How to Obedience Train a Poodle

Medium
4-8 Weeks
General

Introduction

Jojo was Grandma's purebred Miniature Poodle. While Poodles have a reputation for being hyper, emotional dogs, JoJo, like all Grandma's previous Poodles, was beautifully behaved and listened well to obedience commands. He was a joy to be around, and great with the grandkids. 

So why do Poodles have a reputation for hard-to-control, excitable dogs?  It all depends on the training that their owners invest in them, and the environment they are raised in. Poodles are very smart dogs, second only to Border Collies, and they are high energy people dogs. This can make them easy to train obedience to, as long as they are kept calm and focused. Poodles do not do well in stressful environments where they can get confused and upset and have trouble understanding what is expected of them. Being firm, calm, and gentle is the key to successfully training your Poodle obedience commands.

Defining Tasks

The basic obedience commands are 'come', 'sit', 'stay', 'down' and 'heel'. You can use the English words, or the equivalent words in any language, it doesn't matter. Your Poodle will not understand the language or the words, he simply learns that when he hears that particular sound he is supposed to run over to you, sit his bottom down, not leave the spot he is in, lie down, or walk next to your left leg at the same speed you are moving. You should provide commands in a clear, firm, voice. Do not yell, as this is distressing to your dog, but make sure you speak clearly so your dog can hear you. Many owners find it useful to add hand signals as well as verbal commands to obedience behaviors. Hand signals give you an alternate way to command obedience and can be used when your dog is unable to hear you, or when you are trying not to make any noise. A Poodle can start learning obedience commands very young, as a puppy of 6-8 weeks. Your young Poodle may take a while to learn all the obedience commands, but never underestimate your smart little Poodle dog, he may surprise you with how quick he takes to obedience training.

Getting Started

Training your Poodle obedience will require treats and a leash for learning to heel. Be sure to train your sensitive, high energy poodle when you are in a calm, positive mood, and when your Poodle has had some exercise so that your dog is able to focus on training and not be distracted by excess energy or your mood. Always use positive reinforcement, not negative reinforcement, to obedience train your poodle. Keep training sessions short, especially for young dogs, so they do not become frustrated or bored.

The Capture and Shape Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Start with the simplest command
Have a clicker and treats available. Start with the simplest obedience command for your people-oriented Poodle: 'come'.
Step
2
Reinforce 'come'
Wait for your Poodle to run over to you. When he does click and treat, say “come”. Repeat frequently until your Poodle responds to the command “come”. Gradually remove clicker and treat.
Step
3
Reinforce 'sit'
Wait with a clicker in your hand. When your dog sits down, say “sit”, click and treat. Practice frequently.
Step
4
Reinforce 'down'
Once your dog has mastered 'sit', wait while he is in the sitting position for him to lie down, add the “down” command. Practice.
Step
5
Reinforce 'stay'
Teach the 'stay' command by saying “stay” waiting a few seconds while your dog is in place, then clicking and treating. If your dog moves, do not click and treat but position your dog again and repeat the “stay” command until your dog is successful at staying in place. Gradually increase length of time required for your dog to stay in place before clicking and treating.
Step
6
Reinforce 'heel'
Hold a clicker and treats while you walk your Poodle. When your Poodle trots along at your left leg, click and treat. Do not reinforce if your poodle lags behind or pulls in front.
Recommend training method?

The Lure to Obedience Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Lure to come
Hold a treat out and call your dog by commanding “come”. When your Poodle runs over to you, provide the treat, praise and affection. Repeat often.
Step
2
Lure to sit
Stand in front of your Poodle holding a treat above and slightly behind his head. In order to reach the treat, your dog will move back and onto his bottom. Say “sit” and provide the treat when your dog sits. Practice frequently.
Step
3
Lure to lie down
Ask your dog to sit, then hold a treat down on the ground in front of your Poodle until he lies down on the floor to reach the treat. Say “down” and provide the treat.
Step
4
Lure to stay
While lying down or sitting, ask your dog to “stay”. Hold a treat but do not provide it yet. Wait a few seconds, if your poodle remains in place then reward with the treat. If your dog moves, re-position and repeat until he is successful. Gradually increase the time your dog needs to stay in place to get his treat.
Step
5
Lure to heel
Hold a treat in a closed hand at your side and walk with your Poodle on your left side. Lure your poodle to stay at your left side by letting him smell the treat in your closed hand. Periodically provide the treat as your Poodle walks beside you. Replace with another, hold and continue.
Recommend training method?

The Hand Signals Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Pair hand signal for 'sit'
Hold a treat in your hand, palm up. With your Poodle in front of you, move your palm up to your chest. As your dog tracks your movement he will tend to sit down. Say "sit" and provide the treat when he is successful. Eventually you can stop using the treat and just say “sit” and use the hand signal.
Step
2
Add hand signal for 'down'
Hold a treat between your fingers with your palm facing down and your Poodle in front of you. Move your palm down to the floor and say “down”. When your dog follows your hand and lies down on the floor, provide the treat.
Step
3
Signal 'come'
Hold your hands out parallel to the ground straight out from your sides with a treat in one hand. Call your Poodle to come and bring both your hands together at your chest. When your dog runs over, provide the treat.
Step
4
Add hand signal for 'stay'
To teach your Poodle the hand signal for stay, hold your palm out toward your dog while he is sitting and say “stay”. Provide a treat when your dog stays for a few minutes. Gradually increase time, continue pairing the hand signal and verbal command.
Step
5
Signal and reinforce 'heel'
Tap your hip with your hand while asking your Poodle to heel. Reinforce heeling with treats, praise and affection.
Step
6
Alternate verbal and hand signals
Gradually practice using either verbal or hand signals individually. Decrease using treats and use praise and affection for reinforcement instead.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Prince Charlie
Standard Poodle
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Prince Charlie
Standard Poodle
3 Months

Do poodles always cry when you put them in their crate? We have our first puppy he is 12 weeks old and sometimes while I'm cleaning the house and don't want him to get into things he's not suppose to I try to put him in his crate but all he does is whine the entire time he is in there. He does really well at night in a crate but during the day it is very difficult to get him to willingly go in there. I've tried praising him with treat and positive feedback when he does go in there but he literally has learned to just walk and sit there for a treat and walk right back out.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
91 Dog owners recommended

Hello! He is likely experiencing a mild form of separation anxiety. He is still young enough that this can be chalked up to age, and it could potentially correct itself as he gets older. But I am going to send you some information on separation anxiety and use of the kennel just in case. Just so this behavior doesn't become habitual and follow him into adulthood. It sounds like you are off to a great start by giving him a treat to go in. I am going to send you a few additional tips. Leave treats in the crate. You can distract your dog by giving stuffed, frozen Kongs in the crate. This easy fix will really help! I have four or five stuffed Kongs in my freezer at all times. That way I can just chuck a Kong in the crate with Barley whenever I run out for errands! Freezing them makes them last a lot longer. Feed dinner in the crate. I like to feed dogs dinner in the crate. Instead of putting their bowl on the kitchen floor, I just feed dinner in the crate. You can either feed the dogs their dinner when you leave in the crate, or you can let the dog out after dinner. Either way, this is an easy way to start building a good association between your dog and the crate! Put toys in the crate. My dog is a total squeaky toy nut, so at first, I kept his toys in the crate. He was rewarded for going into the crate by a quick bout of play. It was great to see him start to actually want to go into the crate on his own! Make the crate comfy. Make sure the crate is comfy with a comfortable crate mat, a safe chew toy, and something that smells like you! Ensure the crate is the right size. The crate has to fit the dog correctly. Your dog should have room to turn around and stand up comfortably, but not much more than that! Place the crate in a common area. Many dogs cry in the crate because they’re lonely. A simple fix for these dogs is to put the crate in your bedroom at night, near the bed. If the crate doesn’t fit in your bedroom, you can sleep on the floor or the couch near the crate and gradually move towards your final sleeping arrangement. This is similar to what many parents do with young babies – they don’t start with the baby sleeping in his own room upstairs and across the house! They build up to that level of independence. You can get a bit creative and tailor this advice to suit your dynamic. Another thing I have seen success with is white noise. If the common area doesn't work, you can always try to put him in a quiet area with a fan running on low. It is sometimes trial and error with this stuff. In the mean time, do your best to not respond to his whining if you know for sure he doesn't need to go to the bathroom and is safe. Thank you for writing in!

Add a comment to Prince Charlie's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Perry
Poodle
4 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Perry
Poodle
4 Years

Do poodles bark every time when they need to get exercise? Do every poodle have to take obidience training? Is it Rare that a poodle is already obidient?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
671 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diana, Not all Poodles bark when they need exercise. Some dogs learn through practice that when they bark, they are taken for a walk, so they bark again the next time they want to go. Their excess energy also makes it more likely that they would bark in general when in need of stimulation. Some dogs chew more, run around the house, whine, or bark when feeling like they need to be stimulated. Dogs that have been trained to be calm indoors can be calm, but that doesn't mean they do not also need to be exercised. Poodles are one of the most intelligent breeds, meaning that Perry probably learned that barking equals a walk sooner than most dogs would have learned that, so he does it more often. He just as easily could have learned to whine or chew too though. Also, when it seems like he needs exercise, he might actually need mental stimulation the most. Very few dogs are naturally obedient. If you went to a country where you did not speak the language, you would probably not be able to naturally follow instructions in that language either. Some dogs are better at reading body language and are calmer so get into less trouble though. Poodles as a breed tend to be more mentally and physically energetic though. Because Poodles are intelligent and many are energetic, they do need obedience training. Even if your dog is well behaved, they are often happier when learning new things. You can join an obedience class to do this, but you can also read articles and watch videos and learn how to train things yourself, then simply spend a little time each days teaching Perry new things at home and in public. It's a bit like if a smart, inquisitive child didn't have opportunities to learn, he would probably miss learning new things and be bored. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Perry's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd