Training

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2 min read

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How to Train Your Dog to Not Herd

Training

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2 min read

|

1

Comments

How to Train Your Dog to Not Herd
Hard difficulty iconHard
Time icon1-3 Months
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

Does your dog nip at your heels, chase children, or round up other pets? These actions are typical herding behaviors. Really it's no surprise that some dogs have such a strong herding instinct, because that's what they were bred to do.

If you have a Border collie, Australian cattle dog, or even a corgi, then it is no surprise they want to round things up. After all, their distant ancestors were selectively bred because they showed such skill in thinking on their paws and keeping sheep or cattle in order.

The only thing that's changed is the dog has come out of the barn or kennel and into the home --often bringing a deep instinctive drive to herd with them. But if their herding habit means rounding up kids then safety becomes a big issue. Therefore for the sake of all involved, it's best to take control and teach your dog not to herd.

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Defining Tasks

Success in training a dog not to herd, means interrupting their behavior so they return to your side (or perform a command such as 'down'). The idea is to teach rock solid obedience of a command that is incompatible with herding. For example, 'come' has them run back to you, while 'down' has them lie down and stop moving.

The urge to chase and herd is deep-seated, therefore it's as well to start training in a place with few distractions. And when you move out into the park or fields, keep the dog under control on a longline. Remember, the act of chasing is a huge reward for the dog, so you need to prevent this source of satisfaction so he's ready to listen to you.

As with most training, start as you mean to go on with a puppy. However, if your adult dog has an ingrained herding habit, don't despair. You can break the habit but it will take longer, so be patient.

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Getting Started

You will need:

  • A longline
  • Tasty treats
  • Patience

Training a dog to stop any ingrained behavior takes considerable time and dedication. Aim to practice with the dog at least twice a day, for around 15 minutes. Keep the sessions fun and stop before the dog gets mentally tired. It's also a great idea to end on a high note, with a command the dog already knows, so he's left feeling good about himself.

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The Exercise & Stimulation Method

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Exercise & Stimulation method for How to Train Your Dog to Not Herd
1

Understand the idea

Train all you like, but if the dog is brim full of energy and bored to boot, your efforts will fall on deaf ears. Key to training is getting the dog in the right frame of mind so that he listens to you and isn't distracted by boundless energy in need of release.

2

Exercise

Give the dog plenty of physical activity and exercise. If necessary, keep him on a longline so you have control should he spot something worth rounding up. Games such as fetch are great, as it tires the dog and also teaches him to come back to you.

3

Puzzle feeders

Keep the dog mentally stimulated. Instead of feeding from a bowl, use puzzle feeders so he has to work out how to get his grub. You don't necessarily have to buy special equipment, because scattering his kibble on grass or hiding small plates of food around the house are super-fun for him.

4

Mouthing outlet

Herding dogs like using their mouths. Provide an outlet for this with regular games of tug. In addition, give him chews or chew toys to occupy his mouth when he's resting.

5

Training as mental stimulation

Basic obedience training is also great mental stimulation. Be sure to use reward-based methods and keep things fun, and he'll adore this one-to-one time with you.

The Rock Solid Recall Method

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Rock Solid Recall method for How to Train Your Dog to Not Herd
1

Understand the idea

When a dog will 'come' on command, you have the power to interrupt inappropriate behavior such as herding.

2

Use a longline to learn

Have the dog on a longline, with 10 feet or so of freedom. Let him explore and sniff, but when he happens to turn toward you, get his attention and offer out a treat in your hand. As he walks to you to get the treat, say "come" in a firm but happy voice.

3

Build the link between 'come' and a reward

Repeat. The dog learns that when he hears the command "come" and approaches you, he receives a treat.

4

Work with different distances

Vary how far away the dog is when you give the "come" command. Always be super-enthusiastic when he responds. Practice in different places, and from different distances, until he obeys regularly. Then try off lead in a quiet place or the yard.

5

What NOT to do

What NOT to do is also important. If the dog takes an age to respond, never chastise him when he does come at last. You want him to only link 'come' to good things, not bad.

The Spot and Prevent Method

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Spot and Prevent method for How to Train Your Dog to Not Herd
1

Understand the idea

Most dogs have signature behavior that signals they are about to start herding. Learn what your dog's signature is and then interrupt him before he starts herding.

2

Tune into his body language

With the dog on the longline, watch him closely. You want to identify what it is he does immediately before herding. For many dogs, this is crouching down, chin low to the ground, eyes focused on what he is about to herd.

3

Identify triggers

Also take note of what it is that triggers his herding behavior. Sometimes it's an actual object such as sheep or your ankles, other times its movement, such as someone running or a cycle whizzing past

4

Recreate the trigger in a controlled way

Get a friend to recreate a herding situation (for example, running past the dog). Watch your dog's body language and as he prepares to sprint away, give the 'come' command. If he does as instructed, give him lots of praise and a tasty treat as a reward

5

What to do If he ignores you

If he ignores you, then restrain him on the longline and say a firm "No". Ultimately he learns that coming to you earns him nice things.

By Pippa Elliott

Published: 11/03/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Rocco

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German Shepherd

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4 Months

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Question

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He will not leave older dog alone unless i tell him my older dog 5yrs old has recently started growl n snarl at him if he comes near him he will play when its on his terms and has always had other dogs in his life im worried he wont gel

Aug. 8, 2021

Rocco's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ruth, Taking them on walks together would be a good exercise to help them bond in a lower stress way - especially if the walks are a bit more structured and one dog on either side or two people walking them - so pup can't jump on the older dog or bite them during the walk. Whenever puppy enters the room, give your older dog a treat while pup is not looking. Whenever he is calm, relaxed or tolerant of puppy also give him a treat. Try not to let puppy see you rewarding him though so that he doesn’t run over and overwhelm him. I also suggest crate training the puppy. Use the Surprise method from the article linked below to gradually help him learn to be calm in the crate and to relax by using rewards for being Quiet. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate pup at night and when you leave, and you can use an exercise pen with some toys in it also. When you cannot directly supervise the dogs together, puppy should be crated or in the pen. If you want pup to be free but don't want to chase after him while you are home, you can also clip him to yourself using a six-foot leash, so that he has to stay near you and not wander near your other dog. When you are supervising, teach both dogs the Out command (which means leave the area) and make whoever is causing issues leave the area as needed (like pup pestering your older dog). Out command: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I would also teach the puppy Leave It, and Place, so that you can help pup learn self-control around your other dog, and give puppy a calm place they can go (the place bed), so the dogs can be in the same room without the puppy always trying to go over to the older dog or needing to be confined completely while out. Place will take time to teach though, so the crate and exercise pen are still super important at this age. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Decide what your house rules are for both dogs and you be the one to enforce the rules instead of the dogs. No aggression, no pushiness, no stealing toys, no stealing food, no being possessive of people or things, no bothering another dog when they want to be left alone, or any other unwanted behavior - if one dog is causing a problem you be the one to enforce the rules so that the dogs are NOT working it out themselves. For example, if pup comes over to your older dog when he is trying to sleep, tell pup Out. If puppy obeys, praise and reward him. If he disobeys, stand in front of your older dog, blocking the pup from getting to him, and walk toward pup calmly but firmly until pup leaves the area and stops trying to go back to your older dog. If your older dog growls at your pup, make your older dog leave the room while also disciplining pup by making them leave for antagonizing if they did. Be vigilant and take the pressure off of your older dog - you want him to learn to look to you when there is a problem, and for puppy to learn respect for your older dog because you have taught it to him and not because your older dog has had to resort to aggression or he has to hide all the time. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Aug. 10, 2021


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