below. That will likely be the least confusing method for Jax. Another option is to use the "Tethering" method found in that article. Either way, you don't want Jax to have unsupervised freedom during the transition (or in general at that age), because he may have accidents while he is re-learning that the potty is now located outside.You will need to take him out very frequently. The timelines from that article are written for puppies 8-16 weeks old. Puppies older than that can hold their bladders for a bit longer between potty trips. Also, when you catch Jax peeing or pooping on the grass inside, you can go ahead and start telling him to "Go Potty" right before he goes potty, and then reward him with a treat afterward. This will make the transition outside easier later because you can tell him to "Go Potty" also and he will understand what that means. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside You might also want to check out the free pdf eBook "AFTER You Get Your Puppy" for tips on how to safely socialize a puppy without exposing them to disease as much. Essentially, take your puppy with you as many places as you can, but just carry him anywhere where a dog may have been, because it is the feces dirt carried on paws and shoes and on the ground that is a risk for Parvo, and direct touching contact with other sick dogs. If you can avoid the ground and non-vaccinated dogs, then you can minimize your risk without having to miss out on socialization. The most important part of the socialization window closes about when a puppy becomes fully vaccinated. Also, take your shoes off and put them somewhere where puppy cannot get to them since they will track dirt into the house. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zoe
Multipoo
12 Days
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Zoe
Multipoo
12 Days

My dog is blind & I moved in my dads apt. He is 93 and needs help. My dog is great with outside potty duties. I need to train her on potty pads inside. She was using potty pads at my house when I had to work long hours. She will not pee or poop on the potty pads now. She has had accidents on the carpet when I'm not looking. She hasnt went to pitty all day, really since 11pm last night. I can tell she wants to relieve herself but when I put her back on the paper she just sits there. I want to add she has been in & out of her crate all day. HELP PLZ

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Zoe is a cutie! I think that Zoe is having a hard time adjusting to her new surroundings perhaps, and that is why she is having these issues. You say she is great with her outside duties - maybe trying a doggy litter box or doggy grass pads would work better inside than the pee pads. You can get a litter box and train Zoe as described here https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy, or you can try using the same methods of training (such as the exercise pen method) with the pee pads if you prefer she stays with a pad. There is also a spray you can buy, which is a potty training spray that encourages a dog to pee because of the smell. It can be sprayed directly on the pee pad. Inquire with your vet or local pet supply store. Dogs will sometimes mistake a carpet for a pee pad because it is a similar texture. Make sure when you clean the pee spot on the carpet that you are using an enzymatic product which is really the only thing to completely remove the smell. Remember, Zoe has a keen nose and uses it even better than other dogs do, due to her lack of sight. Encourage her every time she pees on the pad or in the litter box; you may have to spend some of your free time on your days off working on this, but I think she'll get the idea soon! All the best and enjoy your little munchkin.

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Pam
Labrador Terrier
2 Years
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Pam
Labrador Terrier
2 Years

We have a doggy door to allow Pam to go outside whenever she needs, but I'm going to be taking her on a plane soon and possibly moving into a new place without a yard so I've been trying to get her to use pee pads before we leave. Our house is very open and we don't have any closed rooms besides the bathroom so I was wondering what other techniques there might be that I can try with her. She's pretty smart and catches onto things quite quickly once she figures out what we are trying to teach her, its just figuring out a way for her to understand how to use a pee pad is our struggle..

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Liz, Check out the article linked below. You can either use an Exercise Pen and the Exercise pen method, or use the Crate Training method. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy The article mentions litter box training, but the steps are the same for pre pads or disposable real grass pads. Another option that would be more familiar for pup is a disposable real grass pad. Also, most larger airports do have areas or grass or fake grass somewhere inside the airport, with out having to leave security points, if you have layovers between flights. You can check online with each of the airport's websites to find out. Disposable real grass pad brands - also found on Amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hugo
Pugalier
14 Weeks
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Hugo
Pugalier
14 Weeks

My 14 week old puppy will sometimes use his pee mats for a pee and poop although recently he has stopped pooping on the mat completely. Is there any tips you can offer to better his potty training?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Liam, Check out the exercise pen method from the article I have linked below. That method uses a litter box but the steps are the same for pee pads also. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If pup is still struggling, I also suggest switching from pee pads to disposable real grass pads - since pee pads are more likely to causs to cause confusion because they are made out of fabric; whereas disposable grass pads are more distinctly different than other things in your home. Disposable grass pad brands - also found on Amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Honey
We think a jack russel/yorki mix
4 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Honey
We think a jack russel/yorki mix
4 Years

Hi,
I am keeping my mother's dog for a little while because she lost her balance and fell. She is 86 and really wants her dog back. However, I am reluctant because I'm worried about her falling again. I thought if I could train her on the pads, then there won't be an issue. My mother's neighbor can walk her once and awhile for exercise. I don't know if any of this is possible. I just feel bad because I know they miss each other. Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated.
Thank You,
Gail Carannante

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Gail, I suggest teaching pup to go potty on a disposable real grass pad inside - which will be more consistent with outside potty training but with the convenience of inside potty training. If she has a porch that's ground level with her house, she could also set up the potty area out there so that she doesn't have to walk out into her yard, but pup isn't pottying inside at all. Check out the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. That method uses a litter box but can be taught using disposable real grass pads. If you plan to teach pup to potty on the grass pad while inside, follow the method - so that the exercise pen is gradually phased out and just the grass pad remaining in the same spot. If she wants to teach this on the porch, then pup will still be brought to the exercise pen on leash, and either she can remove the exercise pen and leave the grass pad there, or leave the exercise pen up long-term so that she can use the leash less. Whatever you do, be sure to consult with her first, since changing her dog's potty habits isn't something you want to do unless she is on board. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Penny
Dachshund
2 Years
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Penny
Dachshund
2 Years

My dogs are pretty good at not having accidents in the house but i recently moved from a house to an apartment and my work situation has changed so I want to train them to use a grass pad during the day when I don't have someone to walk them. At the moment, due to the pandemic, I am working from home and am trying to train the for when I am back at the office full time. I don't want to have to leave them in their kennels, but have to if I can't trust they will not pee in the house. Today we went out first thing to potty as usual. Then today I keep taking them to the pad and they don't understand. We didn't go out for potties for 11 hours. I can't find anywhere that they had an accident either so they have to be holding it. I tried the pheramone spray too. What can I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashleigh, I suggest either following the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, setting up the exercise pen on an area with hardfloor (just not carpet) and simply waiting until you catch them in the act of peeing on the grass pad and can reward - will probably take all day the first two times, and is imperative that you reward when they do go potty there so that they quickly learn it's okay to do so, and it doesn't take as long the next times. This method uses a litter box - just use a grass pad instead and follow the rest of the steps. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy OR Place the grass pad outside in an area nearby grass but not on grass - think a concrete area or the end of your patio. Take pups potty there on leash - stay out there fifteen minutes, walking them over the grass pad and saying "Go Potty". When do they go, praise and give three treats, one at a time. If they don't go, bring them back inside, crate for an hour, and repeat the potty trip every hour, crating between, until they finally go and are rewarded. It will probably take pup a while to finally go with this route too but not nearly as long as moving straight to inside. Practice potty trips to the grass pad outside until pups are good at going there quickly when you say Go Potty. Place a large plastic tray under the grass pad so that moving it inside later is easier. Switch out the grass pad with another one if needed before moving it inside, but make sure both dogs go potty on the new one outside at least once before you move the new one. At that point, move the pad inside, take pups to it on leash, tell them to Go Potty, reward heavily Iif they go on it, and crate between potty trips - trying again in an hour every hour if they don't go, until they finally go. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rockie
toy poodle
8 Weeks
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Rockie
toy poodle
8 Weeks

How to I train my puppy to pee and poop in the puppy pad

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! If you’ve decided that pee pads are right for you and your dog, here are some training tips to get you started: Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Vinnie
Chihuahua
9 Months
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Vinnie
Chihuahua
9 Months

My partner and I successfully trained our puppy early on to visit the bathroom where we keep his puppy pad, he frequently visits the bathroom to pee and poo. The trouble we have is that although he starts on the pad, he then walks off mid pee and does it all over the floor. Also when he poops he walks off the Matt before it’s fully released. What can we do? How can we contain the mess to the mat? We live in a high rise apartment and he’s goes for a walk once a day. But he goes to the bathroom about 5 times a day so it’s impossible to take him out every time. He’s otherwise very well behaved and a lovely dog. Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brad, I suggest teaching pup Down-Stay, Sit Stay and Stand Stay. You can use those commands to remind him to stay in place. Down, Sit, and Stand initial teaching. https://youtu.be/ENcl04S6tio Stand Stay: https://youtu.be/Qrf7e7OMT3A Down Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Sit Stay: https://youtu.be/DPNz6reMVXY Another option is to give the pee pad a slight barrier around it. I suggest using a cardboard box cut down or very shallow plastic container and fitting the pad into that box. If you use cardboard be sure pup isn't chewing and eating it though. You only want the edge height to be 1-2 inches high, to discourage pup from walking off visually but not deter him from going to the pad to begin with...think of it like a combination of pee pad training and litter box training. A final option is to use an actual litter box with a low front opening and place the pee pad in there. You will need to be more vigilant about training for another week or two if you go this route since it's new, but it could be a good long term solution. Check out the Crate Training or Scent method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy The litter box should be this type- something with a lower front opening for easy access. https://www.wish.com/product/55c04fcbc54bf1571860da29?from_ad=goog_shopping&_display_country_code=US&_force_currency_code=USD&pid=googleadwords_int&c=%7BcampaignId%7D&ad_cid=55c04fcbc54bf1571860da29&ad_cc=US&ad_curr=USD&ad_price=21.83&campaign_id=6948791183&gclid=Cj0KCQjw4dr0BRCxARIsAKUNjWRNX4S8vBoH6dwy6Y65ywf9TFi-2bw2OWdyYurHs6TRNUpY6zCQOg0aAuofEALw_wcB&hide_login_modal=true&share=mobileweb Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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sophia
Yorkshire Terrier
5 Months
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sophia
Yorkshire Terrier
5 Months

sophia refuses to pee and poop outside and wont uses pee pad. She just want to uses tile floor. When out side she just want to eat grass stickes.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Patricia, I suggest using the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Following that method, it will detail how to keep her better focused on going potty while outside by walking her around slowly on the leash, teaching the Go Potty command, and rewarding her when she does go. It will also detail what to do when she won't go potty when you take her out - which is bring her back inside at 15 minutes, crate her for about 45 minutes, then take her back outside again, repeating the trips outside and crating when she doesn't go, every 45 minutes -1 hour until she finally goes potty outside and earns a reward. Expect a lot of potty trips the first week, but if you stay consistent pup should start catching on - especially when using Go Potty and rewards for going, and begin going more quickly when you do take her. Since pup is a bit older, you can also add 30 minutes onto all the recommended time frames for how often to take her potty, how much freedom to give for how long, and how often to repeat potty trips when she doesn't go. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jax
Shih Tzu
10 Weeks
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Jax
Shih Tzu
10 Weeks

I'm training the pub on P pads because I live in an apartment. I need to take a sleeping pill to sleep at night. Would it be OK to put him in a diaper only at night time

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Susan, I wouldn't put pup in a diaper since they will not understand the difference in peeing in the diaper vs. Peeing in random locations on the floor, even though the diaper catches it, so it could make potty training a lot harder. I would however have pup sleep in an exercise pen with a pee pad on one end at night, to ensure pup is close to the pad while learning and not having accidents in other locations while you are sleeping. I would recommend this for most puppies their age who are pee pad training anyway, since it also prevents destructive chewing and helps create better habits. Check out the Exercise Pen method. Follow that method during the day with treats, and simply place puppy in their pen at night without treats. On the opposite end of the pen you can also place a non-absorbent bed like www.primopads.com or a cot type bed. Don't put anything else fabric-like in there, or pup may pee on that instead of the pad. The method mentions litter box training, but it can be used with a doggie litter box, pee pad, or disposable real grass pad. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chanel
Yorkie
5 Years
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Chanel
Yorkie
5 Years

hello! my mother in law is moving in with us her dog has always used pee pads im worried that in our home that has a lot of carpet, it will be hard to get her to use the pee pads here
any tips to help the adjustment?
thank you

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Laura, Check out the Exercise Pen method. I suggest starting from scratch with pup and that method, so that pup learns to go in a specific location in your home and not just on a certain material - pee pads which can resemble carpet. Set up the Exercise Pen in the area where you want pup's pee pad(s) to remain indefinitely and keep the potty location consistent for pup there. Exercise Pen method - written about litter box training but can be used with pee pads or disposable real grass pads, in place of litter box if you wish, without changing method's steps. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If pup has significant issues following all of the above advice for 1-2 months still, I suggest using the Crate Training method found in the same article I linked, but instead of using the pee pads, start using disposable real grass pads to change potty training methods in general. Expect this option to take longer, since pup will essentially be relearning potty training almost from scratch if you switch completely, but that will get pup away from using fabric for pottying. Disposable real grass pad brands - also on Amazon: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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rizzo
Silky Terrier
13 Weeks
0 found helpful
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rizzo
Silky Terrier
13 Weeks

hello, I have had rizzo for legit 4 days and he has already learned how to pee and poop on a pee pad with this set-up we have going on. He is also used to his crate and when its "night time" and time to go to bed. He cries or circles around to let us know when he has to use the bathroom and we place him in the playpen we have set up and poops and pees in the same corner. We have already removed 1 pee pad leaving a square of the floor blank to get him to realize more of the designated area to pee and poop on. My question is, that he will sooner be having the whole laundry room to himself along with his crate and a bed he already sleeps and lays in while he's out in the house on his leash. How do I transition opening up to a larger space and moving the pee pad to the designated spot in the laundry room for him?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jason, It sounds like he is doing great. Check out the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. The specific location examples are different than yours - laundry room versus method's kitchen and exercise pen example, but that method includes how to move from the confined space of the exercise pen to expanding into the rest of the home. I would encourage you not to move too quickly with giving freedom even though pup is doing so well, just to make sure that pup develops some long-term memory habits, that will help them remember where to go as things change. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Goody
Maltese x Poodle
3 Years
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Goody
Maltese x Poodle
3 Years

We have had Goody for two months and overall he’s a very good dog. He was gifted to us from his previous owner and he is trained to use the restroom outside. He doesn’t have issues with doing his business outside but there will be times where me and my family will have to go and we cannot take him so we leave him inside the apartment. Even before we leave we will take him outside to let them do his business and then we will bring them back in. We have a pee pad laying around as well and the spray to encourage him to potty on the pee pad. I’m not sure if this will Be part of the reason why he pees or poops around the apartment but I’ve come to notice from these two months of having him is that every time when the Me and my family will have to go for a while (going to pay bills, groceries,etc) he gets very anxious and starts weeping. I will always tell him every time that will come back but I think the anxiousness comes to play with him having accidents around the apartment. I tried to introduce him to the Pee pad but he rarely sniffs around a Pee pad as well as even get close to peeing or pooping on the Pee pad when he has accidents. I think that his previous owner never taught him how do use the pee pads inside their house. Is it because he hasn’t been with us for that long and he get anxious? How do I make him stop being anxious every time I leave? How to get him to use a pee pad when he doesn’t sniff around it?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alejandra, First, a dog will not automatically use a pee pad unless they are specifically taught to do so. Since he is used to peeing on grass, I actually suggest using something called a disposable real grass pad, instead of a pee pad. Pup will have learned from his past that he shouldn't pee on carpet, and the pee pad is made out of fabric so he probably doesn't see the difference. Purchase a disposable real grass pad and set up an exercise pen. Place a non-absorbent bed, like a cot type bed or www.primopads.com on one end, and the grass pad on the opposite end. Follow the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below to teach him to go on the grass pad. When you are away, have him stay in the exercise pen instead of giving full access to the apartment, until he is completely potty trained inside again. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - look for real grass, not AstroTurf. Also available on Amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com www.doggielawn.com For the anxiety, teach pup a Place command and practice pup staying on Place while you enter and leave the room for gradually longer and longer periods of time. Also, keep comings and going very boring. Do not reassure, coddle, or act sorry for him - that tends to heighten emotions. Instead, act like it's no big deal and ignore him for five minutes right after you return, so that he isn't used to getting really excited and worked up waiting for your arrival - which can also increase anxiety while you are gone. Act confident and calm around pup - teach commands that build confidence, like a structured heel, Place command, tricks and games that involve navigating obstacles and learning new tasks, Down-Stay, and Wait. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s If pup likes food, look into purchasing something like AutoTrainer or Pet Tutor, which can be programmed to automatically dispense treats while you are away as it detects pup is relaxing. This gives pup something to enjoy, encourages the calmness, and makes things less boring. You can also give dog food stuffed Kongs, durable puzzle toys with treats inside, Kong wobbles with food, and other fun and durable activities for pup to do while you are away, to take their mind off of your absence. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Holly
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
3 Years
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Holly
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
3 Years

We just rescued a puppy mill breeding female this week. She has only done her business 3 times in 4 days... all inside the house. She does not understand the leash or steps and may never have experienced grass. The rescue organization had an outdoor kennel for her on a hard surface, so we are trying that. We also taped down a pee pad to a hard surface in our family room. The accidents were always when nobody was in the room with her. Thanks for your thoughts!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shelly, When you are home follow the "Tethering" method from the article that I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you are gone, check out the "Exercise Pen" method from the article that I have linked below to prevent accidents. Use a real grass pad for the exercise pen method and at first cover the entire exercise pen with a real grass pad (or a piece of grass sod with something waterproof like a large shallow plastic bin under it). Confining her to the exercise pen and grass inside will help prevent accidents and get her comfortable with going potty on the grass. When you see her go potty there or she goes potty outside, reward her with five treats, one at a time - especially if it's outside because you want that to be the most exciting place to pee. The article linked below mentions litter box training but most of the steps are the same for using a grass pad(s) instead. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad: (you will probably need to lay down more than one in the exercise pen at first to cover the exercise pen - you want to make the exercise pen big enough that she can pee on one end and lay on the other clean end). https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI/ref=asc_df_B005G7S6UI/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309763115430&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=3995932458694647996&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1015431&hvtargid=pla-568582223506&psc=1 Porch potty also sells just the grass without a box, as well as fancier (and more expensive) permanent grass boxes. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Peeve
Terrier mix
2 Months
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Peeve
Terrier mix
2 Months

Our dog looks like he needs to pee or poop so we take him to the pad. We keep him there and he whines and cries. My husband has officially been keeping him there for over an hour now because as soon as we let him go he will poop or pee somewhere else in the house.
The same thing happens with accidents. He has an accident so we bring him there. We have to force him in the pee pad corner and he cries and barks. After a VERY LONG TIME we let him go. He poops and pees on the floor.
PLEASE HELP

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rikki, Check out the article linked below. You have three basic options while pup is still learning. 1. You can use the exercise pen method, closing him in there and keeping half an eye on him so that you can reward him right when he does finally go potty on the pad - to help him learn. 2. You can tether him to yourself with a hands free leash between potty trips so that he can't wander off to go potty. If pup tends to just squat and go whether you are right there or not, you will need to choose one of the other methods until he understands better though. 3. You can use the crate training method from the article linked below, crating pup when he doesn't go, then taking him potty again after crating for a bit. Repeating that cycle until he goes when you take him - at which point you will give some supervised freedom in the house while his bladder is totally empty. Know that pup simply doesn't understand the difference between going potty on the pad and elsewhere right now, which is why pup needs you to prevent him from having an accident through careful management, so he will gradually start to develop a desire to keep the rest of the home free and go only in the place that he habitually goes potty. It's also important to be praising and rewarding pup for going potty correctly, so that he understands that that is where he was supposed to go and he doesn't just think he had an accident. Even perfect potty training tends to take at least 3 months. It's normal for pup to still be trying to make the connection of where to pee and not pee this early - stick to your schedule and prevention of accidents carefully and the process will go most smoothly, even if you aren't seeing progress quite yet. Crate training and Exercise Pen methods - this method can be used with pee pads, disposable-real-grass-pads, or a doggie litter box: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Another alternative to pee pads if real grass pads if pup continues to struggle. www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Smokey
Border Collie
6 Years
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Smokey
Border Collie
6 Years

After moving it’s necessary to train Smokey to potty inside. I purchased one of the popular grass patches of real sod. Smokey will not potty no matter what I try. She will go over 48 hours without eliminating at all. I’m concerned she could get a bll lol adder infection or impacted bowels. Please HELP!!!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I can understand your concern. This is not an easy dilemma to deal with. Smokey is a big dog used to going outside for exercise and toileting and I can understand the reluctance. Is there no way to continue walks outside? To get Smokey to eliminate on the grass sod, purchase a spray from the pet supply store, designed to leave an encouraging odor on the grass. Also, take a look at the methods here: https://wagwalking.com/training/use-a-pee-pad-1. They are all good methods. Smokey may benefit from having a gated area with a little privacy as described in The Set Up Method. It may be that the pee pad is just too open and foreign as a toileting area. Please do not let him go for 48 hours - you are right, it is not good for his health. All the best.

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Daisy
Maltese
2 Months
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Daisy
Maltese
2 Months

We just got Daisy the other day and we introduced her to the pee pee pads. Daisy can pee on the pee pee pad but sometimes she chooses not to or when she’s outside of her pen she doesn’t go to the pad and just goes on the floor. Please help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emma, Check out the article linked below. You have three basic options while pup is still learning. 1. You can use the exercise pen method, closing him in there and keeping half an eye on her so that you can reward her right when she does finally go potty on the pad - to help her learn. 2. You can tether her to yourself with a hands free leash between potty trips so that she can't wander off to go potty. If pup tends to just squat and go whether you are right there or not, you will need to choose one of the other methods until she understands better though. 3. You can use the crate training method from the article linked below, crating pup when she doesn't go, then taking her potty again after crating for a bit. Repeating that cycle until she goes when you take her - at which point you will give some supervised freedom in the house while her bladder is totally empty. Know that pup simply doesn't understand the difference between going potty on the pad and elsewhere right now, which is why pup needs you to prevent her from having an accident through careful management, so she will gradually start to develop a desire to keep the rest of the home free and go only in the place that she habitually goes potty. It's also important to be praising and rewarding pup for going potty correctly, so that she understands that that is where she was supposed to go and she doesn't just think she had an accident. Even perfect potty training tends to take at least 3 months. It's normal for pup to still be trying to make the connection of where to pee and not pee this early - stick to your schedule and prevention of accidents carefully and the process will go most smoothly, even if you aren't seeing progress quite yet. Crate training and Exercise Pen methods - this method can be used with pee pads, disposable-real-grass-pads, or a doggie litter box: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Another alternative to pee pads if real grass pads if pup continues to struggle. www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tequila
Chihuahua
6 Months
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Tequila
Chihuahua
6 Months

How can you train your dog to use the pee pad and use outside bathroom

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, some dogs will be confused when there are two methods being taught at once; others do fine. I would suggest that you use a real grass training pad as opposed to the pee pads. You can use an encouraging spray, bought at the pet supply store to entice her to pee there. This way, Tequila can associate the grass pad with the grass outside. Take a look at the Exercise Pen Method and use the grass pad in place of the litter box. When she pees on the grass inside and outside, be sure to praise her and give her treats as a reward.https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. Good luck!

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Oakley
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
8 Weeks
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Oakley
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
8 Weeks

Hi, we've only had our pup for a few days but the breeder worked on his housetraining and he was hitting the pads 95% of the time. Now each day he seems to be having more accidents. We live in an apartment and I can't practise taking him downstairs/outside regularly to potty until he's had his booster vaccinations. What would you suggest in the meantime so we can avoid mess? Should we only have the pads in one place in the apartment or have them dotted around so he can always see them? Thanks so much

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, and congratulations on Oakley! When you have to clean up an accident, use an enzymatic cleaner. It could be that Oakley still smells the pee after you clean, so continues to go. I would suggest the Exercise Pen Method described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. Here is a great article on setting up a welcoming area for your new pup: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Good luck and enjoy your puppy!

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Nuno
Goldendoodle
4 Months
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Nuno
Goldendoodle
4 Months

When ever i catch him in an accident i take him to the potty pad and use the command but he just sits down thinking i want him to sit down and does that for a long time when he gets tired he lays down and logically he cannot hold it so he pees when he lays down but in the pad but i feel he is not learning anything. Please help

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Nuno is a real cutie. Will you be training him to go outside? Because he'll be a big boy, this will be ideal. In that case, you could start him on a grass pad as opposed to the pee pad. He'll transition to outside so much easier. This guide is for litter boxes, but use a real grass litter pad as opposed to litter.https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. You can try whichever method described suits you best. Take him to the litter often, or if training him to go outside, start with every thirty minutes - it seems like a lot but once Nuno catches on, it will be great and worth the effort. Make sure you are cleaning up messes with an enzymatic cleaner, or your pup will continue to pee where he isn't supposed to. You may not realize it, but the odor is still there. Good luck!

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Nala
Chihuahua
2 Months
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Nala
Chihuahua
2 Months

Hello!
Nala is a chihuahua with yorkie. She just turned 2 months old. I started with the pee pad and she’s been using it during the day fine.. sometimes there are accidents but the main issue is at night. She sleeps in bed with me and pee during the night on my bed all the time. What can I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Patricia, Check out the article linked below and follow the Crate Training method. At night pup needs to be sleeping on a non-absorbent bed in the exercise pen, with one end of the pen having the pee pad and the bed on the opposite end. Exercise pen method - mentions a litter box but the steps are the same when using a pee pad too. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy As hard as it is, pup cannot sleep with you in the bed. You cannot enforce potty training at night while asleep and the absorbency of the bed will naturally encourage peeing there. The more pup does that, the more it becomes a long term habit and leads to an adult dog that cannot be trusted around fabric type surfaces. Confining now, not only keeps pup safe as their jaw strength increases and they are more able to chew and ingest potentially dangerous things but also encourages good independence to later prevent separation anxiety and good potty habits - all of which leads to a dog who can be trusted unsupervised with more freedom in the home as an adult later on, long term. To help pup adjust to being alone in the exercise pen, check out the surprise method from the article linked below. It mentions crate training but the same concepts can be applied to a puppy spending time in an exercise pen. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cookie
Corgi
3 Months
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Cookie
Corgi
3 Months

I just got my corgi 3 days ago and I have never been able to catch her when she is peeing or pooping. I am currently keeping her confined inside a playpen and have placed a pee tray at a corner of the playpen. She eliminates within the playpen but never at the pee tray. I’ve tried directing her to the pee pan ever so often but she never eliminates and thinks that I am playing with her. When I say ‘potty’ and ask her to the pee pan, she would walk over and look at me. However, when she notices that I am not playing with her, she would walk away. Please help. I live in a high rise apartment so bringing her out to potty often is highly unlikely and she has yet to have all her shots so we’re keeping her at home for now.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you are doing all of the right things with Cookie - I think she'll catch on. There are great tips here: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy, including using an exercise pen like you are doing. Buy an encouraging spray at the pet supply store. The scent encourages a dog to eliminate in the same spot. As well, you can try buying a real grass pad - Cookie may take better to that than a pee tray. The grass pad will also help for when you do take Cookie outside. She'll transition between peeing outside and inside more easily. When she does pee or poop in the right place, be sure to praise her highly and give her a few treats. Take a look at the crate method, too if you think that the pen is not the solution. I would let her out of the pen more often. She needs the stimulation and variety in her day. After mealtime, within a few minutes, per her in the pen (in the litter tray or on the grass pad - either one sprayed with the encouraging spray). She may then eliminate. Praise her and keep working on it. Good luck!

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Jarvis
Retriever/hound
2 Months
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Jarvis
Retriever/hound
2 Months

Hello, i just acquire a 2 month old Retriever/Hound mix male dog, i only had him for a few hours and i am starting to train him to use pee pad......Is it too early to do so? He has peed a couple of times already but not on the pad.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! It is definitely not too early to start the training process. If you’ve decided that pee pads are right for you and your dog, here are some training tips to get you started: Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Star
Terrier\mixed
6 Years
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Star
Terrier\mixed
6 Years

I taught her to potty outsize in the grass when she was a puppy..but now I get tired of having to take her outside all the time to potty...i also work..*I just wish she would use the pad.it would make it easier for her and for me..*I keep a pad sitting in the bathroom next to the tolliet...*I have took her to the pad instead of outside and told her to potty..countless times..i have also locked her in the bathroom for 10 minutes at a time hoping she would use the pad.....**she will hold it in until I give Up and take her outside to potty..**dont know what to do..really wish I never learnt her to potty outside..wish I trained her on the pad when she was a puppy..* I also tried spraying the pet eliminater spray on the pad..but seems like shes stuck in her ways. And that she will never go on the pad..and that I'm just going to have to take her outside on a leash for years n years..

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it is sometimes hard to train a dog to potty inside when they have gone outside for many years. You can understand - Star may feel that she is doing the wrong thing by using the potty indoors. And as well, if Star is used to going on walks for her potty breaks, she won't want to give that up either. It's part of the mental stimulation that a dog needs to keep them healthy and happy. I would make sure to still take her for outside breaks a few times a day. In the meantime, you can try using a real grass potty pad as opposed to the training pad. There are many brands available online. Google "real grass potty pad" and several brands will show up. Because the pad is real grass, it is easier to transition a dog used to the outside to inside. Take a look at this guide; there are many good tips and directions for training Star to use a real grass pad: https://wagwalking.com/training/use-indoor-grass. Start training her on your days off so that you have the time for consistency. Praise her highly for success and do not get upset if she doesn't get it right away. Keep trying and use the potty encouraging spray here as well. Do not let her hold the pee, though, as this can lead to health problems that will require a vet's care. Good luck!

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Hanabi
Mameshiba
2 Months
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Hanabi
Mameshiba
2 Months

Hi, I am crate training my puppy to pee on a pee pad. initially she does well but ever since I let her out to her play pen, she only pees and poop on my carpet.

I am living in a small high-rise apartment thus the indoor training. Her play pen is right outside her crate and her potty spot is in the same kennel.I have since partition off her den so that her only pee/poop spot is right beside her sleeping area. However, instead of pee/poop on the pee pads, she bites, play and sleep on it thus associating it with her bed.

How can I correct this behavior since she now associates the pad to a bed or chew toy and what setup can I make/change to make this feasible? I ignore her calls to be let out but instead of peeing/pooping on the pee pad, she pees on the floor nearest in between her bed and pee pad.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would try using a real grass potty pad. Sometimes a dog will associate a regular pee pad like you are using with a bed or carpet because they are of similar makeup and almost like fabric. The real grass pad is a good idea also, because when you are ready to transition Hanabi to the outside for pottying, it is easy to do because she is used to grass. Athough this guide says it is for older dogs, there are excellent tips for training a dog to use a grass pad.https://wagwalking.com/training/use-indoor-grass-1. Show Hanabi the grass pad throughout the day. When she is in the apartment playing, take her to the pad every 30 minutes, and give her the verbal command "go potty". When she has success on the grass pad, give her high verbal praise and a treat every time. To further help her associate the real grass pad with peeing and pooping, buy a potty encouraging spray and spray some on the grass. The spray is designed to encourage a dog through scent. Good luck!

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Chase
jorkie
2 Months
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Chase
jorkie
2 Months

How can I get him to use the restroom on the training pads instead of on the carpet ? But he sometimes uses the pads

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Shiloh
Cocker Jack
6 Weeks
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Shiloh
Cocker Jack
6 Weeks

How to get him to always use the pee pad

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Willow
Pomeranian
2 Months
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Willow
Pomeranian
2 Months

Hello, I have recently welcomed a new Pomeranian puppy into my home. She is 2 months old. She hasn’t been potty trained before. I have a crate for her where she sleeps inside at night or if I’m out for 1 or 2 hours (at the moment). I have puppy pads on the floor next to her crate. Everytime I put her on the puppypad when she needs a wee she starts playing and then after awhile I ignore her and she pees all over my place. Is it best if I train her to potty outside on my patio or stick with the same place I’ve had the puppy pads? I would really appreciate your help. Many thanks

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with him to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Gizmo
Shih Tzu
9 Weeks
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Gizmo
Shih Tzu
9 Weeks

I just got him on August 7. I take him to the pad around every hour like I’m supposed to. The problem is that as soon as I take hom off the pad he pees on my carpet

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with him to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Kenzo
German Shepherd
2 Months
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Kenzo
German Shepherd
2 Months

Sometimes he will pee and poop on the pads and other times it’s like I have to move him over onto the pad if he is close but not on the pad or he will pee and poop on the floor.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with him to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Tiger
Doberman Pit
7 Weeks
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Tiger
Doberman Pit
7 Weeks

Train to use training pads then to to outside

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with her to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Nina
Yorkshire Terrier
11 Years
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Nina
Yorkshire Terrier
11 Years

We just moved to a new home. She used the pee pad all the time in the old house but wants to use the carpet in the new house. What do we do?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Dogs often have a hard time transferring knowledge into a new environment. We as humans learn to read in school and can do it at home, work, etc. Dogs usually don't operate like that, so re-training her as though she is a puppy is the best route to go to correct this.

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Julie
French Bulldog
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Julie
French Bulldog
8 Weeks

Hello :)
My puppy pees all over the house. I have plenty of pee pads on the floor but somehow she manages to miss them all when she urinates. How can I get her to use them instead of the floor/carpets? I have to mention that she cannot leave the house one more month because her vaccine scheme is not over yet.

Thank you in advance.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with her to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Bently
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years
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Bently
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years

Pee pad training is an issue just got him a couple days ago and I know he has to adjust to new environment. I need suggestions he gets very aggressive when unfamiliar people enter the apartment. He barks angrily at people sometime.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with him to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Winnie
Pomapoo
12 Weeks
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Winnie
Pomapoo
12 Weeks

My dog Winnie is 3 months now. She has 2 areas with a puppy pad. She pees on them sometimes but also goes to the bathroom all over the house. I cannot get her to poop on the pads or consistently pee on them. Thank you

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maria, It sounds like pup doesn't understand the concept. The pee pads themselves are easily confused with other fabric type surfaces for puppies. I suggest checking out the article I have linked below and following the Exercise Pen method with pup. You can use a litter box, pee pads, or a disposable real grass pad with this method and the steps should be the same. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable real grass pads - can be good for pups who confuse pee pads with carpet and rugs, but the exercise pen method will still be needed for training this. Also available on Amazon: www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com www.freshpatch.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Shy
Terrier mix
3 Months
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Shy
Terrier mix
3 Months

We are in the process of potty training my puppy to poop and pee outside, so far so good. But the problem is when she is inside the house, she doesn’t know to go to the pee pad to let go. She would pee if she needs to go. How as we train her to pee on the whole inside as we continue to train her to pee/poop outside.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michi, If your goal is for her to only go potty outside in the long run, I suggest removing pee pads entirely, following the crate training method or a combination of the crate training method and tethering method from the article below, and simply going straight to outside potty training to avoid future confusion and an easier, overall potty training process. In general, a the maximum amount of time a puppy can hold their bladder for during the day is their age in months plus one - meaning 3-4 hours hours for your pup right now, and 4-5 hours once pup is 4 months of age. Take pup out more frequently like the method describes when home, and when you are gone off, crate pup and make sure pup is taken out at least every 3-4 hours at this age. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you are wanting pup to learn how to go potty inside and outside long term, I suggest following the Exercise Pen or Crate Training method from the article linked below. Bring pup either outside or to the pad on a leash like the method describes if following the crate training method. If pup doesn't go potty, return pup to the crate like the method describes, then try again after 30-45 minutes. Repeating this cycle until pup finally goes on the pad or outside - at which time you will praise and reward with a treat. Exercise Pen and Crate Training methods - mentions a litter box but the training steps are the same using a pee pad and grass pad too. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If you are trying to teach pup to go potty inside and outside, I would suggest switching from a pee pad to a disposable real grass pad for the sake of consistency, to avoid pup confusing fabrics like carpet and rugs with pee pads. Disposable Real Grass Pad brands - on amazon too: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Finally, when setting up your indoor toilet/pad, choose where you want the pad to be long-term. Part of indoor potty training is teaching pup isn't okay to go potty in a specific spot, not just on that type of surface, so the location of the pad needs to stay the same as much as possible right now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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veer
Golden Retriever
1 Month
0 found helpful
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veer
Golden Retriever
1 Month

pee pad training

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Trixie
Maltese Shih Tzu
11 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Trixie
Maltese Shih Tzu
11 Weeks

We have set up a playpen with a crate for her. We have kept 2-3 pee pads inside the pen making sure it is away from her crate and providing some non pee pad place for her to play. However she don't consistently pee on the pads. Sometimes she pee just on the edge or sometimes entirely outside the pad. Can you tell me how can we teach her to pee in the pad always.
Thanks.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Anjali, First, keep an eye on her whenever she is in there and you are home and reward with a treat each time you see her pee on the pad instead of elsewhere. In addition to rewarding her, you can either cover the entire pen with pee pads, reward each time she goes on a pad, then gradually decrease the number of pads as she improves, or you can crate train pup and take pup to the pee pad pen area on leash, rewarding pup each time she goes potty there. With the crate training option, I recommend doing that for a couple of weeks, until pup is consistently peeing on the pads when you take her, then you can switch to the exercise pen method once she is targeting the pads well - which is similar to what you are doing now with the exercise pen, for convenience sake for the rest of potty training. Doing crate training for a week or two before switching to the exercise pen method, tends to be the most effective way for most puppies, but covering the pen with pads and decreasing overtime works for some puppies. Either way, it's important to reward with a treat when pup goes in the right spot. These methods mention a litter box, but pee pads, disposable real grass pads (which tend to be the least confusing for pups), and doggie litter boxes can all be used with these methods. Crate Training method https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Toby
Biewer Terrier
1 Month
0 found helpful
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Toby
Biewer Terrier
1 Month

When my dog is in his play pan, he goes to potty on his pee pad, sometimes he has even accidents in his play pan. When I let him out to explore the room with potty pads placed in one area of the room, he doesn’t even pay attention to pee pads and relive himself everywhere specially on carpets.
Most of the time he plays and eat the blue part of the pee pad. Would you please help me to understand how train him?
Thanks a million for your help in advance.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Teddy
Labrador Retriever
3 Months
0 found helpful
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Teddy
Labrador Retriever
3 Months

I just adopted my puppy two days ago. So far he refuses to go near his crate at all. And he just pees and poops all over and no matter how many times I try to put out the pads he doesn’t go near them he’ll move away from them and then come back to play.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Bella
Staffordshire Terrier
5 Years
0 found helpful
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Bella
Staffordshire Terrier
5 Years

After we go to bed, she gets up and eats and drinks, then peed on her pads. Only thing is, she is not just peeing on the pads but on the hardwood floors. We give her ample space to do her business, take her out 3-4x per day. I am growing weary of cleaning urine every morning. Help! This only happens at night.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! So dogs will typically have to eliminate about 30 minutes after they eat or drink. This includes treats and bones. So if they are eating/drinking around the clock, they will have to go potty around the clock no matter how well potty trained they are. It is totally ok if you cut off food and water about 2 hours before bedtime. That should help with her night time potty mishaps.

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Mila
Poodle x chihuahua
9 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Mila
Poodle x chihuahua
9 Months

I trained Mila to go potty on the pads and it went great, she started using them all by her self up to the point where she had no more accidents. But the we had to move and now its like she doesn't know how to used them. Also her first days in our new home she wouldn't go potty as frequent as she used to, she would hold it for very long periods of time.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Merlin
French Bulldog
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Merlin
French Bulldog
10 Weeks

Hi , we have been puppy pad training our new addition following guidelines of the command word & regular trips to the pad but he seems to only want to wee on the pad not poop? Is there anything we can do to encourage both?
I have also read in the comments not to add his pad to his crate at night is that correct? He has tried to pull it up from the pad holder the past couple of nights but when we take it out we wake up to poop & wee all over the crate floor which is more difficult to clear up than on a pad.
We do try to also get him to go poo before bed so he doesnt step in it & then head back to his bed which can be messy but sometimes just wont go so we are left getting him to bed knowing he might still need a number 2?
Any help would be amazing !

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Oreo Frisky Bear
Shih Tzu
4 Years
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Oreo Frisky Bear
Shih Tzu
4 Years

He uses the pee pad. We recently got the holders to put the pads in because he pees on the edge of the pads and he will not use the pad in the holder. Is there a way to get him to use the pad in the holder?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, start by simply getting pup used to standing on the holder - with or without a pad in it. Walk pup over to the pad area and encourage them to step onto it using a treat held in your hand. As soon as pup touches even one paw on it, praise right then and give the treat. Practice until pup will intentionally place a paw on it, trying to get the treat. When pup can do that, then wait until pup places two paws on it before praising and giving the treat. Practice until pup intentionally will put two paws on. Then work up to three paws and four paws the same way - adding one paw a time. Once pup learns to stand on the holder to get treats, then only reward when pup stands on it and goes potty - you may need to crate between potty trips and take pup potty there on leash for a few days before pup will do it on their own. Crate Training method - mentions a litter box but the same steps can be used for other surfaces like pee pads, holders, and grass pads. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Almond
Goldendoodle
4 Months
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Almond
Goldendoodle
4 Months

He will pee and poo on the pee pad if he is in the cage. But when he came out he never walk in to the cage to pee or poo. How do I let him know the pee pad is in the cage.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Big baby
alaskin husky
6 Weeks
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Big baby
alaskin husky
6 Weeks

My puppy will go on the floor beside the pad whar do i do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Susan, At this age, I would use the exercise pen method from the article linked below, but cover more of the floor with pee pads (or disposable real grass pads if you plan to transition pup to going potty outside later). I would cover more of the floor with the grass pads in the small exercise pen space (only letting pup out of the pen when you are outside or you know they peed on the pad recently so have an empty bladder) until pup is at least 8 weeks - since a pup only 6 weeks old won't have very much control of their bladder yet. Exercise Pen method - mentions litter box but other indoor toilets like grass pads and pee pads can be used with those methods also. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Once pup is 8 weeks old, if they continue to be confused about where to go when you remove the extra pads, then I recommend using the Crate training method from the article linked below for a couple of weeks, until pup associates the pad with pottying, then you can try to switch back to the exercise pen method if you prefer that method for the convenience of it. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable real grass pad brands- amazon too: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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zhi zhi
Pekinese
3 Years
0 found helpful
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zhi zhi
Pekinese
3 Years

Got the dog 3 days ago, but he is not using pee pad. he had accidents on the carpet. When he goes outside he pees and pooops

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Taco
Poodle
11 Weeks
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Taco
Poodle
11 Weeks

My puppy is only 11 weeks old. He has been sleeping on the pee tray although I’ve put a bed just beside it. Sometimes he sleeps on the bed but he just pee as well. I think sometimes he pee while hes sleeping. I been training him indoors by using pee tray cause it’s not convenient for me to walk him everytime.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jasmine, First, I recommend using a non-absorbent bed for pup, such as www.primopads.com or k9ballistics.com. An absorbent soft bed encourages puppies to pee on the bed. I also recommend using the crate training method from the article linked below at first, for at least a couple weeks, so that you are taking pup to the pad on leash and putting the non-absorbent bed in pup's crate, to help them learn to hold it while on the bed and go potty while on the pad because of the timing of everything and the crate encouraging pup to hold it in the confined space. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy After pup has learned to go potty on the pad instead of the bed consistently, you can try switching to the Exercise Pen method, from the same article I linked above. Those methods can be used with a pee pad even though it mentions a doggie litter box. If you are still having issues, you may want to consider using a doggie litter box or disposable real grass pad instead of pee pads for indoor training - since pee pads are made out of fabric and can be confusing for some dogs. www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com www.doggielawn.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Maltese
2 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Luna
Maltese
2 Months

How do I get her to do number 2 on the pad if she only does number 1. She has a closed off area that I put her into every hour .Bur she only urinates there .

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Dolly
Maltese
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Dolly
Maltese
11 Weeks

I am training my dog to go on pee pads. She goes on them sometimes, but a major issue I have is that she pees while she is eating or right after, so quickly I cannot even move her. I don't really want to put a pad here because I don't want her peeing by her food, but I also am constantly cleaning her pee. What should I do for this? Thank you!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! If possible, give your dog some play time and structured potty time before feeding. Reward your dog for going to the bathroom first thing so she gets into the habit of going right away, before meal time. Dogs typically shouldn't have to eliminate while they are eating unless it was stored in there already. They usually have to go within 20 minutes or so of eating and drinking.

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Carmen
Poodle
9 Months
0 found helpful
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Carmen
Poodle
9 Months

hi, my dog is "almost" trained to go outside and pee and poo. We life in an apartment. it would be great that she knew where to pee or poo at home if it rains, if we are not at home or ....actually if we are in someone`s place.
now she is keeping her pee for too long to avoid peeing in a place (we were in a boat last night and she didnt pee for 12 hours...which might be too long), so I would love her to have the freedom to pee in the pad when she feels like,
I hve been trying with the pads but she doesn`t do it...I hope it is not too late to teach her this
thansk

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Mocha
Goldador
2 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Mocha
Goldador
2 Months

I am facing a problem to potty train her.. she pees and poops everywhere.. i want to train her to do that on the pad.. please help!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Foxy
chihuahua mix
8 Months
0 found helpful
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Foxy
chihuahua mix
8 Months

Foxy is 8 months old and we got her from a neighbor that threw her out because she was peeing in her carpets so when we got her she was using the pads and we were grateful 🎉 but out of the blue she started peeing on carpet ☹️ and now she hasn’t responded to training ..it’s been two weeks of constant cleaning and reprimanding her to no avail 😢so now what ? Don’t want to have to use diapers

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Russell
Miniature Schnauzer
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Russell
Miniature Schnauzer
10 Weeks

How to use pee pad. He goes out side perfectly fine but refuses the pads. I put urine on the pad when he has an accident on the floor but he rather cry at the door to be let out!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Bentley
Yorkshire terrier & chiuaua
1 Month
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bentley
Yorkshire terrier & chiuaua
1 Month

My dog poops when he goes to the bathroom all the time when i take him outside. What do you suggest

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Lord
Yorkshire Terrier
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lord
Yorkshire Terrier
6 Months

Hello,

So we’ve tried all kinds of products to attract him to train him to do his needs on pads, he has a designated spot that we’ve used since we got him but he always does his duties anywhere else but there. We have a spot where he eats and sleeps and we take him to the designated area to pee in the morning when his bladder is full. He does it in there when we are with him but only peeing works sometimes. Any advice?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Blu
Pit bull
6 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Blu
Pit bull
6 Weeks

I’m having a hard time pee pad training him, I know his cues for when he has to potty and I take him to the pee pad but he always walks away like he doesn’t have to and potty’s elsewhere.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Reggie
Yorkshire Terrier
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Reggie
Yorkshire Terrier
12 Weeks

My puppy wees and poos anywhere and everywhere he wants to even if told off and placed outside this makes no difference to him and he avoids the training matts and doesn’t go when we take him out how can try and teach him to be toilet trained if this is what he already does right now ?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Angel
miniature dachshund
7 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Angel
miniature dachshund
7 Weeks

I’m having a hard time puppy pad training.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with him to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Lego
Shih Tzu
2 Years
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Lego
Shih Tzu
2 Years

Chews the wrong stuff, such as his bed, food bowl, brush, towel, etc etc but doesn't chew his toys. Marks everywhere, and i mean EVERYWHERE. Every corner, every item, when i water the plants he waters the plants too with his pee. Because he marks everywhere, he's not allowed in our house because my grandma doesn't want him to pee everywhere.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
230 Dog owners recommended

In a dog’s mind, if something is within reach then it’s on offer. Certain items are especially appealing: eyeglasses, books, cell phones, television remotes, pillows and upholstery. Plastic is wonderfully chewy and when it is imbibed with our smell because we hold onto these things constantly, it can be irresistible. Nothing is off limits to puppies. They have a mouthful of shiny new teeth, and they need appropriate puppy toys to use them on. By around 6 months of age, they have their adult teeth and the need to chew abates, but boredom can give them a reason to take up the habit again. Puppies, just like human toddlers, need a completely puppy-proof area, either a dog crate or pet gated room. If your puppy grabs a forbidden item while you are watching him, quickly distract him with a sharp “Eh eh!” and when he drops it, redirect cheerfully with a toy that he is allowed to have. Teaching tricks is a good way to give your pup appropriate outlets. A good one to start with is “Leave it.” Insufficient exercise and mental stimulation can drive your adult dog to find destructive forms of entertainment, so it’s up to you to meet his needs. If ugly winter weather keeps you inside, play indoor dog games with him. Fetch, hide and seek, and tug-of-war (played correctly) are great fun and exercise for both of you. There are many entertaining dog puzzles on the market, too, and you can even make your own. Just remember that many of these are meant to be enjoyed with you and not left alone with your dog. The only 100% effective way to save your possessions from destruction is to keep them out of your dog’s reach. If eviscerating upholstered furniture is a hobby, your dog must be kept in a crate or a gated dog-proof room when unsupervised. Stuff hollow rubber toys with treats or moistened kibble and give them to your dog when you are away, so he will have something acceptable to do in your absence. What about all those wonderful toys that your dog has? If they are lying around all the time, they aren’t special. Rotate them, only having two or three, at most, available at a time. Keep favorites out of her reach, only to be used when playing with you. This is what keeps it special; time with you is the magic ingredient. Individually and in combination, the following strategies can help stop the marking: 1. Employ management. The first step in correcting a marking issue involves diligent management in an effort to stop the rehearsal of unwanted behavior. Keep a close eye on your dog – no unsupervised time! – so you’re able to immediately interrupt all attempts to mark and redirect his efforts to “go” outside. When you can’t supervise, consider confining your dog to an x-pen or crate, or use baby gates to create an area small enough to deter soiling. If marking is limited to a specific room, restrict access to the area for at least a month (the same benchmark as housetraining). Some clients report success moving their dogs’ food and water to the problem area, as most dogs won’t mess where they eat. Often, employing diligent management to prevent the behavior is enough to offer long-term improvement. 2. Reduce stress. Identify events in your dog’s life that might create stress. Some stressors can be tricky. For example, many owners think showering their dogs with endless treats while requiring little in terms of basic obedience is a wonderful way to convey love. Unfortunately, a lack of basic structure often contributes to anxiety, especially in multiple-dog households. While I’m not a fan of rigid “leadership” protocols, I believe dogs do best when taught a basic skillset designed to create a working partnership with their humans, whose job it is to ensure the well being of everyone in the household. If marking mostly happens when you aren’t home, your dog might be anxious being alone. Be sure to keep departures and arrivals low-key to reduce the tension of an already emotional event for your dog. Teaching your dog to accept time away from you – even when you’re home – can also help reduce anxiety when you leave. Also, be mindful of potentially scary noises that might be causing anxiety – for example, the ear-piercing back-up beep of the garbage truck on trash day. Often, once you’ve identified the trigger, you can successfully counter-condition your dog’s emotional response. Anxiety can be a tricky issue to overcome. Some dogs respond well to homeopathic remedies or flower essence blends designed to reduce anxiety. Another option is Adaptil, a pheromone-based product available as a plug-in diffuser or a collar. Adaptil products release pheromones involved in the attachment process between a nursing dog and her offspring, offering an olfactory message of comfort and security. In some cases, pharmaceutical intervention might be necessary. 3. Clean soiled areas. Use an enzymatic cleaner such as Nature’s Miracle to thoroughly clean urine spots in the home. Avoid ammonia-based cleaners. Urine contains ammonia, and such products can encourage further marking. If moving into a new home formerly occupied by dogs, consider professionally cleaning or replacing the carpet to reduce your dog’s desire to mark over existing animal scent. If this isn’t possible, use a black light to search for potential problem areas. 4. Consider neutering. While not a guaranteed fix, neutering your dog, especially before he reaches full sexual maturity (12 to 15 months), is likely to reduce or eliminate his tendency to mark by stopping the influence of hormones. 5. Discourage all marking, even outdoors. In some cases, the act of marking becomes a well-practiced habit that remains even after removing environmental stressors or choosing to neuter (especially among dogs neutered later in life). In such cases, I recommend drawing a hard line when it comes to marking, even outdoors. When on a walk, give your dog an opportunity to fully void his bladder, then quickly but casually interrupt all subsequent attempts to leave his calling card throughout the neighborhood. It need not be a dramatic interruption; simply keep walking as your dog attempts to mark, almost like you hadn’t noticed. 6. Most importantly, don’t punish! Remember that inappropriate marking is a stress response. Calmly interrupting a dog as he’s marking is one thing. Reprimanding him after the fact will make things worse. Unless you intervene as it’s happening, your dog won’t connect your displeasure with his marking. He might look guilty as you reprimand him, but that look is an attempt to appease you in that moment – not because he realizes his marking, which took place however long ago, is unwanted.

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Dalgom
Shih Tzu
1 Month
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Dalgom
Shih Tzu
1 Month

Our puppy keeps peeing and pooping on our bedroom floor constantly. We are planning to keep her inside a playpen so can we place potty pads inside the pen and make her go potty there?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello Grace, At 1 month of age pup has very little control of her bladder. There isn't a lot of formal potty training that can be done at this age because pup lacks the physical ability; however, providing pup with a pen area and placing the pads on one end can help lay the foundation for pup having a clean sleeping and eating area and a separate potty area, so that when you start more formal potty training around 7 weeks pup prefers to keep non-potty areas cleaner. Expect to be cleaning up some accidents still no matter what you do at this age. If you can let pup out of the pen after they have just pottied in the pen, there should be less accidents in other areas of the home though. Check out the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. Don't expect really consistent results until pup is closer to 2 months and can really start to choose where to go potty, but that method can help lay a good foundation now, and can be used more officially around 2 months also. Exercise Pen method - can also be used with pee pads, grass pads, and similar indoor potties, not only doggie litter boxes like the method mentions. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Roxy
Husky mix
8 Weeks
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Roxy
Husky mix
8 Weeks

I have several pee pads but she just plays with them and rips them up and then pees next to them. I did blot her urine with a pee pad and laid the pad back out.is this a good idea? She Is also biting our hands and feet a lot, saying no does nothing

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
880 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would try switching to disposable real grass pads. They tend to be less confusing for dogs who will later be going potty outside, are not as easy to shred and don't resemble soft toys as much. www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com For the biting, check out the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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