How to Train Your Dog to Not Run After Other Dogs

Medium
4-12 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Are you tired of having your arm ripped out of the socket every time your dog sees another dog? Most dogs are quite social and merely want to get to know each other, but there are times when this behavior is less than friendly.

Imagine this: You are standing on the sidewalk chatting with a friend who is taking her dog for a walk. Your dog is lying at your feet, he isn't growling, barking, or trying to launch himself at the other dog. Instead, he is simply laying there looking at you as if to say, "Hey mom, can I go say hi?”

This doesn't have to be a dream, you can easily teach your furry friend to behave this way. It just takes plenty of patience and the desire to behave for rewards.

Defining Tasks

Training your dog to stop running after other dogs is not an easy task. This type of behavior is inherent in most, if not all, breeds. The concept behind this training is to teach your dog to completely ignore other dogs and to stop them running or lunging after them.

Whether you are trying to teach your dog to behave while he is on the leash, off the leash or both, this is a very important skill for your pup to learn. It could save you, your dog, and another dog or its owner from serious injury.

When walking on the leash you should be able to simply use the "No!" command to keep your dog in check. When he is not on a leash, you may need to rely on a strong recall or ‘down’ command to get the job done. Always remember, training your dog a new skill should be fun for both of you! Heap tons of praise on your dog and always be ready with plenty of his favorite tasty treats to reward him.

Getting Started

You will need:

  • Your pup's favorite treats: Your dog will learn better when he knows there is a tasty treat waiting for him when he gets it right.
  • Clicker training tool (optional): Some pet owners and trainers prefer using a clicker for training as it makes it easy to identify the desired action.  

The best place to start training your dog to behave around other dogs is a nice quiet area with a dog yours is friendly with, but tends to lunge after. Make sure everyone in the family is in on the training and knows exactly what you are doing to ensure you are all on the same page.

You need to schedule training sessions of ten to fifteen minutes three times a day until your dog finally learns what is expected of him. Of course, you should also practice every time you take your dog out for a walk as well. Remember, the earlier you start teaching your pup to behave, the easier it will be to train him.


The Long-Line Method

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Step
1
Leash your dog
Attach your dog to a long-line leash and ask your family or friends with dogs to walk their dogs near yours.
Step
2
Let him wander
Slowly over the first few days, let your dog wander closer to the others, but maintain control.
Step
3
Call him back
As he starts to take off towards the other dogs, call his name and use your recall command. If he returns to you, be sure to praise him and give him a tasty treat.
Step
4
Hold steady
If he doesn't come back, use the leash to stop his forward movement, and then go and bring him back the starting distance.
Step
5
Practice
Repeat this process until you can let the leash trail behind him and he will come back when you call him.
Recommend training method?

The Run Away Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Out for a walk
Take your dog for his usual walk, keeping your eyes out for other dogs.
Step
2
Run away!
When you see another dog, use a fun, friendly voice to command your dog to "run away."
Step
3
Head elsewhere
Head off in a different direction, making the whole thing into a game your dog will enjoy.
Step
4
Come with me
This should get your dog to run with you away from the other dog.
Step
5
Lure with treats
If he doesn't run with you, try tossing a few of his favorite treats in the direction you want him to run until he gets the idea.
Recommend training method?

The Body Block Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Daily walks
Take your dog out for his daily walk watching for the approach of another dog.
Step
2
Don't pull back
If he starts to pull towards the other dog, don't pull back, stand still and hold your spot.
Step
3
Just say no!
Use a correction word such as "No!" and gently tug on the leash to pull his head to the side.
Step
4
Put your body to work
Use your body to turn your dog around instead of pulling him around.
Step
5
Reinforce with treats
If he behaves, be sure to give him plenty of love and a tasty treat.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Auggie
German Shepherd
2 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Auggie
German Shepherd
2 Years

My dog, Auggie, will charge at other dogs when we are taking a small walk around the neighborhood. Once he runs across the street he will not act aggressive against the dog he will just sniff them. Also when we start to walk past the dog I have noticed that he stares at the other dog and will not look away. I cannot get his attention when with another dog. Auggie does fine when around other dogs off leash or at the dog park. What can I do to make him stop charging at other dogs? We also have talked to a dog trainer before and he has said that it might be a territorial thing because it is only when we go around walks in the neighborhood. And when we go on walks in a new place we have no problem. (And I don’t know if this has anything to do with the solution but he already nows “heel” he just breaks the command around other dogs.)

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello CC, What you are describing is leash reactivity - does fine once they meet, and is fine off leash, but acts aggressive from afar on leash. Check out the videos linked below on leash reactivity; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOAtSxMWVlU Explanation of what's being done, in what order: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvOqWMUt7Kc Example of training done in real time with a dog using a Pet Convincer for that dog; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfiDe0GNnLQ Be aware that any dog in a highly aroused state can direct aggression and bite whoever is nearest to them instead (you). If you feel this could happen with your pup I suggest hiring a trainer to help and/or using a basket muzzle on him during the training until he is calmer around other dogs. Also, follow up interrupting the aroused reactivity with rewarding heeling, focus on you, and good behavior in the presence of other dogs to complete the training - but do it very calmly. When you pup is staring down other dogs, starting to scan the horizon, starting to pull, and tuning you out, those are the times to interrupt too - instead of just waiting until he explodes. Staring is a challenge to other dogs, arousing to your dog, and the beginning of the explosion. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tara
Chorkie
19 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Tara
Chorkie
19 Months

Tara won’t listen to her name in an outside environment but she will inside, her hearing has been checked and is fine, but she won’t listen at all outside even a recall won’t work and she always runs to others dogs

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Question
Charlie
Keeshond
11 Months
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Charlie
Keeshond
11 Months

She has discovered dogs across the field and runs away every time I let her out to be with the other dogs. How can I stop this?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sandra, Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Reel In" method. Once she can come on the long leash without distractions, then practice on the long leash around other dogs. Start from far away and as she improves make the distractions harder by getting closer or practicing around multiple dogs and other types of distractions. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
cooper
Pit bull
2 Years
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Question
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cooper
Pit bull
2 Years

there was a similar question to mine, about a dog getting excited at a dog park and chasing down other dogs. Cooper has this and it comes out at the park when an owner throws the ball for his dog to fetch. cooper runs down the dog. But he also does this NOT in the park. Any time another dog is excited cooper wants to chase him down and make him stop. Cooper is very friendly to people and most dogs. How do I get this to stop? He is pretty easy to train I just dont know how to set this up or what to do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kathleen, First, if he is at all aggressive toward the other dogs once he catches them, hire a professional trainer to help you. Practicing this if he is aggressive is not safe without having the right tools and environment to keep everyone safe. If he simply stops the dog from running and is being controlling but not aggressive, many herding breeds will do that, and some dogs that do not herd as well. You need to work on teaching him a couple of commands and work on those commands until he can perform them around high levels of distractions. When he starts to move toward another dog to chase, before he is in full chase give him a command, such as Leave It or Out (which means leave the area). He is probably not a dog that can ever play with other dogs without some structure and instruction from you. Some dogs simply need the extra management to help them make the choices you want because their own instincts compel them to do something that would get them in trouble. First, teach him what "Leave It" and "Out" mean. Once he understands what they mean and can do Leave It around objects and food, practice it on a leash around movement, starting with small movement like your hand and a toy and gradually working up to harder things. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Leave It" method to teach him what Leave It means. After you have taught that, then continue the training around harder distractions, like movement on a longer leash. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Once he knows what "Out" means and will obey it at home, use a long leash to practice it around other things that excite him, enforcing your command with a long leash and harness by reeling him in to you when he is further away from you and disobeys. Practice until he will immediately move away from something exciting before you have to reel him in when you tell him "Out". You can also teach Out and use a vibration collar for added reliability. I suggest hiring a professional trainer to help with any e-collar training though. To teach what "Out" means: 1. First call him over to you, then toss a treat several feet away from yourself while pointing to the area where you are tossing the treat with the finger of your treat tossing hand and saying "Out" at the same time. Repeat this until he will go over to the area where you point when you say "Out" before you have tossed a treat. 2. When he will do that, then whenever you tell him "Out" and he does not go to where you are pointing, walk toward him and herd him out of the area with your body. Your attitude should be calm and patient but very firm and business like when you do this. 3. When you get to where you were pointing to, then stop and wait until he stops trying to go back to the area where you were standing before. 4. When he is no longer trying to get past you, then slowly walk backwards to where you were before. If he follows you, then tell him "Out" again and quickly walk toward him until he is back to where he was a moment ago. Repeat this until he will stay several feet away from where you were when you told him "Out" originally. 5. When you are ready for him to come back, then tell him "OK" in an up beat tone of voice. 6. Practice this training until he will consistently leave the area when you tell him "Out". 7. When he will consistently leave, then practice the training with other areas that you would like for him to leave, such as the kitchen when you are preparing food, a person's space when he is being pushy, an area with a plant that he is trying to dig up, or somewhere with something in your home that he should not be bothering. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Willow
German Shepard border collie
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Willow
German Shepard border collie
7 Months

I’m trying to train her to walk off leash, and she does so good with recall and everything until she sees another dog or person. She runs off and goes right up to them and I can’t even get her back. I don’t know what to do, and I don’t know how tI train her to not do that.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kylie, You need yo practice with a long leash before going completely off leash. I suggest starting with a 30' leash and going places like the park where she will see other dogs and rewarding her for heeling while the leash is dragging on the ground, coming when called and generally staying with you. As she improves move onto a 40'-50' leash that is very light weight - to give the feel of being off leash. The leash will let you enforce your commanf while dogs are around by stopping her from getting to them and you reeling her in wen she disobeys your Come command. She is not ready for freedom until she never disobeys with the light weight fifty foot leash. Check out the article linked below and the "Reel In" method for how to teach Come using a long leash. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Best of luck training Caitlin Crittenden

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Muffin
Labradoodle
2 Years
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Muffin
Labradoodle
2 Years

My dog knows all the commands, but still stubborn sometimes. However my problem is my dog is 60 lbs and I can’t hold on to him. We walk 3 miles every other day. Other dogs have have kind of mastered when walking but we have deer here and other animals. However she gotten she can chase deer. However when baby comes she takes off. The other day I came around the corn on and there were baby chicks in the road and I wasn’t prepared. My biggest problem is she loves the neighbors across the street and runs off to see them when they are out. I don’t mind her loving the neighbors but I just don’t want her running across the street to them unless I give her permission ( we do live on a dead end street but still I want her to know the street is a enemy if you get my drift. I have tried so many things but she ignores my commands when it comes to thing like that. Help. I really can’t afford lessons but I getting desperate and frustrated

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Pat, I suggest teaching an e-collar recall because of all the animals in your area. Check out Sean O Shea from the Good Dog, Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training, and James penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining. All of them can be found on YouTube and are trainers with how to videos about e-collars. E-collars are generally something I recommend hiring a trainer to help you with but if you are willing to learn enough about their use on you own, you can use one yourself. Take the time to learn about fitting, finding the working level, when to reward and correct, and how to use it for come. The YouTube channels I mentioned above will have videos on those things and more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Texas
American Staffordshire Terrier
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Texas
American Staffordshire Terrier
3 Years

He is very well socialised and has always done well whilst at day care etc in group environments. Recently we have begun to have problems with him chasing other dogs, usually timid female dogs, and trying to grab hold of their legs whilst at the dog park. This only happens once the other dog has begun to run away, he seems to think this is an invitation to chase. He will let up with the chasing as soon as called and return to playing fetch and ignoring the other dogs, but I’m at a loss as to how to stop this behaviour in the first place. He has 2 large brothers although he is the oldest (all neutered) and his dog park best friend is an adult male Great Dane.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kelly, It sounds like he is having fun bullying. Dogs will sometimes bully other more timid dogs. At the dog park he is probably very aroused which encourages a form of prey drive - not with the end kill as far as you have experienced but the fun of the chase and the controlling of movement. The behavior needs to not be fun for him anymore - his chasing behavior needs to be associated with something unpleasant, while his calmness around other, especially timid dogs, encouraged and calmly rewarded. I suggest hiring a trainer who has access to a large number of dogs with different temperaments and is very experienced with e-collar training. The correction needs to be associated with his behavior and not just you and not just being in the presence of another dog - but specifically his behavior by correcting at the right timing and rewarding him being calm around that same dog. A high quality remote collar can be used on vibration or a working level stimulation level (a working level is a predetermined level that is the lowest your particular dog responds to - which is different for different dogs depending on temperament and sensitivity). This shouldn't be done at the dog park because you will not have control there. This needs to be done in a controlled environment with other well trained dogs, where you and the trainer can determine the outcome and not your dog. Be sure to do your research on quality collars - do not buy a cheaply made one, they can be inconsistent and even dangerous. Ask your trainer for recommendations. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sadie
Pit bull
12 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Sadie
Pit bull
12 Months

Recently my ex dropped off his dog for a few weeks because he had to go over the road for work. we have had an issue of her chasing down small dogs such as chihuahuas in the neighborhood. Once she broke free of her collar and the second time we were working with a leash and training collar. She unhooked the leash before we even realized the dog was being walked by and ignored the training collar. I’ve taken her to dog parks in the past and have the dogs approach her because she will rush them if I don’t but always plays well. On walks if I walk her she doesn’t pull towards other dogs as long as I see the dog ahead of time and tell her ignore but I’m the only one she listens too. It’s only been a little over two weeks. At first I thought it was due to him not training her or socializing her but now I’m thinking it’s more aggressive after actually seeing it and not just being told. She will also at times growl and snap at others who try to get her to do something she doesn’t want except for me. Especially my child that is with the ex if I’m not in the room. I also found out she would poop on his bed, I have not had this issue. Part of me feels it’s due to bad training on his part. Any tips on any of this would be greatly appreciated!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michelle, When she reaches the small dog does she attach them or just want to play? Assuming she is trying to attack the small dogs, even if just excited with larger dogs, some dogs can have a prey drive toward small dogs - it's not common but may be what's going on. If she was never socialized with small dogs while young it could also be related to that. Either way you really need a trainer to help you in person with this. In the meantime, check out the video linked below on how to reinforce a prong collar - attaching it to another collar, such as a martingale collar. You can also use a harness like Ruff Wear Webmaster Harness along with the training collar - use a small traffic leash to attach the training collar to the harness as a backup in case it breaks, or simply walk her wearing a basket muzzle. As far as behavior goes, it depends on whether the desire to go after small dogs is prey drive or a socialization issue. If prey drive, you will need to teach an avoidance - you are not going to remove prey drive but you can teach your dog to avoid the thing they are driven toward. If the desire is normal dog aggression, then a combination of building respect and trust for you so that she will let you handle situations and obey, and working on desensitizing her around small dogs - to teach her to be calm around them and not pay attention to them. The goal here is not off-leash playing with small dogs - the goal is calmness. Building respect and trust through boundaries: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Working method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle her meal kibble around it. Do this until she is comfortable eating around it. Next, when she is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward her with a piece of kibble every time she touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed her her whole meal this way. Practice this until she is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that she has to poke her face into it to get the treat. As she gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that she has to poke her face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until she is comfortable having her face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while she holds her face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until she can hold her face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when she can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while her face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed her a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until she is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while she is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As she gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give her a treat, until she can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. You need to hire a trainer to help you with the aggression and you need someone who uses a lot of boundaries, positive reinforcement and fair discipline tactfully. Look for someone who is very experienced with aggression and different types of aggression - many trainers are only experienced with fear based aggression and you likely have some dominance- based or territorial aggression, or very possibly prey drive going on too, and they are treated a bit differently than fear. Aggression protocol examples - getting started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAE0jCL9Gbs Dog aggressive dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpsEwePWEeQ Pulling: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHwcvjWOaII More leash work - be careful with protocols that involve you being right next to the dog while training - some dogs will redirect their aggression toward whoever is closest when in an aggressive state- which could be you - a muzzle is needed in those situations, and laying the foundation of respect and trust first helps minimize that. Pet Convincer tool: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfiDe0GNnLQ&t=20s Place command multi-dogs - more advanced desensitization - notice the slack leashes tethering the dogs to the ceiling just in case: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HedxL5Dns54 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Teddy
Shih Tzu x Bichon
2 Years
0 found helpful
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Teddy
Shih Tzu x Bichon
2 Years

My dog is prettified of other people, if we are out for a walk he will purposely go up to other people in the park (looking very cute) and as soon as they reach out to stroke him he barks like crazy, he is also the same with dogs except really enjoys dogs attention, if he spots another dog in the park he will run after them, even if the other dog is not interested and I struggle to get him back, if I wonder over to attempt to put him on the lead he then runs away from me as if it is a game!

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Sam
German shepherd/mastin cross
8 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Sam
German shepherd/mastin cross
8 Months

Sam is a rescue - he had obviously been abandoned and just turned up in our garden one day. He is growing into a big, strong boy - 36 kilos of muscle and bone! He is very sweet natured, but walking him is a nightmare. If he sees another dog, he wants to dash over to him to play. No aggression, but neither does he listen! He doesn't respond to voice commands, treats, pulls on his harness, body control … nothing. Occasionally, he is so hyper I have to let go of his lead or be pulled over. HELP

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Yvonne, First, work on teaching a structured heel in a calm place, where other dogs aren't around, like a fenced in yard, culdesac, or field. You want to work on the basics, focus and getting him to follow you using the "Turns method" from the article linked below. This will take a lot of repetition and practice. Expect walks to be boring for a while - this is normal and walking in square and circles is still exercise. Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Next, once he understands what he is supposed to be doing because you practiced structured walks in calm locations, he has the skills from practicing, and his respect for you has increased, work on the following training around distractions. I suggest also finding something that does motivate him during walks - that can be a tug toy, praise, getting to move forward to something he wants to investigate, or the mental stimulation of working and focusing (many high drive dogs actually get a lot of satisfaction from learning harder things that challenge them mentally), ect...Keep what rewards him in mind so that you can also calmly show him that you appreciate when he is doing well. Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo How to Introduce the Prong collar – plus how to connect to buckle collar with carabiner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23zEy-e6Khg How to walk with a Prong collar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVvy6fztL2Q&t=6s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pepper
GSD
2 Days
0 found helpful
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Pepper
GSD
2 Days

My dog Pepper is one of the friendliest dogs I know. She's never fought with another dog, she never bites, she's completely tame, but when we're off leash, specifically on trails, she tends to run up on approaching dogs. Once she gets there she's all friendliness and just wants to sniff them but it freaks the other dog out and freaks out their owner since they take that as aggressive behavior (when really she just gets excited and wants to play). How do I stop her from doing the whole changing other dogs thing without removing off leash time (which she loves) and without taking away her social time (because she really is just friendly and wants to play with other dogs)? Thanks for any help. I'm getting really tired of managing irate dog owners who accuse her of being aggressive. She is such a good sweet dog and it makes me angry.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Samantha, First, understand that although your dog is friendly many other dogs are not and many owners spend a lot of time trying to get their dogs to the point where they can be around other dogs and having a strange dog run into their face can set them back - which can make a lot of owners angry - but really just scared of a fight. Any dog that is allowed off-leash needs to be under voice control completely. This means that pup needs to have an extremely solid recall and a reliable off-leash heel. With those things in place, pup should be running around within sight range - so that you can call her back to you when you see another approaching hiking. Once she is heeling beside you and others see that she is well behaved, if their dog is friendly, you can request that the dogs meet - giving her social time without causing issues for those whose dogs or people aren't ready for greetings. Check out the videos linked below on teaching an off-leash recall - which starts with a long leash and for you specifically will involve going places like the park to practice recalls around other dogs who are passing by - or you can get together with friends' and their dogs and practice the PreMack principle - allowing pup to go up to another dog only after she has come first - then greeting the other dog becomes the reward itself after checking in with you. Come and the PreMack Principle: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall An off-leash heel is generally started just like a normal leashed heel, then as pup improves you practice the heel on a long leash so that pup is following because they are paying attention to you and not dependent on the leash - but you can use the leash to guide back when needed and prevent pup from disobeying and having inconsistent training. Once pup can heel in places like your neighborhood on the long leash, then also go places where other dogs are walking around and practice the long leash heel around other dogs - with pup learning to ignore other dogs unless told to "Say Hi". I personally prefer starting with a normal weight long training leash - like what you see online and in most set stores, then going to an extremely light weight but strong one when pup is almost ready for complete off-leash work. The light weight helps the training transfer to off-leash better since pup is less aware of a leash being on them prior to taking it off completely. Whenever pup starts not coming or heeling again well, snap the leash back on for a month and do a refresher training course to deal with any issues - the refresher shouldn't take nearly as long as the initial training but at some point most dogs will test ignoring you again and need the refresher. Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel James Penrith from Take the Lead Dog Training also has a lot of great videos on Off-leash training. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoxuNKpmUs390K7x_rvgjcg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Maze
Border Collie x jack Russell
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Maze
Border Collie x jack Russell
2 Years

This Is maze shes a borderjack and shes 2 years old Turing 3 this year in September, as I know a border collie x jack Russell are super hypo but shes just so crazy with other dogs and she was socialized when a puppy, when we go for a walk and she sees them she freaks out she cries and pulls and trysts to get out of her collar to get to them.. I cant trust her off leash around other dogs cause if she sees them she will bolt and not listen to you calling her, and when shes greets the other dog she either gets scared of them or she just annoys them so much by jumping all over them! Please any advice

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ella, I do suggest working with a trainer in your case, and I would highly recommend using the correct tools to prevent her from slipping out of her collar. Check out the articles and videos linked below. With the help of a trainer work on these methods and commands with her. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo An example of a structured walk with a reactive and aggressive dog: Reactive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Video 2: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/good-dog-transformations/how-we-work-through-leash-reactivity-with-the-wild-and-crazy-ozzie-2nd-session/ Video 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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NIsmo
American Staffordshire Terrier
2 Years
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NIsmo
American Staffordshire Terrier
2 Years

I adopted Nismo from an abusive owner at 7 months. He's always been pretty playful with other dogs at the dog park when we first had him. As he's gotten more mature he's become a lot more aggressive towards other dogs. Other dogs that seem time mind their own business he tends to leave alone, however dogs that are playful or also territorial will eventually lead to aggression after a short period of meeting. As soon as he see's another dogs while we're walking he would want to charge at them and I'm generally forced to walk other directions to avoid confrontation.

I have tried training him by introducing him to my cousins miniature schnauzer (Kylo) which he has learnt not to act aggressively towards however has no sense of boundaries and always want overwhelm Kylo and never seem to leave him alone.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Clinton, I suggest looking online to see if there is a G.R.O.W.L. class you could join within driving distance of you. A G.R.O.W.L. class is a class designed for dog aggressive or dog reactive dogs where all the dogs are intensively socializes around a number of other dogs in a structured environment, while they all wear basket muzzles for every ones safety. His response toward other dogs will need to be counter conditioned around a large number of dogs to generalize the training to other dogs in general. You also need a trainer who can show you how to earn pup's respect toward you so that he will let you lead during walks and not feel the need to challenge other dogs. Are other dogs coming up to you to great him on the walk? If so, I don't recommend allowing that as much as you can prevent it. He needs to practice other types of desensitization around dogs, like a structured heeling walk with other dogs, obedience commands in the presence of other commands, and additional things that build impulse control, calmness, and respect for you, and focus on you around other dogs. He essentially needs to learn to defer to you in the presence of another dog and to be counter conditioned emotionally - change his emotional response to another dog to something calmer than what it is now. Below are some commands you can start working on with pup to build impulse control, calmness, and respect for you. I do highly suggest also joining a GROWL class or working with a training group that has access to a lot of dogs to practice around, is very experienced with aggression and reactivity, and comes very well recommended by previous clients whose dogs dealt with aggression. Also, be aware that a dog aggressive dog can redirect that aggression toward whoever is closeby during times of frustration, so it's always a good idea to take safety measures to avoid a bite when dealing with aggression. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Arnold
rat terrier mix
4 Years
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Question
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Arnold
rat terrier mix
4 Years

My dog does great at the dog park for the first 10-15 minutes but then becomes aggressive. He's triggered by other dogs running and playing and he will run after other dogs and growl or bark at them when he catches up to them. He doesn't bite but has body slammed other dogs before. The behavior does not look playful. We always have to cut our time at the dog park short because he always does this.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brittany, Unfortunately, Arnold needs to stop going to the dog park completely. You can continue to have structured play dates with one or two other dogs that you know in your own fenced yards, and practice obedience between play times, to work on his impulses. You can also participate in dog walks with groups like meetup.com, or do structured dog sports, or hikes with Arnold with other dogs. If you continue going to the dog park the behavior will likely only get worse. Because of the pack environment of the dog park, the lack of structure, and how unsafe it would be to use treats or a long leash to enforce training at a dog park, you cannot safely and effectively train a dog in a standard dog park. You have to train a dog in other environments and then use your dog's current training at the park. The running of the other dogs creates arousal, and the pack mentality of the other dogs can cause dogs to act like bullies, try to control other dogs' movements, and even cause fights. It is the opposite of a calm and controlled environment, and some dogs don't do well with the lack of structure and odd behavior and emotional states of the various dogs at the park. This environment can bring out the worst in some dogs and actually cause behavior problems that were not there to show up and continue to get worse. Dog parks are not necessarily bad in general, but they are not a good place for all dogs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nico
Pitbull, Great Dane
1 Year
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Nico
Pitbull, Great Dane
1 Year

My dog, Nico, will charge at other dogs when we are taking a walk around the neighborhood. Sometimes I’m not strong enough to hold him back & he gets to the dog. He doesn’t aggressively attack the dog or anything I think he just wants to play but it scares me since he’s a pitbull . We have another dog that’s he’s perfectly fine with. I’ve tried everything to get him to not do that I’m so nervous around other people’s dogs I take him out for a walk when NO ONE ELSE IS OUT. Please help me I don’t know what to do, I don’t want to have to give him away because he’s apart of our family .

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Megan, First, what are you using to walk him? I suggest finding something that will make it easier to manage his size, such as a gentle leader and collar combo. Second, this is a behavior I highly suggest hiring a private trainer who specializes in aggression and reactivity to help with. Since he isn't attacking the other dog when he gets to them, that will make this easier to address than a situation where he causes the other dogs harm but it is still a serious concern. Due to his size and strength I feel like you need professional help. It also needs to be determined why he is doing to a certain degree. Is he fearful and defensive, excited and overly aroused, territorial and wanting to dominate, ect..? The cause will partially determine how to train it. Some things like working on his focus, trust, and respect for you, and leash manners, will be the same no matter what is going on though. Check out Thomas from the Canine Educator on Youtube. He specializes in aggression and has some videos working with leash reactive dogs. This isn't something I suggest tackling on your own though. Look for someone who specializes in behavior issues and comes well recommended by their previous clients whose dogs have struggled with aggression or reactivity. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lady
Podenco cross
5 Years
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Question
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Lady
Podenco cross
5 Years

Off lead, Lady chases some dogs & growls but she isn't agressive. If the other dog stands his ground she's fine but if it runs, she chases it, growling & barking. When it stops, she just sniffs it. The problem is, some owners think she's aggressive.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Liz, It sounds like Lady lacks doggie social manners. While likely not true aggressive (I can't say for sure without seeing in person though), in canine terms it is "rude" behavior and could result in a fight if the other dog isn't patient with her. She is antagonizing the other dog. She may be trying to control the other dog's movement - a herding type behavior, teasing them into playing, or chasing them away from something she considers hers - such as an area or person. First, I would work on a high level recall and Out command with her - Out means leave an area, and can be used to tell her to move away from another dog. Come: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Practice all of those commands. Once she knows what they mean and can do them in a calm setting, purchase a 20 to 30 foot training leash (not retractable one but long rope like one) and padded back clip harness and practice all of the commands around distractions, starting with easy distractions like a cul-de-sac and gradually moving onto harder distractions like the park as she improves. Use the long leash so that you can enforce your commands and teach her that she needs to listen, even around high distractions like other dogs. I would also work up to teaching her an Off-Leash heel, so that you can call her to yourself and have her heel past another dog she should be leaving alone, when she is with you off-leash. The general rule for her should be, leave other dogs alone unless you have been given permission to go play - which should come from you when both you and the other dog's owner feel comfortable with it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Many thanks, I'll try your advice.

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london
German Shepherd and lab
6 Years
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london
German Shepherd and lab
6 Years

she likes to pullme and when she sees another dog she trys to drag me and i have to let go of the leash

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alana, First, has pup ever redirected aggression toward you, or attacked another dog? If so, you will need to take additional safety measures like the use of a basket muzzle also, and I would suggest hiring a professional trainer who specializes in behavior issues and aggression to work with you in person. If pup is simply excited, reactive, or being rude toward you, I suggest the following. I suggest working on the structure of your walk first. You want pup to be working during the walk - having to stay behind you, focus on you, perform commands periodically, and not have her mind on scanning the area in search of other dogs. The walk should start with her having to exit your home very calmly, performing obedience commands at the door if she isn't calm. She should wait for permission ("Okay" or "Free" or "Let's Go") before going through the door instead of bolting through if that's an issue. When you walk she should be in the heel position - with her head behind your leg. That position decreases her arousal, reduces stress because she isn't the one in charge and the one encountering things first. It prevents her from scanning for other dogs, staring dogs down or being stared down, and ignoring you behind her. It also requires her to be in a more submissive, structured, focused, calmer mindset - which has a direct effect on how aroused, stressed, and aggressive she is - it makes her feel like the responsibility is on your shoulders not hers around other dogs. Additionally, when you do pass other dogs, as soon as she starts staring them down, interrupt her. Don't tolerate challenging stares. Remind her with a gentle correction that you are leading the walk and she is not allowed to break her heel or stare another dog down. It is far easier to deal with reactivity when you interrupt a dog early in the process - before they are highly aroused and full of adrenaline and cortisol, and to keep the dog in a less aroused/calmer state to begin with. This also makes the walk more pleasant for her in the long-run. Leading the walk this way can actually boost a dog's confidence in the long run around other dogs because the dog feels like you will handle the situation so they can relax. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Reactive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Aggressive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Because she is pulling you over, I suggest using equipment that prevents that while in the training process also, such as a gentle leader or correctly fitted prong collar. Don't use a choke chair. It is less likely to be effective and can harm a dog's trachea. How to Introduce the Prong collar – plus how to connect to buckle collar with carabiner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23zEy-e6Khg How to walk with a Prong collar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVvy6fztL2Q&t=6s Outside of the walk you can work on building pup's trust and respect for you in other ways too. The following commands and exercises are also good for that: Agility/obstacles for building confidence if fearful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elvtxiDW6g0 Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ As well as, any tricks that challenge her mentally, require impulse control, and equal her learning new things successfully. A long down stay around distractions is a good thing to practice during walks periodically. Once pup is calmer during walks, focused on you, and behaving, at that point you can also reward with treats for staying focused on you. Just make sure you are rewarding while she has a calm, compliant attitude and not when she is frustrated, aroused, or over excited. Keep your attitude calm and confident during walks to best gain her trust and respect. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leia
German Shepherd
2 Years
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Leia
German Shepherd
2 Years

Hello! My dog, Leia, is a German Shepherd and Pitbull mix that is just about to turn two. She loves dog parks and looks forward to socializing with other dogs. The only problem we have is that she sometimes gets too excited and will chase another dog and sometimes nip it. I read that this may be chase aggression? Should we always call her back to us when we see her chasing another dog?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alyssa, It sounds like pup is getting overly aroused while playing. I would practice in a private fenced yard with a dog buddy. Practice obedience during play, where pups take breaks, calm down, then are released to go play again. When pup responds and comes, reward with treats, so that being called off another dog isn't a frustrating thing for them, but something they learn to do quickly and eagerly. Call them apart to two different people to be rewarded during practice, not the same person to reward, so that the food while standing next to each other doesn't create a fight over the food. Practice in a private yard with a dog buddy and not at the dog park - that's where it's put to the test not learned, because bringing food or toys into the dog park can cause fights and isn't allowed generally. Once pup does great with the training, then use the training to give pup breaks when they are getting overly aroused during play, let them calm back down, then release them again if it's safe to do so. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leo
Dachshund mix
2 Years
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Leo
Dachshund mix
2 Years

Hello!

My dog aggressively
chases and tries to mount (not hump) other dogs at the park only. On leash he doesn’t even react to passing dogs. He gets like seriously in the zone to chase these dogs, he barks and snarls, and the look in his eye changes. I haven’t seen him attack yet but it seems like he wants to. When I bring him home to my parents who have a large German Shepherd, Leo is very submissive to him. I do not understand why he gets that way at the park! Any insight?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mary, The unstructured nature of a dog park tends to increase a dog's arousal due to the chasing, pack group, group arousal and excitement, and overall tension of it. Once highly aroused in that environment, chasing other dogs might be bringing up a predatory or herding chase instinct. When the dogs aren't running and the environment is calmer - pup isn't in that state and thus does fine. Honestly, it sounds like pup shouldn't go to the dog park anymore, or this continuing to happen could lead to aggression issues and problems around other dogs in general later on. It does sound like pup may have some prey or herding instinct, and would probably enjoying a canine sport like lure coursing or possibly fly ball. I would look for other means to socialize and exercise pup - such as joining a local dog walking or dog hiking group - where the pups can enjoy each other's company but stay in a calmer state doing it. You may even find that pup does alright with a calmer buddy, playing one on one, without as much chasing involved, such as in you or a friend's fenced backyard, but even that could be an issue. You may not know whether that causes problems too until you try it. Some dogs simply don't do well at a dog park - it can bring out certain characteristics that lead to behavior issues. It's nothing to be ashamed of but it does help to know what's beneficial and harmful behavior-wise for your dog, and to find an outlet that's more appropriate for that individual poop, that they can enjoy with you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Polly
Mixed breed
2 Years
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Polly
Mixed breed
2 Years

Hi
I’ve just got a rescue dog who is gsd mix and a 2 year old. She is quite timid at home and listens. But is difficult to train. She doesn’t give much of an eye contact whilst training even if I lure her with treats. She pulls on the leash and doesn’t listen to any command. When she sees other dogs, no matter what I try, treats, calling her, turning my body around, she wouldn’t stop barking and lunging towards the dog. Please help me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Snehal, I would go back to some basics with pup. It sounds like they likely were not socialized while young in their previous situation. Practice teaching pup to respond to their name. Say pup's name and make an interesting noise so pup looks toward you (inside where it's calm at first). When pup looks your direction, toss a treat out. You can even feed pup their meal kibble this way throughout the day so that they are working for their meals by interacting with you. Once pup improves, phase out the interesting noise and just say their name randomly, then toss the treat when they look. If pup comes over when you say their name, give three treats, one at a time. When pup is a bit more relaxed around you in general, start using pup's daily meal kibble to desensitize to touch more, in a calm environment. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold her collar and give a treat. Touch her tail gently and give a treat. Touch her belly, her other paws, her chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Work on desensitizing pup to leash pressure, then teaching a formal heel in a calm location - gradually working up to more public locations with distractions. Accept a leash article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-accept-leash Heel - follow the Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Once pup is more secure around you and knows how to heel when other dogs aren't around, I suggest looking for a G.R.O.W.L. class, which is a class for dog reactive or dog aggressive dogs. The dogs all wear basket muzzles, then are intensively socialized together more quickly in a structured environment to help desensitize them to other dogs. Also, check out the article linked below for additional tips on helping pup with their timidity. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Aleah
Labrador Retriever
4 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Aleah
Labrador Retriever
4 Years

Aleah is a rescue dog and the vet believes she is around 4. She is very lovable and listens well at home. However, if she sees another dog she becomes very aggressive. She has pulled me over a couple times when I was walking her. She will bolt out of our yard at the dogs as well. We have a fenced in backyard for her but would like to be able to give her a little more freedom. Is there anything we can do to curtail this behavior?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Barbara, I suggest looking for a G.R.O.W.L. class in your area, which is a class for dog reactive and dog aggressive dogs, who are all socialized together in a structured environment. All of the dogs wear basket muzzles to ensure safety, and the instructor guides the process. Once classes are an option again with social distancing, see if there is one you can attend with her. It would be worth hiring a private trainer who specializes in behavior issues lie aggression to work with you in person as well; especially since many dog aggressive dogs can redirect their aggression toward whoever is closest while in a frustrated aroused state, so certain precautions may be needed to ensure you aren't bitten while training around other dogs. With that said, I suggest working on the structure of your walk. You want pup to be working during the walk - having to stay behind you, focus on you, perform commands periodically, and not have her mind on scanning the area in search of other dogs. The walk should start with her having to exit your home very calmly, performing obedience commands at the door if she isn't calm. She should wait for permission ("Okay" or "Free" or "Let's Go") before going through the door instead of bolting through if that's an issue. When you walk she should be in the heel position - with her head behind your leg. That position decreases her arousal, reduces stress because she isn't the one in charge and the one encountering things first. It prevents her from scanning for other dogs, staring dogs down or being stared down, and ignoring you behind her. It also requires her to be in a more submissive, structured, focused, calmer mindset - which has a direct effect on how aroused, stressed, and aggressive she is - it makes her feel like the responsibility is on your shoulders not hers around other dogs. Additionally, when you do pass other dogs, as soon as she starts staring them down, interrupt her. Don't tolerate challenging stares - even if she is stressed. Remind her with a gentle correction that you are leading the walk and she is not allowed to break her heel or stare another dog down. It is far easier to deal with reactivity when you interrupt a dog early in the process - before they are highly aroused and full of adrenaline and cortisol, and to keep the dog in a less aroused/calmer state to begin with. This also makes the walk more pleasant for her in the long-run. Leading the walk this way can actually boost a dog's confidence in the long run around other dogs because the dog feels like you will handle the situation so they can relax. Protect her from other dogs. If she feels nervous and someone wants to let her meet their rude, excited dog, tell the other person no thank you. A simple "She's in training" tends to work well. Be picky about who and how she meets other dogs. Avoid dogs that don't respect her space, pull their owners over to her, and generally are not listening well - those dogs are often friendly but they are rude and difficult for a nervous dog. Also, avoid greeting dogs who look very tense around your dog, who stare her down, who give warning signs like a low growl or lip lift, who look very puffed up and proud - that type greeting with a dog is likely to end in a fight since your dog doesn't know how to diffuse that situation. A stiff wag is also a bad sign. A friendly wag looks relaxed and loose with relaxed body language overall. A tense dog with a very stiff wag, especially with a tail held high is a sign of arousal and not always a good thing. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Reactive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Aggressive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Outside of the walk you can work on building pup's trust and respect for you in other ways too to help her confidence. The following commands and exercises are also good for that: Agility/obstacles for building confidence - if pup is anxious and fearful in general: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elvtxiDW6g0 Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Down-Stay Any tricks that challenge her mentally, require impulse control, and equal her learning new things successfully. A long down stay around distractions is also a good thing to practice during walks periodically - but while around other dogs keep pup moving in heel. After going through a G.R.O.W.L. class, to continue pup's socialization, a good way to do introductions with other dogs is to recruit friends with calm dogs and use the Passing Approach and the Walking together methods from the article linked below. After a few practice session of this, when the dogs can calmly walk side by side finally, take pups on walks together with both in a structured, focused heel. This gives both dogs something other than each other to focus on, keeps their energy calm, and helps them associate each other with the pleasant experience of a walk. Repeat this with lots of different dogs, one or two dogs at a time - you want other dogs to be associated with calmness, pleasant experiences, and boring things - not roughhousing, wrestling, nose-to-nose interactions always, or being rushed by them. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Sometimes you can even find others to practice with through obedience clubs, meetup groups, or hiking groups. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Loki
German Shepherd
6 Years
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Loki
German Shepherd
6 Years

My dog is fairly good at recall and always comes back to me when at the dog park and around all dogs except for our other dog who is a Pomeranian (same age), he will chase our pom and tackle him over repeatedly until the pom starts to just run away and not listen to us, i can’t grab loki’s attention when this happens and i’m unsure what’s causing it and how to stop it as it’s only when off leash???

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
65 Dog owners recommended

These 2 are a cute pair! Has Loki always done this or is it new behavior? It is hard to determine why Loki is doing this to your Pom without knowing him more about Loki, but I do suggest that you work on obedience. He does know his recall well, so it is the fact that he is ignoring you that needs to be addressed. All of the methods here work well. Try the Consistency Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you. The Reel in Method is good:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall. Work on Loki's other obedience commands, too. It's a whole package of good behavior that will allow Loki to refocus and listen. Practice his heeling skills when on a walk which is a good basis for staying by your side once the recall is accomplished. Look at the Turns Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Good luck!

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Jack
Labrador Retriever
1 Year
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Jack
Labrador Retriever
1 Year

We just rescued jack about five months ago and when we first got him he was shy and nervous and didn’t really like other people especially other dogs, now he’s almost a whole new dog. He wants to meet people and is polite but still kinda weird with how people pet him. When it comes to other dogs he’s shown great improvement. He can be in a fenced in area with other dogs and when off leash he listens and doesn’t show any signs of aggression like when he’s on a leash. The other day we went on our normal walk around the neighborhood and one point he was off leash bc he had been doing so good with everything and then a dog came from around the corner and I didn’t see him and jack (my dog) ran up on him. The owner freaked out and jack came running back to us. There was no growling or barking but it just didn’t look good. The other dog was okay and my dog was okay it just scared me bc he hasn’t done something like that before. I was wondering if this means my dog is bad or something. Can you help? Also the website won’t let me put a 1 year and five months for his age and he’s also a lab mix with something we don’t know.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
65 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the cute picture of Jack. It sounds as though he is doing really well. I think the fact that he ran up to another dog is a natural reaction - he was saying hello. The fact that there was no barking or personality issues shows that Jack is doing fine. I know that it is unnerving to some people to have a strange dog run up to them. I would always keep the leash on when in the neighborhood as a courtesy to others but allow Jack plenty of freedom in an off-leash dog park. All the best!

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Sketch of smiling australian shepherd