How to Train Your Dog to Not Jump on Strangers

Medium
2-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Do you live in fear of your doorbell? Will you only take your dog out for walks late at night or only on desolate country roads? If you answered yes to both questions, you may have a jumper in your home!

Most young dogs simply can't contain themselves and jump frantically whenever meeting someone new. But if this somewhat obnoxious habit isn't nipped in the bud, you could end up with a full-sized hound pouncing on all of your guests! Definitely not an ideal scenario.

Defining Tasks

While you may think that your pooch is just trying to hug new friends, the truth is much smellier. Dogs are pretty much governed by their noses. When two dogs meet, they figure out everything they need to know by shoving a nose where the sun don't shine.

When a dog meets a person, they want get a good whiff of all the smells of the human. People pack the majority of their scent in their crotches and out of their mouths. Pants block most of the interesting stuff below the belt, so many a pupper heads upward to do their first-encounter investigating. This is really not polite canine behavior, and can actually be quite dangerous if the dog is big or the recipient is unsteady.

Getting Started

So how do you convince your furbaby to say hello on all fours? You'll be happy to know that there are multiple ways to teach your pup some manners. To be prepared, you should have:

  • Some Assistants: Round up as many volunteers as you can to help reshape your bounding buddy’s behavior. If at all possible, try to get some that your dog has never met before.
  • A Leash: Until your pupper gets the picture, you need to start restraining him every time someone comes into your house. You can even attach the leash to a sturdy object to do the heavy holding for you.
  • Treats: For the pooch who follows his stomach, grab some tasty treats to help entice him away from guests or oncoming strangers.

When training your dog not to jump, only include willing participants into your sessions. You're likely to lose a friend or two if you allow your furbaby to practice on them without notice.

Below are some excellent ways to train your dog not to jump on people. With lots of work, you and your pup will be answering the door and walking through town like nobody's business.

The Tether Training Method

Effective
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Step
1
Use the leash
When someone comes to your door, put your dog's leash on him so you can gain control at any point during the greeting.
Step
2
Put your dog in a sit
Make your dog sit a ways away from the door, like on his mat. Give him a treat for staying in the sit position.
Step
3
Ignore the dog
Ask the person entering not to acknowledge your pooch (who is hopefully sitting like a good boy).
Step
4
Reward good behavior
Praise your dog and give him a treat every now and then to let him know that he's doing the right thing.
Step
5
Let him say hi
If he's behaved well up to this point, allow him to say a calm hello, and then lay him down close to you.
Recommend training method?

The Sneaky Setup Method

Effective
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Step
1
Call on your assistant
Enlist the help of some of your dog- loving buds, the more, the merrier.
Step
2
Have them come in
Whenever one of them comes over, have them enter your home multiple times.
Step
3
Retry if there's jumping
Each time your pooch bounces, the enter-er must say, “oops!”, back out of the door and shut it.
Step
4
Reward the good
If your pup stays paws to the floor, praise him like crazy, or even offer a treat.
Step
5
Go outside
Take the training session out to the sidewalk (on leash).
Step
6
Arrange a meeting
Have your volunteer approach your dog and you.
Step
7
Have them turn around
As soon as the eager pupper pulls on the leash or jumps in the direction of the oncoming person, said person must turn around and walk the other way.
Step
8
Let the meeting happen
If your mutt can get her bearings and simmer down, your assistant can resume walking closer. The overall goal is to have a calm greeting that doesn't involve any jumping.
Step
9
Repeat!
Continue these exercises until your dog starts to understand that a calm response works better.
Recommend training method?

The Flying Food Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Place the treats
Set a bag of treats somewhere near your home's entrance, but well out of Fido’s reach.
Step
2
Prepare for any entry
Whenever a you or a visitor arrives, grab the treats.
Step
3
Use the goodies
Toss one treat a fair ways away from your guest or yourself.
Step
4
Keep tossing
If your dog goes for it, toss another, and another each about ten feet from the entering human.
Step
5
Continue during excitement
Keep throwing those treats until your furbaby visibly calms down.
Step
6
Reward success
Praise them with lots of pets and coos if this happens.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

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