How to Train Your Dog to Not Poop in His Crate

Easy
1-3 Weeks
General

Introduction

You’ve brought the cutest little puppy into your home, he fits snugly in your hands and he forces even the grumpiest of individuals into a smile. While he is adorable and everything you imagined he would be, you don’t enjoy coming downstairs in the morning to the smell of excrement. It just isn’t the way you want to start your day! It might be manageable if it was just once in the morning, but when you’re regularly greeted by the sight of a stool when you open his crate, then well, something needs to be done.

Apart from the obvious offense to your eyes and your nose, having all that bacteria sit next to your puppy isn’t good for his health. Puppies immune systems are vulnerable and having excrement in the place where he sleeps only increases the chance of him contracting an illness.

Defining Tasks

Every puppy goes through a transitional stage when they move into a new home and get used to their crate, so going about his business in there isn’t uncommon. Thankfully, training him not to defecate in his crate is relatively straightforward. While you will need to use some straightforward obedience commands, training centers more around adjusting his environment and creating a routine.

Puppies are so receptive when they’re young that they quickly get the hang of training and many dogs stop going about their business in their crate in just a few days. Even if he does prove slightly stubborn, you can expect results in a matter of weeks. 

Getting this training right is essential for the health of your dog. You don’t want him picking up early illnesses and you definitely don’t want the hefty vet bills that come with medical problems.

Getting Started

Before your toilet campaign kicks off, there are several things you will need to get hold of. A leash will be essential as you introduce your dog to his new outdoor toilet. You will also need treats or his favorite food to incentivize and reward him.

A quiet place, free from distractions where he feels relatively comfortable will also be required. You may also need to invest in a new, better-sized crate for one of the methods below and some new bedding.

Once you have collected the above, set aside some time each day and just come with a can-do attitude and you’ll be ready to get to work!

The Crate Alterations Method

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Step
1
The right size
Head over to your crate and make sure it is the right size. If his crate is too big then your dog may feel there is enough space to defecate in the corner rather than going outside. The crate should be big enough for him to stand up and turn around in, but it shouldn’t be much bigger.
Step
2
A new crate
If your crate is too big, order a smaller one online or head to a local pet store to buy a new one. Measure the crate before you go and have an idea of what sized crate you need before you head out to make a purchase. Often a simple crate change can stop the habit on its tracks.
Step
3
Feed him his meals in the crate
This may seem odd at first, but dogs don’t want to go to the toilet in the same place they eat. So place his bowl in the crate and leave the door open. It usually takes just a day or two before he will associate his crate with an eating area and will look elsewhere to defecate.
Step
4
Change the crate bedding
Introduce some new blankets and bedding into the crate. Dogs don’t usually like going to the toilet in an area they enjoy sleeping in. If he currently poops and hides it under the bedding, remove the bedding altogether. Not having somewhere to hide it may well deter him from defecating there in future.
Step
5
Deal with accidents promptly
If he can smell previous stools, he will feel more comfortable going to the toilet there again. So quickly remove him and clean the area thoroughly with antibacterial spray. You don’t want him associating his crate with a suitable toilet area.
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The Consistent Schedule Method

Effective
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Step
1
Meal routine
Feed him meals at the same time each day. By creating a regular schedule, you will be able to predict when he will need to go to the toilet, enabling you to remove him from the crate before he gets a chance to go.
Step
2
Take him out regularly
This is particularly necessary for puppies who need to be let out every hour if they are under 12 weeks old. It is always worth taking him out within 20 minutes of him eating a meal as this is the time the bowels are stimulated.
Step
3
Head back home
If they do not go to the toilet as expected, take him in for 15 minutes and then head back out. If you know a number 2 is likely to be imminent, don’t be put off if he doesn’t go straight away, simply head back out again promptly. It is crucial you always have your dog outside when he needs to go, this will get him into a habit of only going outside.
Step
4
Timing
As your puppy gets older, increase the time between taking him out. When he is about 6 months old he will only need to go outside every 3-4 hours. Ensure this still ties in with taking him out after meals. This will slowly train his body clock to tie in with your toilet schedule and soon he won’t ever need a number 2 when he is in his crate anyway.
Step
5
Never punish
Don’t punish him when he does defecate in his crate. Dogs do not respond well when they are terrified. He may even start defecating in his crate out of fear, so simply take him out of the crate when he does have an accident, clean the mess up thoroughly and return him.
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The Postive & Negative Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
Be treat ready
Arm yourself with treats whenever you take him outside. To start with, you need to be prepared to shower him with praise and treats whenever he doesn’t go to the toilet in his crate.
Step
2
Reward promptly
When you’re outside, give him a treat within 3 seconds of finishing his business. It is important he gets the treat as quickly as possible otherwise he won’t associate the treat with going to the toilet. Also make sure you don’t stare at him waiting for him to go, puppies in particular will be nervous to start with and need to feel comfortable to go about their business.
Step
3
Lose the treats
As he starts to poop outside regularly, slowly reduce the frequency of treats. When you are confident he is getting the hang of the toilet training, it’s important you reduce the treats and praise, you don’t want him piling on the pounds!
Step
4
'NO'
When you see him about to poo in his crate, say ‘NO’ loudly and firmly. Use your body language and voice to convey your disapproval, but be careful not to overdo it, you don’t want to terrify him. Only do this if you catch him about to go to the toilet, if you tell him off hours after the deed he won’t make the connection between the behavior and your angry response.
Step
5
React swiftly
Take him out until he has have gone about his business. As soon as he has, be sure to praise and reward him as part of the positive reinforcement outlined in the steps above. Using a combination of both positive and negative reinforcements will quickly teach him where it is and isn’t acceptable to go to the toilet. His days of going to the toilet in his crate will soon be over!
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Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Denton
Husky
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Denton
Husky
2 Years

Denton goes potty outside every morning and then I finish getting ready for work. He is then placed in the kennel I will normally get hone and try to let him out during lunch time. However, he has defecated in his kennel. And this happens even if I leave him in there for a 5 to 10 minutes. I think he suffer from separation anxiety. Cause when I’m home and he is in the kennel he is fine. It’s when I leave and he can’t hear me what should I do. Any advice

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Elizabeth, First, make sure he is actually pooping after eating breakfast in the morning and not getting distracted while outside. Most dogs will need to go potty again 30-45 minutes after eating so plan his morning routine accordingly to make sure he has a change to poop first and hasn't learned to hold it until it's quiet in his crate. Take him potty on a leash and slowly walk him around outside on the leash to keep him focused. Tell him to "Go Potty" and give a treat for peeing. After he pees, tell him to "Go Potty" again and walk him around at least twice as long, and reward with several treats or pieces of dog food if he poops - to teach him to poop quickly when you tell him to go potty. If the issue still happens despite pooping outside before you leash, it could be separation anxiety. There are a couple of routes you can take with the separation anxiety. The first step is to work on building his independence and his confidence by adding a lot of structure and predictability into his routine. Things such as making him work for rewards like meals, walks, and pets. Working on "Stay" and "Place," commands while you move away or leave the room, and teaching him to remain inside a crate when the door is open. Change your routine surrounding leaving so that he does not anticipate alone time and build up his anxiety before you leave - which is hard for him to deescalate from, and be sure to give him something to do in the crate during the day (such as a food stuffed Kong to chew on); this is the general protocol for separation anxiety. It is gentle but can take a very long time for some dogs. Another protocol involves teaching the dog to cope with their own anxiety by making their current anxious go-to behaviors unpleasant, giving them an opportunity to stop those behaviors long enough to learn something new, then rewarding the correct, calmer behavior instead. This protocol can feel harsh because it involves careful correction, but it tends to work much quicker for many dogs. If you go this route, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using both positive reinforcement and fair correction. Who is extremely knowledgeable about e-collar training, and can follow the protocol listed below, to help you implement the training. Building his independence and structure in his life will still be an important part of this protocol too. First, check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Make sure you are implementing what he teaches there in other areas of his life too. Second, purchase a remote electronic collar, e-collar, with a wide range of levels. I recommend purchasing E-Collar Technologies Mini Educator for this. If you are not comfortable with an e-collar then you can use a vibration collar (the Mini Educator is also a vibration mode) or unscented air remote controlled air spray collar. DO NOT use a citronella collar, buy the additional unscented air canister if the collar comes with the citronella and make sure that you use the unscented air. (Citronella collars are actually very harsh). The vibration or spray collars are less likely to work though, so you may end up spending more money by not purchasing an e-collar first. The Mini Educator has very low levels of stimulation, that can be tailored specifically to your dog. It also has vibration and beep tones that you can try using first, without having to buy additional tools. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Once you have found the right stimulation level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours. Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave the room. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking or see him start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time he barks or tries to get out of the crate, stimulate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. Do not go higher than three more levels on the mini-educator or one level on another collar with less levels right now though because he has not learned what he is supposed to be doing yet. The level you end up using on him on the mini educator collar should be low to medium, within the first forty levels of the one-hundred to one-hundred-and-twenty-five levels, depending on the model you purchase. If it is not, then have a professional evaluate whether you have the correct "working level" for him. If he continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around inside. When he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him. Once he is less anxious he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more. First, he needs his anxious state of mind interrupted so that he is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate for him to relieve his boredom instead, since he will need something to do at that point. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

We have a now 8 month doberman puppy that we are really struggling with. We followed these instructions the first time with her and her sister. Her sister got it within a month and is completely potty trained— but for her , for months, every night at 3 am — or some time when we are sleep .. she decides to go to the bathroom despite our training. We were told to start over and put her in a crate again to do all of this. We feed her in the crate, we have given her blankets and her favorite toys and bones. And she has despite all our efforts continued to poop on her food bowls and on her pillows, blankets, and toys. We changed her diet back and forth and we have done every schedule known to man. We have packed lunch and gone on long hikes in the woods. Outside for the majority of the day and giving treats to her when she poops but we get home and fall asleep she poops in the crate. She lays in it which can not be good for her health and most of the times she does this all night because we are not aware unless we do a morning bathroom run(which happens at 3 am mostly) . We do not know what else to do. We have trained both dogs the same, and for a month— we could leave both out. But she started regressing and pooping and now that she’s back in the crate it is an every morning chaotic mess. What should we do? It’s been 8 long months of taking this advice and trying this schedule or that schedule and changing diets, but she still goes every early morning and makes a routine out of it for us to the point that there is: bath, and return to clean crate. It’s almost like she expects us to just do this every night/ early morning now that shea back in crate. Like she has grown into this habit and we do not know what to do. Please help us, we are at the breaking point.

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Ares
Husky Jack
8 Months
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Ares
Husky Jack
8 Months

We got Ares when was 4-5 months from a shelter. Who knows what habits or where he was before then. When we first got him home he was super well behaved and things were looking up. After a month he seemed to get comfortable and started peeing and pooping in his crate. We thought maybe it had to do with the shelter or wherever he was before. We would take him out before we left anywhere and sometimes he’d still go. We take him out between every two hours but everything I’m reading says at 6 months it should be every 4 hours and he’s 8 months..
The habit of him going in there has never stopped. Most of the time he’ll even EAT his poop to dispose of evidence 😅 what is our problem you think?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sydney, First, just to rule a few things out....Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to stand up, lie down, and turn around and not so big he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - too big won't encourage a dog's natural desire to hold it in a confined space. Second, make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate like a soft bed or towel - that can also sabotage efforts - check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent type bed. If it's not either of those things, then it is very possible be has lots his natural desire to hold it in a confined space because he was kept in such a space too often and forced to potty there - he may even associate it with pottying and think he is supposed to go there. If that's the case you need to potty train a different way. Check out the tethering method from the article linked below and follow that method whenever someone is home: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you have to leave, unless he has a safe, cool space to stay outside, you will need to create a durable exercise pen or dog-proof room and train him to go potty on a real-grass pad in that room, using the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. Set this area up somewhere that you can block off access to later when he is fully potty trained because eventually you will want to be able to just leave him in the main area of the house and because of the tethering method and the main area of the house not being associated with pottying - like the room with the pen or dog-proofed room is, he should hold his bladder while you are gone - this probably won't be an option until he is past the chewing phase too though....check out the Exercise Pen method below and use a real-grass pad instead of a litter box (or create your own out of sod and a shallow, plastic storage box), and don't phase the exercise pen away like the method mentions - since you will eventually just transition to him only going potty outside and getting rid of the grass pad entirely later. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad - not astroturf: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lucy
Bulldog
5 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Lucy
Bulldog
5 Months

Our new puppy was housed in a crate where it was OK for her to poop and pee. How to we break the cycle of this since she only will poop and pee in there? She thinks we are crazy when we take her outside. She will, literally, wait to go in her crate to pee and poop. She will step in it and be content. HELP!...please

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kristina, Unfortunately, you will need to use an exercise pen to contain her when you cannot supervise her while potty training, and use the "Tethering" method from the article linked below to teach her to go potty outside. When she gets older and is potty trained, you can then use a crate instead of an exercise pen so that it will take up less space. When you get to that point, I suggest a crate that does not resemble what she used the bathroom in - for instance if she was in a wire crate before use a plastic one. If she used a plastic enclosed one before use a wire one later. Ideally you would be home to take her outside every hour to potty train and tether her to yourself. If that's not an option, set up an exercise pen in an area that she will not have free access to later, like a heated basement or guest bathroom, and put a disposable real grass pad in there for her to go potty on. The real grass will be more consistent with the grass outside. I do NOT suggest using pee pads for this. Real grass pad: https://www.freshpatch.com Tethering Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Angel
Mixed breed
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Angel
Mixed breed
1 Year

I have a new dog and she is about a year old. She has recently began going going to the bathroom in her crate. She covers it with her blankets and lays down next to it. She does this while we are sleeping or away at work. She didn't do this before and we have had her for about 3 weeks. Is this something for concern? We live in an apartment and go on frequently bathroom walks but she has suddenly refused to go to the bathroom. Thanks for the help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ally, First, remove anything absorbent from her crate and make sure that the crate is only big enough for her to lie down, stand up, and turn around, and not so big that she can have an accident in one end and stand in the other end to avoid it. The blankets alone may be the issue. Check out www.primopads.com Look for something non-absorbent to give padding for the next year. Pee and poop should sit on top of anything in the crate with her and not absorb or drain into anything at all, to motivate her to hold it. Second, it is possible that something happened that lead to her not wanting to go potty outside - pooping is vulnerable for a dog and if they feel afraid they may not want to go. She could also simply be distracted. If she isn't going potty outside, then she may be having the accident in the crate when she physically cannot hold it anymore. She also may have learned that she prefers going poop in her crate so she isn't going outside because she is holding it until she gets to her crate intentionally. Whichever one comes first, the crate needs to be adjusted to make it a less enticing place to poop and she needs to be encouraged to poop outside more. When you take her potty, bring a few small tasty treats with you. Tell her to "Go Potty" and when she goes potty, give her one treat for pee. After you tell her to go potty, walk her around again for a few minutes, tell her to "Go Potty" again, and if she goes, give her five treats, one at a time, for going poop. Pay attention to her environment, is it super distracting? Does she seem scared? See if taking her potty in a different area helps her focus or feel more secure. Be sure to take her on a leash to avoid her getting too distracted to go potty. Insist that she goes potty again after peeing every time by telling her to Go Potty again and walking her around slowly on the leash, encouraging her to sniff and taking her away from anything she gets too distracted by. Many young dogs will not go poop on their own when you take them because they are so distracted, and need for you to insist that they go potty again each time they are taken. They will not have to poop every time, but if she hasn't pooped recently, take the time to insist on it in case she does need to go - she will often surprise you by going sometimes when you insisted, even though you didn't really think she had to - making you glad to took the time. If she is pooping more than three times a day, seems in pain when she goes or is constipated - which can cause her to hold it until she isn't able to anymore, or doesn't seem to have control of when she poops, then visit your vet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leo
German shepherd mix
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Leo
German shepherd mix
2 Years

Me and my husband adopted Leo in January and have dealt with training problems. We were told when we adopted him that he knew how to act in the home and in a crate. We came home one day after being gone for maybe an hour and he destroyed the house. We left him in a Crate for about an hour and he chewed through the tray at the bottom. We moved the crate into our room and he sleeps in it just fine and goes into it on his own accord. When we are home he never goes to the bathroom in the house. We leave him to roam the house sometimes when we leave and he always poops. We leave him in the crate when we leave and sometimes he poops, sometimes he doesn’t. He has a strict eating schedule and walking schedule but still does this. I don’t know what to do at this point. I don’t want to come home to poop everyday.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, pup definitely needs to be crated when you aren't there to supervise right now. Also, make sure the issue isn't related to the crate set up or schedule. Go with pup outside to go potty and make sure that he is actually pooping when he goes out before crating him. Be sure to feed meals at least 45 minutes before you will be crating and give an additional potty break 15-45 minutes after food, even if he already peed recently. Many dogs will need to poop after eating, but the urge to go can be a bit delayed, so if you feed then crate right away - you often get an accident. Make sure the crate is the right size. Large enough that pup can turn around, stand up, and lie down, but not so large he can potty on one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - too big and it won't encourage potty training. Make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate. If you want to give a bed, check out something like www.primopads.com and use the included zipties to secure the pad edges all around the crate so that he can't pull it up to chew as easily. The issue might also be a form of separation anxiety. If so, work on building his independence and his confidence by adding a lot of structure and predictability into his routine. Things such as making him work for rewards like meals, walks, and pets. Working on "Stay" and "Place," commands while you move away or leave the room, and teaching him to remain inside a crate when the door is open. Change your routine surrounding leaving so that he does not anticipate alone time and build up his anxiety before you leave - which is hard for him to deescalate from, and be sure to continue to give him something to do in the crate during the day (such as a dog food stuffed Kong to chew on); this is the general protocol for separation anxiety. It is gentle but can take a very long time on its own for some dogs. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Another protocol involves teaching the dog to cope with their own anxiety by making their current anxious go-to behaviors unpleasant, giving them an opportunity to stop those behaviors long enough to learn something new, then rewarding the correct, calmer behavior instead. This protocol can feel harsh because it involves careful correction, but it tends to work much quicker for many dogs. If you go this route, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using both positive reinforcement and fair correction. Who is extremely knowledgeable about e-collar training, and can follow the protocol listed below, to help you implement the training. Building his independence and structure in his life will still be an important part of this protocol too. First, check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Make sure you are implementing what he teaches there in other areas of his life too. Second, purchase a remote electronic collar, e-collar, with a wide range of levels. I recommend purchasing E-Collar Technologies Mini Educator or Garmin Delta Sport or Dogtra for this. If you are not comfortable with an e-collar then you can use a vibration collar (the Mini Educator and Garmin should also have a vibration mode) or unscented air remote controlled air spray collar. DO NOT use a citronella collar, buy the additional unscented air canister if the collar comes with the citronella and make sure that you use the unscented air. (Citronella collars are actually very harsh and the smell - punisher lingers a long time so the dog continues to be corrected even after they stop the behavior). The vibration or spray collars are less likely to work than stimulation e-collars though, so you may end up spending more money by not purchasing an e-collar first. The Mini Educator has very low levels of stimulation, that can be tailored specifically to your dog. It also has vibration and beep tones that you can try using first, without having to buy additional tools. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM A modern, high quality collar will have so many levels that each level should be really subtle and he will likely respond to a low level stimulation. It's uncomfortable but not the harsh shock many people associate with such collars if done right. Once you have found the right stimulation level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours or days if you can (take it off at night to sleep though). Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking or see him start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time he barks or tries to get out of the crate, stimulate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. Do not go higher than three more levels on the mini-educator or two more levels on another collar with less levels right now though because he has not learned what he is supposed to be doing yet. For example, if his level is 13 out of 100 levels on the Mini Educator, don't go past level 16 right now. The level you end up using on him on the mini educator collar will probably be low to medium, within the first forty levels of the one-hundred to one-hundred-and-twenty-five levels, depending on the model you purchase. If it is not, then have a professional evaluate whether you have the correct "working level" for him. If he continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog, sprinkle several treats into the crate without saying anything, then leave again. Practice correcting him from outside when he barks or tries to escape, going back inside and sprinkling treats when he stays quiet, for up to 30 minutes at first. After 30 minutes -1 hour of practicing this, when he is quiet, go back inside and sprinkle more treats. This time stay inside. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around and get stuff done inside. When he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Continue to put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him. Once he is less anxious he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more. First, he probably needs his anxious state of mind interrupted so that he is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate for him to relieve his boredom instead of barking, since he will need something other than barking to do at that point. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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London
Shih Tzu
7 Weeks
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London
Shih Tzu
7 Weeks

Poops in his crate in the middle of the night. I take him out every 2 hours but he seems to be going in between. He will only poop once a day. Help?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katrina, I suggest a trip to your vet first. Pooping more than three times in 24 hours could suggest a medical issue. Most puppies need to be dewormed several times before 10 weeks (I am not a vet). Check out the tethering method and Crate Training method from the article linked below and pay special attention to teaching the "Go Potty" command, taking pup potty on leash, keeping him moving and focused while outside to encourage the urge to poop, and rewarding after he goes potty to help him learn. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Also, make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate, including a soft bed or towel - something soft in the crate will encourage pottying in the crate. Check out www.primopads.com for a non-abosorbent bed idea. Make sure the crate is not too big. It should only be big enough for him to stand up, turn around and lie down. If it's big enough he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it, it won't encourage potty training. A crate divider can make a bigger crate small enough without having to re-buy a crate. Rule out potential medical issues if he is pooping frequently though - because he won't be able to stop the pooping no matter what you do if there is a medical reason behind it that needs addressing. Don't give any food two hours before bed until time to wake up in the morning. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bujee
French Bulldog
1 Year
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Bujee
French Bulldog
1 Year

I have had my dog since 4 months old and had her on schedule using the bathroom every 4 hours. She was doing great and not using the bathroom in her crate as much at the start. Forward to 6 months later. All of a sudden she number 1 and 2 inside her crate on a regular and seems to be nothing i can do to break her off that problem. She seemed to have been create trained where my other dog wasn't and now the other dog does not use the bathroom in crate but she does.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erick, First, take a look at her crate. The crate should only be big enough for her to lie down, stand up, and turn around, and not so big she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - too big of a crate won't encourage her natural desire to hold it while in there. If you went up in crate size that could be to blame, or she may have just realized how big is was all of the sudden. There should also be nothing absorbent in the crate - including a soft dog bed or towel. If you need to give her a bed, check out something like www.primopads.com that is non-absorbent but still has a little firm padding. Second, if the crate smells like pee or poop that's confusing to her. Clean it thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes. Only enzymes will fully remove the smell for a dog's sensitive nose - and any remaining smell will encourage a dog to go potty in there again. You may even need to buy a different type of crate at this point since she now associates it with pottying - if you have a plastic closed in viri-kennel then buy a wire one, and vice versus. If she is being left in crate for too long that could be to blame. If it's less than 8 hours and she is having accidents, then I would check with your vet for a medical condition that could make it so that she can't hold it for very long - forcing her to have an accident. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Baxter
Yorkshire Terrier
Eleven Months
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Baxter
Yorkshire Terrier
Eleven Months

My 11 month old yorkie is in a crate at night and during the day while at work. He will hold his bowel movements and urine during the night until morning. But he will not hold it during the day. I come home daily to him defecating in his crate. He walks around in it and lays in it. So daily bathes and crate cleaning are normal. What can I do to stop this behavior? His crate is doesn’t have much room for him to walk around in. It’s about as tall and long as him.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Misty, A couple of things could be going on here: 1. He was left in the crate too long and forced to have multiple accidents in it so he lost his natural desire to hold it in a crate. At night most dog's digestive system shuts down so many dogs don't need to go potty during the day like the do at night. This can happen with puppy mill puppies, pet store puppies, rescue puppies that are crated too long, or if owners don't let them out frequently enough. 2. He is holding during the day due to a medical problem, distraction while outside, a lack of understanding that he should be pottying outside, or fear of pooping outside for some reason - pooping puts a dog in a vulnerable position so they often don't want to go if they feel unsafe. When a dog holds, at some point they can no longer hold and involuntarily poop wherever they are - even if they don't want to make the crate messy. After this happens enough they typically loose their instinct to keep the crate clean in some cases. I suggest doing the following: 1. When he take him potty, take him on a leash. Tell him to "Go Potty" and whenever he pees, give him one treat. Whenever he poops outside, give him five tiny, tasty treats, one treat at a time. Walk him around slowly, encouraging him to sniff and keeping him on task, tell him to "Go Potty" again after he pees and walk him around again for 5-10 minutes. Most dogs need to be kept focused to poop - pee is usually easier. The rewards and movement should help get his digestive system going, and the treats motivate him to go. 2. If he doesn't poop, he needs to be attached to you with a six foot leash to keep him from wandering off to poop while you are home, and taken out every hour until he poops. Always take him out within thirty minutes of him eating because most dogs need to poop after eating, even if he just peed before being fed. 3. If you have to leave him, place him in an exercise pen with a real grass pad (NOT pee pad) in a room that he does not normally have access to. Check out the "Exercise Pen" method from the article linked below. Practice that method while you are home until he will start going potty on the grass, then only have him use the grass pad while you are gone and need to put him into the exercise pen, and reward pottying outside so the focus is on outside potty training more than the grass pad. He will be learning to go potty on the grass pad AND in that location, which is why the exercise pen needs to be in an area that he normally won't be allowed so that he doesn't have accidents there later once you remove the exercise pen and have him go potty only outside. Do not phase the exercise pen out like the article mentions. You want to keep using it just to keep your home clean right now since you can't use a crate, then remove it completely and not let him into that area anymore when he is fully potty trained in the rest of the house and will hold it while you are gone. The article mentions litter box training, but use a real-grass pad instead - the steps are the same regardless of which you use. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy You won't be able to use a crate again until he is fully potty trained because right now he associates it with going potty. 4. Address any fear of being outside if he seems afraid while outside, or take him somewhere calmer is he seems too distracted and you are currently walking him somewhere with a lot of distractions. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Piper
cockapoo
16 Weeks
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Piper
cockapoo
16 Weeks

Our 16 week old puppy had been doing really well with not pooping in her crate from 10 weeks old. Then at around 14 weeks and continuing, she poops in her crate. Now, she poops in it every night and every time we leave. We give her plenty of opportunities to outside before we put her in the crate. Why is she going backwards with the potty training and what can we do to fix it?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jennifer, Some puppies will get more distracted when they get older. When you take her potty outside, take her on a leash, tell her to "Go Potty" then walk her around to find a place to pee. When she pees, give her one treat. After that tell her to "Go Potty" again and walk her around for another 10 minutes, keeping her focused on what she's doing and redirecting her attention back to sniffing if she starts to get distracted. When she poops, praise her enthusiastically and give her five treats - one treat at a time. Keep the treats by the door so that you will remember to grab them on your way out the door. Many puppies and some dogs will just quickly pee outside so that they can get back to exploring and playing, and they need to be kept focused and kept on task in order to poop too. is she is holding her poop outside, then eventually she will just be forced to hold it wherever she is - such as the crate at night or the middle of the day. If you are letting her into the yard by herself to go potty that is likely to blame. Just not keeping her focused enough or walking her around long enough after peeing could also be the issue. After she eats, make sure that you are taking her back outside to go potty because most puppies need to poop within 15-45 minutes of eating, even if they just went out right before eating. If her poop looks loose or she is having more than 3 poops a day, then I suggest visiting your vet. There may be a medical issue like an infection or parasites that is messing up her GI system and needs to be addressed. (I am not a vet though) Take a look at her crate. The crate should only be big enough for her to lie down, stand up, and turn around, and not so big she can poop in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - too big of a crate won't encourage her natural desire to hold it while in there. If you went up in crate size that could be to blame, or she may have just realized how big is was all of the sudden. There should also be nothing absorbent in the crate - including a soft dog bed or towel. If you need to give her a bed, check out something like www.primopads.com that is non-absorbent but still has a little firm padding. Finally, if she is afraid of something outside, pooping puts a dog in a vulnerable position, so she may be refusing to go because she is nervous. If that is the case, she needs help overcoming her fear of whatever is making her nervous outside. Being distracted is a lot more common than fear though if you are only taking her potty in your own yard and she was previously fine. Watch her body language for signs that she is tense or nervous. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Denim
Shitzu
14 Weeks
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Denim
Shitzu
14 Weeks

Denim has been with us for 1 week . I have to work so I need to leave him in the crate for about 7 hours until I return home . I take him to potty and he does before I leave . When I get home from work he’s pooped his crate . Also when I leave him for short periods less than a hour he poops in his crate and cries the whole time . He doesn’t poop or Lee in his crate at night. What should I do ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Debra, A puppy can only physically hold their pee and poop for the number of months they are in age plus one - meaning that at about 3 months old he physically cannot hold it for longer than 4 hours and thus was forced to go potty in the crate. When this happens often enough a dog will loose their natural desire to keep a confined space clean and will simply learn to potty in that space - making it so that you cannot use a crate to potty train anymore. The above is likely what has happened after a couple of weeks. Puppies also often need to be taken potty 15-45 minutes after eating to poop, even if they just peed before being fed. The food gets their digestive system moving. Make sure you are taking him potty far enough ahead of time after you feed him before you leave to give him a chance to poop outside. At this point you will need to switch to another method besides crate training because he has learned to associate the crate with pottying. Set up an exercise pen in an area of your home where he normally doesn't have access to, like a spare bedroom or bathroom. Place a disposable real-grass pad on one end of the pen and use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below to teach him to potty on the grass pad. Do not use pee pads for this or that could lead to peeing on carpet and rugs. You want him to only learn to pee in that one room on the grass-pad in the pen if your end goal is outside potty training. The method below mentions using a litter box, I suggest using a real-grass pad instead to more closely resemble outside, and not to phase the exercise pen out but keep it where it is until your pup is ready just to be free in the rest of your home and hold it all day - at which point you will just leave him out or confine him to another dog-proofed room, and not crate (you can try reintroducing the crate later once he is fully potty trained to have it as an option during travel). Exercise Pen: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real-grass pad options on amazon too: freshpatch.com doggielawn.com porchpotty.com Use the exercise pen while you are gone or cannot supervise him. When you are home, use the tethering method from the article linked below to teach him how to hold his bladder in the rest of the house so that you can eventually transition him to pottying only outside even while you are gone off when he is 8+ months old and can make it 7-8 hours without an accident by then. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bailey
Shihpoo
11 Weeks
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Bailey
Shihpoo
11 Weeks

We adopted Bailey at 9 weeks. Potty training during the day is going well, but at night, he will poop in his crate. We set alarms & take him out every 3 hours overnight. He will have one completely successful night, then the next night will have pooped every time we go to take him out. We've made the crate small, then he poops in his bed. We took away the bedding, then he cries all night. We do know he loves his bed, he likes his crate & will voluntarily go in during the day to nap & have a snack in there while we eat. We leave his door open all day & only close the door when he's there for bed or for us to run out. He's had no accidents when we have left him during the day. We keep the crate in our family room away from the bedrooms. He does not cry at all, except if he does not have his bed. Could it be separation anxiety? Or is he just young & we just need to be patient? Currently: we are exhausted with getting up only to find he's pooped.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kara, The issue is most likely the bed (for the crate to work there needs to be nothing absorbent in it until fully potty trained) and his daytime routine. Pooping at night is not typical digestion-wise. Is he also pooping outside during the day? How often is he pooping total during 24 hours? You want to get all of the poops "Out" during the day so that his digestive system sleeps at night too. Many puppies get distracted while outside. Follow one of the methods from the article linked below to focus more on getting him to poop 2-3 times during the day when you take him out. Make sure you are teaching him "Go Potty" - which will help him learn to focus better, giving treats for pottying, taking him out on a leash to minimize distractions, and walking him around and keeping him focused well on pooping ("Go Potty" again) after he pees each time. Most puppies just quickly pee, then move onto playing or going back inside and don't stop to poop; you have to insist that he stay focused longer and try in case he needs to. Also, most puppies need to poop 15-45 minutes after eating so be especially vigilant at those times. Movement can help get things going, as can poop scent or attractant sprays. Make sure you are feeding dinner at least two hours before bedtime - you can try moving the meal even a little earlier if it tends to help you. Pooping outside article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is pooping more than 3-4 times in 24 hours, I suggest a trip to your vet to get things checked out. 2-3 times is typical for a puppy. After every meal is also pretty common. For the bed, check out primopads.com. It won't be soft but it's not absorbent and offers a little padding still so can be the in-between of soft and nothing until older. I don't suspect separation anxiety this young - just adjusting still. It shouldn't hurt him to cry. Let him work it out as long as you know other needs are met. When he cries and you know he is just adjusting and doesn't need to go potty, don't let him out until he gets quiet. If you let him out, he won't learn to adjust and will be rewarded for crying so will continue to do so. If you are really consistent expect it to take him up to two weeks to adjust, with 3 days being the normal. Another good reason to remove the bed is most puppies will go through an additional more destructive chewing phase around 6-8 months - this phase is when bedding and toys are often ripped to shreds and pieces can be swallowed because jaws are getting strong by then. If he starts to destroy things at that age, then you will end up having to remove the bed then anyways for safety and training, and it will be harder to do so then than now once he is really used to it. I generally withhold all soft bedding until after fully potty trained and past all the destructive chewing phases. To get him used to being in the crate with the door closed, you can also practice the methods from the article linked below some during the day - especially focusing on the Surprise method. Do not give food at night though because that can lead to more wakefulness and pooping. Crate Training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pebbles
Shihpoo
4 Years
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Pebbles
Shihpoo
4 Years

Pebbles is 4 years old, and I just got her from a home where she was trained to go potty using puppy pads. I am transitioning her to going potty outside and she has been mostly successful peeing outside, but not pooping. Her old family left her in her crate for a while during the day I believe, and today I went out for a few hours and left her and my other dog in their crates (after taking both of them out this morning). When I came back, she had pooped in her crate. This was her first time in her crate here for that long during the day while I was gone so maybe that is part of the problem. All of that to say that I want to know how to train her not to poop in the crate (or in the house at all).

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jasmine, First, make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate - including a soft bed, towel, or stuffed toys. Use something non-absorbent like www.primopads.com if you want to give a bed in the crate and need something else. Second, make sure the crate is the right size. It should be big enough to turn around, lie down, and stand up, but not so big she can go potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Companies make crate dividers for wire crate if you need to size down without buying a new crate. Third, work on getting her to go potty outside. Check out the crate training article linked below and specifically the tips about using an attractant spray, teaching the "Go Potty" command, walking around again after she pees. Scent, movement, and helping her stay focused can help her poop outside. Be sure to take her outside 15-45 minutes after she eats also, even if she just went out before eating, because many dogs need to poop after being fed. Crate Training method - since she is older she can hold her pee for longer. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Work on the above the help her poop outside. If she consistently poops only in the crate despite doing the above well, then she may have lost her natural desire to hold it in a confined space because of how she was raised. Once a dog looses that, they don't get it back, so you will need to take another approach to potty training. When you are home, use the Tethering method from the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you have to leave the house, have an exercise pen set up in a room that she doesn't have access to normally - like a guest bathroom, room in the basement, laundry room, ect...One one end of the exercise pen put a real grass pad and use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below to train her to potty on the real grass pad. Use a grass pad because it more closely resembles grass outside, put the exercise pen somewhere away from the rest of the house that you can block off access to when she isn't in the pen - so that she only learns to potty in that room and not other areas of the house, and adjust the exercise pen method to use a grass pad instead of the mentioned litter box, and not to phase out the exercise pen even since your goal is outside potty training and not inside pottying. When she is completely potty trained in the rest of the house, then you will simply keep her in the rest of the house while you are home instead of crating or confining in an exercise pen - you can use baby gates to confine to the kitchen or somewhere to prevent chewing. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - use real grass, not astroturf to help transfer to outside: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com Once you are a year past crate issues and she is fully potty trained, you can try reintroducing the crate to see if she will hold it in there now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Millie
Labradoodle
4 Months
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Millie
Labradoodle
4 Months

Millie is pretty far along in her potty training, but very recently she began pooping at night and in her cage when we leave, even for short errands. I am not sure what more to do. The cage is the right size, I’m consistent with feeding, she’s up to date on vacs and was just at the vet with a good bill of health. Help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jody, At four month of age she may be getting more distracted and excited while outside - this can be normal. If she is overly distracted then she might be holding it and not pooping outside when she needs to, then when she comes inside and things are calm she poops in her crate. First, make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate with her, including a soft bed or towel - that can cause issues. Use something like www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Second, whenever you take her potty outside, tell her to "Go Potty" and give one treat if she pees, then tell her to "Go Potty" again after she pees and slowly walk her around for twice as long as you did for peeing, encouraging her to sniff and redirecting her attention away from anything that begins to distract her. When she goes poop, give four small treats and praise. Work extra hard on this 15-45 minutes after meals, after she is running around a lot, and before crating her or putting her to bed. This has to be done on a leash - she won't be ready to stay focused enough to poop off leash yet, that comes later if you have a fence. Expect to take extra time outside for this. I know you probably don't want to walk around for longer to make sure, but when in doubt make sure you are giving her a really good chance to poop outside. If you can consistently get her to poop outside with the extra effort, then as she matures and focuses better it should eventually get quicker again with age. Pay attention to how many times she is pooping in 24 hours, 2-3 is normal at this age. If its more than that, something like a change in food, probiotic, or re-visit to your vet may need to happen, especially if it is 5+ times. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nova
Chocolate lab
2 Months
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Nova
Chocolate lab
2 Months

Hey there! We just picked up our puppy a week ago. During the day she doesn’t have accidents inside and lets us know when she needs to use the bathroom, usually by going to the door and barking. My problem lies when she is crated for the night. I’m not sure if it is possible, but I feel like she poops in her crate on purpose. Never any pee. She will poop up to 8 times in one night, and the consistency isn’t the same as during the day, it is usually solid, whereas at night it’s more or less diarrhea. Looking for pointers on what I might do to nip this in the bud fast? I’ve tried getting up every two hrs, making the crate smaller, putting a little bed in there for her, etc all with no luck. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Zach, This doesn't sound behavioral unless she has other signs of extreme anxiety (not the normal puppy crying but shaking, drooling, trying to escape to the point of injury, totally shutting down, ect...). I would consults your vet, there could be something with digestion going on that's worse at night, a hormonal issue that fluctuates then and effects things, or something she is eating at night or a few hours before bed that's causing it. Try keeping her in an exercise pen at night and taking her potty still (expect accidents in the pen like what happens in the crate - this is just an experiment and not what I recommend long term). If her pooping habits are completely fine in the exercise pen at night, in contrast to how they are in the crate, then it could be anxiety related to the crate. If things are still diarrhea in the pen then I would look for a medical cause that has a connection to her evening routine or the changes in her body that happen at night. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Josephine
Labrador Retriever
9 Weeks
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Josephine
Labrador Retriever
9 Weeks

Josie has been having trouble pooping in the crate. I adjusted the size to the specifications that your site suggests and she eats in there now. My question is should I leave rhe clean bowl in the crate with her when she is sleeping and throughout the day.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Eric, If making those changes has stopped the accidents, I suggest keeping the bowl in there for about two weeks, then removing it once pup has hopefully developed a habit of keeping it clean in there, without needing the bowl. If pup starts to have accidents again, you can return the bowl to there for a few weeks longer. You can feed pup their meals in there long-term also, but take the bowl out after meals once potty training is better - to make it more comfortable. If you want to experiment with taking the bowl out sooner, you can after a week as well - just be ready to return it again and continue feeding meals in the crate if accidents return. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Melo
Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
15 Months
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Melo
Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
15 Months

Melo uses his crate as a bathroom. We adopted him and have only had him for two months and can not get him to stop using his crate as a toilet. I’ve had many dogs and he is the first to do this. His crate is the right size, he has no medical condition, and he is on a bathroom schedule. I’ve been doing the treat and positive praise when he goes potty outside, which is only making him go quicker, because he is easily distracted when outside and will take forever to go pee/poo. We always make sure he does both pee and poo before we go back inside the house and before we leave for work or school. After we leave, 30 minutes or an hour later I will check the camera and he has gone pee/poo in his crate. We stopped putting him in his crate because I would have to bathe him everyday because of his bathroom mess. So he roams free in the house but returns to his crate to pee/ poo. He is usually alone for 4 -5 hrs at a time. Many times only 2 hrs and he still will use the bathroom in his crate. When we are home he can hold it until we take him out and he can hold it all night until morning. We take him out between 9:30- 10:00pm before bed and then at 7 am. We also have been giving him a special bone with peanut butter when leave and he only gets this when we leave. Yet, still goes bathroom in his crate when we leave the house. We have added playing calming music when we leave the house. We also play this when we are with him in relax state so far no changes. Is putting a pee pad in his crate encouraging him to use it as a bathroom? I do this for easy clean up because if nothing in there he will still go pee/poo in there.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Zenna, First, the pee pad definitely encourages pottying in there - a pee pad is typically scented to actually attract a dog to going potty on it, BUT it sounds like this was already a full blown issue long before you added the pee pad. Since you don't know his past, there is a very good chance he was actually taught to go potty in the crate and views his crate the way a pee pad trained dog would view a pee pad - when he is pottying in there it's because he actually thinks that that is the toilet and is where he should go, so has no motivation to hold it for 6-8 hours until you get home - when he could feel relief by going in the toilet crate after two hours. Some dogs are intentionally taught to potty in their crates on pee pads. Many are simply crated so long as puppies that they are physically forced to go in their crates regularly and they eventually loose the natural desire to keep it clean and begin to learn to go potty in there routinely. You most likely won't be able to use a crate for this dog - definitely not right now but possibly never. However, you can use something like an exercise pen instead just to keep pup in a safe area of the house if pup isn't trustworthy left free. If you remove the crate, will pup have an accident in the house or wait until you get home to be taken outside? If pup will wait, then you can either leave pup free, confine in an exercise pen, or lock in a safe room of the house and not have to worry about accidents - just simply get rid of the crate. If pup will still have an accident in the house if the crate is removed, then you will need to teach pup to use a designated toilet while you are gone. I would actually create something similar to a big litter box for this...Purchase a large shallow plastic storage container - so it looks like the bottom half of the crate or litter box and put a piece of grass sod or a real grass pad bought online, into the container. Teach pup to use this instead of the non-absorbent/messy crate while you are away. Confine pup in a room that you can close off when you are home, with hard floors, and place the new toilet in that room for pup to use. When you are home, maintain normal potty training with your supervision and frequent trips outside - Only using the new toilet when you can't work on potty training with pup. Real grass pad brands - most also found on Amazon: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com - you can also just buy the sod replacement tops here I believe. After enough practice keeping the rest of the house clean without accidents, pup should eventually be able to be left without a toilet and still be able to hold it for up to 8 hours without accidents (while not in a crate). I would not expect to be able to use a traditional crate again though - since pup believes that it is a toilet and the habit appears to be ingrained. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Benedict
Labrador Retriever
2 Months
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Benedict
Labrador Retriever
2 Months

Benny gets really upset when I put him in his crate every night and in between potty breaks. He barks and whines throughout the night causing me to lose sleep. When he gets really upset he ends up pooping even thought he crate is small enough. I can’t seem to find the balance between taking him out and letting him cry it out since it seems like he poops every time he gets really upset. Any help would be much appreciated.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katherine, First, what you are dealing with isn't too unusual, so don't panic. Since pup is so young, I am assuming that you just started the crate training process during the past week. It takes most puppies about two weeks to adjust. First, practice the Surprise method from the article linked below during the day to help teach pup to be quiet and calm in the crate during a time when everyone isn't so sleepy. This should help pup with nights too, but don't give treats at night. You will just have to ignore the crying at night - practice the method as often as you can for up to an hour when you are home during the day with some freedom out of the crate between each session whenever you can. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate In the evenings, watch puppy's schedule. Be sure to take away all food and water at least 2 hours before bedtime. You may need to feed pup even earlier than that too. Pup's digestive system needs a chance to clear out before bed. During the day how often is puppy pooping. If puppy isn't pooping 2-3 times during the day, he is likely getting distracted while outside and not finishing - resulting in him needing to poop at night when he can no longer hold it and he is finally calm enough to go. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below, and specifically the sections on walking pup around on a leash slowly, teaching "Go Potty", rewarding with treats to motivate, and always walking pup around slowly again after he pees to encourage him to poop - especially 30-45 minutes after he's had a meal or run around a lot. Finally, at this age pup will need to be taken outside during the night a couple of times most likely - especially during the crate training phase when he stays awake longer fighting sleep. A puppy can hold it for longer if asleep, but at this age 3 hours will be his maximum if he stays awake or wakes up. If it's been at least that long and he cries, take him potty. Just do it on a leash, keep it super boring (no treats at night), and put him straight back into the crate without playing after he finishes. You don't want him to think night trips are fun and wake up more to play later. If he wakes up sooner than three hours, ignore him - unless he soiled himself. If he pooped, you will need to clean it up, but keep the entire thing as boring and uneventful as possible. You may even want to see if someone has another crate you can borrow during this transition so that you can simply open the crate, wipe him off, and put him into the other crate while you clean. I am so sorry it's been so hard. In most cases it does get easier within two weeks. Some puppies can be a lot more dramatic than others, but I wouldn't give up on crate training yet - a couple of hard weeks can yield a dog that's able to be safe, learn good manners, and earn more freedom later. If you aren't seeing any improvement within two weeks, check back here with detail about what you tried and for how long, or hire a professional trainer, who comes well recommended by their previous clients, specializes in behavior issues, and has a lot of experience with puppies, who can assess the situation in person to tailor a solution to you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Winnie
Dachshund
9 Weeks
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Winnie
Dachshund
9 Weeks

We have had Winnie a week and she did well overnight the first few days, but then made a huge mess of her crate one evening when we were out to dinner. Not diarrhea, but smeared it around everywhere- maybe like she was trying to bury it? And then the night three nights, she has pooped in her crate- not a huge mess again- but not in a neat little corner either. She is on a good daytime schedule- she poops outside 1 hour after she eats (3 times) and again just before bed. I fed her supper at 3:30pm yesterday to make sure she had an empty system at bedtime, and she went after supper and before bed, but still also in her crate at night. I take her to pee once at night- I could stay out longer and get her to poop too- but I am wondering why she is going at night at all when she wasn't before. The only thing that has changed is she didn't eat much the first couple of days while stressed and is now eating well. Her crate is small, we have changed out soft bedding. Should I leave her crate door open at night with a pad or grass area so she can get out and go? Or make her poop at 3am? Thanks for any help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Julie, I actually suggest a trip to your vet. Most puppies poop about 3 times per day. It sounds like she is pooping pretty often, and since the increase is more recent I suggest getting her check by your vet to make sure there isn't an infection or she doesn't need to be wormed again (common) or something else going on. (I am not a vet so really can't give medical advise here - but I suggest speaking with your vet). Once you have ruled out or dealt with anything medical going on, clean her crate really thoroughly with an enzymatic cleaner that will fully remove the smell. Look for the word enzyme or enzymatic somewhere on the bottle. Natures Miracle has one, Whip It is one, and there are other...Just make sure you get one with enzymes - even bleach doesn't tackle the smell well enough for a dog's sensitive nose. Check out the article I have linked below and follow the Tethering method and the Crate Training method - it sounds like potty training over all is going well, but compare the schedule below with what you are doing and make sure you aren't missing something, like not taking her potty frequently enough. At this age 2-3 hours during the day is her maximum time she can hold it in the crate. Anything past that and she physically can't hold it - if she is forced to potty in her crate by being left for too long too many times, she will start to loose her natural desire to keep the space clean. Avoid that!! It makes it much harder to potty train if that happens. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside At this age she will need to go potty 1-2 times during the night. Most puppies will wake and start crying - and you will take them then so that you don't have to wake them up. If pup isn't waking you up when she needs to go during the night, you will unfortunately have to set an alarm and get up to take her for a few weeks. You can push back the time you take her at by an hour every month she is older, until she doesn't need to be taken at night at all around 4.5-5.5 months (typically, it can last a month longer or be a couple weeks sooner that she can hold it through the night) As unpleasant as it is to wake up during the night, I suggest avoiding the grass pad and crate being open at night if you can. That is a good backup solution if the entire setup is still in an exercise pen to keep her from chewing things and wandering at night, but adding any type of indoor potty training for a dog who you want to exclusively outside potty train long-term could cause a lot more work and need for extra potty training in the long run. In my opinion overall it is FAR easier to wake up during the night to take her potty for another few weeks, but then have a fully potty trained puppy within a couple of months, than have to undo certain indoor habits and work on potty training for a lot longer overall. I generally tell people to be really strict and put in the hard work with potty training up front to do it right - and they will be done and have far less frustration in the long run, than the person who put less work in and spent less time on it at first - but took a year to potty train their pup. I can tell you are dedicated and doing a good job, keep learning and keep up the good work. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Shihpoo
7 Months
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Luna
Shihpoo
7 Months

Luna has been regressing in house training and having accidents in my apartment while I'm out so I'm trying out crate training again (had stopped a couple months ago). She got two walks today while I was at work, at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., and when I got home around 4:30 she had pooped in her crate. Her crate is small, no room for her to walk around, so she was covered in poop. I'm not sure what else to try!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Madeline, When you took her potty did she go potty? The issue might be her getting distracted while outside and not actually finishing. If that may be the case, I suggest teaching the "Go Potty" command and rewarding with a treat after she goes. Also, make sure you are taking her somewhere more boring to go potty - where there are less distractions if that's an option. Walk her around slowly on the leash, encouraging her to go and telling her to "Go Potty". When she goes potty, give her a treat. You can also use a potty attractant spray, such as "Go Here" or "Hurry!", which can be sprayed on the ground in the area you want her to go in to also encourage her to want to go potty there. If she went potty when you took her outside and is still having regular accidents that soon, I suggest a trip to your vet. There might be something medical going on like an infection or parasites that is leading to more frequent accidents. Having an accident 1.5 hours after pottying outside (if she went then) isn't typical so I would get that checked out if she is pottying that soon after despite the confined space of the crate. Be sure to clean the crate thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes to full remove the potty smell either way. Even bleach won't do it well enough, it needs to be enzymes. Look on a pet cleaner bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rigby
Goldendoodle
13 Weeks
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Rigby
Goldendoodle
13 Weeks

Any suggestions?
We have a 13 week old goldendoodle who poops in her crate at night about 2-3 times per week. We have a crate with a divider in it set to about 8 spaces back. Just big enough so she can lie down and turn around. She is GREAT during the day in her crate. She NEVER poops then. But in the morning when we wake up it’s always a gamble. She is in her crate at the same time every night and wakes up at the same time every morning. She will bark to let us know that she’s up at 6am and we immediately come downstairs, but never know what we are walking into. She poops about 3x a day already. And is doing much better with going outside except in the crate at night. The only thing she has in her crate is a chew toy and a small blanket. But she doesn’t even try to cover it up. She jumps in it and grinds it into her fur and paws making for a disaster trying to clean her up. Our breeder recommended not giving food in the crate but at this point I’m open to anything to help. Her feeding schedule is consistent and so is her bathroom schedule so we don’t know what else to do to fix this problem. I feel awful every time I have to clean her up out of her crate since it is so dried to her I almost have to power wash her in the bathtub and then she sits and shakes afterwards. And we are using an enzyme cleaner to help destroy the scent. How do I avoid trauma but also clean her? How do I stop this from happening all together? We are losing our minds....

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karissa, First, remove all food two hours before bed and don't give anymore until breakfast in the morning. If you are leaving food with her overnight or dinner is too close to bed, that alone might be the reason for this. Second, as unpleasant as this is, this might be a case where you need to temporarily set an alarm for the middle of the night or early, early morning to take her potty outside, then put her back into the crate. If you do this, take her on a leash, keep the trip super boring with no treats or play or verbal interaction - you want her to stay as sleepy and bored as possible. After she goes potty, take her straight back inside and into the crate, ignore any crying when you put her back in (she will probably cry the first couple times because she thought you were getting up for the day, but after some consistency she should learn just to go back to sleep). The goal with these trips is just to get out of the cycle of accidents long enough to establish some new rhythms. Third, when you take her potty after dinner and before bed, really work on helping her focus on pooping. Each time you take her potty, tell her to "Go Potty". If she pees, give a treat, then walk her around slowly again and tell her to "Go Potty" again. If she poops, give three treats, one at a time. By doing this you are teaching her the Go Potty command and making sure she is really finishing pottying in the evening and not holding her poop after peeing because she is excited or distracted. Fourth, if pup is pooping more than 3x during 24 hours you may want to consider a trip to your vet to make sure their isn't a GI issue such as needing to be wormed again, an infection, ect... (I am not a vet). Such issues could lead to nighttime pooping accidents if her eating schedule isn't causing it. The goal is to stop the incident from happening at all so that the baths aren't needed. I would focus on that the most. Another type of haircut might make the cleanup easier too, but that would be a question for your groomer since you also don't want her to be cold. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Yummy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year
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Yummy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year

My dog just turned a year old. We have tried too many house training techniques to list. We have a proper size crate, we don't over feed and we take her out regularly, yet she has no compunction against pooping in her crate. She generally will not pee in there, but poops in her crate often. I am at my wits end because nothing seems to work and at a year old, I would think house-training would no longer be an issue.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Adrienne, At one year of age pup probably has already lost her natural desire to keep a confined space clean - which is why a crate isn't working no matter how you adjust it. This means that a crate will not be an effective means of potty training for you right now. There are a couple of other routes you can take. You can either place a disposable real grass pad in a small confined space that she stays in while you are away - such as a bathroom with the rugs taken up, and teach her to potty on the grass pads while you are gone, then while you are home, keep pup tethered to you with a 6 or 8 foot leash to prevent her from sneaking off to poop - thereby stopping accidents in other parts of the house so that she is being effectively potty trained again. You could install a doggie door if you have a fenced in yard, and create a small enclosed area right by the doggie door - so that she will be close to the doggie door to go outside to go potty. You will need to spend time teaching her and rewarding her for going through the doggie door while you are home - don't expect her to use it without training first. This option would also limit her access to the rest of your home so help with potty training. If finances are flexible, you could pay someone who is home all day to dog sit her and keep her tethered to them to work on potty training during the day while you are gone - as a daycare/pet sitting option. If you have a safely fenced yard and she will not disturb neighbors - depending on the safety and seclusion of where you live, you could provide a shaded, safe temperature area outside with access to water and have to stay outside when the weather permits, then tether her to yourself inside when you are home to work on potty training while you are there - stopping accidents inside while you are away so that potty training can progress while you are at home again. Whichever method you choose, know that it needs to stop the accidents from inside from happening as well as possible, then provide enough supervision while you are at home for her to only go potty outside during those times too - and not be able to sneak off to poop then. Accidents need to stop as much as possible for potty training to be successful, then pottying outside should be rewarded with treats as well to help pup make that connection too. Clean up any accidents that you are aware of - old and new with a cleaner that contains enzymes - look on the pet cleaner bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic. Only enzymes will fully remove the smell and the smell needs to be removed for your home not to smell like somewhere pup should go potty any more. Another option that is a bit of a long shot but certainly might be worth trying, is switching which type of crate you are using. Sometimes pup will have associated pottying just with their particular crate and not with all confined spaces - allowing you to crate train still using a different type of crate. For example, if you are using an enclosed Vari kennel type crate - switch to a wire crate. If you are using a wire crate - switch to a Vari Kennel enclosed type crate. You may even want to see if a friend or family member has one that's the correct size that you could borrow and clean well with the enzymatic spray to see how pup responds before purchasing your own. Finally, spy on pup with a camera - does pup show other signs of separation anxiety - such as panic, barking that lasts for hours, trembling, lots of salivating that doesn't stop, trying to escape the crate to the point of injury - if so the pooping could be related to separation anxiety - in which case addressing the separation anxiety should stop the accidents also. True separation anxiety is not super common so I would make sure pup has several signs of it before going that route, since separation anxiety is a bit harder to address than other things listed above - but could help a lot with your issue if you find that is the reason and it is addressed.. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Migo
Yorkshire Terrier
10 Weeks
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Migo
Yorkshire Terrier
10 Weeks

How do I...
1. Get him to stop going in his crate? I thought they didn’t like to mess in their bed?
2. Make him go in one spot? How big should that area be?
3. Does he need to get a treat for peeing and pooping? Or just one treat when he has completed both?
4. If he goes potty in the house, what is the best way to correct him? Should I immediately take him out? Kennel him? Not sure.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mandi, First, make sure the crate you get is only big enough for him to stand up, turn around, and lie down. Too big and he will have accidents. You can also save money though by purchasing a wire crate with a metal divider and blocking off the back of the crate to make it the correct size, then adjust the size as he grows. Second, how long are you crating him for? At his age, the maximum amount of time he can hold it for during the day is 3 hours - after that he will be forced to have an accident because of his age and abilities. Third, make sure there is nothing absorbent in the crate like a towel or soft bed. Check out www.primopads.com for a non-absorbent bedding option. Anything absorbent in the crate will encourage peeing. Fourth, was a medical condition by your vet? Are his poops normal or runny and are they more than 3-4 times per day right now. I am not a vet so consult your vet about that. Fifth, what is his history? Was he kept in a small confined location as a young puppy and forced to go potty in that location - if so he may have lost his natural desire to keep a confined space clean. This is common with pet shop puppies. If that is the case, you will need to set up an exercise pen in a room you can close off from the rest of the house (so that he can't go potty there while you are home and working on potty training), and place a disposable real grass pad in the exercise pen and a non-absorbent bed like primopads or a cot on the opposite end and have him sleep there at night. Don't use pee pads because they resemble carpet and spend time teaching him to go potty on the grass pad some during the day while you are home when you first transition to using the grass pad - only use this option if a crate won't work - crate training will be easier in the long run if he hasn't lot his natural desire to keep a confined space clean. Exercise pen method for potty training - you will use a real grass pad instead of a litter box and you won't phase the exercise pen away since you are training him to go potty outside and not in the house during the day, but this method will demonstrate how to teach him to use the grass pad while in the exercise pen at night if needed. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - also on Amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com Sixth, are you taking him potty on a leash and walking him around slowly to encourage pottying through movement and smell, and to keep him from getting too distracted while outside. Some puppies have accidents in their crates because they were too distracted while outside to finish going - when that's the case, more effort needs to be put toward helping pup finish pottying completely outside. Walk pup around slowly on a leash, tell pup to "Go Potty". When he pees, praise and give one treat. Walk him around slowly on the leash again, keeping him sniffing and looking for a spot and less distracted, tell him to "Go Potty" again. If he poops, give three treats - one at a time. Eventually, you can just do one for the entire outings but while he is still learning and struggling with poop, give extra treats to teach the "Go Potty" command so that he will learn to pay attention when he should be pottying, and to help motivate him to poop better. When he has an accident. If you catch him mid-squat clap your hands two times, then quietly rush him outside on the leash to finish going. Once outside, if he goes potty, all is forgiven - give a treat (even if you are still mad pretend because puppies live in the moment and what he is doing right then outside is correct). Go back inside and quietly clean up the accident without scolding. If you find the accident after he has done it - watch him better next time. It's too late to discipline. discipline only works if it's mid-squat. The goal with potty training is to avoid as many accidents as possible though to encourage a habit of cleanliness inside. Potty training is all about creating habits. Careful supervision, crating when you can't supervise or pup's bladder isn't completely empty, and taking outside frequently are the goals with potty training - this is one area where punishment doesn't work great - prevention is 1000% better and goes much quicker. Too harsh corrections can teach a pup to hide for accidents or not go potty in front of you outside. Corrections after the incident is over aren't connected well enough to the incident to pup for them to learn from it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Casper
Bully Basset
10 Months
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Casper
Bully Basset
10 Months

We have had Casper for about 3 months now.. He had a few accidents here and there which is normal but goes regularly outside on a leash. He poops about 3 to 4 times a day sometimes. Only time he is in the crate is when we leave to take kids to school or appointments so maybe 1 to 3 hours tops if even that. He is very clingy when we are home then knows when we are going to leave. When he is in his crate he poops and sometimes in multiple spots.. He will even lay in it or roll in it like it's nothing to him. I've tried leaving him out the crate while gone but then he decides to grab things to chew on or just poops on the floor in multiple spots also. I'm jot sure what to do.. We've tried giving him a bone to chew on while in his cage, toys, he goes to potty reguarl3, he gets fed once in the morning after we return from school drop off, and sometimes again around 4pm depending on if he ate it all or not. I'm so tired of cleaning the mess every single day and can't figure out how to help him. It feels like it's separation issues but I can't fix that. Please help.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Casper is a pretty handsome guy! Thanks for the question. Has Casper been exhibiting this behavior since you got him or is it new? How big is Casper's crate? Sometimes when a crate is too roomy and gives a dog extra space, they will use it for bathroom duty, too. There are a few things you can do such as feeding him in his crate - dogs don't typically like to eat and poop in the same location. As well, when you take him for walks, reward him with a treat when he poops and perhaps he'll associate pooping with treats outside only. Another option is to try him with an exercise pen and a grass pad (to be as similar as outside as possible, so not pads). This may allow Casper to relieve himself in a clean environment when you are not home and he is unable to hold it. The exercise pen method is well described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy I do think that once you have Casper trained to use the grass pad rather than his crate, you can eventually stop using the grass pad and have him go outside all of the time. He is young yet and may be having a hard time getting things under control. Make sure that he gets a few long walks each day, too especially before you have to leave for a while. Enjoy Casper and good luck!

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Belle
Husky
7 Months
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Belle
Husky
7 Months

We have had Belle for a month now, she is a shepherd/husky mix and 7 months old. I wake up with her in the morning and let her and my other shepherd out to go the bathroom. She always pee's right away, sometimes poops right away, other times she takes forever to go poop. I have her on a leash, due to our yard not being fenced and having 6 acres. She watches our other shepherd go right away and then he goes back inside. She also keeps pooping in her kennel. She wont go in her kennel all night, but when we leave for work and she is only in her kennel about 3 hours, we always come back to her and poop in kennel... I am rewarding her with a treat when she goes outside, just not sure what else to do! I have never had this issue with any of my other dogs!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alexandra, First, I suggest checking the size of the crate. Make sure that it is only big enough for her to stand up, turn around, and lie down - and not so big that she can go potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid the mess. Too big and she won't be motivated to keep a confined space clean. If you have a wire crate, you can purchase a metal crate divider to make a larger crate smaller temporarily until she grows into it - without having to buy a whole new crate. Second, remove everything absorbent from the crate and keep it that way consistently for a while. Check out www.primopads.com if you would like to still give her a non-absorbent bed in the crate to give a bit of firm padding. Third, the crate needs to be cleaned thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes - the smell needs to be fully removed to not encourage future accidents and only enzymes break that down to the level that needs to be done to ensure even a dog won't still smell it. Clean the crate really well, then use that type of cleaner for any future accidents anywhere. Look on a pet cleaner bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic somewhere - not all pet cleaners or general cleaners contain it. Also, avoid cleaners that contain ammonia, because ammonia smells like urine to a dog. Fourth, make sure that pup is pooping after eating before you leave. Even if pup already peed right before you fed them, eating and lots of movement will trigger the need to poop. Often a puppy will need to poop 15-40 minutes after eating, opposed to right away, so adjust the feeding and bathroom schedule to accommodate that last potty trip before you leave for work. Fifth, taking pup potty on the leash is actually good for potty training right now to help with focus. Walk pup around slowly on the leash - the movement can help stimulate the need to go. Encourage sniffing to find a spot. Begin telling pup to "Go Potty" and praise and give a treat every time after she pees - give three small treats or pieces of dog food, one piece at a time, after she poops each time! Doing this will help pup learn the "Go Potty" command, teach better focus, and hurry the process along - but it will take repetition and consistency doing it to teach the command to see results - keep a baggie or bowl or small treats by the door that you exit through to help remind you and make this easy. Sixth, how often is pup pooping in 24 hours? If it's more than 4 times, I suggest a trip to your vet to get pup checked out for an infection, parasites, ect... That might be making it hard for her to hold her bowels. A food that doesn't agree with her, switching to a food too quickly, or a specific food ingredient allergy could also be to blame. I am not a vet though so consult with your vet for anything that could be medically related. Finally, if the issue is anxiety, check out the Surprise method from the article linked below, and the crate manners exercise from the video linked below. Also, keep departures and arrivals SUPER boring - basically ignoring pup during both for several minutes - it can seem mean but by keeping pup's arousal level low you are conditioning the habit of pup staying calm during those times - which can also decrease anxiety levels. Practice both methods calmly when you are home for an hour each day - or more often on days when you are home all day, with breaks between training. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate Manners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn5HTiryZN8 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Simba
Yorkie
10 Weeks
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Simba
Yorkie
10 Weeks

Hi I think my 10 week pupp has confinement anxiety he doesn’t signal he needs to go potty but when I put him on the pee pad if he has to go he will . He pooped in his crate over night but sleeps in the room so I can hear him in case he has to go why is he pooping in his crate and how can I stop it effectively and fast

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brandon, At 10 weeks most puppies do have to go potty during the night 1-2 times still. Most puppies will cry when they wake up needing to go, but if the crate is too large or there are absorbent things in the crate- such as a soft dog bed or towel, or you are sleeping through the crying, pup will likely just go in the crate instead. First, make sure that the crate is only big enough for pup to turn around, stand up and lie down. Not so big that they can go potty in one end of the crate then stand in the opposite end to avoid the accident. Too big and the crate won't encourage a dog's natural desire to keep a confined space clean. You can purchase crate dividers for wire crates - to make a bigger crate temporarily smaller until pup grows into it, without having to buy a new crate. Remove all absorbent bedding, towels, and other fabric from the crate if present. Check out a bed like www.primopads.com fo use while still in the process of potty training. Soft beds can be used later when pup is fully potty trained and past destructive chewing phases. If pup is still having accidents and not alerting you after adjusting those things as needed, you might be sleeping through crying or pup simply might not be letting you know - most puppies will cry, but occasionally a puppy won't and will just hold it quietly until they physically can't anymore, then will have an accident. If either of those things are the case, you will have to set an alarm to take pup out at night on a schedule. As a general rule puppies can hold it for the number of months they are in age plus one. If pup stays asleep the whole time, that number increases by a couple of hours, once pup wakes up they will have to go potty if it's been that long though. For a puppy 10 weeks old, I recommend taking pup potty every 3-4 hours at night, sooner if pup tends to have an accident sooner than that. As pup gets older and bladder capacity increases, you can push that time back by an hour each month, and try not waking pup at all to see if they can make it completely through the night by 5 months - occassionally a pup can make it through by 4 months also, but most puppies can do it by 5 months. When you take pup potty, take pup on a leash, keep the trip as sleepy and boring as you can - no treats, no play, minimal talk or affection, then put pup straight back into the crate after, go back to bed, and ignore any crying in the crate - knowing that they don't have to potty since they just went and simply want attention. Ignoring the crying will help pup learn after a few nights that they should just go right back to sleep and not expect to get up yet. Know that pup probably doesn't have true separation anxiety if the accidents are not happening as soon as you crate pup, but rather sometime during the night. What you have described is normal for a puppy, in terms of needing to potty at night - pup just may not be alerting well. True separation anxiety this young is extremely rare. Some level of adjusting to the crate still is normal, and continuing with the process of crate training while young can actually prevent true separation anxiety later. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Diosa
Yorkshire Terrier
19 Weeks
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Diosa
Yorkshire Terrier
19 Weeks

I am crate training my puppy, but she spends the whole tome in the crate crying and barking, so the other people living in the house ask me to put her in the garage while crate training. It is her 3 rd day and she keeps consistently pooping in the crate, even when it’s only been an hour. How do I stop her from barking the whole time and pooping in the crate?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rose, First, what is the consistency of pup's poops. Is pup pooping more than 3 times a day when not in the crate also? Are the poops soft or watery? If so, pup might have a digestive issue that needs to be checked by your vet, and you won't be able to effectively crate train until pup is feeling better. (I am not a vet, so consult your vet about anything medical). If the pooping is only anxiety triggered, and pup is not being left in the crate for longer than 5 hours at a time, and is being walked around slowly on the leash, taken potty 30 minutes after eating, and after running around, to ensure pup is having the opportunity to poop while outside, then I suggest the following. Crate Training method - these times can be adjusted since pup is older. Adding an hour to each time mentioned for potty breaks, freedom out of the crate, and when to take back outside after refusing to go potty when you take them. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If she is not already used to a crate, it is normal for it to take up to 2 weeks for pup to adjust. When she cries and you know she doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give her a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help her adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If she continues protesting for long periods of time past three days (which it sounds like it's already been), you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks and cries. If she gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If she disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at her side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If she stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward her quietness. The rewards will help her learn to calm down in the crate and be quiet. The corrections will help her become quiet long enough for you to have the opportunity to reward and interrupt her highly anxious and aroused state that may be leading to the pooping. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Surprise method - details on how to reward quietness: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. Again, be sure there isn't something medical like worms, a food allergy, or infection causing the pooping - if so that will need to be addressed with your vet to see improvement with the crate training also. (I am not a vet) Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Simon
English Setter
21 Months
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Simon
English Setter
21 Months

He’s regressed and now poops in his crate.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hi there, do you mean overnight? Or while at work? There could be a few reasons for the setback. I would have Simon checked at the vet first, to rule out any underlying medical issues that could cause this to happen. Are there new changes in the house or in your backyard that could be causing stress and anxiety? Are you away from home more often than normal? Make sure that Simon has the same amount of exercise time that he always did so that when he is outside, he doesn't forget the reason for being out there due to excitement. If there is something in the yard that could be causing Simon to be afraid, be sure to reassure him when outside. Dogs love routine as well, so try and keep Simon on a schedule that allows him to go potty when he is used to (like after meals.) This is a great article that outlines the reasons I have mentioned, as well as many more.Please take a look: https://pethelpful.com/dogs/Why-Would-a-House-Trained-Dog-Start-Pooping-in-the-House. You may need to train him again from step 1. See the crate training method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Good luck!

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Rocky
Boxer
10 Weeks
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Rocky
Boxer
10 Weeks

Hi! Rocky seems to have a strong bladder for such a little pup. We have a designated area with pee pee pads for him to go, but whenever we put him in the cage when we eat dinner, he poops and pees in there, even though we've had him in his area. He does not go overnight though. How can we go about this? The place we got him said he should not go out yet. Thank you!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katie, First, I would check with your vet about recommendations on whether to take him outside yet. Where you live will largely effect how risky that is. If you live in an apartment where other dogs are on the grounds, the risk is much greater. If you live in a home with a private yard -especially a fenced one, most vets would advise that you can begin potty training outside safely before shots are completed. Consult your vet about these matters. I am not a vet. American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior's statement on socialization and vaccines. https://avsab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Puppy_Socialization_Position_Statement_Download_-_10-3-14.pdf I also recommend the following article and e-book: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ After You Get Your Puppy free PDF E-book download: www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads If you are in a situation where you need to or choose to continue indoor potty training, I suggest switching to a disposable real grass pad instead of a pee pad - so that pup will be better prepared to switch to outside potty training later. Pee Pads can create confusion with other fabric material, like carpet and rugs, if you remove them later. Disposable Real Grass Pad brands - also on Amazon: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com As far as the pottying in the crate, first, make sure that the crate is only big enough for pup to stand up, turn around and lie down, and not so big that pup can go potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - too big and pup won't be encouraged to hold it in there. Many wire crates also come with or you can purchase dividers for - to make the crate temporarily smaller, so that you don't have to purchase an entirely new crate. Second, make sure that there is nothing absorbent in the crate at this age, even a towel or soft bed. Check out www.primopads.com for an example of a non-absorbent bed to use while pup is still learning. If the crate is too big or anything absorbent is in it, that can lead to accidents. A puppy this age typically has a maximum bladder capacity of 2-3 hours while awake - that number usually increases at night if pup stays asleep. If pup isn't being taken out at least every 2 hours - 1 hour ideally for learning purposes, that can lead to accidents too. Also, check out the Surprise method from the article linked below, to help pup adjust to being in the crate and learn how to be calmer. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate If pup still has accidents in the crate despite all of the above, some breeders will put pee pads inside crates - which results in a puppy learning to go potty in the crate, which could be the issue. If pup came from a rescue or pet store where pups where kept in cages and went potty in the cage, that will also teach a puppy to go potty inside a crate. Some rare puppies simply do it despite best efforts to avoid it. If pup has lots their natural desire to keep a confined space clean for any of the above reasons and the above tips are followed to set the crate up in a way that encourages good potty habits, and pup is still having frequent accidents in the crate, then you may not be able to use a crate for potty training and may need to switch to the Exercise Pen method combined with a disposable real grass pad, and reintroduce the crate later - once pup is already potty trained. Check out the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below - this method mentions litter box training but pee pads or disposable grass pads can also be used instead and the steps are the same. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If you vet feels it's safe to immediately switch to outside potty training with your particular situation, check out the Tethering method or Crate Training method from the article linked below. If adjusting the crate fixes the crate pottying issue, I suggest the Crate Training method or a combination of the Crate Training method and the Tethering method. If using the crate isn't an option despite adjustments, I suggest using the Tethering method and setting up an exercise pen with a disposable real grass pad inside, in a room that can later be closed off once pup is fully potty trained - since pup will be learning to go potty in that general area as well as on the actual the pad - you don't want it to be a main area of the home - but a bathroom, laundry room with appliances off, guest room, large closet, or other area with a door that is temperature controlled. Crate Training and Tethering methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Duke
Bouvier des Flandres
9 Weeks
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Duke
Bouvier des Flandres
9 Weeks

Our bouvier has been with us for a little over a week, and we've been implementing the crate for the last 4 nights. The first 3 nights in the crate he cried for an hour and each time I went out to check on him (thinking an hour was more than plenty to try the "cry it out" idea), he had pooped in the crate. And it was a big mess, so I didn't have him spend the rest of the night in the crate. This was unexpected because he had pooped after dinner and before bed on all three occasions (he's generally doing very well with potty training). So we've been more diligent about making the crate an enjoyable place, he's spending time there in the day for short bursts of 10-30 minutes, but I'm worried the pooping is anxiety-related, and if so, how can we get that under control? His kennel is out in the family room and open to him all the time, he eats meals in there and has some of his favorite toys kept in there. During the day when he spends time in there with us in the house, he whines a little but does mostly okay. It's at night time that things seem to go south.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kameron, First, how often is he pooping in 24 hours? If it's more than 4 times I would speak to your vet. There could be something medical going on that's causing him to have less control over that and need to go more frequently - like needing another worming, an infection, or a food sensitivity. I am not a vet so speak to your vet if his poops are more frequent than that or very loose. Second, check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. Practice that method during the day - which is similar to what you are already doing during the day, but involved closing the door, rewarding quietness with treats, and how to extend out the crate time. At this age you want to get pup used to being in the crate for 1.5 hours calmly. After 1.5 hours during the day pup will need to be taken potty though. He needs to get used to not only being in the crate (which is where you start) but being alone while in the crate, so once he is doing well in the crate during the day practicing leaving the room and working up to him being in the crate in the room by himself for gradually longer periods of time. It's the time alone that is ultimately hard about the crate. Even though this feels tricky, I would encourage you to continue with crate training. It may take him a bit longer than some but if the pooping is anxiety related (rule out medical too though!), then that is a sign that it's even more important for pup to learn at this age how to be by themselves to prevent full blown separation anxiety as an adult - and crate training done correctly helps prevent the more intense adult separation anxiety often. You can also try adjusting pup's dinner schedule just in case it's a timing issue - and pup is a dog who simply needs to poop twice after dinner. Move dinner one hour earlier and see if that helps. Know that it's normal for the first two weeks to be hard with crate training, even with the best training. It's simply an adjustment for pup so takes practice. Instead of pup getting used to sleeping with you in the bed - making the transition back to the crate harder, if you can't have pup sleep in the crate just yet, have pup sleep in an exercise pen and not in the bed. Even if in a crate, it's normal for pup to need to be taken potty two times during the night at this age also. In a crate, a pup will normally wake up and cry when they need to go. If in a pen, you may need to set an alarm to take pup to prevent pup from just going on the floor - because they won't be as motivated to hold it in a less confined space than the crate. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sassy
Boxer Mix
2 Months
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Sassy
Boxer Mix
2 Months

How do I get her to walk on leash, and stop pooping and peeing in the house?

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Frankie
cockapoo
6 Months
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Frankie
cockapoo
6 Months

My puppy has realized at night when she poops before bedtime then she will be going into her crate so she has stopped pooping when I try to get her to and she will wait until she is in it and then poop to get my attention. Her crate is kept in a different room than where we sleep

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, is there any way you can take Frankie out for a long walk about 30 to 45 minutes after she eats? She should have to go potty then and perhaps will not need to right before bed. Take a look here for excellent tips on potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Also, when you get in from the last pee break before bed, perhaps give Frankie a treat toy when she is put in the crate (and wait a few minutes before putting her in, so that she does not associate the last trip out with crate time). Working on getting her to like a crate is a good idea, too. This is very helpful: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. Good luck!

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chai
French Bulldog
9 Weeks
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chai
French Bulldog
9 Weeks

i have had chai for a little over a week and take her out to pee and poop every hour or so. if i leave and put her in the crate for an hour after she went outside i get home and she pooped in the crate. this has happened multiple times a day and in the middle of the night. she just walked into her crate to try to poop. i’m not sure why!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Margherita, First, make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. Check out the Crate Training article linked below for tips on how to get pup to go potty while outside - which makes accidents in the crate less likely. After she pees, walk he around on leash for another 10-15 minutes, telling her to Go Potty calmly, and rewarding her if she goes. Many puppies will need to poop after running around a lot and 15-45 minutes after eating (there is a delay after eating, so you sometimes have to feed up, wait while supervising, then take potty again before crating). Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you are still struggling after applying the above suggestions, then unfortunately pup may have already lost her desire to hold it while in a confined space. This commonly happens when someone accidentally teaches pup to do so by placing something like a puppy pad on one end of a larger crate or confining a puppy in cage where they are forced to pee through wired flooring - like at a pet store and some shelters. There are rare puppies who simply do it anyway, even though nothing happened to teach that. In those cases you can try feeding pup her meals in there to discourage it but most of the time you simply have to switch potty training methods until she is fully potty trained - at which point you might be able to use a crate for travel again later in life. Having something absorbent in the crate like a soft bed can also encourage it - but if you catch that early, generally removing the soft bed will help. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold her bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so she won't go into there looking to pee, and take her potty outside only. Since she may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave her alone, be sure to leave her in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until she is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Styx
Pit bull
10 Months
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Styx
Pit bull
10 Months

My dog knows how to ask to go out and does every 2 hours she goes out we will pee but then soon as I have to leave in put her in her crate she poops in there 2 times every day why? How do I stop her in tried of cleaning of her poopy cage every morning and afternoon

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Luna
Mix
6 Months
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Luna
Mix
6 Months

I adopted Luna from a family of breeders. She had never seen outside of a cage for the first 5 months of her life. After getting her, she began pooping and peeing in her kennel and rolling in it and laying in it(even with a cage just large enough for her to stand and turn around in). All kennel Matt’s had to be taken away due to her pooping on them and then stomping in them. She poops sometimes twice at night. We take her out nearly every HOUR and praise her when she goes potty. However she still poops in her kennel. When she goes outside she also does everything in her power to “break into” the house. I’m talking running full force into the patio door( and she is a LARGE puppy). I walk outside with her and she won’t leave my side long enough to go potty. She won’t go potty on a leash at all, even when I walk her for 30+ minutes at any given time. Help!

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Suki
Labradoodle
6 Months
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Suki
Labradoodle
6 Months

Suki sleeps in the crate at night and was doing well, sleeping until 7am. I would let her out to pee/poo with no issue.
Now that some family members wake up earlier, she must hear them and is now pooing in the crate, even if no one is up early. I'm not sure what to do! HELP!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Selena, First, I would temporarily set an alarm about an hour before pup tends to poop in the crate and take pup potty on a leash, then return to the crate, ignoring and crying and not feeding yet until the normal breakfast time, just to stop the cycle of pooping in the crate. While doing the above temporarily, work on puppy's daytime schedule with food and pooping. Work on trying to get 2-3 poops out of pup during the day. Check out the article linked below - the times won't apply but pay attention to the tips on teaching Go Potty, movement and leash walking to get a poop, using a potty encouraging spray if needed, and the timing of poops related to eating and waking. I also suggest feeding pup an hour early in the evening and at least two hours before bed. After pup eats and it's been at least 15 minutes, work hard to get pup to poop in the evening after dinner - that might mean an evening walk, walking pup in circles in the yard a couple of different potty trips, or using a potty encouraging spray. Remove all food and water at least two hours before bed. If pup is going through a growth spurt and eating more, that might be the reason for the change too. Many times, taking pup out an extra time but returning to the crate so it's not a fun trip, temporarily until pup gets past the growth spurt can help until this phase pases and pup is less ravenous again. How many times is pup pooping in 24 hours? If pup is going more than 3-4 times I suggest a trip to your vet to see if there is GI upset for some reason, or food needs to be switched or pup treated for something. I am not a vet. Finally, is there anything absorbent in the crate. If so, remove it. Check out www.primopads.com and look for a non-absorbent durable crate mat to use in the crate instead. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Aonani
Mastiff lab mix
3 Months
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Aonani
Mastiff lab mix
3 Months

We got her a week ago and she poops every night in the kennel even when she poops outside right before bed. It never fails. How do I prevent this.

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Teddy
Mal-shi
5 Months
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Teddy
Mal-shi
5 Months

Teddy was doing great potty training then got a little sick to his stomach for some reason. He had diarrhea and began going in his crate (not his fault). At any rate he had a few crate accidents but now his bowl movements are back to normal and he found it habit to go in his crate...I need help. Nothing is working!!!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you a crash course in potty training. Some of this you may know, but it's always good to refresh and essentially start over once you start having issues, so those issues don't become habits. House-training your dog or puppy requires patience, commitment and lots of consistency. Accidents are part of the process, but if you follow these basic house-training guidelines, you can get the newest member of your family on the right track in a few weeks’ time. Establish a routine Like babies, puppies do best on a regular schedule. The schedule teaches them that there are times to eat, times to play and times to do their business. Generally speaking, a puppy can control their bladder one hour for every month of age. So if your puppy is two months old, they can hold it for about two hours. Don't go longer than this between bathroom breaks or they’re guaranteed to have an accident. Take your puppy outside frequently—at least every two hours—and immediately after they wake up, during and after playing, and after eating or drinking. Pick a bathroom spot outside, and always take your puppy (on a leash) to that spot. While your puppy is relieving themselves, use a specific word or phrase that you can eventually use before they go to remind them what to do. Take them out for a longer walk or some playtime only after they have eliminated. As your puppy gets better at going outside, the same method can be applied to the potty pads. Reward your puppy every time they eliminate outdoors. Praise or give treats—but remember to do so immediately after they’ve finished, not after they come back inside. This step is vital, because rewarding your dog for going outdoors is the only way to teach what's expected of them. Before rewarding, be sure they’re finished. Puppies are easily distracted and if you praise too soon, they may forget to finish until they’re back in the house. Put your puppy on a regular feeding schedule. What goes into a puppy on a schedule comes out of a puppy on a schedule. Depending on their age, puppies usually need to be fed three or four times a day. Feeding your puppy at the same times each day will make it more likely that they'll eliminate at consistent times as well, making housetraining easier for both of you. Pick up your puppy's water dish about two and a half hours before bedtime to reduce the likelihood that they'll need to relieve themselves during the night. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without needing a bathroom break. If your puppy does wake you up in the night, don't make a big deal of it; otherwise they will think it is time to play and won't want to go back to sleep. Turn on as few lights as possible, don't talk to or play with your puppy, take them out and then return them to bed. Supervise your puppy Don't give your puppy an opportunity to soil in the house; keep an eye on them whenever they’re indoors. Tether your puppy to you or a nearby piece of furniture with a six-foot leash if you are not actively training or playing. Watch for signs that your puppy needs to go out. Some signs are obvious, such as barking or scratching at the door, squatting, restlessness, sniffing around or circling. When you see these signs, immediately grab the leash and take them outside to their bathroom spot. If they eliminate, praise them and reward with a treat. Keep your puppy on leash in the yard. During the housetraining process, your yard should be treated like any other room in your house. Give your puppy some freedom in the house and yard only after they become reliably housetrained. When you can't supervise, confine When you're unable to watch your puppy at all times, restrict them to an area small enough that they won't want to eliminate there. The space should be just big enough to comfortably stand, lie down and turn around. You can use a portion of a bathroom or laundry room blocked off with baby gates. Or you may want to crate train your puppy. (Be sure to learn how to use a crate humanely as a method of confinement.) If your puppy has spent several hours in confinement, you'll need to take them directly to their bathroom spot as soon as you return. Mistakes happen Expect your puppy to have a few accidents in the house—it's a normal part of housetraining. Here's what to do when that happens: Interrupt your puppy when you catch them in the act. Make a startling noise (be careful not to scare them) or say "OUTSIDE!" and immediately take them to their bathroom spot. Praise your pup and give a treat if they finish there. Don't punish your puppy for eliminating in the house. If you find a soiled area, it's too late to administer a correction. Just clean it up. Rubbing your puppy's nose in it, taking them to the spot and scolding them or any other punishment will only make them afraid of you or afraid to eliminate in your presence. Punishment will often do more harm than good. Clean the soiled area thoroughly. Puppies are highly motivated to continue soiling in areas that smell like urine or feces. It's extremely important that you use these supervision and confinement procedures to minimize the number of accidents. If you allow your puppy to eliminate frequently in the house, they'll get confused about where they’re supposed to go, which will prolong the housetraining process.

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Minnie
Dalmatian
8 Months
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Minnie
Dalmatian
8 Months

How to keep my dog from using the bathroom in her create?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

I am going to send you information on both potty training and crate training. When issues start to arise while going through the potty training process, it is usually best to just wipe the slate clean and start completely over. So some of this may seem a little remedial, but this is the best route to go. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Nova
German Shepherd
10 Months
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Nova
German Shepherd
10 Months

every night, he poops in his cage in the middle of the night. We let him out around 9 every night to ensure he doesn't poop in his cage but he still does it. I clean his mat with antibacterial soap and make sure that its thoroughly clean. How do i stop him from pooping in it every night?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. You can try to move his dinner time back by an hour to see if that helps. You can pick up his water bowl at 7pm and do not give him access to any water until you wake up. Also, make sure he doesn't have any treats, or bones, or anything that can stimulate his digestive system after 7pm. Do this for a few weeks to see if he breaks the habit. If it continues, this is a sign of mild separation anxiety. Google has tons of great resources for treating separation anxiety. But try the simple tips first!

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Luna
Border Collie
7 Weeks
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0 found helpful
Luna
Border Collie
7 Weeks

How do I know if she’s has to go to the toilet? When she’s is in her crate, she’s is very quiet so it is hard to know when she isn’t going to go. It’s normally after I fall asleep

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Luna is pretty young and will need lots of guidance in the potty training department. This guide has excellent advice, including an informative section on crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Remember, she will have to be taken outside often because her bladder is pretty small. I would take her out every 30-60 minutes until she gets the idea. It may seem like a lot but it will be worth the effort. Puppies need to go out as soon as they wake up, after meals, after a nap, after playtime, when excited, etc. As well, Luna will need to go out in the middle of the night at least once, maybe twice, until she is older. She may not be waking you and is peeing in the night, and in that case, I would set an alarm to take her (a quiet phone alarm not a blaring alarm that may startle her). Make it a quick trip, no talking, pee only, and then back to bed so that she does not think it is playtime. Be sure to take her out the last thing before bedtime. Good luck!

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Cj
Catahoula Great Dane Lab
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Cj
Catahoula Great Dane Lab
7 Months

She wont stop going potty in her cage

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Because your dog is a little older and still having potty issues, there may be a variety of reasons as to why she is still having accidents in her crate. Without being able to ask you questions to narrow down the cause, I am sending you an article full of information on this subject. It might give you some insight as to why this is still happening, and solutions as well. https://wagwalking.com/symptom/why-is-my-dog-pooping-in-his-crate

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Mocha
Mixed
5 Months
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Question
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Mocha
Mixed
5 Months

Pooping in her Kennel, whining when I leave the room.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, thank you for the cute pictures and question. Is Mocha pooping in her crate at night? She still may need a potty break in the middle of the night. Don't give her food or water for two hours before bedtime and give her a nice long walk after supper in the evening to give her a chance to poop if needed. I would start off by potty training Mocha all over again. This guide has excellent tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Take a look at the Crate Training Method. As well, during the day, you can take Mocha out every 30 - 60 minutes. This may seem excessive at first, but once she has continued success outside, it will be worth it. Clean all accidents in the crate with an enzymatic cleaner to remove the odor. You may not smell it, but Mocha does and may repeat her actions because of it. As for the whining, this is most likely temporary. She is young yet. Leave a radio or the TV on when you leave the room or provide her with an interactive toy to keep her busy. A feeder toy is great with a couple of treats inside to give her a challenge and something to do. Make sure she is well exercised at all times, to expend her energy and to help her relax. You can also work on obedience training as a way to stimulate her mind and tire her out, so that she'll rest when you have to leave the room: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-dog-basic-obedience. Get Mocha accustomed to you leaving the room by extending the minutes each time. Leave her with the feeder toy for 5 minutes. The next day make it 8 minutes, the next day 10, and so on until she plays with her toy and keeps herself busy until you return. Good luck!

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Bai
German Shepherd
13 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Bai
German Shepherd
13 Weeks

She knows how to go outside, but when she’s in her cage she will go potty and then whine a little. I let her out enough to where she shouldn’t be doing that but she does it anyways.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you quite a bit of information on potty training and using the crate to aid in that process. Some of it you may know already, but somewhere in the info, you may see something that you missed. Hi! I am going to send you information on both potty training and crate training should you decide to utilize a crate to aid in potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Hunter
Terrier mix
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Hunter
Terrier mix
1 Year

Hello,

We adopted Hunter about 5 months ago from a shelter where they said he was a stray. We have been trying to crate train him without much luck. He does not know what to do on a leash. When we go for walks he stands next to me and just stares into space. No matter the length of the walk in 5 months he has NEVER peed or pooped while on a leash and walking with me or my husband. The only way we can get him to use the bathroom is tying him in the back yard to a leash and letting him do his business there. Even when he does pee or poop in the back yard being tied up, I can bring him inside and put him in his crate and leave for an hour or two and come home to more pee and poop in the crate. He also does it overnight. Even if he’s gone to the bathroom outside. It never fails that as soon as we leave the house he uses the bathroom in the crate and every morning I wake up to pee and poop in the crate regardless of him going outside. I don’t know what else to do. I’m an sick and tired of having my house constantly smell of poop.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rachel, First, follow the Pressure method for leash walking from the article linked below. Pressure method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-accept-leash First, make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for them. Make sure the crate is only big enough for them to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that they can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. Check out the Crate Training article linked below for tips on how to get pup to go potty while outside - which makes accidents in the crate less likely. Because pup is older, potty trips can be every 3 hours instead of 1 when you are home and between 5-8 while away at work and pup in the crate (less at first until pup learns to hold it). Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you are still struggling after applying the above suggestions, then unfortunately pup may have already lost their desire to hold it while in a confined space. This commonly happens when someone accidentally teaches pup to do so by placing something like a puppy pad on one end of a larger crate or confining a puppy in cage where they are forced to pee through wired flooring - like at a pet store and some shelters. There are rare dogs who simply do it anyway, even though nothing happened to teach that - which may be there case here. In those cases you can try feeding pup their meals in there to discourage it but most of the time you simply have to switch potty training methods until they are fully potty trained - at which point you might be able to use a crate for travel again later in life. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold their bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so they won't go into there looking to pee, and take them potty outside only. Since they may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave them alone, be sure to leave them in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until they are out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Since pup does go potty on a long leash outside alone, I also suggest taking pup potty on a 20-30' foot leash. Allow pup to wander away on the long leash, calmly telling pup to "Go Potty" when you first get outside. If they go, toss a couple of treats that are large enough for pup to find and praise pup genuinely. When pup gets used to going potty with you on the long leash, gradually coil up the length of the leash by one foot at a time, until pup is going potty within 6 feet of you over the course of a month of so. At that point, you can switch to a 6 foot leash. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Baxter
German Shepherd
5 Months
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Baxter
German Shepherd
5 Months

He knows to let me know when he goes outside but he continues to have accidents in his crate even though he’s not in there for long periods of time. I don’t know what to do. He’s well trained about using the bathroom besides that. I know there’s gonna be occasional accidents, but I just wasn’t sure if there was more advice.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. Without being able to ask follow up questions, I hope I am not giving you information you already know or have tried. If he is only eating 2 meals a day, then he should only be pooping about 3 times a day. But if he is given treats, dental chews, or anything else that will stimulate his digestive system, you can count on him needing to eliminate about 20-30 minutes after he is finished. We often give dogs treats or food toys to get them to like the crate. It's a great idea but also causes un-wanted elimination. So cutting out all food and water about an hour or so before crate time, and making sure he goes to the bathroom right before putting him in will help with this process.

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TITO
schnauzer
9 Weeks
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TITO
schnauzer
9 Weeks

I M TRYING TO POTTY TRAIN HIM

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

I am sending you information on potty training as well as crate training. There is a lot of information, but it should help you with this process. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Molly
Husky
5 Months
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Molly
Husky
5 Months

I am home all day with Molly & she is let out quite often with no accidents in the house anymore. Normally on the weekends we are gone more and she is put in a kennel for no more then 3 hours usually. She will poop everytime & its like she never stops pacing so poop gets EVERYWHERE in & out of the kennel. We are not sure what else to do. We tried a smaller kennel but she did it then also.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello, This is something that may be worth hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues, to help with in person, simply because this may take a bit of trial and error and observing her to solve. I would set up a camera to spy on her while you are away, even sitting outside for a couple of hours and her thinking you are gone. A phone or tablet, plugged with an app like skype on mute can work. A video baby monitor or security camera or GoPro may also be item you can use that you already have on hand. Watch her in the crate. Is she shaking, drooling, trying frantically to escape, barking or howling a lot - this alone doesn't mean anxiety though, but combined with other behaviors can mean it. If the pooping is a sign of true separation anxiety - barking or pooping by themselves can be signs of other behaviors, not anxiety, but when combined with things like excessive drooling, escape attempts, shaking, ect...it can be anxiety. If it is anxiety, the anxiety itself needs to be addressed for the pooping to improve. How soon are the accidents happening? Is pup pooping outside before you crate her? Many dogs will need to poop 5-45 minutes after eating a meal or running around a lot. Because of the delay, if you are feeding pup then leaving before they poop, or they pee and act done, then are fed and crated, the issue might be timing. Take pup outside on a leash again after feeding, even if they just peed. Pay attention to how long pup tends to poop after eating. Walk pup around slowly on leash, telling pup to Go Potty. Reward with a treat after they pee, then walk them around again for another ten minutes - the movement helps things get moving and stay focused, telling them to Go Potty again. Reward with three treats - one at a time if they poop. Adjust their feeding schedule to make sure there is time for a poop before you leave if that may be the issue. Is there anything absorbent in the crate? If so, remove it. You can use something like www.primopads.com or k9ballistics.com water-proof vinyl type crate pads instead if pup needs a little padding. Be sure to clean the crate thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes to fully remove the previous accident smells, so the smell won't encourage further accidents. Try feeding pup meals when you are home in their crate as well, to help them associate the crate with eating instead of pooping. If pup has lost their natural desire to hold it in a confined space and simply associates the crate with going potty, like a pee pad (this may be from pee pads in a crate, living in a pet store pen, having too many accidents in the crate, or simply the rare puppy who doesn't mind the accidents in there), then pup will need to be taught to go potty on a disposable real grass pad in another room of the home they can be confined in, which can be closed off from the rest of the home later on - since pup will be learning it's okay to go potty in that room. Pup can be confined in the room with the grass pad while you are away until they are big enough to be trusted in the rest of the home and be able to hold it then, and while you are home, continue outside potty training as usual. Don't use pee pads for this since those resemble carpet and rugs and you want pup to learn outside potty training. Check out the exercise pen method from the article linked below - the difference is, you will not transition pup out of the pen to freedom in the rest of the home. You will keep the pen or small room they stay in with the grass pad, until they are old enough to simply be left in the rest of the home without supervision, at which point you will remove the grass pad, close off access to the room the pen or pad used to be in, and leave them in the rest of the home they are used to keeping clean due to potty training you have done during the week, to hold their bladder until you return to take them outside. Exercise Pen - you can use part of this method with a grass pad instead of litter box, as mentioned. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable real grass pad examples- amazon too: www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com www.doggielawn.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Canelo
English Bulldog
3 Months
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Canelo
English Bulldog
3 Months

My family and I have been working on potty training my two bulldog puppies, (a 3 month old and a 2 1/2 month old) and they have been getting the habit of going potty on the potty pad, but recently they have been having problems urinating on the potty pad. They have been urinating while playing and just walking around, and neither of them no longer squat nor life their leg to, they just pee standing and walking without notice. One of my puppies even urinating while playing with the other pup while laying on his belly. Could this be a medical problem for them or what could we do to fix this?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! If they are suddenly going potty and it looks accidental, you may want to talk to your veterinarian. I have been training for almost 15 years and I have not seen that, though I have heard of that in a medical setting. I would definitely give your vet or local clinic a call. Good luck!

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Diesel
French Bulldog terroir
10 Weeks
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Diesel
French Bulldog terroir
10 Weeks

Why won’t he stop pooping in the crate

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Nala
Labrador/ collie
10 Weeks
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Nala
Labrador/ collie
10 Weeks

We have had Nala for 2 weeks, everything started off really well. She slept in her crate brilliantly and would call if she needed the toilet. However now she doesn’t call out and will poo in her crate at night. I get up 2 or 3 though the night to let her go to the toilet as she is only young. She is not hiding her poo.
She has also done the same while we are at work. I come back at lunch time to let her out which Is also fine, no poo, but when my partner gets back from work a few hours later she has been to the toilet. Any advice, I think we may need to make her cage smaller.
Thank you

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training just in case there is any information in here that you haven't tried. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Winston
Huskador
1 Year
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Winston
Huskador
1 Year

When I leave the house even if it's for 20 minutes even if has used the bathroom out side many times he will bark and wine when I leave and poop in his kennel but if I'm home and it's bed time he won't go in his kennel

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. It sounds like he has some mild separation anxiety going on. Dogs can sometimes eliminate because the pheromones they release calm them down. A quick trick to help is to feed him in his kennel for the next few weeks. Dogs won't eliminate where they eat. He might do it out of habit during the first few days, but he will adjust and stop doing it.

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Suki
Shiba Inu
1 Year
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Suki
Shiba Inu
1 Year

No matter what potty schedule we've tried or positive reinforcement we've attempt, she will not stop using the bathroom in the crate.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katlyn, First, make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. Check out the Crate Training article linked below for tips on how to get pup to go potty while outside - which makes accidents in the crate less likely. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you are still struggling after applying the above suggestions, then unfortunately pup may have already lost her desire to hold it while in a confined space. This commonly happens when someone accidentally teaches pup to do so by placing something like a puppy pad on one end of a larger crate or confining a puppy in cage where they are forced to pee through wired flooring - like at a pet store and some shelters. There are rare pups who simply do it anyway, even though nothing happened to teach that. In those cases you can try feeding pup her meals in there to discourage it but most of the time you simply have to switch potty training methods until she is fully potty trained - at which point you might be able to use a crate for travel again later in life. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home, use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature, are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold her bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so she won't go into there looking to pee, and take her potty outside only. Since she may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave her alone, be sure to leave her in a safe area that's been dog proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until she is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Otis
Dachshund
7 Months
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Otis
Dachshund
7 Months

We have had Otis since 10 weeks, he’s always been a very nervous dog and doesn’t like walks as he is scared of everything around him and other dogs, we’ve started focus training on each walk to work on this. We have another dog and walk him separately. Otis hates being on his own, whether it’s in the crate or in the house, he sleeps in his own crate at night and is normally fine with this, I’ve started to re train him for
The day as he keeps going to the toilet in the house. However he’s now going to the toilet in his crate? - he goes before he goes in and even if I leave him in there for an hour he still goes? I’m lost on what to do with him!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amy, First, if the behavior is new, you may want to check with your vet to make sure there isn't something causing incontinence like a urinary tract infection. Does pup display signs of separation anxiety while in the crate - including heavy drooling, heavy panting, continuous barking or whining the whole time they are in there, shivering, scratching at the crate and trying to get out frantically, or trying to escape to the point of injuring themselves. Just barking or doing a little bit of one of the behaviors isn't necessarily separation anxiety, but several behaviors or one behavior to an extreme likely is. Is so, pup's separation anxiety would need to be addressed while in the crate to also help the accidents - since the accidents could be related to severe separation anxiety. If pup is healthy, make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com or k9ballistics.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. Check out the Crate Training article linked below for tips on how to get pup to go potty while outside - which makes accidents in the crate less likely. At this age, you can add 1-2 hours to the times in the article since pup is older. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you are still struggling after applying the above suggestions, then unfortunately pup may have already lost his desire to hold it while in a confined space. This commonly happens when someone accidentally teaches pup to do so by placing something like a puppy pad on one end of a larger crate or confining a puppy in cage where they are forced to pee through wired flooring - like at a pet store and some shelters. There are rare puppies who simply do it anyway, even though nothing happened to teach that. In those cases you can try feeding pup her meals in there to discourage it but most of the time you simply have to switch potty training methods until he is fully potty trained - at which point you might be able to use a crate for travel again later in life. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold his bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so he won't go into there looking to pee, and take him potty outside only. Since he may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave him alone, be sure to leave him in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until he is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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luna
Pit bull
8 Weeks
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luna
Pit bull
8 Weeks

when its time to go to sleep i put her in the crate and she always poos in the crate. i take her out to potty outside and she doesnt go but when i take her inside she poos.she always wakes me up at 6am crying. what should i do.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training just in case you decide to use a crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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luna
Pit bull
2 Months
0 found helpful
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luna
Pit bull
2 Months

my puppy doesnt want to poop. everytime i take her out all she does is sniff and eat everything. i take her outside for 30 mins and she doesnt poop. i take her out 30 minutes after eating and doesnt poop. then when she doesnt poop i take her 15 minutes later and still doesnt poop. but when i bring her inside she poops 20 minutes later. and when its time to sleep she ate 4 hours ago i take her to poop and when i put her in the crate she poops again what should i do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brenda, First, make sure that the crate is only big enough for her to stand up, turn around, and lie down and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. You can buy metal crate dividers for bigger wire crates to make them small enough if needed. Also, remove anything absorbent from the crate at this age, including a soft dog bed or towel. You can use a bed like www.primopads.com or k9ballistics if you need a new non-absorbent bed for her. Too large of a crate or something absorbent in the crate can cause puppies to not want to hold it in the crate. Second, check out the article linked below, and use all of the tips found there, including teaching pup to Go Potty, walking pup around slowly on the leash, using a potty encouraging spray on the ground where you want her to go, taking her somewhere calm, walking her around again after she pees, and utilizing the crate between potty trips until she goes. Crate Training method https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside A second option is to use the Tethering method if you are home all day and can keep a close eye on her while she is leashed to you. That method is also found in the article I have linked above. Pup is likely too distracted or nervous while outside so they are holding it while out there. Walking pup around slowly on the leash, giving treats when they do go potty, teaching Go Potty, and going somewhere calm for potty trips can help pup adjust to time outside and learn to go. It may take pup a week or so to adjust as well. You can also try spending additional time outside, simply hanging out there calmly to help the newness of it wear off, and setting up the crate correctly should help to discourage pup form going in there - expect pup to cry to be let out instead and take them outside when they do. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mabel
Cocker Spaniel
11 Weeks
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Mabel
Cocker Spaniel
11 Weeks

She poops in her cage at night , I don’t feed her after 6 we go to bed about 10.30 after I put her out in the garden she normally goes to poo around 8 , I get up at 2 to let her out but she has done a poo no wee I clean her bed and spray the cage help please

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am currently struggling with this same issue with my new puppy! Smaller breed dogs have slower moving digestive systems to keep their blood sugar regular. What I have done, and have had others done is bump their dinner time back an hour. Once she gets a little older, around 4 months old, you can go back to her regular dinner time. This will help to ensure that everything is out of her system before bed.

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Teddy
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks
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Teddy
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks

Hi, my puppy poops in his crate a night. I take him outside at 11pm then put him in before going to bed. He howls for around 30 mins and bangs on the crate. Then he will repeat this a few more times every few hours.
I don’t get up in the night as people have told me to go cold turkey and he will get used to it. It’s happened for the first 5 nights we’ve had him and it’s hard clearing up the poo in the morning. What advice would you give me? Thank you

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Paul, I recommend ignoring the cold turkey advice you have received because it won't work for a puppy your dog's age. In general puppies can only hold their bladder for the number of months they are in age plus one during when awake. Once you pup wakes up, they won' be able to make it past 3 hours in the night - leading to accidents pup can't prevent. Once pup adjusts to the crate in, pups will often be able to make it about twice that long - meaning 5-6 hours before needing a potty break at night. Even under ideal training, its reasonable for your puppy to need at least one potty trip during the night. If they aren't taken potty when they truly need to go, and are forced to have an accident instead, enough accidents in the crate will cause a puppy to loose their natural desire to keep a confined space clean, and the accidents will then increase, and make it impossible to use the crate for potty training - a much harder issue in the long run. Don't worry about what you have done or not known thus far, that's why its great to pursue learning new things, like you are doing here. What I recommend going forward, is to ignore pup's crying when you first crate them in the evening, and ignore any crying that happens before it has been 2-3 hours since they last went potty outside. When they wake and cry when its been at least 2-3 hours since the last potty, take pup potty outside on a leash, and keep the trip as boring as possible - no play, little talk, no treats, just right to business, then back inside and into the crate. When you return pup to the crate, and they cry with an empty bladder, then ignore that crying then. By ignoring the crying when pup is only crying for attention or food, and responding to true potty needs, pup should still learn to only wake when their bladder wakes them, and not for additional reasons - which should help pup stretch potty needs to every 6 or so hours within a couple weeks many times. If pup is not sleeping in your room (which is fine), use an audio baby monitor to listen out for when pup wakes needing potty trips. I also recommend practicing the Surprise method from the article I have linked below during the day, to help pup adjust to the crate overall sooner. Only give treats during daytime practice though, not at night because they can keep pup awake or needing to potty at night. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ You can add an hour to the 2-3 hours each month pup gets older also - 3 hours for a 2 month old, 4 hours for a 3 month old, 5 hours for a 4 month old, ect...until pup can hold it 8 hours during the day at 7 months, and isn't waking for reasons other than potty needs and thus can double those times at night, to make it through the night before 7 months. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Winnie
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
9 Weeks
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Winnie
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
9 Weeks

Has suddenly started pooing in her crate. Not been a problem before is this for attention or? This has happened at night and during the day when she’s usually be in her crate asleep. Any help would be much appreciated

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. It can take weeks or months to completely potty train a dog. 9 weeks is still very young, so your dog will need continued potty training over the next few weeks to really implement good habits. I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Athena
Great Dane
1 Year
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Athena
Great Dane
1 Year

She always uses the bathroom in her crate no matter what on beds, blankets, sheets everything we are moving so we would like to have her trained before then.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! One way to help with this is to feed her in her crate if you haven't already tried that. Dogs typically won't eliminate where they eat. You may have to do this a few times before she gets it, but it should help. You can also put her in there with a kong or other treat related toy overnight which will also get the message across to her.

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Debbie
Pit bull
5 Years
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Debbie
Pit bull
5 Years

My name is Vanessa I am currently fostering a 5 year old pitbull named debbie, she is on a routine but everytime she goes outside she will only pee she will not poop and yet when she is kenneled she waits until I leave for a little bit then I come back to find poop all over in her kennel. What do I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Vanessa, First, make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. Check out the Crate Training article linked below for tips on how to get pup to poop while outside - which makes accidents in the crate less likely. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you are still struggling after applying the above suggestions, then unfortunately pup may have already lost her desire to hold it while in a confined space. This commonly happens when someone accidentally teaches pup to do so by placing something like a puppy pad on one end of a larger crate or confining a puppy in cage where they are forced to pee through wired flooring - like at a pet store and some shelters. There are rare puppies who simply do it anyway, even though nothing happened to teach that. In those cases you can try feeding pup her meals in there to discourage it but most of the time you simply have to switch potty training methods until she is fully potty trained - at which point you might be able to use a crate for travel again later in life. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold her bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so she won't go into there looking to pee, and take her potty outside only. Since she may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave her alone, be sure to leave her in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until she is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Josie
Great Dane
5 Months
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Josie
Great Dane
5 Months

She poops in her kennel at night. I get up during the night and take her out but she doesn’t always poop then

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Yvonne, Is pup pooping at least 2 times during daytime hours? If not, I would work on getting pup to poop during the day. If pup is being fed within 3 hours of bedtime, I would try moving dinner earlier. I would use a potty encouraging spray, sprayed on the area you are taking pup potty to, right before you take pup there. I would walk pup around slowly on leash, encouraging pup to sniff around, for at least 15 minutes after they have peed - the movement can help pup feel the urge to go and keep them on task. I would tell pup to "Go Potty" and give pup one treat for peeing, and three, one at a time, for pooping. That will help pup learn to go potty on cue in the future. If pup is not somewhere that you can hear them when they wake, I would also move their crate where you can hear them whine, in case they are asking to be let out to go potty in the night and you are not hearing it, or purchase an audio baby monitor that you can listen out for their crying with. If pup has anything absorbent in the crate, I would also remove that. You can use something non-absorbent for a bed like www.primopads.com or www.k9ballistics.com. Also, make sure that the crate is only big enough for pup to stand up, turn around, and lie down, and not so big they can go potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Too big won't encourage pup's natural desire to hold it in a confined space. You can purchase a metal crate divider for larger crates that need to be made temporarily smaller until pup grows or is fully potty trained. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tillie
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
3 Years
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Tillie
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
3 Years

Our beautiful Tillie, is fab and will always let us know when she needs to go outside to the toilet, however at nighttime she always seems to be pooping in her crate. We always let her out before going to bed, but this doesn’t make a difference. Please help?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This one can be tricky. Often adjusting evening meal time can help. It typically takes dogs an entire 8 hours for their systems to be mostly empty after a meal. IF you feel comfortable with this, you may want to push back dinner time by an hour or two. Try just an hour first and give it a week. If that doesn't help, you can push it back by 2 hours, and then continue to do what you're doing with taking her out right before bed time.

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Stella
German Shepherd
7 Months
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Stella
German Shepherd
7 Months

My dog is completely house trained and out of nowhere she has started to poop in her kennel again.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Logan, I would start by making sure the kennel is only big enough for pup to turn around, stand up, and lie down. A metal crate divider can be used to make the crate smaller if needed until pup grows into it, if it's too big. If there is anything absorbent in the crate, like a soft bed or towel, I recommend replacing it with a non-absorbent bed, such as www.k9ballistics.com or www.primopads.com crate pads. How often is pup pooping per day? If it's more than 3 times or it looks runny, I recommend a trip to your vet. A Gi issue might be causing accidents. I am not a vet. When pup goes potty, are you going outside with them and watching them go? If not, I recommend going outside with pup, with them on leash if you don't have a fenced in yard or they tend to get distracted and not go. Tell pup to "Go Potty" and give three small treats, one at a time, after pup poops. Walk pup around slowly on a leash again after they pee, for 10-15 minutes to encourage the urge to go if they aren't pooping on their own. At this age pup might be getting distracted while outside and not pooping when you let them out, then the urge to go hits them later while they are in the crate. Be sure to clean the crate thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes to fully remove the potty smell, so pup won't be encouraged to go in their again by the smell. Only enzymes will remove it enough for a dog's sensitive nose. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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alfie
French Bulldog
8 Months
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alfie
French Bulldog
8 Months

Alfie is 8 months and sleeps happily in his 4'x3' pen at night. However, although he goes for evening walk and then goes out in garden before bedtime, he is still peeing and pooing overnight in pen. How can I break this habit ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Anne, I recommend crating pup in a smaller space at night. The space should only be big enough for pup to turn around, stand up, and lie down - if it's big enough pup can go potty in one end and stand in the other end to avoid the accident it won't encourage pup to hold it overnight. Also, is there anything absorbent in the pen with pup, such as a soft bed or towel? If so, I recommend replacing anything absorbent with a non-absorbent bed like www.primopads.com or k9ballistics.com. An absorbent surface won't encourage pup to hold it either, and any lingering smell from old accidents can encourage pup to go potty in the same spot, so either clean the entire area really well with a cleaner that contains enzymes, or replace anything that can't be cleaned. I would set up the appropriate size crate with a non-absorbent bed and have a way to listen for pup if they wake needing to go potty outside during the night - like an audio baby monitor if pup sleeps in another room. When in a smaller space like a crate, most dogs will ask to be let out if they need to go potty, rather than soil their small space. If the issue is a habit, the following should help: the smaller space of a crate, removing all food and water at least 2 hours before bed, ensuring pup is really going potty outside before bed by going with them outside and watching to make sure they go and aren't just getting distracted or not emptying fully, and watching to see if pup is pooping 2 times during the daytime - and if not, taking pup potty on a leash again for a while so that you can help them walk around slowly and focus on finishing. If pup cannot hold it for 4 hours during the day or is pooping more than 3 times in 24 hours or the poops look really loose or runny, I would contact your vet. If those things are going on, there may be a medical reason why pup can't make it through the night. If there is a medical issue, that will need to be addressed so pup is able to physically hold it, before the crate and changes I recommended can help. I am not a vet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zoey
pitbull
1 Year
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Zoey
pitbull
1 Year

She poops in her cage every night. She is in there for 7-8 hours. I take her out before bed and she is fed everyday at the the same time but she wont stay out of my trash or the litter box. I've tried moving it but she climbs to get it.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, It sounds like pup needs to be crate trained and sleeping in the crate at this age. Check out the article I have linked below and the Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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rolex
Maltipoo
13 Weeks
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rolex
Maltipoo
13 Weeks

he doesn’t eat much and he just poops everywhere

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use a crate to help with potty training Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Zsa Zsa
Poodle x Schipperke
11 Weeks
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Zsa Zsa
Poodle x Schipperke
11 Weeks

We just got our puppy a few days ago and everything is going well except for when it comes to the crate. She absolutely hates being in there: whether we sit next to her or not or go in to reassure her every now and then, she yelps practically non stop until we take her out. We are home all the time so she only needs to go in there for an hour or two per day, but of course is kept there during the night. During the day, we take her outside to go potty before she goes in there and again immediately after taking her out. During the night, we do the same before she goes in the crate, but it seems like she yelps the entire night. Seriously, I’m honestly not sure if she gets any sleep at all during the night. The problem with that is, I can’t tell if she’s crying because she needs to go potty or if she just she wants to get out of there. I wake up to let her out in short 3-4hr intervals, but twice now, I’ve gone down to find she’s already gone potty in her crate. I know she likely doesn’t want to go potty in there, but I also don’t think I can take her out every 15 mins during the night. I need to function during the day! She has a toy, a chew toy, she only has enough room to turn around in her crate, and she’s in a familial area. Is there anything I can do to help her feel more comfortable in her crate? Is there anything I can do to stop her going potty in her crate?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Ryder
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ryder
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Months

I’m trying to get him to go potty on a certain area, I’ll be out there for 20 mins. He will go pee but when I put him back in crate after then he poops. Why is that?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use a crate to help with potty training Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Question
Ace
Boxerpit
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ace
Boxerpit
8 Weeks

How to keep him from pooping in crate

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty as well as crate training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Harley
Chiweenie
1 Year
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Harley
Chiweenie
1 Year

We have had Harley since she was 7 weeks old. We have always taken her out constantly but she still uses the bathroom inside. She is getting a little better though. The main problem is she pees and poops in her kennel every single night. We clean it out every day with Clorox cleanup. What do we do? Is she untrainable?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. It sounds like you are doing everything correctly. My only other suggestion would be to move back dinner time and water another hour. So if your bed time is 10pm, then no food or water after 6pm until she gets out of the habit of going at night. You can even do dinner at 5pm and last water at 6pm.

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Nash
pitbull
4 Months
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Nash
pitbull
4 Months

My puppy is crated at night. He goes poop right before he is crated. He poops in his crate every single night. We have made the crate smaller, removed bedding, feed him in his crate, and have him on a feeding schedule.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Another thing to try is moving back his dinner time by an hour or two. Start with an hour and go for a week to see if he stops pooping at night. If not, try two hours. You will have to be on this modified schedule for about a month until he gets out of the habit of going in his kennel.

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Ralph
Dachshund
14 Weeks
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Ralph
Dachshund
14 Weeks

Every night at around 0230 he will cry in his crate but before we get to him he will have messed in his crate. Previously he has been holding his bladder from around 2200 until 0500

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it is expected that Ralph will need to go for a potty break in the night; you were fortunate that he was able to go for that time period previously. I would withhold water and food for 2 hours before bed and make sure that Ralph has a long walk before bed. Take a look here for information on potty training a young puppy: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. You should expect that Ralph will need to go after about 4 hours, and if 2:30 a.m. seems to be the usual time, then I suggest that you set a quiet vibrating alarm to take him for a quick pee before he has the need to go in his crate. Don't set a loud alarm, or he may learn to wake up based on that sound and continue even as his bladder gets better at holding urine. This waking up will only last a while, and you can gradually add a few minutes time to the alarm each month. Before you know it, little Ralph will be making it through the night. Good luck and enjoy your pup!

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Zeus
English Bulldog Terrier
3 Months
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Zeus
English Bulldog Terrier
3 Months

Potty training. Poops in the crate everytime he is left in there. Need help with crate training. He has separation anxiety

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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rocky
Shih Tzu
3 Months
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rocky
Shih Tzu
3 Months

How do I potty train my puppy? everytime he will act on sniffing and circling around I immediately pick him up and we will go to the comfort room so that he can do his business there. 30 minutes gone by still wouldn't poop or pee but when I bring him back to his crate he will do it there.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hans, First, make sure that pup's crate is only big enough for pup to turn around, stand up, and lie down. Too big and it won't encourage pup to hold it in there. If it's a larger wire crate, you can also purchase a crate divider to block off the back of the crate to make it small enough until pup is older. Also, if there is anything absorbent in the crate like a soft bed, towel, or pee pad, remove that. Absorbent things can encourage pottying in there. You can give pup something like www.primopads.com or the non-absorbent k9ballistic crate mats instead if you want to give a little padding for rest, instead. If those steps have already been taken, pay attention to timing. At this age pup will only be able to hold it for as long as they are months in age plus one, maximum during the day. At 3 months old, that means pup can't hold it for longer than 3-4 hours. Left too long and pup will be forced to have an accident and after enough forced accidents pup may loose their natural desire to hold it in a confined space. How large is the spot you take pup to go potty? Is it outside? If the area is inside and you are trying to teach pup to use an indoor toilet, I recommend using the Exercise Pen method from the article I have linked below. If that spot inside or outside is not much bigger than the crate, I recommend making it larger so pup can walk around in it more, or using a disposable real grass pad instead of a pee pad. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy If the area is outside, check out the Crate Training method from this article below, and pay special attention to the steps about using a potty encouraging spray, walking pup around slowly on a long leash, teaching Go Potty and giving pieces of kibble as a reward after pup goes potty in the correct spot - to help pup learn. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If pup has already lost that desire to keep that space clean through accidents, a previous come (some breeders will put pee pads in crates causing this), or the rare puppy who does it no matter what you do, then you will need to pursue a different potty training method, and you can hopefully use the crate later once pup is fully potty trained again. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold her bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so she won't go into there looking to pee, and take her potty outside only. Since she may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave her alone, be sure to leave her in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until she is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Monte
Labradoodle
7 Months
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Monte
Labradoodle
7 Months

Monte is a 7 month old labradoodle, I've had him for 4 and a half months. He was really, really good at going to bathroom outside until about a month ago. He now constantly is doing his business in his kennel (since he is put in the kennel whenever I go to work and at night while I sleep. I'm not sure what I should do. Any Advice?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brooke, First, I recommend going outside with pup when he does out to go potty if you are not doing so already - he may be getting distracted at this age and not fully going potty while out there. Tell pup to Go Potty, walk them around slowly until they go, then give a treat and praise after, to help pup learn to go quickly when taken outside and motivate pup to go there. Second, if there is anything absorbent in the kennel, I recommend taking it out, and cleaning the kennel thoroughly with a cleaner that contains enzymes. I also recommend making the kennel only big enough for him to stand up, turn around, and lie down - if it's bigger than that, you can use a metal crate divider with wire crates to block off part of the kennel until pup either grows into it or is fully potty trained. Third, how often is pup peeing? How many times a day is he pooping? If pup is peeing more often than every 3 hours or pooping more than 2-3 times in 24 hours, I recommend a trip to your vet to see if there is a medical reason behind the accidents. Something like an infection can cause urinary incontinence like symptoms and GI upset can lead to pooping in the crate. I am not a vet so consult your vet for this area of need. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Fredo
American bully
5 Months
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Fredo
American bully
5 Months

Good morning I brought my puppy from this breeder's house the puppy is very beautiful and sweet my question is he very play outside but when I bring him in the house he goes in the corner or by the painto and does move he does even come when u call him cus he so scary I wanna know why hell play outside but does move or do anything in the house

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jamus, Was he kept outside at the breeder's home? It sounds like he either may not be used to being in a house and is feeling nervous, was disciplined while inside and now thinks its not okay to play there, or is tired depending on how much activity he is getting outside and napping - puppies tend to nap a lot. Talking more with his breeder about how he was kept and raised and whether he acted htat way before while with them could help solve this. In the meantime, try feeding pup part of their dog food in chew toys like kongs to see if that helps pup relax more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rachel
Shepherd/Husky/stbernard
11 Months
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Rachel
Shepherd/Husky/stbernard
11 Months

My family and i have had this girl since she was old 8weeks old. We have had issues since the beginning trying to get her potty trained. She has pooped in the kennel since the day we introduced it to her. And she doesnt care to lay in it and be covered. We have her on a very consistent schedule, and she was doing ok. But then all of a sudden she is pooping in the kennel again, no changes, and she doesnt let anyone know. She will poop and pee all over the house also without any warning. And then she will step in it and track it if its not caught immediately after (she will literally poop turn around and walk back through her own poop). And to top it all off the cat shes grown up with is now her main enemy #1. Weve tried umbilical training, feeding her in her kennel, consistent schedule, treats outside,... None of it seems to make any difference.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Koda
Mix
3 Months
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Koda
Mix
3 Months

Hello, I’m struggling heavily with my puppy, she poos and pees in the crate basically as soon as shes in it. We’ve recently decreased the cage size to see if it helps but she still stands and lies in her crate all in her poo/pee making her need a bath every day. She has never peed or pood outside and pees as soon as she brought back in which is so frustrating (she doesn’t seem scared to go outside in general) I believe due to our frustration she hides after peeing or pooing and pees and poos in hidden areas so we can’t catch her peeing in time and are unable to correct her straight away. She never peed or pooed on puppy pads as she used to lie on them believing they are her bed (and would then go and poo in her real bed) We’ve had her from 4 weeks and we’re really coming to the end of trying as nothing seems to help. I’ve purchased puppy books, adaptil plug ins and collars, different crates etc. Nothing is helping us - she is completely unbothered by her own pee/ poo and doesn’t avoid it like a normal dog would. Please help us
Thank you,
Elen

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Elan, Sometimes breeders will place pee pads in crates or confine pups in there too long causing them to associate that with going to the bathroom. The rare puppy will just do it no matter what you do. Since it sounds like it's not a matter of adjusting the crate, I would pursue potty training another way completely. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold her bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so she won't go into there looking to pee, and take her potty outside only. Since she may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave her alone, be sure to leave her in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until she is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tansy
Dachshund
5 Months
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Tansy
Dachshund
5 Months

Hello - I've just adopted a 5 month old puppy who was only taught to use pee pads. She mostly has accidents but there are a few successes with the pads so far, but for the last day or so she's only been going in the crate - almost as soon as I leave her in there. Now when I can see that she's about to go, I try to let her out to use the pad, but she won't go, until I put her back in the crate. I've been starting to get her used to outside, but with the city noises and cold weather, she's been to nervous to do anything outside yet. I'd like her to start going outside (and definitely not in the crate) but for now I struggle to even encourage her to use the pads.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Bear
German Shepherd/ Blue Heeler
1 Year
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Bear
German Shepherd/ Blue Heeler
1 Year

Bear was potty trained up until recently when we got another puppy that was being potty trained to not use the bathroom in the house or in the crate. All my dogs are crate trained and house trained, with the exception of bear recently. When Bear saw the puppy do it, he started doing it and when we got the puppy house broke and crate broke, bear continues to poop in his cage. My boyfriend and I constantly clean it up and tell him no. All the dogs go potty every 2 hours except when we’re asleep, the maximum 6 hours between my boyfriend and I. He’s the only one out of my three dogs who poop in their cage. They are rarely ever in the cage unless they’re misbehaving by chewing on things, using the bathroom on the floor, tearing something up. Like a time out almost. It’s never for long periods of time and they have access to food and water the entire day with outside time and bathroom breaks frequently. All my dogs are inside dogs with their own crates, and rooms which they’re out of majority of the day but in the evening or while im at work, I’m unable to keep and eye on them so they go in their separate rooms freely with food water toys open cage. I’ve been redirecting and tried rewarding him. He goes 3-4 days at a time without doing it then will start again. I’m not sure what to do and I need help!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! At this point it sounds habitual, no longer behavioral. The best way I can explain their sometimes wonky habits is like muscle memory. He became accustomed to going eventhough he probably doesn't HAVE to. It takes much longer to break habits than it does to learn them. My best piece of advice with this sort of thing is to spend a few weeks to a month, feeding him in his crate. And also pushing back his dinner time by a few hours so you know his belly is fairly empty before bed time. This will get his body and brain back in the habit of sleeping through the night, undisturbed. Once you feel he has broken this habit completely, you can resume his normal routine.

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Bella
Husky
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bella
Husky
9 Months

Hello my name is JaTia. Bella is my husky and also my first dog. (Pet) I have did my research with this breed and I do know it could be a handful. She’s been using the bathroom in her crate at night (bedtime) she well potty trained and let’s us know she has to go. As of this week she’s just been using it in her cage back to back. She’s a good puppy and I feel lost what would I do?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

First off, make sure that your dog’s crate is a comfy place to be. Give them a cozy blanket and plush toys for warmth and for company. Next, look into the common reasons for crate peeing. These include age, lack of routines, behavior issues, and illness. Potty Routines A regular dog walking schedule will help your dog pee at the appropriate times. A consistent morning walk does wonders to prevent potty accidents. For dogs, morning exercise is not only a source of physical and mental stimulation but also their best opportunity to use the toilet—unless you’re able to pop home during the day or book a drop-in pet visit. One caution with exercise: limit strenuous exercise prior to your dog’s bedtime or to leaving them in the crate for the day. That’s because after running hard, your pup will want to drink more water. This can lead to an engorged bladder and a resulting crate pee accident. Bladder Management This brings us to the exciting topic of canine bladder capacity. It can vary greatly based on the size, breed, and age of the dog. Anecdotally, my husband’s parents live with a 100lb Doberman/Shepherd mix (whom we have nicknamed “The Camel”) who can hold his bladder for 12+ hours, though he’s given the chance to “go” every 6 hours or so. He often keeps his bladder full until the right opportunity comes along, such as a walk around the neighborhood or a trip to the dog park. One of his favorite playmates, however, my brother’s 80lb Staffordshire Terrier, can only hold it for 8 hours max. Our Labrador/pit mix is somewhere in between. So how do I find out dog’s bladder capacity, you ask? According to the AKC, a good rule of thumb for puppies is to “take the puppies age in months… and add 1 to estimate the number of hours that a puppy can hold it before she needs to go outside to potty.” So, for a 5-month-old puppy, that would be about 6 hours maximum. For adult dogs it depends on their size and health. According to VetInfo, a medium-sized adult dog should be able to hold it for 8-10 hours (with larger dogs for longer, and smaller dogs for less time). Keep these maximum time periods in mind; your dog may be peeing in the crate simply because they can’t hold it any longer. Behavioral Causes According to the ASPCA and many pet parents we’ve spoken to, indoor dog pee accidents such as crate peeing are often related to separation anxiety. Separation anxiety is not uncommon in rescue dogs. It can also occur after losing a family member, changes in routine, moving to a new home, or the addition of a family member. If you suspect your dog has separation anxiety, read this trainer’s three-part series on how to help. For mild separation anxiety, try counterconditioning. This means developing a positive association between the thing that causes your dog to be anxious—such as your departure. One way to do this is to give them a tasty treat every time you leave for the day, so they associate your leaving with the positive outcome of receiving a treat. Since it is best for the enjoyable, positive association to last as long as possible, you may try reserving meal time for when you leave for the day. A food puzzle toy like a KONG or IQ Ball makes the experience last and provides some distraction, too. Medical Causes for Dog Crate Accidents If your dog started peeing in their crate suddenly, and you can’t point to any changes in routine or environment, it’s possible that a medical condition is to blame. Several canine illnesses can bring on indoor peeing, including, as the ASPCA notes: “a urinary tract infection, a weak sphincter caused by old age, hormone-related problems after spay surgery, bladder stones, diabetes, kidney disease, Cushing’s disease, neurological problems and abnormalities of the genitalia.” Certain food allergies and medications could also cause your dog to lose control of their bladder, resulting in peeing in their crate. If you suspect that your dog is suffering from any of these conditions, consult your vet for a treatment plan. Crate Pee Solutions To stop your dog from peeing in the crate, you’ll need time and patience. So what should you do in the meantime? Consider getting a divider and pee pad for your dog’s crate. The AKC writeup on this topic suggests that if given the choice, a dog would rather pee in a different spot than where they sleep. So, using a crate divider and placing a pee pad on one side, with their bed on the other, should help. Lastly, enjoy your dog! The loyalty and joy that pets bring to our lives are worth the effort. With some patience and love, you can help them work through their crate peeing issues and strengthen your bond in the process.

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Nova
Boston Terrier
14 Months
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Nova
Boston Terrier
14 Months

Shes pooing and weeing in her bed and crate but only at night
If she is left during the day she is clean
Meal times are always the same she poops and wee outside no problems exercise regulary wee and poo before bed but always every morning wee and poop in her creat and her bed

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lucy, Since this is only a night issue, I would consider speaking with your vet about it, since some types of night incontinence can be related to a medical issue. I am not a vet though. Other common causes of this are: 1. Pup being distracted or nervous while outside during the day and not peeing or pooping as often as needed. If this may be the case and you aren't already doing so, take pup outside to go potty on a leash and walk pup around slowly while telling them to "Go Potty". Reward with a treat if they go. Repeat again after they pee to get them to poop. Sometimes dogs need help focusing to make sure they aren't just going outside and playing or getting distracted and coming back in before they have finished. 2. The smell or absorbency of the crate. Be sure to clean the crate and any bedding really well with a cleaner that contains enzymes - only enzymes will remove the smell well enough for pup not to be encouraged to go potty there again. If there is anything absorbent in the crate like a soft bed or towel, remove that also. You can replace them with something like www.primopads.com or k9ballistics non-absorbent crate mats. Something that won't absorb the pee is key though. Make sure that the crate is only big enough for pup to turn around, stand up, and lie down, and not so big they will go potty on one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid the accident. 3. Pup may simply not be barking to ask to go out when they wake up needing to go. If they aren't barking, you will have to set an alarm middle of the night or early morning - test out times to see how long pup can go before an accident happens, and take pup out again between when they go to bed and when you normally get up. If pup is not located where you can hear them, they may be asking to go out but you aren't hearing them, then you may need to either move the crate closer to where you sleep or set up an audio baby monitor to hear them. At this age I would also want to explore why they can't make it through the night though. Is there something medical going on? Were they not pottying well before bed? Were they eating or drinking too close to bed (remove all food and water 2 hours before bedtime)? Or are you expecting them to go without a potty trip too long (are they crated for more than 8-10 hours at night)? Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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lily
Maltipoo
8 Months
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lily
Maltipoo
8 Months

She messes every time she is in her kennel while we are at work. She does not mess at night.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Leslie, Here are a few things that can cause that: 1. If pup is being crated for longer than 8 hours during the day. If so, pup will need a potty break midday because their bladder won't be able to go longer than 8 hours without a potty break. 2. If pup has something absorbent in the crate. If there is a soft bed or towel in the crate, remove that and replace it with something non-absorbent like www.primopads.com or k9ballistic non-absorbent crate mats. 3. If the space is too big. The crate should be big enough for pup to turn around, lie down, and stand up, but not so big that they can go potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid the accident. Too big and it won't encourage pup's natural desire to keep a confined space clean. 4. Pup has something medical going on that's causing more frequent peeing or pooping. If pup's poops are runny, more than three times a day, or pup can't hold their pee for more than 3 hours during the day I recommend visiting your vet. Dogs can generally hold it for longer while asleep than in the day so something could still be going on even if nights are fine if there are other indicators or an issue during the day. I am not a vet, so check with your vet about anything medical. 5. Pup has lost their natural desire to keep a confined space clean. This sometimes happens when a pee pad is placed in a crate and pup intentionally taught to go potty in there at some point. It can happen when pup is forced to go potty in the crate too many times due to not being let outside when they truly do have to go potty - like being crated for 8 hours as a puppy when their bladders can't hold it that long without potty breaks. Pet stores and some shelter stays can lead to this because they go potty in their kennel spaces. Some rare dogs simply do it regardless of their past. When loosing their natural desire to keep the space clean is the case, you will need to switch to another potty training method. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold her bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so she won't go into there looking to pee, and take her potty outside only. Since she may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave her alone, be sure to leave her in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until she is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. 6. Another cause of accidents in the crate is separation anxiety. True separation anxiety is generally very obvious, with several signs, including heavy panting and drooling, no-stop barking, accidents in the crate, trying to escape to the point of injury, shaking and trembling, refusal to eat, and/or vomiting in the crate. Some of these signs should be investigated by your vet to make sure its not something else going on, and if they are happening when you are home and pup isn't crated also, assume a trip to your vet is needed and not that it's anxiety. To address accidents due to separation anxiety, the anxiety itself needs to be resolved. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bailee
Texas Heeler
6 Months
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Bailee
Texas Heeler
6 Months

Bailee is a super smart dog, yet when i leave him alone either in my room, or in the kennel he poops and pees and screams, I have isolated him and rewarded, I have tried everything, He is sneaky and chews on things ive tried everything and i am about to send him to a boot camp, cause im tired of it, He doesnt listen when you get on to him i have tried e-collar doesnt do anything

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Heather, At this point I recommend hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues, uses a lot of obedience commands, boundary setting, and things like agility for confidence building, with experience specifically with separation anxiety, to work with you in person for this. Check out trainers like Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training. He has dozens online, and deals with dogs with anxiety and aggression. Many of his videos show confidence building through agility, boundary setting with obedience commands, working with separation anxiety, and other behavior issues. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Atlas
Pug
6 Months
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Atlas
Pug
6 Months

Atlas recently started pooping in his crate, will not eat his food out of a bowl, and is easily distracted when we go outside to go potty. I’ve stood for hours trying to get him to go, only for him to come back in the house and poop. If he doesn’t poop on the floor he will poop in crate. When we first brought him home, he was getting treats for going potty. Now he doesn’t seem to respond to treats or maybe we are not treating properly. I leave for work around 3am and if I take him out then he thinks it’s play time. Help!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shandon, First, when you take pup outside to go potty, if you aren't already doing so, take pup on a leash, walk them around slowly instead of standing still, try to bring pup to a calm area to go, spray a potty encouraging spray on the ground right before you take them to that spot, tell them to "Go Potty" and reward with a treat after they go (try using freeze dried meat or liver treats like Stella and Chewy). If pup pees, then repeat the process again to get pup to poop. Give pup 15 minutes for each before returning inside. Many dogs need to poop 10-45 minutes after eating, after running around a lot, or after waking up. After eating is the most common for pooping, but it's usually a bit delayed - like 20 minutes after. Pay attention to your pup's internal clock to time that potty trip, and take them back outside for a poop after eating even if they were just outside to pee right before eating and didn't need to poop then. Hopefully the above will get pup to poop, but if pup doesn't after 15 minutes, bring them back inside and keep them tethered to you with a hands free leash so they can't sneak off to poop. When you see signs of them wanting to go - like circling, sniffing, whining, pulling away from you, squatting, ect...quickly take pup back outside again to try again. Some dogs who have been punished for accidents in the home make the wrong connection that they were punished for pooping in front of someone, rather than associating that punishment with going in the house. When that's the case, pup may avoid pooping in front of you. You can try taking pup potty on a long leash outside, like 20-30 foot, and keeping pup tethered close while inside. When pup poops from the end of the long leash, toss pup a large enough treat for them to see and praise genuinely. As they become more comfortable going when you take them outside, gradually coil the long leash up until pup is pottying at the end of a six foot length again after a month of so. If pup poops right in front of you when tethered to you inside or you can't have pup tethered to you, your next option is to teach pup to use a disposable real grass pad and have pup stay in an exercise pen with grass pads covering the floor of it until they go potty there, then give them a couple of hours of freedom in the home while they are empty before either taking them back outside to try again or putting them back into the pen while their bladder is filling up again - until they go potty in there again. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or enclosed balcony - once weather is a safe temperature are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold his bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so he won't go into there looking to pee, and take him potty outside only. Since he may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave him alone, be sure to leave him in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until he is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. I would also speak with your vet. There could be a connection between his hesitancy to eat and issues with pooping. To get him to eat dog food again, I suggest mixing his food with something he likes the night before feeding him. Start with a higher quantity of food he likes and a bit of dog food, then gradually increase the dog food and decrease the food he likes overtime. Test out freeze dried meat dog food toppers, like stella and chewy or nature's variety first. If he likes those, crush them into a powder in a ziplock bag, then place that and some of his dog food in the bag overnight to flavor and scent the food. Feed that regularly if he will eat it, then gradually decrease how much powder you use and increase the dog food slowly in place of it - go slow so that eating the new food has become habit and he doesn't think about it changing gradually so keeps eating it. If he likes the kibble topper, you can also feed something like Ziwi peak or nature's variety raw boost long term - which is composed of freeze dried food or has it mixed in, if that's in your budget. If pup doesn't like the freeze dried stuff, then do the same thing but use things like minced chicken, liver paste, or goats milk mixed with the dog food and refrigerated overnight (you may want to do the goats milk last minute because it will get soggy though). Another option, is to have pup work for all of their kibble. Have pup perform commands and tricks and use the dog food that has been mixed with freeze dried powder from a ziplock bag, as rewards for pup obeying commands. Many dogs are actually more enthusiastic about their food if they have to earn it and consider it a treat. Feed pup entire meal amounts this way so that he is hungry during training in place of the bowl for a while. When you do so, act like the food is treats - you should act like you have a great prize not like you have to temp pup to eat. It may seem opposite but what a dog can't have without working for it, often makes it even more appealing. Once pup is eating that well, you can transition the training treats into toys pup works for like kong wobbles, puzzle toys, or hollow durable chew toys. For toys like a kong wobble, you can screw off the top once pup is eagerly eating the treats they get out of there, and it will create a red bowl pup can eat out of without overthinking any aversion to bowls they have. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cee Cee
Shepsky
12 Weeks
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Cee Cee
Shepsky
12 Weeks

Every time I go to pick her up she pee’s right away no matter how many times I say no! It’s every time even after she poops in her cage. It’s becoming disrespectful at this point.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! I am going to give you some tips that will build her overall confidence. It is likely her behaviors will start to resolve themselves over the next few months. So patience is key! There are several methods you can use to improve your submissive dog´s confidence. 1. Work on obedience training. Daily obedience work, even when it is only for a short time, provides submissive dogs with a lot of confidence. Family members are proud of dogs that perform on command and dogs pick up on this feeling. If the obedience training is harsh, though, a submissive dog will just get worse. Find a positive reinforcement and reward-based training class in your area. If the trainer works with a discipline-based system, it is not appropriate for a submissive dog. 2. Socialize your dog as much as possible to make them adaptable. The sensitive socialization period for your dog ended when she was a puppy, about 15 weeks of age, but she can still be socialized as an older dog, it is just going to take a lot more work. To socialize your dog, take her out as much as possible, let her meet new people, let her meet your friends dogs (if they are friendly with other dogs), and let her run free at the dog park so that she will meet new dogs. (Some dogs will be too nervous to play at the dog park so this phase may only come later.) 3. Give your dog a job or get her involved in a canine sport. Most dogs are not able to "work", however, so in order to give them an activity to build their confidence, it is a good idea to get them involved in one of the canine sports. Flyball, agility, Frisbee, dock diving, and other activities may be available in your area. 4. Use counter-conditioning techniques to help her overcome fear. This is the best but also the hardest (for you!) of the methods available to treat a submissive dog. For each thing that your dog is afraid of, you have to train her to have a pleasant feeling. When a dog is no longer afraid of the situation, he is confident and no longer going to be submissive. If you decide to try to build her confidence through counter-conditioning, the first thing you have to identify is the trigger. What is stimulating your dog to be so submissive? If she is only afraid of one thing it is easier to train her; unfortunately, most submissive dogs are afraid of almost everything. Spend some time with your dog to become familiar with her fears. The next step is to teach him that the scary thing is actually a good thing. When she is exposed to the scary object, give her a tasty treat and let her relax around the object without any pressure. The final step in counter-conditioning your dog to face her fears is to expose her and not provide a treat or even notice that he is being exposed. If you need more help on using counter-conditioning, the animal behaviorist Patricia McConnell has a book that I have found to be useful. The techniques are great and will help your dog develop confidence but as with most behavior modification, takes patience and persistence. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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