How to Train Your Dog to Not Attack Chickens

Hard
2-12 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

You’ve always loved the great outdoors. You like being immersed in nature with a variety of animals roaming around your property, from dogs to chickens. But having such a diverse home can come with its own challenges. Does your dog have an appetite for your pet chickens, for example? Do you want to be able to let your chickens and dogs wander around freely, but don’t want to lose another chicken to your canine friend?

Your chickens may be part of your livestock, you may depend on them for eggs and dinners of your own. If you can train your dog not to attack the chickens, you can finally have the harmonious home you envisaged. You will be able to relax when it all goes quiet and not panic whenever you start to do a chicken headcount. Otherwise, your fear is that Chicken Run, the movie, may become chicken run, your reality, and your chickens will become determined to escape.

Defining Tasks

Training your dog not to attack the chickens will require a number of different elements. You will certainly need obedience commands to retain control over him when he is around the chickens. You will also need to take steps to familiarize him with the chickens. 

As you can probably imagine, training him not to attack the feathered members of your yard will be no straightforward task. This task is made even harder if your dog has already developed a taste for chicken, or he is older and stuck in his ways. However, with persistence and patience, you should be able to train him to behave around chickens in a few weeks or months. It is important you succeed in this endeavor if you want to protect the lives of your chickens and possibly any other animals you have on your property.

Getting Started

Before work begins, you will need to round up several things. You may want to get a body harness for training. This will help you retain control and reduce the strain on your dog's neck. A secure leash will also be required Before starting the process, spend a few days cementing your bond with your dog so that he is keen on listening to you.

You will also need an abundance of treats or his favorite food to act as both an incentive and reward. Apart from that, you just need an optimistic attitude and a good degree of patience, then you’re ready to get to work!

The Stop & Pull Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Stop & Pull method for Not Attack Chickens
Step
1
Getting ready
Secure your dog to the leash and safely stow your chickens in a coop. Once they are both safe and secure, slowly head over to the chickens.
Step
2
Be vigilant
Keep an eye on your dog's behavior and wait for him to pull or lunge. As soon as he goes for the chickens, say "STOP" loudly and firmly so he knows you mean business.
Step
3
React swiftly
Pull him in the opposite direction and walk away. Ensure you do this at the same time as you say "STOP". He will quickly associate his aggressive behavior with being pulled in the opposite direction and a stern tone from his owner.
Step
4
Small steps
Edge closer to the chickens every few days. Every day you need to take him toward the chickens, following the steps above. After several days or weeks, you will be able to get closer to the chickens before he shows signs of aggression. This is progress. It may be slow, but it was always going to be, so be patient!
Step
5
Lose the leash
When you can walk your dog around the chickens without showing signs of aggression, you can remove the leash. It may take many weeks or months to get to this stage, but when you can finally lose the leash, stay very close to him for the first few leash-free encounters.
Recommend training method?

The Restrain & Reward Method

Effective
3 Votes
Restrain & Reward method for Not Attack Chickens
Step
1
Setting up
Secure your chickens in a pen and put your dog on a leash. Ensure you have firm control over the leash and then prepare to head towards the chickens. A body harness will help you retain control if he is big and strong.
Step
2
Slowly approach
As you are approaching, constantly praise and pet your dog, and even reward him with a treat. You are showing him that this calm behavior around the chickens will prove fruitful.
Step
3
Cut the praise
Stop all praise and rewards as soon as your dog displays signs of aggression. Also stand firmly still until he has calmed down. This will show him that as soon as he changes from passive to aggressive he’ll stop receiving attention and he won’t be able to get any closer.
Step
4
Step by step
You don’t want to rush this process, so take it extremely slow. If you get several feet, reward him and then take him away and play with him for 5 minutes. The next day, go back and try and get several feet closer. The trick is to slowly build familiarity between your dog and the chickens in a steady, controlled manner.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat this process until you can walk around the chickens without your pooch displaying any signs of aggression. Only after many weeks, you should finally be walking around the chickens with your dog. Once you can walk around them calmly, slowly reduce the frequency of treats. Finally, when he hasn’t shown signs of aggression in many weeks or months, you can take him off the leash.
Recommend training method?

The Drop Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Drop method for Not Attack Chickens
Step
1
Get his attention
Take a treat and hold it in front of your dog's nose. You are going to teach him to drop when you command him to. This will increase your control around the chickens so you can quickly get a handle on his behavior until he cuts all signs of aggression.
Step
2
Slowly lure him to the ground
Use the treat to bring your dog's head to the ground. You may also want to gently push his back down to encourage him to begin with.
Step
3
Drop
Say "drop" firmly as he approaches the ground. Then, as soon as your dog is lying down, give him a treat and praise him. It is important you give him the treat within 3 seconds of lying down, otherwise, he won’t associate the 'drop' with the treat. Practice this every day for 10-15 minutes until he drops when you instruct him to, without the promise of food.
Step
4
Head for the chickens
Walk slowly, giving him verbal and physical attention as you approach. Then as soon as your dog shows signs of aggression, stop and have him drop to the floor. As soon as he does this, reward him with a treat and praise. Removing the positive stimuli of you giving him attention is known as positive punishment and he will quickly respond to it.
Step
5
10 minutes daily practice
Slowly make your way closer to the chickens, ensuring you have your pup drop whenever he turns aggressive and see to it you always praise him up until the point his behavior changes. Over many weeks, he will begin to understand he gets zero attention as soon as he turns aggressive. When he is finally comfortable around the chickens, you can reduce the frequency of treats and remove the leash.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Shilo
Pit Bull/Australian Shepherd
4 Years
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Question
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Shilo
Pit Bull/Australian Shepherd
4 Years

My dog continues to kill my neighbor's chickens, run out the door when accidentally left open and barks non-stop. If she doesn´t clean up her behavior, she will need to find a new home.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Andie, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using e-collars to work on boundary training, teaching an avoidance of chickens, and a Quiet command. Check out the videos linked below for an example of teaching a dog to avoid chasing and killing livestock. Day 1 https://youtu.be/lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2 https://youtu.be/ZvmgfnF1vmk Day 3 https://youtu.be/xj3nMvvHhwQ Check out the article linked below and follow the Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark I suggest having a trainer help you with the barking as well, but the first step is teaching a Quiet command. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Little Ann
Great Pyrenees
2 Years
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Little Ann
Great Pyrenees
2 Years

We have chickens in a large run. She is fine around them as long as they are in the run. If one gets out they are fare game to her. She doesn't outright kill them, she strips the feathers and skin until they die. The she will 'clean up'the mess.

She loves the chase anything and I think that is part of it. Just fun for her.

What would be the best way to cure her of this?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello David, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using e-collars to help you teach an avoidance of chickens. Check out the videos linked below for an example of teaching a dog to avoid chasing and killing livestock. Day 1 https://youtu.be/lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2 https://youtu.be/ZvmgfnF1vmk Day 3 https://youtu.be/xj3nMvvHhwQ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden Check out the article linked below and follow the Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark

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Leila
Mixed breed
3 Years
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Leila
Mixed breed
3 Years

I've been working with Leila since she was a puppy to leave my sometimes free roaming chickens alone. My other two dogs have had zero problems but every time I think I have broken Leila's habit of chasing and plucking them to death she does it again. She will be fine and ignore them and even avoid walking past them most of the time but if she catches them by surprise and they startle she goes after them and as soon as she's killed one goes and hides knowing she wasn't supposed to touch them.

If I see it I can stop her but If I'm not there at that moment it is the end for that chicken.
I will find the feathers and a dead chicken and I know I will find her tucked under the house porch.

After her latest incident my solution has been to have her on a tie lead when the chickens are allowed to forage, and she gets free range of the yard/property when they are put up in the chicken run.

Is there anything else I can do break this one terrible habit she has. She is an otherwise very friendly, non-aggressive, well behaved, if stubborn dog.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Indigo, I suggest teaching an avoidance using the methods from the trainer linked below. This trainer works with livestock chasing dogs in the UK. I would not tempt her too much though since she has already killed several chickens. I think after doing the training below for extra assurance, with the help of a trainer who is qualified, that you should still mange her interactions with the chickens by keeping them apart when you can. When choosing a trainer you may even want to send some of the videos to the trainer to make sure the trainer has a clear understanding of how to use the remote collar and find a 'working level' (the level to set the collar at for your dog dependent on her sensitivity to it) for such training. Livestock avoidance training videos: Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rebeca De La Hoz
Jack Russell Terrier
4 Months
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Question
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Rebeca De La Hoz
Jack Russell Terrier
4 Months

We live on a chicken farm. We have been putting him in a pen when he attacks chickens. We leave him in there for 20 minutes. It worked at first and now has become a full time killer. As soon as he gets released he goes for another chicken. I love my Jack Russell

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rebecca, First, pup needs to be kept on a leash when outside at this age so that you can proactively work on training. Second, are the chickens in an enclosed area like a coop and chicken fence - if so, I would invest in a pet barrier device, to keep pup from approaching the chicken enclosure and breaking in. Third, I suggest hiring a professional trainer who can practice the following training with you. Check out James Penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining. He has a Youtube channel. He works with dogs that chase and sometimes will kill livestock. To stop the killing you would need to pursue training like that, creating a strong avoidance of all chickens. Whether this is doable will depend on your level of dedication, willingness to learn, and how large the space he is in is. If he is in tight quarters with the chickens, like in a small yard, then the temptation will likely be too great, and he will either resort to killing them or will be in a constant state of stress trying to avoid them. If the chickens are outside and the property is large, so he has plenty of room to go somewhere that they are not located to avoid them, then the training is feasible. Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Mild cat issue example - teaching impulse control: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWF2Ohik8iM Moderate cat issue example - teaching impulse control using corrections and rewards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dPIC3Jtn0E Severe cat issue example (chickens are not cats, but both are attacked by dogs due to prey drive often): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MLJV5PBh7Y More e-collar work with cats with the same dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8lkbX0dhT0 Work on impulse control in general with pup, by teaching things that increase impulse control and calmness - such as a long, Place command around lots of distractions. Practicing the command until you get to the point where pup will stay on Place while you are working with the kitten in the same room. You can also back tie pup while they are on place - connecting a long leash attached to pup to something near the Place just in case pup were to try to get off Place before you could intervene. This keeps kitty safe while practicing and reinforces to pup that they can't get off the Place. The leash should be long enough that pup doesn't feel the leash while they are obediently staying on the Place because it has some slack in the leash. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Below are some other commands in general you can practice to help pup develop better impulse skill/self-control - impulse control takes practice for a dog to gain the ability to control herself. Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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jackson
Pomeranian-america Eskimo mix
3 Years
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jackson
Pomeranian-america Eskimo mix
3 Years

my dog in not furious or violent but my dog killed my neighbors chickens.now we have to give him away what should i do so he does not eat the chickens?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hayley, Depending on whose decision it is to give the dog away - your neighbors or your own, you can try teaching an e-collar avoidance of the chickens. I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced with remote e-collar training to help you with this. You also need to work on off-leash obedience. Check out James Penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining. He has a Youtube channel. He works with dogs that chase and sometimes will kill livestock. To stop the killing you would need to pursue training like that, creating a strong avoidance of all chickens. Whether this is doable will depend on your level of dedication, willingness to learn, and how large the space he is in is. If he is in tight quarters with the chickens, then the temptation will likely be too great or cause him too much stress. If the chickens are out of sight most of the time unless he goes looking for them or leaves your property, so that he can choose to avoid them if he wants to, then the training is likely feasible. If the issue is a legal issue and your neighbors are demanding he leave I am not a lawyer so I cannot address that. Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lucy
Border Collie
3 Years
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Question
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Lucy
Border Collie
3 Years

We rescued Lucy and her husky mix brother about two years ago. We also have one older Shepard/pit mix. We have a Farm, and she is trained to protect the chickens from predators and coral them into their coop at night, along with encouraging strays to come back to the flock (as they are free range chickens). She has no issue with any of these tasks when we are present, however, if we are away she will then attack the chickens, even though she knows she is not allowed. Neither of the other dogs harm the chickens, and she only does it when we are not watching her. how do we get her to protect the chickens when we are not there instead of attacking them. She will be good for months, and then one day out of the blue massacre like a dozen. She doesn't eat them, just kills then for the thrill of the hunt. I am so frustrated. We don't want to have to leave her chained up, as that leaves the chickens vulnerable to predators. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Natasha, I would contact a trainer who specializes in herding and livestock guarding training to see if they have any additional thoughts on the matter because they will have more detailed experience than I do in that area, but in my experience she needs to be retired as a livestock guardian. You can train her to avoid the chickens to prevent future deaths so that she doesn't have to be chained up likely, but she cannot be pinned up and fenced in with them really close by to guard them while also learning to avoid them to stop the killing. She needs to be taught to avoid the birds, and allowed to avoid them so that she stops killing them. Border Collies can be trained to do a number of things but they are not exactly guardians by nature; they are herders - she will naturally want to control the chickens due to her herding instincts but a true guardian is raised with livestock and genetically prone to guarding so that they bond with those animals and have a natural desire to protect them like they would with family. The desire to control and the intensity for herding is not typically found in a livestock guardian. She may be trying to control the birds with nips and movement, and when they don't cooperate she starts to get rough with them (which herding dogs will sometimes do with large livestock to get their point across and get a stubborn animal to cooperate), then her roughness turns into attacking the bird and she gets on a bit of a killing spree so to speak, because it's fun. To teach her to avoid the birds, check out James Penrith's videos on YouTube - he specializes in livestock chasing and killing: Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Maddie
Black Norwegian Elkhound
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Maddie
Black Norwegian Elkhound
3 Years

So we have 20 acres of yard and she won’t stay in the 20 acre she keeps running off for 30 min and comes back but how do I make her stay in the yard

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kevin, Check out James Penrith from Take the Lead Dog Training on Youtube and his videos on e-collar training. You will need to teach an e-collar boundary and an e-collar come. You may need pup to wear a tracking device that lets you see on a handheld device when she approaches the boundary so that you can enforce the boundary with the e-collar to proof the command even when you are not with her. To do this correctly, you need to practice a lot with pup on a long leash, using her "working level" stimulation - which is the lowest level she responds to. The key here is not super high stem but lots of repetition and consistency - then continued consistency for a while when she thinks you are not around also. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Louie
Border Collie
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Louie
Border Collie
12 Weeks

Two weeks ago we got a 10-week puppy. He is super sweet and well-behaved, for the most part. The chickens would often fly over their side of the fence so we would tell Louie to chase the chickens back over the fence. He occasionally would catch one and we have been trying to teach him to be nice to the chickens so we can get them back on the other side of the fence. I now realize encouraging this was a bad idea because he ate a chicken today! He was hanging out unsupervised in our yard. Do you think we can train this instinct out of him, even though he's already developed a taste for them?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marissa, Since he is so young you can likely train him still but it's going to involve teaching him to avoid the birds completely - no herding chickens in his future. You may also need to do e-collar training with this in the future. For now, teach him Out and Leave It. Walk him around on a 30 or 50 foot training leash and practice those commands around the birds - the first step is simply showing him that he should avoid the birds. Reward him when he is completely ignoring the birds and looking at you. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Third, check out James Penrith from Take the Lead Dog Training. If pup continues pestering the birds or things get worse, you will probably have to use e-collar training. Generally I would wait until 5 months to start this but because this is a serious issue you may need to start sooner. Supervise pup outside around the birds - keeping him on the long leash a ton right now, practice your commands Out and Leave It. If pup is still wanting to go after the birds in a couple of months - follow the training on James's YouTube channel for dealing with livestock chasing using an e-collar and long leash. If the chickens are contained in one specific area, you can also use a pet barrier device to keep pup away from the coop entirely. Check out "Pet Safe Pawz Away Pet Barrier Device". This device would be kept by the chicken coop and it's radius adjusted just to include the immediate area around the coop, then pup would wear the corresponding collar and taught to avoid the area similarly to how dogs are taught to stay inside invisible fences. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Grizzly
Husky
One Year
0 found helpful
Question
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Grizzly
Husky
One Year

Hi there! My roommate and I are planning on adopting a Siberian Husky but we have a beloved flock of hens. What would be the best approach to bringing the new dog home, introducing him to the chickies, and created a non-hostile environment for them?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aubrey, In this situation you are dealing with a prey animal and a predator - the issue probably isn't so much one of socializing and avoiding a fear-response in pup since pup is already an adult dog, but teaching pup a firm Leave It and teaching an avoidance of the chickens. Whether and how to do this depends a lot on your setup for the chickens and the dog. Without knowing more details its hard to completely answer your question. Ideally the chickens would be located far enough away from the house that pup could easily choose to avoid interacting with them while outside, or would even be kept in a chicken coop and fenced area where pup couldn't get to them directly - that will be the easiest for pup. Ideally, you would choose a dog whose been evaluated as having low prey drive -especially with a husky which can have a high prey drive. Either way, check out the videos linked below on livestock chasing behavior and teaching an avoidance. Teach pup a firm leave it and Out (leave the area). Practice walking past the chickens with pup on a long leash and commanding Out or Leave It. Reward pup if he obeys your commands and ignores the birds, and correct with a "working level" (the lowest level a specific dog has indicated he can feel) e-collar stimulation for any fixating on the birds, moving towards them, stalking, or other predatory behavior. Repeat the above training a TON until pup can easily ignore the birds when you are present to enforce that command. Leave It method - for teaching an initial Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - the section on how to Teach a Dog the Out Command, then the training will alter be enforced with the e-collar, and not your body language: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ After you have taught pup to leave the birds alone while you are there, then hide and let pup into the yard when he doesn't think you are around. When he displays any predatory behavior toward the birds - including staring or trying to go up to them, I would correct with the e-collar - probably a bit higher than his working level. In general, reward pup (treats or toys - find what he likes) whenever he does well around the birds - so that the corrections are not associated with the birds being there but with his behavior toward the birds - which gives him a choice whether he is corrected or rewarded and things are clear to him. E-collar work with livestock chasing dogs - teaching pup an avoidance of the animals: Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Teaching impulse control with small animals if the animals must be in closer quarters: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWF2Ohik8iM Continued teaching impulse control using corrections and rewards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dPIC3Jtn0E Small animals in close quarters with dog and training: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MLJV5PBh7Y More e-collar work with small animals with the same dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8lkbX0dhT0 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bindi
Poodle x Shih-Tzu
8 Years
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Bindi
Poodle x Shih-Tzu
8 Years

We just got baby chooks. My dog always barks at them and really wants to get to them. He also shakes alot when he is near them.
1. Why does he shake?
2. How can l train him to be around them with wanting to attack them?
Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bindi, Many dogs shake when highly aroused - it could be due to excitement, anxiety, or aggression. It's essentially a sign of a lot of pent up energy and high arousal. Exactly how you train this depends on whether pup has a high prey drive toward the chooks or is just very excited. Check out the videos linked below for examples of teaching dogs self-control around small animals. Mild cat issue - teaching impulse control example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWF2Ohik8iM Moderate cat issue - teaching impulse control using corrections and rewards example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dPIC3Jtn0E Severe cat issue example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MLJV5PBh7Y More e-collar work with cats with the same dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8lkbX0dhT0 I highly suggest hiring a trainer to help you if you feel the animals are in danger or the issue is severe. Work on impulse control in general with pup, by teaching things that increase impulse control and calmness - such as a long, Place command around lots of distractions. Practicing the command until you get to the point where pup will stay on Place while you are working with the chook in the same room. You can also back tie pup while they are on place - connecting a long leash attached to pup to something near the Place just in case pup were to try to get off Place before you could intervene. This keeps the small animals safe while practicing and reinforces to pup that they can't get off the Place. The leash should be long enough that pup doesn't feel the leash while they are obediently staying on the Place because it has some slack in the leash. You can also practice this in the yard by taking the Place outside and tethering pup to a nearby tree, assuming the chooks are outside. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Below are some other commands in general you can practice to help pup develop better impulse skill/self-control - impulse control takes practice for a dog to gain the ability to control herself. Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jake
German Shepherd
11 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Jake
German Shepherd
11 Years

Chicken killer

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Pamela, Check out James Penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining. He has a Youtube channel. He works with dogs that chase and sometimes will kill livestock. To stop the killing you would need to pursue training like that, creating a strong avoidance of all chickens. Whether this is doable will depend on your level of dedication, willingness to learn, and how large the space he is in is. If he is in tight quarters with the chickens, like living in a small yard with them all the time, then the temptation will likely be too great, and he will either resort to killing them or will be in a constant state of stress trying to avoid them. If he has plenty of room to go somewhere that they are not located to avoid them, then the training is far more feasible. Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bear
Pit bull
1 Year
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Bear
Pit bull
1 Year

He is walking around the coop and stalking and barking at the chickens and I cant get him to stop.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dogs need to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach them to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Amy
Great Pyrenees, Yellow Lab
4 Months
0 found helpful
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Amy
Great Pyrenees, Yellow Lab
4 Months

I have a puppy who has been doing very well around chickens. I also have a 2 year old Anatolian shepherd who has had a previous record of killing chickens. Since I got the puppy, my LGD(Anatolian Shepherd) has started again with killing chickens. And it seems he is starting to teach the puppy to chase and kill them too. I’m not sure what to do. I have tried separating them but somehow either the puppy digs his way in or the LGD jumps his way out. This morning I found a chicken leg the puppy was chewing on. It looked fresh, maybe they killed it together in the afternoon. I’m not sure. My question is is there a way to stop both of them from doing this? I know it’s hard for a dog to stop especially when it’s their job to be taking care of the chickens. My friends have told me to give them up because “Once they taste chicken blood, they’re going to keep doing it.” I don’t want to though. Do you have any advice you could give me?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This one is a bit tricky. Both breeds have instincts to hunt/retrieve. But also both breeds have great instincts for protection. I think I want to go with a method to desensitize them. I wish this is something I could work on with you in person. I really enjoy working on this type of behavior modification with my customers. Watching the progress is awesome. So I will do my best to relay this to you via message! The dogs need to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach them to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching them "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking them out on leash. You can do one at a time, or both together if you have decent control over them. Any time they even look at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once they break their attention away from the chicken, you reward them with a treat. Ideally, you want to them to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as they aren't focused on the chicken, you can reward them. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until they are no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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sparky
Cavoodle
8 Years
1 found helpful
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1 found helpful
sparky
Cavoodle
8 Years

my dog is friendly towards humans and is hyper. but when it comes to fluffy animals eg. chickens, birds, cats, rabbits, guniea pigs, etc he will attack it or even kill it i am getting chickens but dont know how to control him. i had one chickens and he chased it around the garden and almost got it. i dont know what to do to make him leave them alone.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Sparky needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Beagle
Beagle
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Beagle
Beagle
2 Months

My mom has been wanting a beagle since I can remember. I finally found some beautiful beagle near me and I would love to gift one to my mother. But we have free range chickens and I know beagles have a high prey drive. How could I train a beagle to not chase after our chickens when we let them out? If I put them in the same pen together since he is a puppy will he get used to them and not want to chase them? I could use some help please and an opinion on wether or not I should buy him.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. The puppy will need to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Astor
German Shepherd
1 Year
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Astor
German Shepherd
1 Year

I cant get him to listen to me, and he won't stop killing chickens

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Astor needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Biscut
Labrodor Retriever/ Great Pyrenees
6 Months
0 found helpful
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Biscut
Labrodor Retriever/ Great Pyrenees
6 Months

I have a lab/ Great Pyrenees puppy. He was doing very well until today. Yesterday when I was fishing in the pond out back I noticed Biscuit was starting to stare at the chickens and he was paying a lot of attention to them. When I noticed this I started to take his attention away by calling his name every time he even looked at one. By the time I finished fishing he barely looked at them. Well today while I went inside for lunch he broke the fence and went into the chicken pen. He killed one of my chickens. When I went out to check on him I found blood and egg yolk all over his face and paws. I tried a lot of different training techniques and it seemed to be working. The thing is my parents had told me that if he killed a chicken he’d go to the pound or I’d have to give him away immediately. I know he’s a good dog I just need to figure out what works for him. Would tying the dead chicken around his neck and leaving it on for a week work? I’ve read it works but I’m not sure about it.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Biscuit needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Shaggy
Pompek
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Shaggy
Pompek
1 Year

My family has chickens and ducks, while I was away he was in the care of a relative and killed three in a week then killed four more the next and two more its really fruastrating because my family wants him gone he bit a duck yesterday...he's not eating it but biting I guess where he stays sometime and where the pen is,are relatively close how can I get him to stop he was not doing it while I was there but he has gone mad now.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Shaggy needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Skivvy
Australian Cattle Dog
2 Years
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Question
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Skivvy
Australian Cattle Dog
2 Years

He plays with the chickens till they fall over and died, he doesn't eat them or bit them he just runs through them and send them every which direction until they are exhausted then I have dead chickens everywhere. He thinks it is a game and it is a pain in the bum

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Skivvy needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Chester
Great Dane
7 Months
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Chester
Great Dane
7 Months

He has not killed but he bites and pulls on the chickens to the point where the only thing left to do is to end the suffering. He doesn’t seem to act this way all the time. He even goes in the coop with them sometimes usually when we are in there. Trying to figure out if he is rough playing or is he trying to kill them. He grew up with them so it’s kind of strange that he has started this. He is a big puppy. Weighs right at 60 pounds. His dad is half Dane and half Lab not sure what the momma is. Any help would be appreciated.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dogs need to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach them to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Juliet
Anatolian Shepherd
10 Weeks
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Juliet
Anatolian Shepherd
10 Weeks

She hasn’t killed any chickens yet. She doesn’t mind them but she stares at them quite a bit. When she thinks we aren’t looking she will get close to them and smell them. When we are around her she will stare at the chickens watching their every move. It really bothers me. She used to chase them but I made her stop after grabbing her from the neck and leaving her on the ground for a good 2 minutes while repeating no. Anyways she keeps staring at them and I haven’t been able to get her to stop. I want her to accept the chickens as a part of her flock before she gets older.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dog needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach er to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching her "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking her out on leash.Any time she even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once she breaks her attention away from the chicken, you reward her with a treat. Ideally, you want to her to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as she isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward her. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until she is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dog. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Boss
Belgian Malinois
9 Years
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Boss
Belgian Malinois
9 Years

My dog keeps snapping at chickens and killing them when we aren't around. It's not out of aggression, she doesn't charge or chase the chickens. She just passes them, snaps end somehow kills them, drops them and carries on like nothing happened. It all happened in the blink of an eye without noticeable body signs... We witnessed it once.
This only happens when my husband is working outside and our dog is with him.
When I'm gardening and our dog is with me, it never happened.

I really don't know what to do anymore...
I've lost around 30 chickens already (1 time she bit and killed 12 chickens in less then 5min)

Does somebody have any advice on how to handle this?

Greetings
Lisa

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dogs need to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach them to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time the even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Dobby
American Staffordshire Terrier
2 Years
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Dobby
American Staffordshire Terrier
2 Years

We moved to a farm in May. I have 4 cows and he goes NUTS when they're near the fence. I got chickens. He has killed 1 rooster and today a hen. They are free-range and we check the yard before we let the dogs out. I NEED him to STOP going after the chickens, mainly, but any other farm animal as well. My other two dogs follow Dobby's example but show no interest when Dobby is preoccupied. I do not want them learning this behavior. I NEED help! He's a sweet, STUPID, loveable dog but THIS HAS TO STOP!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dog needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time he even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dog. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Parche, Bongo, Rayo
Mutt
6 Months
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Parche, Bongo, Rayo
Mutt
6 Months

We have ducks, we had 8 and now we’re down to 6. And it was almost 5 last night. We have 3 dogs. 2 of them are 6 month old puppies and the third is the dad (he’s 4 years old). We don’t know the breed the mom was incredibly mixed and so is the father. All three are male. The ducks and dogs had been coexisting outside for 3 weeks and suddenly the killing started 2 nights ago. If a human is around the dogs won’t touch the ducks or really even pay any mind to them. So there were never any signs of aggression to correct/stop. The killing seems to be only taking place when there is no supervision or it’s nighttime. We’ve never had to “supervise” the dogs per se and now we’re under a constant paranoia. Ducks are not the same as chickens and we can’t just place them in a coop 24/7 they need fresh open water but it’s also unfair to cage up the dogs all day/night too. We’re at a loss. These dogs are part of the family but it’s not okay to just let them kill animals, it’s ducks now and could very much turn into killing lambs because we have some newborns on the farm. We make money with the ducks but selling their eggs. As well as breeding one specific pair and selling ducklings to farmers in the area. At the moment we have the dogs tied up but it’s not permanent as we’re looking for an alternative. We really really want to find a way to stop this.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dogs need to learn that the ducks are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach them to become less excited by the ducks. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching them "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking them out on leash. Any time they even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once they break their attention away from the duck, you reward with a treat. Ideally, you want your dogs to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he/she isn't focused on the duck, you can reward them. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until they are no longer interested in the ducks. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The ducks need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Louie
Jack Russell
5 Years
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Louie
Jack Russell
5 Years

Aggressive towards other dogs

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Oli, I recommend looking for a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area, which is a class for dog aggressive and reactive dogs, who are all intensively socialized together in a structured environment under the guidance of the class instructor. I also recommend checking out Thomas David from America's Canine Educator on Youtube to learn more about aggression and type of training that may help with it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Atlas
Great Pyrenees/American Akita
1 Year
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Question
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Atlas
Great Pyrenees/American Akita
1 Year

Atlas was great with the chickens until about 4 mo old, he got one and killed it. We think he was just trying to play with it and was too rough on the poor thing. So we have kept them separate, the chickens have a chain link fence that we keep closed. Just recently Atlas has discovered he can jump the fence, and he will jump in, grab a chicken, and jump out. He knows he is not supposed to and so he has started running off with the chicken so we wont see.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dog needs to learn that the chickens are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the chickens. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash.Any time he even looks at a chicken, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the chicken, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the chicken, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the chickens until he is no longer interested in the chickens. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The chickens need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Blazer
hunter
3 Years
0 found helpful
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Blazer
hunter
3 Years

how to make him to stop eating my baby chicks

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

i there. I am going to send you information on how to teach your dog to be less excited by the chickens. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dogs need to learn that the animals are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach her to become less excited by the animals. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching her "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking her out on leash.Any time she even looks at a animal, you give the command leave it. Once she breaks his attention away from the animal, you reward her with a treat. Ideally, you want to her to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as she isn't focused on the animal, you can reward her. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the animals until she is no longer interested in them. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The animals need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Oscar
Golden Retriever
21 Months
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Oscar
Golden Retriever
21 Months

I've just begun running with Oscar. My daily route takes me along the canal where there are many geese and ducks. He's fine offlead and has good recall, but I put his lead on when we reached the canal. He was very excited to see the fowl, and it was hard to distract him. In the end I turned around and came back to the path away from the canal. He's big and strong and I'm afraid he'll go into the canal after them. I couldn't restrain him if he lunged and i don't want him in the canal as it has steep sides and he couldn't get out were he to fall in. I know it's in his genes but could I train him out of the desire to chase ducks?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dogs need to learn that the animals are just a normal part of the environment. So we need to teach him to become less excited by the animals. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching him "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking him out on leash. Any time he even looks at a animal, you give the command leave it. Once he breaks his attention away from the animal, you reward him with a treat. Ideally, you want to him to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as he isn't focused on the animal, you can reward him. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the animals until he is no longer interested in them. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dog. The animals need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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Dana
German Shepherd
3 Years
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Dana
German Shepherd
3 Years

My german shepherd has always been a challenge but I love her very much. I live on a farm and she grew up in this environment since she was a puppy but she seems to never get used to it. She always tries to attack my chickens, cows, donkeys, bunnies, you name it. I've tried everything but nothing seems to work. She just doesn't seem to understand. When we are with her and the other animals she acts almost perfectly but when we leave her alone with the animals she is the complete opposite. I don't know what to do anymore and if she doesn't act better soon I will need to give her away.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Your dogs need to learn that the animals are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach her to become less excited by the animals. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching her "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking her out on leash.Any time she even looks at a animal, you give the command leave it. Once she breaks his attention away from the animal, you reward her with a treat. Ideally, you want to her to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as she isn't focused on the animal, you can reward her. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the animals until she is no longer interested in them. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The animals need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions.

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sassy
long haired german shepard
8 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
sassy
long haired german shepard
8 Months

my dog will not come when she is called when out of the house and off leash, as well she is going after our chickens so far she has not killed any but has had a mouth full of feathers

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. I am going to send you information on how to teach your dog to be less excited by the chickens. This is something that with some time and patience, can be turned around. Following this information, I will send you information on how to teach recall. Your dogs need to learn that the animals are just a normal part of the household. So we need to teach her to become less excited by the animals. If you are up for this, it is going to take about a month of consistent practice before you see results. You will want to start out by teaching her "leave it". Leave is great for anything you want your dog to leave alone. Instructions on leave it will be at the end of this response. After about a week or so of working on the command, you can start taking her out on leash.Any time she even looks at a animal, you give the command leave it. Once she breaks his attention away from the animal, you reward her with a treat. Ideally, you want to her to be sitting and looking at you. But in the beginning stages, as long as she isn't focused on the animal, you can reward her. You will literally practice this over and over, while moving closer to the animals until she is no longer interested in them. While this method takes a while, it is the best in relaying the messages across to your dogs. The animals need to be left alone! Here are the steps for "leave it" Teaching a dog 'leave it' Teaching “leave it” is not difficult. Begin the lessons inside your home or in an area with very few distractions. Here are the steps for teaching “leave it”: Make sure you have two different types of treats. One type can be fairly boring to the dog, but the other type should be a high-value treat that he finds pretty delicious. You will also want to make sure that the treats are broken up into pea-sized pieces so it won’t take him too long to eat them. Put one type of treat in each hand. If you like to train with a clicker as your marker, you can also hold a clicker in the same hand that holds the high-value treat. Then, place both of your hands behind your back. Make a fist with the hand that is holding the treat of lower value and present your fist to your dog, letting him sniff. Say “leave it” and wait until he finishes sniffing your fist. As soon as your dog is done sniffing, you can either click with the clicker or say “yes.” Then offer him the higher-value treat in your other hand. Repeat until your dog immediately stops sniffing your hand when you say “leave it.” When you say “leave it” and he stops sniffing right away, leash your dog and then toss a low-value treat outside of his reach. Wait until he stops sniffing and pulling toward the treat. As soon as he does, either say “yes” or click and then give him a high-value treat from your hand. Practice this exercise a number of times. Over time, by practicing “leave it,” your dog should stop pulling as soon as you give the cue. When rewarding him with a treat, make sure that it is something good, not plain old kibble. By doing so, you are teaching him that asking him to leave some food doesn’t mean he won’t get anything, but that in fact he might get something even more delicious. When your dog is reliably responding to the cue, you can teach him that “leave it” can apply to other things as well, not just food on the floor. Repeat the exercise with five different items that are fairly boring to your dog. After using five different “boring” items, start using slightly more exciting items. You know your dog, so you alone know what items he would consider more interesting, but don’t jump to high-value items right away. To increase his chances of success at learning the cue, you want to work up to high-value items gradually. If Kleenex or a piece of plastic, for instance, would attract your dog on a walk, don’t start with those. Choose the items based on your ultimate goal: Anytime you say “leave it,” you want to be confident that your dog will indeed leave whatever you are asking him to leave. . The reward he receives when he leaves an item can change as well. If your dog has a favorite toy, squeak it and play for a moment when he comes running to you after leaving the other item of interest. Most dogs love interacting with us, so a moment of praise or play with a toy can be just as effective as a treat. Keep it fun Even though you’re practicing “leave it” as a way to keep your dog safe, you want him to see it as a fun game you play. When your dog is proficient at the game in your home, start practicing in a variety of locations with more distractions. Recall: STAGE ONE – 'Catching' or Charging Up the 'Come' Cue Start in a distraction free environment so that your dog can focus only on you. Whenever your puppy or dog is coming to you on his own, wait until he is a couple of feet from you and then say his name and the word 'come.' When he gets to you, make a big fuss. With this exercise, your dog will learn that coming to you is a really good thing. After a while, you can lengthen the distance between you and start using the word when he is coming to you from a greater distance. Coming to you should always be rewarded, whatever the circumstance and no matter how long it took your dog to respond. Motivate your dog to come by being exciting, running away from him, waving a toy, or having delicious food for him when he gets to you. This will show him that coming back to you the best thing he can do. STAGE TWO – Solidifying the Cue Through Play Make sure you play the Back and Forth game with another person that your dog is comfortable with. Start the game in a quiet environment so it is easy for your dog to focus on you. Hold your dog back while the other person calls him excitedly. Try not to use his name or the cue word but talk excitedly to ‘gee’ him up. Do not release him until the person calls his name followed by the cue word “come.” When the cue word is given, release your dog and let him go running to the person calling. As soon as he reaches them they should praise and reward him with a game of tug or a food reward. When your dog has had his reward, have the other person hold him back as you call him and release as you say his name followed by the cue word. When he comes to you reward him with another game of tug or food reward. Repeat this game back and forth but only do a few repetitions so your dog does not get bored or too tired. Keeping it fresh means the game is always fun to play. STAGE THREE – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Inside Now your dog knows what the word “come” means you can use the cue word to call him to you while adding a hand signal to the word. Hand signals are always good to build with vocal cues so that even if your dog cannot hear you he will understand what the hand signal means. This is good if your dog is a distance away from you. Start in a quiet environment. Walk away from your dog and call his name followed by the cue word and a hand signal. Praise and reward him when he comes to you. Start increasing the distance you call him from and praise for his compliance. If he does not respond, go back to the previous distance and repeat. Only practice this cue for a few minutes so your dog does not get bored. The secret to success is to always keep it fun, exciting and fresh. When your dog recognizes the hand signal, try calling his name and using the hand signal by itself without the vocal cue. You will then be able to use a combination of vocal cue only, hand signal only and the two together. Now your dog knows what the cue word means you can start to call him from different rooms or from areas where he cannot see you. This will encourage him to respond even when you are out of sight. STAGE FOUR – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Outside Now your dog is consistently coming to you in a distraction free environment you can proof your recall cue by taking it outside. Practice the recall in your yard and then gradually build up to the point where you can use it in the park or similar environment. The ultimate test is to use the recall when your dog is engaged in a different activity. Wait for a lull in that activity and then call your dog to you. Praise his decision to comply.

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Clutch
Plott Hound
12 Weeks
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Clutch
Plott Hound
12 Weeks

This is my coon hound in training and I love his drive so far. But he has a chicken problem. He's killed 3 chickens in the last week and he went after a 4th one today. He's a really stubborn dog and he doesn't get the hint of punishment. I've used a e-collar and he seems not to get the hint. What else is there for me to do before I have to pen him up. None of my hounds have ever been in pens and I don't really wanna start with him.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brandt, I highly suggest hiring a professional trainer with experience teaching avoidance with an e-collar, who also uses positive reinforcement. An e-collar will allow you to train remotely - which is often needed for teaching livestock avoidance, but the e-collar without the proper training isn't effective alone, if pup isn't also developing impulse control, understanding why they are being corrected and how to avoid it, and being rewarded for doing the correct behavior around the new chickens instead. A long leash and rewards need to be added to the training, with pup being touch a command like Leave It/ Out - which means leave the area, reeled in with a long leash when they don't move away from the birds, corrected with the e-collar only after they have learned Out or Leave It and told to move away and disobeyed the command - so they understand why they are being corrected and the correction stops as soon as they move away - via being reeled in the with leash and the e-collar stimulation stopping once they begin to move away, and being rewarded each time they choose to move away without having to be corrected or reeled in. All of this will require a LOT of repetition so that pup develops a strong long-term habit of avoiding the birds. Out - leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Check out James Penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining on YouTube for videos discussing and demonstrating work with livestock chasing and killing dogs, and the proper use of e-collars, long leashes, and obedience in dealing with those behaviors. Finally, the training will need to be done with the e-collar once pup has thoroughly learned with you present, and pup corrected when they go near the birds while you hide from somewhere nearby where you can watch them to correct. That way pup will decide that the rules still apply even when you aren't there. Long term, if the birds have a coop and chicken fence, a pet barrier device can be purchased and a corresponding collar that pup wears will correct whenever pup gets within a certain distance of the bird's area - to give pup occasional reminders if needed, to continue to leave the birds alone. It's very important for the training process to be in place, for any tool to be effective. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bailey
Great Pyrenees
11 Months
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Question
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Bailey
Great Pyrenees
11 Months

My dog has been attacking my neighbors chickens. She has killed 3 in the last 4 months. I’ve also noticed a few other unidentifiable dead animals around my yard. How do i get her to be able to run around the neighborhood freely but not have to worry about her killing anything? Especially the chickens?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kristen, I would seek the help of a professional trainer who has experience with low level e-collar training. Check out James Penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining. He has a Youtube channel. He works with dogs that chase and sometimes will kill livestock. To stop the killing you would need to pursue training like that, creating a strong avoidance of the chickens. Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY More examples of teaching avoidance - in this case with a dog who chases or kills cats: Mild cat issue - teaching impulse control: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWF2Ohik8iM Moderate cat issue - teaching impulse control using corrections and rewards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dPIC3Jtn0E Severe cat issue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MLJV5PBh7Y More e-collar work with cats with the same dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8lkbX0dhT0 Work on impulse control in general with pup, by teaching things that increase impulse control and calmness - such as a long Place command around lots of distractions with pup on a back tie leash to keep other animals you are practicing around safe - rewarding pup for ignoring them and keeping enough distance between the animals at first for pup to succeed, before gradually adding more distraction in as pup is ready for it due to practice. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Below are some other commands in general you can practice to help pup develop better impulse skill/self-control - impulse control takes practice for a dog to gain the ability to control herself. Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the room: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Clyde
Labradoodle
2 Years
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Question
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Clyde
Labradoodle
2 Years

My dog has kills animals how can I take that behavior and make it to where he can blood track deer instead.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bryleigh, Check out the articles linked below on tracking, especially the first article that teaches tracking a wounded deer with a blood trail. Blood trail: https://wagwalking.com/training/track-wounded-deer Tracking deer in general: https://wagwalking.com/training/track-deer Similar article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-track-deer Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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