How to Train Your Dog to Not Bark When Playing

Medium
1-6 Months
Behavior

Introduction

Playing with your dog is one of the most fun moments of his day. He gets to release some of his energy, spend time with his favorite person, and play games that he loves. Sometimes your dog might get over-excited and start barking. While this is most likely because he's having fun, it can be annoying or even considered a nuisance by neighbors. While this barking behavior may be more likely displayed by certain dog breeds like Border Collies or Australian shepherds, it can happen with any dog that gets a little too excited about ball throwing or playing.

It is possible to teach your dog not to bark when playing, but it may take a few steps to make sure he understands that loud noises are not part of playing the game with you. With some patience and good training skills, you can help him learn that barking won't get him what he wants. This is a useful skill that will work just as well in a crowded park as it will in your home. 

Defining Tasks

Barking is a natural behavior and your dog won't understand that it's undesirable for you at first. However, being able to signal your dog to stop barking is important to keeping neighbors, landlords, and other folks at the dog park happy and excited about your dog. Repeated loud barking is a sure way to get on someone's bad side, and it makes playing less fun for you. Some dogs will pick up on this skill faster than others. Herding dogs may have an especially difficult time learning not to bark because they have been bred to use their "voice" to communicate. With extra patience and consistency, they can pick up on the commands and learn to stop barking when you play. With this skill, you can make staying quite a fun part of playtime or even a signal that the game is over.

Getting Started

You won't need very much to get started, and you can begin anywhere you usually play with your dog. Changing a behavior that comes naturally will be difficult at first, so a large dose of patience will be most important. Consistency throughout your training is key. Here are a few props to have on hand when you begin the training. 

  • His favorite throw toy, ball or a stick.
  • Dog treats you can reward him with.
  • A pouch to keep treats available and your hands-free.

Teaching your dog not to bark while playing will be well worth the time it takes to get him to stop. Each dog is different, so read through the three methods below to find the best option for your dog. Pretty soon play time will go back to being fun and engaging for both of you. 

The Quiet Method

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Step
1
Teach your dog to bark
This may sound counter-intuitive, but teaching your dog to bark on command will help teach him to stop on command.
Step
2
Mark the bark
To begin, try to get your dog to bark. When he does, say "yes" and give him a treat.
Step
3
Introduce the "bark" command
When he begins to understand what you want, say "bark" after he barks and give him a treat.
Step
4
Test the command
Soon he should be able to bark when you say the word. Test him by asking him to bark and decreasing the number of times you treat him.
Step
5
Wait it out
Don't treat your dog when he barks before you give him the command. If he barks when you aren't asking him, ignore the bark. When he's quiet, say "bark" and give him a treat after he barks. This way he learns that he only gets treats when you ask for the bark.
Step
6
Introduce the 'quiet' command
Once he can bark on command, introduce him to 'quiet.' Ask him to bark and when he does, hold out a treat in your closed fist. As soon as he stops barking to smell, say "quiet" and then open your fist and give him the treat.
Step
7
Practice
Practice asking him to 'bark' and then to be 'quiet' until he starts to understand that when he stops barking he gets the treat. Practice this in different parts of the house, in the park, and in many other situations.
Step
8
Introduce during play
Once he's comfortable, introduce 'quiet' during playtime. When he starts to bark, stop playing and say "quiet." Give him a treat when he does. Soon he should stop barking when you give the command, even when he's excited about playing with you.
Recommend training method?

The Stop Play Method

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Step
1
Begin playing with your dog
Start off your training session like any normal play and wait for him to start barking.
Step
2
Stop playing when he barks
As soon as he starts to bark, stop playing.
Step
3
Turn your back on him
Turn your back to face away from him to make sure his barks are not rewarded.
Step
4
Wait three seconds
When he stops barking, wait three seconds and then turn around.
Step
5
Start playing again
Pick up right where you left off until he barks again.
Step
6
Repeat
Repeat this process each time he barks when you play, no matter what. With consistency, he will learn that barking is no fun and he should stop.
Recommend training method?

The Last One Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Begin play as normal
This works for dogs who demand you continue playing by barking at you. Begin playing with your dog like normal.
Step
2
Tell him "last one"
When you are ready to be done, say "last one" right as you throw the ball or stick for the last time.
Step
3
Stop playing
Stop playing with your dog and pack up.
Step
4
Ignore any barking
When he starts to bark to get you to play again, ignore him. You can turn your back or begin walking away.
Step
5
Be consistent
When you've said "last one" to your dog, do not throw the ball or stick again when he barks.
Step
6
Make it a habit
When you make this command part of your routine, your dog will eventually learn that "last one" means playtime is over, and he will stop barking. It could take a week or a few months depending on the dog, but once it's a habit for both of you, barking should not be an issue.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Sam (female)
Labradoodle
3 Years
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Question
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Sam (female)
Labradoodle
3 Years

She barks like crazy during play (usually a tennis ball, but it's with all toys and play) with our other Labradoodle. It's hard to enjoy playing - that'show bad it has become. I need some tips, tricks and tools to train her not to do this.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
460 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jeff, Work on teaching her the "Quiet" command and the "Out" command. Also, work on getting her really excited and then suddenly giving her a command. When you give her the command, stop all play and wait until she obeys. When she obeys, then reward her, and after a minute tell her "Okay" and start playing again. Do this to help her learn self-control and how to calm herself down. Check out the article below and follow the "Quiet" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark To teach her "Out", toss a large treat several feet away from you, while with the same hand, you point to where you want her to go with your pointer finger. When she runs over to get the food, praise her. As soon as she finishes eating the treat, tell her "Okay" to indicate that she can come back toward you, and encourage her back. Repeat this often until you can point and say "Out" and she will go to where you are pointing before you toss the treat. When she does that, then toss the treat to her when she is in the correct spot, away from you, where you pointed. Next, transition to using it in real life. Whenever she disobeys the "Out" command, then get in front of her and calmly and firmly walk toward her until she backs out of the area you told her to get out of. Continue to block her and stand firm until she gives up trying to go back to where you told her to leave. If she tries to return to the area you told her to leave once you walk back there or away from there, then repeat walking toward her. Expect to repeat it a lot at first. The more consistent you are about enforcing her staying out of somewhere you have told her to leave, the more likely she is to respect your command. Practice in the kitchen, around things she wants to bother like plants, and finally, around other dogs. Start with calmer dogs first and work up to her favorite play buddies. Keep her out of the area you tell her to leave, until she is told "Okay", so that she will learn to learn and stay out of an area through your consistency. This takes repetition. Once she knows "Quiet", "Out", and how to calm herself, then when she is playing give her instructions. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks, and if she continues to bark, tell her "Out" and get between her and the other dog and walk toward her until she leaves the other dog alone, then give her time to calm back down. When she is calm, release her with "Okay" to let her play again. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Luna
Golden Retriever
1 Year
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Question
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Luna
Golden Retriever
1 Year

I rescued my golden Luna when she was 10 months old, and she already had habits like barking. She doesn't always bark at us but more when she wants to initiate play with my other 2 dogs. She won't stop barking until they play with her which gets very irritating!! I try like saying no but she doesn't care half the time. Please help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
460 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karly, Work on teaching her the "Quiet" command and the "Out" command. Also, work on getting her really excited and then suddenly giving her a command. When you give her the command, stop all play and wait until she obeys. When she obeys, then reward her, and after a minute tell her "Okay" and start playing again. Do this to help her learn self-control and how to calm herself down. Check out the article below and follow the "Quiet" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark To teach her "Out", toss a large treat several feet away from you, while with the same hand, pointing to where you want her to go with your pointer finger. When she runs over to get the food, praise her. As soon as she finishes eating the treat, tell her "Okay" to indicate that she can come back toward you, and encourage her back. Repeat this often until you can point and say "Out" and she will go to where you are pointing before you toss the treat. When she does that, then toss the treat to her when she is in the correct spot, away from you, where you pointed. Next, transition to using it in real life. Whenever she disobeys the "Out" command, then get in front of her and calmly and firmly walk toward her until she backs out of the area you told her to get out of. Continue to block her and stand firm until she gives up trying to go back to where you told her to leave. If she tries to return to the area you told her to leave once you walk back there or away from there, then repeat walking toward her. Expect to repeat it a lot at first. The more consistent you are about enforcing her staying out of somewhere you have told her to leave, the more likely she is to respect your command. Practice in the kitchen, around things she wants to bother like plants, and finally, around other dogs. Keep her out of the area you tell her to leave, until she is told "Okay", so that she will learn to learn and stay out of an area through your consistency. This takes repetition. Once she knows "Quiet", "Out", and how to calm herself, then when she is playing give her instructions. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks, and if she continues to bark, tell her "Out" and get between her and the other dog and walk toward her until she leaves the other dog alone, then give her time to calm back down. When she is calm, if the other dog wants to play or she can be calm around the other dog now, then release her with "Okay" to let her play again. Be very consistent with this. Expect it to several repetitions of making her leave the area before she gives up. If the barking continues, even after she leaves the area, then purchase a small canister of Pressurized air, called a Pet Convincer. Tell her "Quiet" one more time. If she disobeys, then tell her "Ah Ah" while spraying a bit of air at her side, by her rib cage. Do not spray her in the face. The air is simply to snap her out of the barking, since barking is a self-perpetuating behavior, meaning that it is it's own reward. When she is calm and leaving the other dog alone or playing quietly with him, then reward her with calm praise and treats. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bella
pitbull
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Bella
pitbull
4 Months

Hello!

I have a 7 yo Husky and I just got a Pitiful puppy and they love each other! However, the puppy barks a lot while playing with the Husky and now the Husky is starting to bark as well. Last night I was trying to make her stop and she bit my face - still playing you know. How can I make her understand that it's ok to play with each other but the loud and continuous barking is not allowed? I don't want her to think that playing is not nice. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
460 Dog owners recommended

Hello Leticia, First, I suggest teaching the "Quiet" command using the "Quiet" method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, I suggest teaching an "Out" command - which means leave the area, to use when she needs a time out to calm back down, or if disobeys your Quiet command. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Once she knows the Out command, to avoid being bitten during the wrestling, I suggest keeping a drag leash on her that doesn't have a handle, so that you can simply step on the leash if she ignored your command, pick it up and lead her away from your husky to enforce obedience. Check out VirChewLy leashes from the link below for something durable that is less likely to get caught on furniture (only use the leash on her when you are supervising). VirChewLy leashes: https://www.amazon.com/VirChewLy-Indestructible-Leash-Medium-Black/dp/B001W8457I?psc=1&SubscriptionId=0ENGV10E9K9QDNSJ5C82&tag=lidotr-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B001W8457I Work on obedience with your Husky as well so that she will respond to commands and leave the area or become quiet as needed also. Be careful anytime you are trying to get between two dogs - use the right tools and precautions to avoid teeth, such as drag leashes. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Panda
Flat Coated Retriever
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Panda
Flat Coated Retriever
3 Years

She is obsessed with sticks and balls. This situation has suddenly got much worse and she now barks continuously until somebody throws something for her. She will do it to anyone, if we are having lunch in the garden she literally does not stop, she will even go up to a stranger and do it. We've tried ignoring the barking, but there is no end to it!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
460 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emmy, I suggest teaching her a command such as Quiet or Out - which means leave the area. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Work on those two command and also following the "how to use out to deal with pushy behavior" section of the Out article. If the barking continues as disobedience once you tell her Quiet or Out, then it's time to use a punisher carefully to interrupt her obsessiveness and calm her down enough to redirect her focus onto something more appropriate. You can use a Pet Convincer, which is a small canister of pressurized air sprayed briefly at her side to surprise her. Only use the unscented air and NOT citronella - which lingers to long .Teach her Out and Quiet first though, so that the discipline is for disobeying your command when she continues to bark, which helps her understand why she is being disciplined and how to avoid it in the future. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Molly
Bearded Collie
7 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Molly
Bearded Collie
7 Years

Molly loves playing ball, especially in the house but she barks incessantly, when you can't find the ball, when you're too slow in picking it up, she's just demanding. She understands 'last one' and I've tried turning my back and even walking out of the room when she barks at me but no success, we don't seem to be able to play without accompanying barks. We live in a terraced house so not great for neighbours and as our daughter is expecting a baby I'm worried the barking will upset him. Can you help?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
460 Dog owners recommended

Hello Moyra, I suggest teaching the "Quiet" command from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Once she has learned what Quiet means, use that command when she barks and hide the ball until she stops barking. When she stops barking for even a second, throw the ball for her as a reward for barking. Once you have practiced that so that she understands that she is supposed to be quiet when told quiet and will be given the ball if she obeys, if she still continues to bark regularly after a couple of weeks, then I suggest looking into a high quality bark collar (NOT citronella). Do your research into brands and quality. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lottie
Labradoodle
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lottie
Labradoodle
9 Months

She barks when she plays with other dogs? I was reading the quiet command but I do not know how I am going to get her to bark when it is just her and I?

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