How to Train Your Dog to Not Whine When You Leave

Hard
2-8 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

If your dog whines when you leave, loiter outside the closed door and listen for a while. Or, if in doubt, ask the neighbors what happens after you're gone.

If the dog whines but soon quiets and settles down to sleep, then your work is done. He's already learned that crying isn't rewarded (you don't come back) and after a brief whinge, he stops. This is an acceptable state of affairs because interfering could backfire badly and make him cry more.

However, the alternative scenario is the whine is just the beginning, and after you are gone the whine gets louder and crescendos into a full-scale howl or bark. You wouldn't be the first pet parent who has a dog that suffers from anxiety in your absence and makes a noise in order to call you back to end the isolation.

This is a worry for the wellbeing of your best buddy, but it's also bothersome to those in adjoining apartments. To keep the peace, you need to know how to train your dog not to whine when you leave.

Defining Tasks

You can teach a dog the "Quiet" command, but this may only quiet him while you leave and after you're gone he may resume barking. Instead, it's best to create a new way of being alone where the root cause of the whining is addressed by teaching the dog to be content when alone.

This can be difficult to do since the behavior may be deeply ingrained and, in some cases, prescription medication from the vet may be necessary. However, if the dog has merely gotten into bad habits, then there are steps that will quiet him.

Be aware that accidentally rewarding the whining will reinforce the behavior. Thus it's important to ignore the dog when he makes noise, so he learns it is of no benefit to him. The other side of the coin is to respond and praise the dog when he is being actively quiet, so he learns this is a good thing to do.

Some dogs learn to deal with separation better when crate trained. If your dog is otherwise calm then consider this. However, if your dog's whining spirals into chewing and destructive behavior when you're gone, he may become unduly distressed by being confined and it may make matters worse. If in doubt, consult a qualified animal behaviorist.

Getting Started

Get set for success by equipping yourself with the following:

  • A crate: Crate training can provide a sense of security that comforts the dog when you aren't there.
  • A super-tasty, long-lasting treat or a puzzle feeder: This is to occupy the dog and distract him while you leave so he doesn't notice the moment of departure.
  • A TV or radio: The volume left on low can work wonders for some dogs.
  • A special toy: This is given to him when you leave and removed when you come home. This is the doggie equivalent of having a written note saying you will return.

The Desensitize Method

Most Recommended
1 Vote
Desensitize method for Not Whine When You Leave
Step
1
Shake things up
Before leaving, you tend to do things in the same order, such as putting on your shoes and coat, reaching for the car keys, and picking up your bag. These act as cues, which tell the dog it's time to start whining. Instead, throw him off the scent by doing things in a different order.
Step
2
Desensitize him to leaving
Again, try wearing your shoes in the house (so he doesn't only link them to being left) or walk around holding the car keys. The idea is to break the link between the keys and leaving, so he take these things in his stride and ignores them.
Step
3
Short abscences
Practice leaving him for ultra-short times - such as putting the rubbish out. Only come back in when he's quiet, so you reward the silence.
Step
4
Don't make a fuss about leaving
Drop the habit of reassuring the dog you'll be back soon. The dog will all too easily read this as he's right to be concerned because you're about to go. Instead, be totally nonchalant and ignore the dog when you go...and return.
Step
5
Low-key reunions
Don't make a big thing about coming back, In fact, don't immediately greet the dog but putter around while ignoring him, until he's calmed down. This reduces the significance of comings and goings, making him less likely to whine when you go.
Recommend training method?

The Set the Scene Method

Effective
0 Votes
Set the Scene method for Not Whine When You Leave
Step
1
Quiet place
Set up the dog's bed or crate in a quiet part of the house. The idea is for him to have a safe place he feels secure and won't be disturbed by outside noises.
Step
2
Pheromone therapy
Plug in a DAP (Dog Appeasing Pheromone) diffuser beside his bed. This gives off soothing hormone messages that keep the dog chilled
Step
3
Draw the curtains
A dark environment is calming. It also muffles noises from the outside world that make him reactive.
Step
4
White noise
Leave a radio or TV on with the volume low. This provides a blanket of noise to quiet him.
Step
5
Ultra-tasty treat
As you leave, give the dog a long lasting ultra tasty treat (One that is safe in your absence, such as a Kong stuffed with peanut butter). This distracts him so he's too busy licking to whine when you leave.
Recommend training method?

The Keep Busy Method

Effective
0 Votes
Keep Busy method for Not Whine When You Leave
Step
1
A tired body
Some dogs whine when left because they have plenty of energy and would prefer to go with you, for a walk. Make sure the dog is pleasantly tired when left, by giving an appropriate amount of energetic exercise.
Step
2
Exercise before you leave
In addition, consider walking the dog immediately before you leave. When he returns home tired he's more likely to snuggle down for a snooze than complain he's left behind.
Step
3
Mental exercise
A bored dog may whine when left, after all, it's going to be pretty dull when you're gone. Instead, make sure he has plenty to keep his mind occupied during the day, so a break is a welcome relief. Training is a good mental workout, as is giving his meals in a puzzle feeders. Also be sure to play with him and give lots of one-to-one attention.
Step
4
Daily training
Regular daily training sessions can work wonders, as they also makes him feel more secure and understand you are in control.
Step
5
An "I will return" marker
Some dogs settle when they understand you're coming back. This can be achieved by giving him a toy that he only has when you're gone and you remove on your return. Since you always come back to retrieve it, the dog waits patiently in the knowledge your intention is to return.
Step
6
Provide a distraction
Give the dog a Kong, or similar puzzle feeder, stuffed with wet food. This will distract him while you leave, so he doesn't whine. Then hopefully with food in his tummy, he'll settle down to sleep.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Bailey
Labrador Husky
5 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bailey
Labrador Husky
5 Years

The problem is when I come home, when he smells me outside or senses me I guess, he starts barking and whining. When someone in the family approaches the door instead of me, not a peep. Help as my apt. Neighbours are fed up.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jennifer, First, I suggest purchasing a high quality remote stimulation collar or bark collar (not citronella). A bark collar will only correct the barking and not the whining. For the whining you will need a remote controlled collar so you can control when corrections happen. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he standing and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this - all of this is to figure out what level to use in training for it to be effective without being too high for him: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Once you have found the right stimulation level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours. Next, set up your camera to spy on him where he tends to go when he hears you or in the crate if he is crated. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. After a bit come back home. As soon as you hear him barking or or whining on the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time he barks or whines, stimulate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. Do not go higher than three more levels on the mini-educator or one level on another collar with less levels right now though because he has not learned what he is supposed to be doing yet. If he continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet for at least 1 minute straight, go back inside to the dog. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around inside. When he is being calm, then you can calmly greet him but don't make a big deal of it - don't act like you were gone, just normal, calm interaction - you don't want coming home to be exciting. If he stays in a crate, which can also help, then when you let him out after you come home and ignore him for a bit, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Practice this protocol as many times a day as you can to desensitize him to you leaving and coming back and to help him overcome the issue sooner - 10 times in one day would not be too much if there were calm breaks between training, but at least 1-3 times a day. Let any complaining neighbors know that there could be extra barking for a few days but you are actively training him to stop the issue and it should improve soon. If you get stuck, Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training does paid Skype Training sessions and has used similar separation anxiety protocols with hundreds of reactive, fearful, and aggressive dogs at his facility, so would be a good problem solving resource even more experienced than myself in this area. You can always ask further questions here too though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Bailey's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
harley
cockapoo
1 Year
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
harley
cockapoo
1 Year

i just moved into an apartment building and my dog will not stop whining, howling and pawing at the door when I leave! I bought a two way audio camera to watch him. He does well when left with another dog he knows, there are no issues there. So I thought I solved the problem, I bought another puppy and it seems he is not comfotable with her and still howls and crys. They have only been together 3 days though. I have tried pretty much everything listed above but I do not know what to do because I feel like I cant leave the apartment or he will disturb my neighbours

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Payton, First, I suggest teaching Harley the quiet command by following the "Quiet" method from the article that I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, work on adding structure and boundaries to his life, and building his independence. Teach him a "Place" command and work up to him staying on that for up to an hour while you move about the house and leave the room. He needs to learn how to cope with being by himself, and practicing a place command while you leave the room is a great way to start. Also, work on Down-and-Sit-Stays on a long leash outside. Practice the commands on a thirty, forty, or fifty foot, non-retractable leash and work up to backing away from him the entire 30+ feet length of the leash. Work on teaching him to stay in a crate even while the door is open. If you have not introduced a crate, then check out the article that I have linked below and start the "Surprise" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Once he can handle being in a crate when you are there, then get him used to staying in the crate with the door open. To do this, clip a leash on him, put him in the crate, and while he is quiet open the crate door and if he tries to leave, close the door quickly again. Repeat opening and closing the door until you can open the door and he will stay inside. Tell him "Okay!" in a cheerful tone of voice when it's time for him to come out. Overtime, practice backing away from the crate while the door is open. If he bolts out, grab the leash that he is dragging and put him right back in. Practice this until he will stay in the crate with the door open for up to an hour while you move around the house or sit on the opposite side of the room and ignore him. By doing this, you are teaching him to cope with his anxiety and be a little more independent. You are giving him something specific to do - stay in the crate willingly, opposed to just closing the crate door and him trying to escape. If he can get used to being in the crate while you are out of the door and the door is open, then you will more easily be able to put him in the crate with a food-stuffed chew toy, like a Kong, when you leave, and he will better understand how to calm down in there. Once he has developed a habit of being calm in the crate, then you can give him freedom in the rest of the house again. He needs to learn a calm habit first though. Work on the above. If you are not seeing progress, then the next step is to interrupt his frantic-ness using an electric collar that has a vibration setting also (he may not respond to the vibration so you need both stimulation and vibration - if he does respond to just vibration then you can use that). When you choose a collar, only get one that has at least thirty-levels. Cheap, poorly made collars can be dangerous and collar without enough levels can be too harsh or not effective enough. E-collar Technologies, Garmin, SportDog, Dogtra, and Petsafe all make decent collars. E-Collar Technologies and PetSafe have the collars that go down lowest in dog weight I believe. You can also try using a remote controlled unscented air spray collar (AVOID citronella - only use unscented air or you might make your problem worse). Honestly, many dogs will not respond well enough to the spray collars though. I highly suggest hiring a trainer who is experienced with separation anxiety and using e-collars to help you. You want to find the lowest level that he can feel on the collar. You want to set a good foundation for him by doing the other training that I mentioned above to at the same time to help him learn independence. You also want to reward him when he is calm. To use the electric collar you would: 1. Get him used to wearing the collar around while it is turned off. 2. Find the lowest level that he responds to - called a "working level". 3. Set up your camera to watch him again. 4. Leave the house, drive down the block so he thinks you are gone, then walk back and hide next to the house - so the collar and remote will be in range. 5. Watch him on the camera and listen for howling, scratching or him getting really worked up whining. 6. Stimulate the collar when he howls, scratches, or starts to get worked up whining (a brief whine is okay but not anxious-continuous whining). 7. When he gets quiet for two minutes, go back inside, ignore him for five minutes (he should be in the crate when you first practice this). When he is calm, then open the crate door, but don't let him come out yet - if he tries to rush out, then close the door quickly again and repeat the opening and closing it exercise until he stays in there while the door is open. 8. When he will stay in the crate while the door is open, then ignore him for another five minutes while the door is open. 9. Tell him "Okay" to let him know he can leave the crate at the end of the five minutes, but act really boring and nonchalant with him when he comes out. 10. Practice the training sessions, correcting him from outside with the collar while watching on the camera, coming back in when he is calm, ignoring him for a total of ten minutes, then acting boring when you let him out. This protocol sounds very harsh I know. It is important to practice him being independent of you through things like "Place", "Stay", and being in the crate. He needs to learn how to cope with independence so that he will be able to handle being alone. When you correct him with the collar, you are correcting him at a more reasonable stimulation level that is high enough for him to feel but not so high that it's any harsher than it needs to be. Right now the anxious response is his go to. He needs an opportunity to choose a different response. When you correct him, you are interrupting his anxious state of mind and expression - which will get more and more anxious as it builds. When you remove that option from him, then he has to find another way to react. By coming back inside, you are essentially rewarding him when he is being calm - showing him that you come back and that it's alright for you to leave. Also, showing him that being calm is how he gets you back, not by getting worked up. He has an opportunity to learn in that situation. Being in the crate simply makes it easier for him to learn because his only other option is to chew on a chew toy and rest. He cannot pace, destroy things, pee on rugs, or try another type of behavior when the scratching, whining, and howling are not options anymore. After he has learned calmness in the crate and that has become a new habit, then it will be easier for him to be calm outside of the crate when you are gone too. If he has issues with when the time comes to let him out of the crate again - after he has formed good calm habits, then you can go back to the same camera and electric collar exercise, but he will likely respond to it even better by then because he already learned what he should do when he is corrected for getting worked up - which is calm down. He will be less likely to try other anxious behavior because he will understand why he is being corrected and what to do better. When you put him into the crate, be sure to leave a dog food and liver paste or cheese or peanut butter (NO Xylitol sweetener -it's toxic to dogs!) stuffed- safe- hollow-chew-toy for him in the crate, so that when he calms down he will have that to chew on - he probably won't chew it until he is corrected and learns to calm down though. Dogs typically won't eat when they are anxious. When he learns to be calm and is ready to do something other than get worked up, you will want him to have it though, so that he can learn to enjoy himself in the crate or in your home when you are gone. You can also try an automatic treat dispensing device, such as an AutoTrainer or Pet Tutor. Depending on the level of his anxiety he may or may not care about those treats though. The device might only work once you have interrupted his frantic state and he is looking for something to do or focus on. Either way the device will be great for the new puppy when he is older though - to prevent separation anxiety. I highly suggest crate training the new puppy with dog- food stuffed Kongs to prevent separation anxiety. You can download a free pdf puppy e-book that talks about all that and more: www.lifedogtraining.com Clip on the free downloads tab once at that website. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden I suggest that you do all of this under the guidance of a qualified trainer though. You have to be careful to use e-collars correctly. They can be very effective tools when used correctly, but they are powerful and can be severely misused if you don't understand how to use them. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to harley's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Oliver
Terrier mix
2 Years
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Oliver
Terrier mix
2 Years

I’ve had Oliver for 2 weeks now. He whines and barks whenever I leave. He’ll whine in the crate and when left loose. He even managed to grab a blanket through his crate and rip it up while I was gone. Oliver is also heartworm positive but is going to get treatment but for now I’m worried that he’s stressing himself out while I’m gone. How do I help him cope with me being away?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amanda, First, be sure to give him a food stuffed hollow chew toy in the crate with him when you leave. Second, work on structured obedience commands that are calming and encourage independence. I suggest teaching a Place command, structured Heel (when he can go on walks again), Down-Stay from a distance, and to stay in his crate with the door open. You want to teach him to handle you leaving the room and let you be in charge in a calm way - this can help with general anxiety as well. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo While he still has heartworms the above is all I can suggest without you checking with your vet first. Once he is clear or if your vet gives permission now you can also discipline the escape attempts using something that interrupts him and gets his attention, like a vibration collar, low level stimulation remote training collar, unscented air spray, or something similar to interrupt his anxious state of mind and provide an opportunity for him to learn to calm himself. When he gets calm and stays calm, then you can return to him from a nearby location where you were spying on him with a camera, and sprinkle treats into the crate as a reward for being calm - then leave again; repeating this several times before returning home, ignoring him for 10 minutes, then letting him out while he is calm. Check out the information below for more details: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Oliver's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Mushu
Shih Tzu
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Mushu
Shih Tzu
11 Weeks

Mushu cries when I take a shower, leave to go to the bathroom, etc. I leave him for 3-4 hours at a time on a daily basis during the work week. On weekends, I spend all day with him. But I once brought him into the bathroom with me and he started to cry after 2 minutes. I tried to just let him cry it out for a while, but he started to really yelp and bark as if he was getting hurt. I don't get to finish showers or pee without him being there. He knows that he goes into the bathroom when I leave for work and in there is some toys, his crate, pee pads, and everything, so he has a little room to move. I'm just not sure what else I can do since he is so young, I figured he is just crying because he is a baby? I don't know what to do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Olivia, First, you need to encourage yourself that he's not being harmed when he cries desperately - my own puppy sounded like she was dying when we first worked on this. She is now 6 and does great alone. This is going to take some tough love and conviction that you aren't hurting her. It's important that puppies learn to cope with being alone now, being given opportunities to learn how to self-sooth and self-entertain - practicing those things actually prevents more serious separation anxiety later. When you are home, work on teaching a Place command and the crate manners protocol and insist that she stay in those spots while you walk in and out of the room - this is going to take persistence and practice. She needs to gain some independence. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Is she crying while you are gone in the pen, or just when she knows you are home but not with her. If she does fine while you are gone, great! Practice her spending time away from you and letting her cry. Follow the Surprise method from the article linked below - only returning when she gets quiet - expect it to take her a couple of hours to get quiet for even a few seconds at first - but some good earplugs. She needs to learn that the way to get you to come back is by waiting patiently. Surprise method - this can be done in a crate or exercise pen - crate training is great for anxious pups even though that can seem odd: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate If you live somewhere were you can't wait out the crying, it's too hard on your nerves, or the crying is continuing after you leave too, then you need to use a gentle punisher to interrupt her anxious state of mind, then follow that up with the training in the Surprise method from the article linked above once she is quiet. At her age I would simply use a small rolled up, soft towel, a Pet Convincer - which is a small canister of pressurized air, or a small bump on the side of the cage - the goal here isn't to give a punishment but to interrupt her anxious state of mind enough that she will think for a minute and get quiet - which gives you a chance to reward quietness and teach her how to spend her time in a better state of mind - a calm one. So for example: Her: crying, crying, crying... You: Say "Ah Ah" calmly, bump the pen or crate with rolled up little towel/puff of air at her side from a foot away, then wait to see if she stays quiet, and praise and reward if she stays quiet for several seconds. Correct whenever the crying starts back up again, reward when she has stayed quiet - gradually waiting longer and longer before rewarding so she is getting better and better at staying quiet before being given a treat. Leave the room between corrections and rewards when she can stay quiet for more than a couple of seconds. Don't use citronella scent for anything - it's too harsh, keep your tone calm during corrections and praise, and don't correct at her face - no air near the face. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Mushu's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Toby
Cavoodle
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Toby
Cavoodle
3 Months

We are trying to teach Toby to be alone. He’s fine when we are around however as soon as we leave the room he follows us. He starts winging when we shut the door and then gets louder. What do we do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hannah, I suggest crate training him, teaching Place, and beginning Down-Stay - and gradually working up to distance. For the Crate Training, check out the Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate manners - more impulse control practice: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Place - gradually work up to distance, and walking out of the room while he stays. This will take a lot of practice at this age but is great for building self-control, calmness, independence in a healthy way, and impulse control: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Learning to be alone will involve crying - it's super important not to return to puppy when he cries. Wait until he gets quiet for at least a couple of seconds and when you do return ignore him for a few minutes at first, to make coming and going less of a big deal, and teach pup that crying isn't the way to get you back, waiting patiently and calmly is. Giving pup a chance to eventually quiet down on his own, and not rescuing him, is super important for preventing separation anxiety later in life. It is extremely rare for a young puppy to already have separation anxiety- most pups are just struggling with learning something new that's a bit hard - i.e. being out of your presence. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Toby's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Dakota
Labrador Retriever
16 Months
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Dakota
Labrador Retriever
16 Months

My dog is not crate trained but is confined to a room while left alone. She whines and scratches as if her life depends on it. She scratches at the door and has ruined carpet. I exercise her daily and even give her a KONG as a treat only when she is left alone. Im not sure how to stop her destructive behavior.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Claudia, I highly suggest crate training her. This behavior is a lot easier to address while she is in a crate. Left free she is able to work herself up and express her anxiety in an unhealthy way. Using a crate and a separation anxiety protocol you can interrupt her anxious state and help her learn a better behavior in place of it. Check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating crate anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Make sure you are implementing what he teaches there in other areas of her life too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Dakota's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Britt
Lab mix
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Britt
Lab mix
9 Weeks

we are trying to crate train britt and it has been horrible. we tried to put her in her crate at night, but she cried ALL night that eventually we just let her sleep with us. i know she is very little right now so things will change in the next few months, the thing i am most concerned about is her howling and whining when we leave. we have a 3 year old chocolate lab who is with her. we tried to keep Britt in her crate while Bella was left free to roam around the house. Britt cried for hours. Bella went to day care the next day, britt cried for 46 minutes straight, then stopped, fell asleep, woke up and cried for 38 minutes straight. so we decided to just gate off the kitchen and leave her in there with her crate open so she could roam around there, she cried. we put bella in the kitchen with her, she still cries. if she doesn't see people she loses her mind. im not sure how to break this habit. thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, If it has been less than two weeks this is normal. The hard truth is that you need to let her cry for a week and not save her from it - every time you go to her when she cries she learns that that is the way to get you to come back and actually learns to cry even more. Some very determined puppies will cry for hours! Some adjust right away, but the hours puppy is also normal. If you leave them to cry you give them opportunity to learn that they are safe and they have the opportunity to calm themselves down (usually by becoming so tired they fall asleep), then they learn to stop crying because it does them no good. Most puppies take three days of very consistent training to adjust. Some very determined puppies do it for two weeks - but each day tends to be a bit better than before. It sounds harsh but you are actually preventing separation anxiety later by teaching them how to self-sooth and be alone now. When they have to go potty, try to wait for a quiet second before you return to her -you may have to be fast. You can correct the crying too. I typically only recommend this for older dogs because crying is normal for young puppies and almost all of them will adjust if given a chance for two weeks, then be fine in the crate for the rest of their lives, but there are circumstances where waiting it out is simply not an option. For such a young puppy I suggest crating her in a room by herself (no other dog around or you will have to do this all over again when your dog is gone). Work on getting her good and tired when you are home so that she will not be able to fight sleep as easily in the crate. Give her a food stuffed chew toy, and work on the Surprise method from the article linked below during the day. At night, wear earplugs or crate her in a room where the crying will not interrupt your sleep. Set an alarm to take her potty every three hours since you will not be able to depend on her cries to wake you up when she needs to go - later you can use an audio baby monitor and wait until she wakes up to take her potty. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate If you find you need to correct, then tell her "Ah ah" and use a rolled up dish towel with a couple of rubber bands around it to bump the edge of the crate just hard enough to surprise her enough to stop the crying, then leave again. When she cries, return and bump the crate and leave again, and when she stays quiet for a couple of minutes, return and sprinkle treats in the crate - correct crying/reward quietness. Practice this during the day. You do not want to give food at night because it can make a pup need to go potty at night or cause them to stay awake in hopes of food. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Britt's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Pippin
Corgi
8 Months
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Pippin
Corgi
8 Months

We just got our corgi 2 weeks ago and he seems to have separation anxiety. He will not go out side (or even go to the bathroom) without one of us out there with him or else he will cry and bark. While we are at work during the day we put him in a kennel in a separate room and leave the fan going with TV in the background. We also leave a toy in there for him but he still whines every time. I do walk him in the mornings before we leave and a longer walk in the evening. I don't know what to do to get him more comfortable on his own.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello K, I recommend a few things. First work on commands that increase independence, such as Place, Crate manners, and Down-stay from a distance using a long leash. Practice Place and Down-Stay while you walk in and out of the room, or walk away outside (while he is on a long leash for safety and consistency). Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Second, add more structure to his routine. Anxious dogs tend to need extra structure in their routine: Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Dog Training Do’s https://www.solidk9training.com/sk9-blog/2016/09/08/the-ten-commandments-of-dog-training-and-ownership-do-2 Third, work on things that build confidence. Agility obstacles and certain tricks can help with this. You can build a few simple agility obstacles out of things like boards or PVC pipes, or buy things online. Working a dog through something new and uncertain can help the dog learn to be more adaptable and confident. Fourth, you can follow the surprise method from the article linked below to help him learn to entertain himself and calm himself in the crate. Practice this training when you are home but in another room or have pretended to leave. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Finally, if the barking continues after building confidence, independence, and spending time getting him used to the crate, you can use a more strict protocol to address separation anxiety. Many dogs will calm down with the above training, but occasionally the anxiety continues and something more strict like the method below can help. check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating crate anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Purchase a stimulation or vibration bark collar (the vibration may not be strong enough for him though). Have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours. Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave the room. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking the collar should correct him. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. As soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around inside. When he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Continue to put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him. Once he is less anxious he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more. First, he needs her anxious state of mind interrupted so that he is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate for him to relieve his boredom instead, since he will need something other than barking to do at that point. Practice all of this during the day at first. Once he has learned that e-collar corrections are for barking and is able to calm himself back down during the day, then you can transition the training to night time when he tries to bark then - if you are certain that he does not need to pee at that time. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Pippin's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Arlo
Husky Shepherd Pitbull
14 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Arlo
Husky Shepherd Pitbull
14 Weeks

I live in a high rise and the minute my puppy is alone even if I’m in another room he starts whining and howling/barking really loud. When he’s beside me he sleeps or is just generally quiet. He doesn’t bark at people or noises just silence until he’s alone. I have tried leaving a radio on, giving him food before I leave, giving him toys. I was keeping him in a crate when I would leave so I tried leaving him out and he just soils all over my room and destroys my carpet. My neighbours are complaining that he cry’s the whole time I’m out the longest being yesterday from 9:00am- 2:30pm. But most of the time it’s a couple hours max. I don’t know what to do about it without bothering my neighbours more. Especially if he doesn’t stop.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Branda, In general most puppies will learn to stop after a few weeks if given a food stuffed chew toy and placed into a crate with crate training, but because of your neighbors there is another protocol you can use that tends to work faster - it's typically used for dogs but can be used by a pup when the first protocol of waiting isn't an option. First, work on teaching calmness surrounding the crate. Check out the video linked below and regularly practice that training while you are also implementing the rest of what I will discuss here: Crate Manners and calmness: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Second, when you put him into the crate, put a food stuffed chew toy in there with him. If he gets the food out quickly, you can make it last longer by putting his puppy food into a bowl, covering it with water, letting it sit out until it absorbs the water and turns to mush, mix a little peanut butter (avoid the sweetener Xylitol - it's toxic) or liver paste or cheese into it, then freeze it overnight in a baggie in the freezer. You can stuff several hollow Kongs ahead of time and freeze them so that you can grab one as needed. Finally, when you are home, practice crating him in another room. When he cries, use a vibration collar with a handheld remote or a small canister of pressurized air called a pet convincer - DON'T use citronella. Tell him "Ah Ah" and vibrate the collar or spray a small puff of air at his side through the crate wires, then leave again - stay very calm while you do this. The pet convincer is a bit stronger if he isn't sensitive and needs more of an interruption than the vibration. If he stays quiet for five minutes, return to him, sprinkle some dog food into the crate without letting him out, then leave again. Repeat correcting him with the vibration or air spray when he barks or tries to escape, and rewarding with treats when he stays quiet for at least five minutes. As he improves, wait until he is quiet for longer before you reward him until you have worked up to a couple of hours between rewards. Practice this for shorter periods at first and work up to at least two hours while you are home as he starts to improve. When he gets used to doing this while you are home, set up a camera to spy on him and pretend like you are leaving, putting him into the crate, and spy on him through the camera from outside to see if he is still barking when you are completely gone. You can use two tablets or smart phones with Skype or Facetime on mute, a computer and phone with Skype, a GoPro with the Live app, a security camera, video baby monitor, or other camera device for this. If he does bark or try to escape, correct again. Return to him when he has stayed calm for the amount of time you have previously worked up to while you were inside, or a bit less time if he is struggling now. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Arlo's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Fin
Lurcher
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Fin
Lurcher
1 Year

Hi, I rescued my dog Fin when he was 8 months old and was completely untrained. I have had my dog for over a year now, and he excels in every aspect of being an excellent dog and friend. The problem I have, is every time I personally leave the home, he whines and will even howl occasionally. My partner will be home, but Fin continues to do it. But if my partner goes out he isn't bothered. Similarly, the times I have left for multiple days, he finds the first few hours challenging, but then he doesn't whine for the duration of me being away. We have a few different people visit whom he enjoys, but he doesn't whine when they leave. This leads me to believe it is only when I go out.
I can't go five mins away to the shop without my partner telling me how much he has whined. I have tried all the tips on this page, and others. He has had success with Pet Corrector sprays, but not with this issue. Any guidance will be greatly appreciated
Kind regards,
Dave

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello David, I suggest working on a bit more independence in your relationship. Work on commands that foster this such as: Place - work up to 1-2 hours overtime, with you being both in and out of the room and him staying on place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners - work on this a lot too: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo A distance Down-Stay using a long leash outside Keeping interactions calmer. No super exciting, highly arousing interactions right now - your relationship should be calm, a bit business-like, and matter-of-fact. You should convey confidence and calm. Praise should be calm and even-keel, and pets should be rewards for him doing something like Sit first - and not for him demanding it. No wrestling right now. You want his relationship with you to change enough for him to learn to cope with anxiety, increase independence, and view you more as leader than playmate. That doesn't mean you can't have fun or ever be more casual - but right now is anxious dog bootcamp. Have your partner practice the same things too so that Fin is less demanding of them - especially a structured heel and crate manners for them. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hi, thankyou for all the guidance. Fin is well trained skills-wise, and enjoys a lot of freedoms outdoors, without a lead. I have him play with dogs, and don't wrestle with him very often. The only issue I really have is the whining when only I leave the house, he isnt bothered by anyone else leaving. He is almost two, when do I stop having a business like relationship with him?

Add a comment to Fin's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Ymir
Boarder collie
11 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ymir
Boarder collie
11 Months

I have a dog who is almost a year old. I have him crate trained and he loves his crate. My issue is that he whines, cries and digs at his kennel for hours when I go to work. My second dog is great but as soon as the younger one starts doing his behaviors, she gets upset with him and will start growling and barking at him from her own crate. When she barks at him (usually just once) he will calm down for about 5 minutes, then he starts again. Usually after about 2-3 hours of this, the dogs will go to sleep. I have tried stuffing Kongs with treats, I have the radio (youtube) on a 12 hour music video for "calming dog music", they both have toys and treats, I tried a kennel cover on the kennel but so that he can still see the other dog and isn't "lonely", I have put a collar on him that stops his barking (It is the only part that was successful). I even tried doing the "fakeout" with a remote trainer so that when I left, I would hide outside my front door and when he started, I would use the vibration setting to stop him. After 3 weeks of this, it finally started to work. A month later, he went back to his old habits. He exercises for 2 hours in the morning until both of them don't want to move anymore, I don't make a big deal out of my leaving and I even tried a Thunder Shirt on him. I am at my wits end. My landlord is threatening to kick me out due to "excessive noise" not that I blame him. If I had a tenant whose dogs did this for hours a day, I would evict them as well.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shawna, Based on what you have shared I suggest doing something a bit similar to a couple of the things you have already done, but a lot more comprehensive so as to address the need to learn independence, self-soothing, better self-management, and anxiety coping skills. The first step is to work on building his independence and his confidence by adding a lot of structure and predictability into his routine. Things such as making him work for rewards like meals, walks, and pets. Working on "Stay" and "Place," commands while you move away or leave the room, and teaching him to remain inside a crate when the door is open. When you are home, he should be practicing staying on Place or in the crate with the door open a lot - he needs to learn how to calm himself when not confined - this exercises self-control. Don't be overly affectionate or excitable or anxious with him while doing all this - your attitude should be super calm and a bit business-like, you don't want him overly dependent on you right now, but still trusting of you and respectful toward you. Focus on making him work by having him do things that require self-control and calmness from him - exercise is great but he needs mental stimulation more probably. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Practicing the crate manners protocol should also help with him not building up anxiety whenever he goes into the crate, because it will become so routine even when you don't actually leave. I suggest purchasing a remote collar, such as e-collar technologies' mini educator. I wouldn't use vibration. Since it took so long to get a response I don't think it was the right tool for him. Go to stimulation, but use a collar like the mini educator that has 100 hundred levels so you can find the correct level for him. You are going to make his current anxious go-to behaviors unpleasant, giving them an opportunity to stop those behaviors long enough to learn something new, then rewarding the correct, calmer behavior instead.This protocol can feel harsh because it involves careful correction, but it tends to work much quicker for many dogs. If you go this route, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using both positive reinforcement and fair correction. Who is extremely knowledgeable about e-collar training, and can follow the protocol listed below, to help you implement the training. Building his independence and structure in his life will still be an important part of this protocol too. An important thing to note about this is the use of stimulation and not vibration for your dog (you should see some type of difference in just a few sessions) combined with rewards - your return, for being calm, and a huge emphasis on challenging his brain to teach him better self-coping skills, calmness, and self-control in general so that he is able to succeed. First, check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Make sure you are implementing what he teaches there in other areas of his life too. Second, purchase a remote electronic collar, e-collar, with a wide range of levels. I recommend purchasing E-Collar Technologies Mini Educator for this. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Once you have found the right stimulation level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours. Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave the room. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking or see him start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time he barks or tries to get out of the crate, stimulate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. If he continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, both prongs making contact with the skin, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around inside. When he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Continue to put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him. Once he is less anxious he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more. First, he needs her anxious state of mind interrupted so that he is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate for him to relieve his boredom instead, since he will need something other than barking to do at that point. Practice all of this during the day at first. Once he has learned that e-collar corrections are for barking and is able to calm himself back down during the day, then you can transition the training to night time when he tries to bark then - if you are certain that he does not need to pee at that time. I would put a lot of that time exercising them into stimulating his mind - continue with a decent amount of exercise, but as a border Collie he needs to work mentally on things that challenge his mind and require concentration for him almost more than he needs to run. When my own Border Collie was young I used to take him on walks and hikes but also spent 30 minutes -1 hour minimum each day teaching him new things every day...he learned almost 100 commands during his first three years of life - not because I had a goal to teach that many things but because I was trying to wear him out mentally to keep behavior issues in check. Border Collies are incredibly smart and need to be stimulated mentally to take the edge off. Some breeds need to run all the time, others need to think a lot. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Ymir's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Carter
Chihuahua
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Carter
Chihuahua
1 Year

When I leave for work or gone for a few hours from the house he will tear at the carpet and other little things. He always whines super loud and I got him a crate BUT I feel if I lock him in the crate it will make it worse but if I leave it open things will keep getting destroyed

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hannah, You do need to crate, for his safety with the chewing, as well as the sake of your stuff, and for the behavior not to turn into a long-term super hard to break habit. Right now it is probably related to age partially. For the crying in the crate, I suggest working on a few things to teach calmness in the crate: Crate manners protocol: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method - do this in addition to the crate manners protocol, and not in place of: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Most dogs will adjust to the crate and learn to relax in it or chew on a food stuffed chew toy within two weeks of doing the above. If your pup is still having a hard time past that there is a protocol you can do to interrupt the anxious state of mind and teach a calmer one. It can feel harsh since it uses a correction to interrupt but it tends to be easier on the dog in the long run. I would suggest trying the crate protocols above first though because that's all that's needed for most dogs for a couple of weeks. First, check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Make sure you are implementing what he teaches there in other areas of his life too. Second, purchase a remote electronic collar, e-collar, with a wide range of levels. I recommend purchasing E-Collar Technologies Mini Educator for this. If you are not comfortable with an e-collar then you can use a vibration collar (the Mini Educator is also a vibration mode) or unscented air remote controlled air spray collar. DO NOT use a citronella collar, buy the additional unscented air canister if the collar comes with the citronella and make sure that you use the unscented air. (Citronella collars are actually very harsh). The vibration or spray collars are less likely to work though, so you may end up spending more money by not purchasing an e-collar first. The Mini Educator has very low levels of stimulation, that can be tailored specifically to your dog. It also has vibration and beep tones that you can try using first, without having to buy additional tools. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Once you have found the right stimulation level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours. Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave the room. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking or see him start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time he barks or tries to get out of the crate, stimulate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. Do not go higher than three more levels on the mini-educator or one level on another collar with less levels right now though because he has not learned what he is supposed to be doing yet. The level you end up using on him on the mini educator collar should be low to medium, within the first forty levels of the one-hundred to one-hundred-and-twenty-five levels, depending on the model you purchase. If it is not, then have a professional evaluate whether you have the correct "working level" for her. If he continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around inside. When he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Continue to put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him. Once he is less anxious he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Carter's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Brody
Cocker Spaniel
12 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Brody
Cocker Spaniel
12 Weeks

Hi! My puppy is great on a night. He sleeps through and doesn’t go to the toilet until we let him out in the morning! The problem is when we leave him alone in the house. He will just sit in his pen and bark and cry. We walk him and play with him before we leave and give him a kong to keep him entertain but once he’s finished with that he barked for about 45 minutes. Will he grow out of it?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alice, How long has he been doing this? If it's been less than two weeks, this is still normal and he is likely still learning to self-sooth and self-entertain and it typically gets better if you stay consistent and don't let him out when he cries - unless he truly needs to potty. Instead, wait until he is quiet for a second before freeing him. Almost all puppies cry when first learning to be left alone. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below and practice the training from that method when you are home - to teach quietness. You can also purchase an automatic treat dispensing device that helps teach puppies to be quiet by periodically rewarding them with a treat when it senses they have been quiet for a certain amount of time. AutoTrainer and Pet Tutor can be set to do this I believe - double check the one you choose before purchasing though. Surprise method for teaching calmness in a crate or exercise pen: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Brody's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd