How to Obedience Train a Bloodhound

Medium
1-4 Weeks
General

Introduction

Obedience training your Bloodhound is essential for having a healthy and enjoyable relationship with your dog. These dogs can be sweet but have a natural tendency to be dominant, so it's important to start training early and be firm and patient in your commands. The earlier you start your training the better. 

Bloodhounds have incredibly sensitive noses and are often used by police for tracking and following trails. They can follow a scent for miles, so making sure your dog has a good recall and is obedience trained will be essential to making sure he is safe and under control. Basic obedience is important for every dog, but especially for these kinds of dogs. Not only will it help give your dog direction and an understanding of where he is in the pecking order of the family, but it will make him more enjoyable for friends and family who come over or interact with your dog.

Defining Tasks

The earlier you can teach your Bloodhound basic obedience, the better. Young Bloodhounds are like sponges, and it is never too early to start training them. If you have a young puppy or adolescent you might find them to be easily distracted and a little willful at times. Don't let this discourage you because this is the best time to lay the foundation for a well-trained dog. He'll grow out of this trying and stubborn phase into a gentle and well-manned dog at long as you put in the time.

When you obedience train a Bloodhound you need to keep your training times short because they don't have a long attention span. It's best to give your dog several short training sessions throughout the day so you can slowly build on each lesson and keep it fun. The last thing you want to do is frustrate or bore your dog because that will make training miserable for both of you.

Getting Started

To get started you won't need too many supplies. Make sure you always train in a low distraction area without too many scents. You might also need these items:

  • A well-fitting collar
  • Special treats
  • A timer to make sure you don't train too long
  • All your patience
Below are three basic obedience skills you can start with. Read through each one and get started. The more time you put into training, the better your dog will be.  

The Sit Method

Effective
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Step
1
No distractions
Find a place inside your house that is quiet and with no distractions.
Step
2
Show the treat
Show him his favorite treat. It won't take long for his nose to find it.
Step
3
Encourage a 'sit'
Move the treat behind his head, making sure he's following it with his nose.
Step
4
Reward the 'sit'
He should naturally sit to reach the treat. Give tell him he's a good boy and give him the treat.
Step
5
Name the trick
As soon as he sits his butt down while following the treat, say "sit" before you give him the treat.
Step
6
Test the 'sit'
After a while, test him be saying "sit" without the lure. When he sits on command, get excited and give him lots of treats.
Recommend training method?

The Down Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Same spot
If you've found a good, quiet spot to train, keep using it to introduce this training.
Step
2
Start with 'sit'
Ask for a 'sit'.
Step
3
Lure him again
Use your treat, and instead of giving it to him right when he sits, slowly bring it down to the ground until he is lying down and give him the treat.
Step
4
Practice makes perfect
Keep practicing until it becomes natural and he's easily lying down.
Step
5
Now name it
Start to introduce the command. As he follows the treat down say "down" before you give him a treat.
Step
6
Test the command
After lots of practice, test the command by asking him for a 'down' without the lure. When he does it, give him lots of treats and you are ready to move on.
Recommend training method?

The Stay Boy! Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Return to your spot
Continue to introduce all new trainings in the same spot.
Step
2
Start in a 'down'
Ask your dog to lie down and then stay.
Step
3
Just a few steps
Take a few steps back and if he stays, say "good stay" and walk back to give him a treat.
Step
4
Increase the time
Take a few more steps back and increase the time before you say "good stay" and give him a treat. If he gets up, put him back in a 'down' exactly where he was and decrease the time.
Step
5
Use the command name
Start to use the command name "stay" before you walk away. Release him with an "ok" and give him a treat.
Step
6
Introduce more challenges
When you think he's ready, start to ask for the stay in more distracting places, eventually working up to outside.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Copper
Bloodhound
10 Weeks
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Question
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Copper
Bloodhound
10 Weeks

Biting all the time

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Denise, First, if you can find a free puppy play date class attend one of those with him so that he can learn how to control the pressure of his bite by playing with other puppies. Petco and some other pet stores with training offer free puppy play classes if you call and ask for the schedule. If you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age, set up play dates with those puppies too. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Second, check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. At the same time however, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Also, know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep at it. If you have other friends' with puppies, why not invite them over, sending them the following videos and articles too, and practice it all together - allowing puppies to learn and be socialized. Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Roxy
Bloodhound
6 Months
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Question
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Roxy
Bloodhound
6 Months

She has started barking, a lot, at anything, even a fly in the window. Also jumping up on us and hurting with her nails. Add to that the biting when she decides to if she is not entertained otherwise. Help!!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
614 Dog owners recommended

Hello Barbara, Check out the Step Toward method and the Leash method from the article linked below for the jumping. Both methods can be used with your own family, and the leash method when you have guests. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump For the biting, check out the Leave It method from the article linked below and teach the Out command. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out- which means leave the area. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ For the barking, first, you need a way to communicate with her so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, once pup understands what Quiet means you will choose an interrupter - neither too harsh nor ineffective. A Pet Convincer is one example of an interrupter -only use with unscented air (don't use citronella because it lingers so can be confusing). A pet convincer is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air that you can spray a quick puff of at the dog's side to surprise them enough to help them calm back down. (Don't use citronella and avoid spraying in the face!). In situations where you know pup will bark or is already barking (catch them before they bark if you can), command "Quiet" calmly once you have taught that command proactively. If they obey, reward with a treat and very calm praise. If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward then. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Don't skip the rewards. Finally, work on desensitizing pup to what's triggering the barking in the first place. Make sure pup is regularly being socialized. Also, when pup sees something that they normally would have barked at and doesn't bark in the first place, without having to even be told Quiet, calmly praise and give a treat to reward pup's good response. It's very easy to skip this part of the training and ignore the good behavior - but it's super important to notice when pup is doing something right to progress. Keep rewards calm still. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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