How to Obedience Train a Bloodhound

How to Obedience Train a Bloodhound
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon1-4 Weeks
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

Obedience training your Bloodhound is essential for having a healthy and enjoyable relationship with your dog. These dogs can be sweet but have a natural tendency to be dominant, so it's important to start training early and be firm and patient in your commands. The earlier you start your training the better. 

Bloodhounds have incredibly sensitive noses and are often used by police for tracking and following trails. They can follow a scent for miles, so making sure your dog has a good recall and is obedience trained will be essential to making sure he is safe and under control. Basic obedience is important for every dog, but especially for these kinds of dogs. Not only will it help give your dog direction and an understanding of where he is in the pecking order of the family, but it will make him more enjoyable for friends and family who come over or interact with your dog.

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Defining Tasks

The earlier you can teach your Bloodhound basic obedience, the better. Young Bloodhounds are like sponges, and it is never too early to start training them. If you have a young puppy or adolescent you might find them to be easily distracted and a little willful at times. Don't let this discourage you because this is the best time to lay the foundation for a well-trained dog. He'll grow out of this trying and stubborn phase into a gentle and well-manned dog at long as you put in the time.

When you obedience train a Bloodhound you need to keep your training times short because they don't have a long attention span. It's best to give your dog several short training sessions throughout the day so you can slowly build on each lesson and keep it fun. The last thing you want to do is frustrate or bore your dog because that will make training miserable for both of you.

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Getting Started

To get started you won't need too many supplies. Make sure you always train in a low distraction area without too many scents. You might also need these items:

  • A well-fitting collar
  • Special treats
  • A timer to make sure you don't train too long
  • All your patience
Below are three basic obedience skills you can start with. Read through each one and get started. The more time you put into training, the better your dog will be.  

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The Sit Method

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1

No distractions

Find a place inside your house that is quiet and with no distractions.

2

Show the treat

Show him his favorite treat. It won't take long for his nose to find it.

3

Encourage a 'sit'

Move the treat behind his head, making sure he's following it with his nose.

4

Reward the 'sit'

He should naturally sit to reach the treat. Give tell him he's a good boy and give him the treat.

5

Name the trick

As soon as he sits his butt down while following the treat, say "sit" before you give him the treat.

6

Test the 'sit'

After a while, test him be saying "sit" without the lure. When he sits on command, get excited and give him lots of treats.

The Down Method

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1

Same spot

If you've found a good, quiet spot to train, keep using it to introduce this training.

2

Start with 'sit'

Ask for a 'sit'.

3

Lure him again

Use your treat, and instead of giving it to him right when he sits, slowly bring it down to the ground until he is lying down and give him the treat.

4

Practice makes perfect

Keep practicing until it becomes natural and he's easily lying down.

5

Now name it

Start to introduce the command. As he follows the treat down say "down" before you give him a treat.

6

Test the command

After lots of practice, test the command by asking him for a 'down' without the lure. When he does it, give him lots of treats and you are ready to move on.

The Stay Boy! Method

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1

Return to your spot

Continue to introduce all new trainings in the same spot.

2

Start in a 'down'

Ask your dog to lie down and then stay.

3

Just a few steps

Take a few steps back and if he stays, say "good stay" and walk back to give him a treat.

4

Increase the time

Take a few more steps back and increase the time before you say "good stay" and give him a treat. If he gets up, put him back in a 'down' exactly where he was and decrease the time.

5

Use the command name

Start to use the command name "stay" before you walk away. Release him with an "ok" and give him a treat.

6

Introduce more challenges

When you think he's ready, start to ask for the stay in more distracting places, eventually working up to outside.

By Katie Smith

Published: 03/23/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Rosco

Dog breed icon

Bloodhound

Dog age icon

16 Weeks

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Question

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he is getting too excited about the treats he won’t sit still he wants to jump and try to get it and he really struggles with paying any attention to what i’m saying just the treat in my hand

June 20, 2022

Rosco's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Abby, Check out the Step Toward method from the article I have linked below for the jumping. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump I would also use pup's kibble to train while at home, so pup is motivated but not overly excited. This is also healthier for pup than most treats, then you can save the treats for things like heavy distraction areas and socialization. You will need to use the treat to lure pup into position when first teaching something, but after pup has learned the command and you are practicing it, keep the treat hidden in your pocket until after pup obeys. Most young puppies get super excited around food so what you are experiencing is also pretty normal when training a puppy. Puppies take patience but they are also a lot of fun. Once pup knows what a command means, have pup practice doing that command to earn other things they like without treats too, like ask pup to sit before you toss them a toy they want, open the door to go on a walk (as long as pup won't have an accident needing to pee), or before you put their food bowl down. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

June 21, 2022

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Cadaver

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Bloodhound

Dog age icon

15 Weeks

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Question

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I'm about to get Cadaver in the next couple weeks, and I'm looking for tips and tricks for training this breed. I have had hounds, but never a full-blooded one. I know how to train the basics,But I would really appreciate any extra tips and ways to train him. Thanks so much for the help in advanced!

Sept. 20, 2021

Cadaver's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Virgil, First, know that every puppy is an individual, so your pup could be the exception to these these, but generally I would say. 1. Understand that pup's instinct to sniff and the smells around pup will be very distracting and interesting to pup. Many bloodhounds will get caught up in a scent and forget everything else they were doing. I would start recall early but always keep in mind that smells, which are invisible distractions to us, can lead pup into trouble when not monitored. Additionally, you can also use smells to your advantage and teach pup finding games, hide treats, and motive pup with smelly objects and smelly treats in training. Smell will often be a bigger motivator in training than something like a tennis ball would be for another breed. 2. Bloodhounds tend to do things at their own speed a bit and it's normal to need a lot of repetition in training. Set your expectations for slow and steady win the race. Pup can learn but it's likely a slow march forward with steady progress than instant results. Consistency and steadfastness from you will be important for training, and remember to use scent to your advantage in training. 3. Bloodhounds can be sensitive even though they may seem also independent or stubborn. Consistency and follow through often works better than harshness. Earn respect through regular training practice, consistently enforcing your rules, and patiently waiting pup out until they follow through on things. Overly harsh training, like hitting or yelling can cause them to shut down. Use smelly rewards to your advantage, and even scents in your environment to your advantage - such as "You may go sniff that tree if you come first, but only if you come to me first", so obedience is rewarded with smell, instead of smell being a reason pup can ignore you. A long training leash helps with this type of training. 4. If you want to see pup get excited about training, tricks, games, ect...keep pup's breed in mind and choose ones that fit his instincts. A bloodhound isn't always into the conventional dog games like fetch, frisbee, agility, ect...Although many have excelled anyway. Tracking, hide and seek, day hikes, and calm socialization with other dogs might appeal to your dog more. Think about pup's prey drive, scenting ability, social skills, and what environments, games, and training utilize those if you want to really watch pup have fun. Again, there are exceptions and the occasional hound will love a frisbee, but if not, that doesn't mean pup can't have a lot of fun by changing the activity. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Sept. 21, 2021


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