How to Obedience Train a Bloodhound

Medium
1-4 Weeks
General

Introduction

Obedience training your Bloodhound is essential for having a healthy and enjoyable relationship with your dog. These dogs can be sweet but have a natural tendency to be dominant, so it's important to start training early and be firm and patient in your commands. The earlier you start your training the better. 

Bloodhounds have incredibly sensitive noses and are often used by police for tracking and following trails. They can follow a scent for miles, so making sure your dog has a good recall and is obedience trained will be essential to making sure he is safe and under control. Basic obedience is important for every dog, but especially for these kinds of dogs. Not only will it help give your dog direction and an understanding of where he is in the pecking order of the family, but it will make him more enjoyable for friends and family who come over or interact with your dog.

Defining Tasks

The earlier you can teach your Bloodhound basic obedience, the better. Young Bloodhounds are like sponges, and it is never too early to start training them. If you have a young puppy or adolescent you might find them to be easily distracted and a little willful at times. Don't let this discourage you because this is the best time to lay the foundation for a well-trained dog. He'll grow out of this trying and stubborn phase into a gentle and well-manned dog at long as you put in the time.

When you obedience train a Bloodhound you need to keep your training times short because they don't have a long attention span. It's best to give your dog several short training sessions throughout the day so you can slowly build on each lesson and keep it fun. The last thing you want to do is frustrate or bore your dog because that will make training miserable for both of you.

Getting Started

To get started you won't need too many supplies. Make sure you always train in a low distraction area without too many scents. You might also need these items:

  • A well-fitting collar
  • Special treats
  • A timer to make sure you don't train too long
  • All your patience
Below are three basic obedience skills you can start with. Read through each one and get started. The more time you put into training, the better your dog will be.  

The Sit Method

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Step
1
No distractions
Find a place inside your house that is quiet and with no distractions.
Step
2
Show the treat
Show him his favorite treat. It won't take long for his nose to find it.
Step
3
Encourage a 'sit'
Move the treat behind his head, making sure he's following it with his nose.
Step
4
Reward the 'sit'
He should naturally sit to reach the treat. Give tell him he's a good boy and give him the treat.
Step
5
Name the trick
As soon as he sits his butt down while following the treat, say "sit" before you give him the treat.
Step
6
Test the 'sit'
After a while, test him be saying "sit" without the lure. When he sits on command, get excited and give him lots of treats.
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The Down Method

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Step
1
Same spot
If you've found a good, quiet spot to train, keep using it to introduce this training.
Step
2
Start with 'sit'
Ask for a 'sit'.
Step
3
Lure him again
Use your treat, and instead of giving it to him right when he sits, slowly bring it down to the ground until he is lying down and give him the treat.
Step
4
Practice makes perfect
Keep practicing until it becomes natural and he's easily lying down.
Step
5
Now name it
Start to introduce the command. As he follows the treat down say "down" before you give him a treat.
Step
6
Test the command
After lots of practice, test the command by asking him for a 'down' without the lure. When he does it, give him lots of treats and you are ready to move on.
Recommend training method?

The Stay Boy! Method

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Step
1
Return to your spot
Continue to introduce all new trainings in the same spot.
Step
2
Start in a 'down'
Ask your dog to lie down and then stay.
Step
3
Just a few steps
Take a few steps back and if he stays, say "good stay" and walk back to give him a treat.
Step
4
Increase the time
Take a few more steps back and increase the time before you say "good stay" and give him a treat. If he gets up, put him back in a 'down' exactly where he was and decrease the time.
Step
5
Use the command name
Start to use the command name "stay" before you walk away. Release him with an "ok" and give him a treat.
Step
6
Introduce more challenges
When you think he's ready, start to ask for the stay in more distracting places, eventually working up to outside.
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Success Stories and Training Questions

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