How to Train Your Dog to Not Pee at Night

Medium
1-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

You're in that place between dreams and reality. You hear the sound of a babbling stream as you drift off. But wait! There are no rivers in your house! You shoot out of bed as you clue into what's happening. Sure enough, a golden puddle awaits you smack dab in the middle of your living room.

Anyone who's dealt with a midnight urinator knows how much of pain this bad habit can be. But why would a dog who is otherwise house trained insist on “going” inside after the sun goes down? Finding that out will help you better address the situation.

Defining Tasks

Peeing at night can happen for a whole heap of reasons. Sometimes it's just a matter of not being supervised before potty training is complete. Other times, your dog could be marking his territory in a spot that he previously peed on and can still smell.

Another reason that younger pups have night time accidents has to do with when they eat and drink. Their bladders are small, and empty faster than older pooches. If you're giving your youngster a giant bowl of water before bed, she might not be able to hold it until morning. Thankfully, most of these problems are fixable!

Getting Started

To help your fur buddy make it through the night with no accidents, you'll need to be prepared. Try to come to the table with the following:

  • An Alarm: You may think it's overkill, but it's easy to let minutes turn into hours when you aren't paying attention. Having an alarm can help you set a strict schedule.
  • Cleaning Supplies: Don't just grab your favorite bargain brand! Dish out the extra dollars for an enzyme-based cleaner made specifically to beat dog urine.
  • A Crate: Some dogs just need a safe space to become their den. A dog's instinct tells them not to pee in their den, so staying in the crate overnight might stop sneaky floor pees.

Peeing inside at night can also be a sign that your dog isn't feeling so hot. It's a good idea to get a full check-up to make sure all is well before trying to train your dog out of this unpleasant habit.

Below are some methods that you can use to help both Rover and you sleep through the nights. Remember, if you catch your pooch in the act of peeing inside, don't freak out! Clap your hands loudly and give a firm “no!”, then lead the dog outside.


The Rigid Routine Method

Effective
0 Votes
Rigid Routine method for Not Pee at Night
Step
1
Set your alarm
Pick a time in the evening that is about two hours before bedtime.
Step
2
Take the bowl away
When the alarm goes off, take away your pup’s water dish.
Step
3
Go outside
Make sure you give your dog one or two more potty breaks before heading to bed.
Step
4
Keep tabs on your dog
Bring your pooch’s bed in your room so you'll hear if he gets up.
Step
5
Don't sleep in!
If your pup makes it through the night, be sure to get him outside first thing in the morning to relieve himself.
Step
6
Reward a job well done
After he “goes” in the right spot, praise him with a treat.
Recommend training method?

The Marking Menace Method

Effective
0 Votes
Marking Menace method for Not Pee at Night
Step
1
Find where your dog has peed
Locate all of the pee spots in your home. If you really want to be thorough, you can use a UV light.
Step
2
Clean the spots
Get your heavy duty enzyme cleaner and soak the area.
Step
3
Follow the label
Get your heavy duty enzyme cleaner and soak the area.
Step
4
Try it out
See how your dog does overnight after a thorough cleaning. If he does not return to the pee areas, you may have beaten the smell!
Step
5
Steam clean!
If your first clean didn't stop the night accidents, you may want to rent a steam cleaner or hire a professional. Then you'll know for sure that all urine scents are gone.
Recommend training method?

The Cozy Crate Method

Effective
0 Votes
Cozy Crate method for Not Pee at Night
Step
1
Bring in the crate
Put it somewhere that your family is, like a living room or bedroom.
Step
2
Make it cozy
Think of what a den looks like. Try putting a towel on top of the crate and a fluffy blanket inside.
Step
3
Check the size
Your dog should be able to comfortably lay down in his crate, but only just! If it's too roomy in there, the pup may designate a corner for peeing.
Step
4
Put a treat inside
Let your dog know that the crate is a good thing. Give him a tasty treat once he goes inside and put his favorite toys in there.
Step
5
Go outside before bed
Make sure that your pupper fully relieves himself before heading in for the night.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Tiger
Rottweiler
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Tiger
Rottweiler
2 Years

How to prevent not to pee at night at night

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
30 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kartikey, While sleeping most dogs' bladders become less active, making it easier for them to hold it until morning. While your dog is awake his bladder will be active though and he will not be able to hold it for as long. First of all, make sure that you are taking him outside to go potty right before it is time to go to sleep for the night, and not one or two hours beforehand. When you take time out, watch him and make sure that he actually eliminates. Some dogs will get distracted outside and will not eliminate, and then they will have to go in the middle of the night, which causes accidents because you are sleeping. Once he wakes up in the morning, his bladder will "wake up" too, so you will need to take him to the bathroom right away. Not thirty minutes or an hour later, but right away. Most dogs naturally will "hold it" when they are in a confined space, to keep from eliminating where they are eating or sleeping. For this reason, try putting him into a crate at night to encourage him to hold it. This will only work however if he eliminated right before bed and again as soon as he wakes up in the morning. Crating him will encourage him to try to hold it for longer though, and it will help him break the bad habit of going in your home. Make sure that any accidents that he has had before, have been cleaned up well with a pet safe spray that contains enzymes. It is the enzymes in the spray that break down the protein in the pee and poop so that your dog can no longer smell it. If your dog can still smell where he eliminated before, then the smell will encourage him to go there again and cause confusion. Just because people can no longer smell it does not mean that a dog cannot, since their since of smell is much better than ours. Also avoid cleaners containing ammonia because ammonia smells like urine to a dog. Make sure that you take away all food and water two hours before bedtime, and do not give it back to him until after he has eliminated in the morning. His last drink and meal for the day need to happen at least two hours before bed so that his body can shut down for sleep and not be digesting still. Otherwise, if his body is still digesting, he will need to eliminate. If you do all of these things and are still having problems, then visit your veterinarian. A dog at two years of age can normally hold his bladder for ten hours overnight so long as he eliminates right before bed and right when he wakes up, does not eat or drink during the two hours right before bed, is encouraged to hold his bladder by being confined at night, is not encouraged to pee inside by old pee or poop smells, and has been potty trained in your home before so that he understands that he is not supposed to eliminate inside. If he is still having accidents after all of these things, then he might have a medical issue such as a urinary tract infection or incontinence, that effect his ability to hold his bladder for long periods of time. If this is the case, the problem will not get better until it has been treated. Urinary tract infections can also lead to kidney infections, which are dangerous if left untreated. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Otis
Miniature Pinscher
2 Years
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Question
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Otis
Miniature Pinscher
2 Years

I have several issues with Otis overall he is a very good dogs and for the most part he listens well but I have not been able to get the potty training down. We have had a steady schedule for almost 2 years now. I get up and he goes potty at 6:30 then breakfast then he goes in his kennel when I leave for work I come him at noon and let him out. Now not every day but it happens quite frequently he pees in his cage before I get home for my lunch break. Usually after lunch when he goes back in his kennel he makes it until we get home at about 4-4:30. We also have an issue with him going pee in the house at night again not every night but it’s happening still. I have tried to limit water and like i said we’re on a pretty set schedule but he’s still having these problems.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
30 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katelyn, If the accidents are recent after a period of being house broken, and you know that he is peeing when you take him outside during those trips outside, then I would suggest taking him to your vets. He might have a urinary tract infection or some form of urinary incontinence, that makes it physically impossible for him to hold it for that long. Certain medications, such as steroids, can also cause frequent peeing. When you take him outside to go potty during the morning and during the day, if you are not already so, then follow him outside and make sure that he is actually going completely. If he is getting distracted and playing and then coming back inside without having peed, or is only peeing a little bit to mark something but not emptying his bladder completely, then that might be your issue, and making the trips outside more boring by adding a leash and supervising him, and then rewarding him when he goes fully before bringing him back in, should help. Also make sure that when you clean up the accidents that you are using a pet safe cleaner that contains enzymes. The enzymes will break down the pee enough to remove the smell to the point where he cannot still smell it. If he can still smell it, even if you cannot, then the smell will encourage him to eliminate in that same area again and again. Another option is to set up an exercise pen and experiment with leaving him in there if he has lost the desire to hold his bladder inside his crate due to the accidents. This option might work if he is normally accident free while loose in your home when you are there.This should remove the association with peeing in the crate if that has become a habit now. For some dogs this will make things better and for some it will make it worse, so you will have to try it to see. If you try this then make sure that you are still following him outside to make sure that he pees though, or if that caused the original problem, the problem will still occur in the new area despite removing the association with the crate. A final option, if the issue is simply that he lacks the physical bladder capacity needed to hold it for that long, especially if your vet discovers a form of urinary incontinence, is to teach him to use a litter box in an exercise pen area while you are gone. Here is a Wag! article for teaching your dog to how to use a litter box: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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