How to Train Your Rescue Dog to Pee Outside

Medium
1-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

If you’ve got a heart of gold and are looking to adopt a new dog, then you’ll be looking to get a rescue dog. Giving a dog in a rescue shelter a second chance is an extremely meaningful and rewarding experience, as you’ll be helping with the problem of overpopulation on the streets, and most importantly giving a dog a second chance that they may never have gotten without you. 

However, owning a rescue dog is certainly a challenge. Of course, every dog is an individual and some will be easier to train than others. But as rescue pups are generally not puppies and will likely have an unknown background, they may have been a street dog for a long time and as such will have likely picked up bad habits. As your four-legged friend won’t be used to toilet training, it will likely be necessary for you to teach them to pee outside.

Defining Tasks

Toilet training a rescue dog is very important for a range of reasons. Teaching him or her to pee outside is a form of obedience training and as such, if you successfully train them, they will respect you more and appreciate that they need to listen to your commands. Cleaning up pee is an unpleasant experience and if you train them to go outside you’ll save a lot of time and expense in not having to clear up after them or buy new items of furniture or clean the carpets. Urine contains a lot of harmful substances such as ammonia and it isn’t very hygienic for you or your family to be inhaling those fumes. Exposure can be detrimental to health if urine is not thoroughly cleaned and disinfected--another reason to get your pet to go outside. Also, cleaning up urine is an unpleasant experience and may result in you becoming frustrated with your pooch, without them knowing what they’ve done wrong. Therefore, training them to go outside can strengthen your bond.

This command can be quite difficult as your rescue dog is likely set in their ways, and although will hopefully only take a few days, it could take a couple weeks for them to learn.

Getting Started

To get going, you’ll definitely need a patient but determined attitude, as rescue dogs can be that bit trickier to train than a new puppy with no prior experience of the way the world works. Delicious treats as a reward for going in the correct place are important. Sort out what your pooch's favorites are, however, high-value treats such as chicken, sausage or cheese can be good, as they’re extra tasty to puppers. A crate is also a valuable tool for toilet training your pup, make sure the crate is the right size for your breed and weight of pooch. Finally, make sure you also get a hefty supply of potty training pads for your pooch, they should be readily available at your local pet store, they will ensure that the clear up is much easier for you and will help save your carpets from urine staining.

The Healthy & Happy Pup Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Vet visit
First things first, be sure to take your pooch to the vet, to rule out any problems he or she may have. For example if your pupper has a urinary tract infection or kidney disease (more likely in older dogs), they’ll be much more likely to pee inside as it hurts and they can’t hold it.
Step
2
Make him at home
Going to a new home is an exciting and frightening experience for new dogs, making them more likely to have accidents initially. Make your dog at home by giving him safe spaces. Also, you could buy a pheromone diffuser, which will remind them of when they were a pup and with their mom, which is likely to calm him down a bit.
Step
3
Use a crate
A crate can be a safe space for your pup and you can put toilet pads in the crate until he stops having accidents. Pooches don’t like to eliminate in the spaces they eat and rest in so they’re less likely to go in there.
Step
4
Let him out regularly
However, he will go in his crate if he can’t hold it, so make sure you let him out regularly. How often your dog will need to pee will depend on his breed and size, also on his health status, as if he has an issue with his kidneys he'll need to go more. Make sure the amount you take your pup out meets his needs.
Step
5
Reward him when he gets it right
Make sure you give him a tasty treat and lots of praise when your pooch gets it right.
Recommend training method?

The Routine Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Be with your pooch
Take some time off from work if possible, or get a relative or a friend to be with your pooch in the first week at their new home, as you’ll want to establish a routine.
Step
2
Eight bathroom breaks per day
Taking him out more than he needs initially will ensure that your pooch's bladder is never so full that he needs to go inside.
Step
3
Time the breaks
Time the breaks so that they’re all roughly at the same time throughout the day, for example one before breakfast, after lunch, after dinner etc.
Step
4
Treats and praise
Give your pooch lots of treats and praise when he gets it right to let him know he’s been a really good boy. If you’re clicker training him, give him a click and a treat at the exact time he gets it right.
Step
5
Don't punish if you didn't see it
Don’t punish your pooch if he’s had an accident and you weren’t there to witness it. If you catch your dog in the act, give him a clap to get his attention and stop him, then take him outside so he knows this is where he’s supposed to go.
Recommend training method?

The Smell Association Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Clean up accidents ASAP
Make sure that if your pooch has an accident, you clean it up straight away with an antimicrobial disinfectant that gets rid of any remnants of the smell of urine. If any trace is left, your pooch will recognize the scent of his pee and want to go there again. Tip: stay away from ammonia-based disinfectants as these smell a bit like pee.
Step
2
Same urination station
Always take your pooch to the same spot outside, so that he knows that it becomes routine and he remembers this is where he likes to go.
Step
3
Leave soiled pads at the station
The scent of his old pee will encourage him to go in the same spot again, dogs are creatures of habit after all.
Step
4
Meet his needs
You’ll need to make sure you’re taking him out enough for his breed and size; you can’t blame him for having accidents if he’s not going out enough. Look up how much your type of pooch needs to go out and take him out double the amount to begin with to be on the safe side.
Step
5
Treat and praise away
Give your pooch lots of treats and tell him what a good boy he’s been when he gets it right. If he goes in the wrong place, try not to scare him by telling him off angrily, but disrupt his flow by making a loud noise and taking him outside to the correct place.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Catherine Lee-Smith

Published: 11/22/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Duke
Lab/Dane mix
5 Months
3 found helpful
Question
3 found helpful
Duke
Lab/Dane mix
5 Months

We just brought him home from a rescue. He has never been with a family and so has spent his life in a shelter. He won’t pee outside. Has had several accidents inside. 2 which have been while laying down. One being in his crate. We take him out every hour but he will not go pee outside. He pooped for the first time outside today. Not sure what to do to break a life time (only 5 mos but) habit.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kerri, It sounds like Duke is afraid of peeing outside because he has not experienced it before, or possibly he had a bad experience doing it once. Take a couple of days when you are home and not at work and it is nice outside, such as a weekend, and spend the entire day outside with him each day. If you can do this more than two days in a row, then that would work even better. While outside feed him all of his meals there and give him plenty of water to drink there. Play with him and get him excited, and make sure that he has shade if it is hot. Doing all of that should make him need to go potty. If your yard is not fenced in then purchase a long leash such as a thirty foot leash and attach it to him and allow him to wander several feet away from you whenever he wants to go potty. He might be afraid to go in your presence because he has been punished by someone for having accidents in the past. After he is comfortable peeing outside, then you can gradually decrease the amount of distance between you and him, until he will pee in your presence too. When he does eventually go, quietly praise him and toss him four treats, large enough for him to find in the yard, as a reward for going. Do this every time that you catch him using the bathroom outside. Overtime he should become more comfortable going outside. Once he is comfortable going outside, then you can use a typically potty training schedule and techniques to teach him to not go potty in the house. Because of his uncertain past do not punish him for having accidents in the house, instead distract him quickly if you see him begin to go potty inside and rush him outside to finish, but do your absolute best to prevent the accident in the first place after he is comfortable eliminating outside and can be taken outside frequently. Make sure that you clean up any accidents with a pet safe cleaner that contains enzymes. Only enzymes will break up the pee and poop enough for him to not be able to smell it still, and be attracted to eliminating in that same spot. Also if there is a particular type of material that he tends to have accidents on, and he does not tend to pee on another type of material, then once you get him over his fear of peeing outside, keep him confined to areas with the material that he does not pee on between his potty breaks. For example, if he is used to peeing on the hard floor of a shelter or crate, and has accidents on your kitchen's hardwood or linoleum floor but he does not pee on carpeted areas, then confine him to a carpeted area, or even better, find an old piece of carpeting or an old rug and use that on the floor of a room where he can stay when you are not able to completely supervise him, between his potty breaks outside. Be sure to give him interesting toys while he is in there, such as food stuffed Kongs, puzzle toys, wobble toys that he can tip over to dispense food, and chew toys, to remove any anxiety about being in that room and to prevent bad chewing habits. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Flaps
Tibetan spaniel mix
5 Years
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Flaps
Tibetan spaniel mix
5 Years

I just adopted a rescue dog who is 5 years old but has only been trained to go on puppy pads (he previously spent his entire life inside). I want to train him to go outside. I tried to start him without pads in the house and just take him outside every couple of hours. He will poop outside when he needs to, but he will not pee. He went 24 hours without peeing and now has peed twice inside on the carpet after coming inside from long walks when he wouldn’t pee. I am ordering some pads so that hopefully he doesn’t soil the carpet again (I have used an enzyme cleaner), but I’m also afraid this will make it harder to get him to go outside. Should I take the pads outside with me to try to get him to go?

I should mention that I live on the 11th floor, so I can’t just rush him out the door if he is having an accident, I have to wait for the elevator. Also, he turns up his nose at treats, so I have just been using praise and a clicker.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, Congratulations on the new dog! Since Flaps is so used to using Pee Pads he probably views the grass and outside area as somewhere that he should not pee. Since he is refusing to pee outside after holding it for so long, take the pee pads with you outside and encourage him to go on there as if they were grass. Tell him to "Go Potty" when he is on the pee pads, and praise him for going on them when he does, but do not keep the pee pads available inside your home if he will go on them outside alright. You want to transition home from going potty inside to peeing outside, even if it is on pee pads outside at first. Continue to take him outside to pee on the pee pads very frequently so that he does not have an accident in the house when he cannot find one inside. When he is doing well peeing on the pee pads outside, then start putting grass and outdoor debris on the pee pad to get him used to that. Start with just a small handful of grass or dirt at first. Overtime, either gradually cover the pee pad more and more with outside debris like grass, until the pee pad is completely covered, or cut the pee pads smaller and smaller so that Flaps is peeing on the ground around it more and more. When you get to the point where the pee pad is totally covered with debris or is only an inch or two wide, then remove it entirely and tell him to "Go Potty" on just the normal ground. When you first tell him to "Go Potty" somewhere without the pee pad under him, make sure that it is in a location where you used to have the pee pad before because he will associate that location with peeing and be more likely to go. If he will poop on the normal ground without a pee pad alright right now, continue having him poop just on the ground when you can. If he poops on the pad after peeing that is fine too, but encourage pooping on the ground since he has already been doing that for you, to maintain that. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Salvador
Pomchi
5 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Salvador
Pomchi
5 Years

Hello! Background: Sal was flown up to MN from Puerto Rico last night. We believe he was a street dog. I live in an apartment building, and it takes a few to get to the grass. I also have a balcony.

Situation: He would not go potty outside last night on two walks. He would not this morning either, and when we returned indoors he peed on the carpet while tethered to me, and then again on the kitchen floor. Both times I had looked away for just a second! He is eating and drinking adequately. We spent the better half of the day smelling the things and giving him an opportunity to go outside, but he never did. We would be outside for an hour, go inside into the kennel for about 50 minutes, and head back outside. This last time on the way up he started to pee in the hallway, so I clapped and rushed him down a stairwell outside. He then seemed to forget about it and not go.

I'm wondering:
-should I be doing anything differently?
-should I carry him through the hallways?
-should I have taken him right to a puppy pad?
-when he pees in the apartment should I take him to a puppy pad or outside?
-is there a time frame in which I should try the chicken broth method if he hasn't gone potty outside?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nadine, It sounds like you did everything correctly. He may just need a different approach. Does he seem nervous while he is outside? Is he afraid of being on a leash? If he is nervous while outside he might be refusing to go because of that. It that's the case, then spend time outside with him every day with treat and toys getting him used to your neighborhood so that he will relax and sniff around while out there. Look into purchasing a spray designed to encourage peeing and pooping. It is usually called "Hurry Spray", "Puppy Training Spray", "Go Here" or something similar. Spray that on the area where you would like him to pee right before you lead him over to that spot. If he seems nervous while on the leash, then spend extra time getting him used to the leash. Try to follow him around and keep it loose as much as you can while keeping him safe. Every once in a while tug on it, wait until he stops fighting it if he resists, and then give him a treat. He should start to learn to come toward you when he feels tension on the leash and also to like the feeling of tension on the leash better. You can also try using regular a ten to twenty foot leash that is not retractable, and letting him wander around to sniff while you stand further away. Do not use a retractable leash on him while potty training right now either way. The tension on the leash could be the issue. Using the long leash is a good thing to try if you have somewhere where you can take him with enough space to do that. If he does not seem nervous about being outside or being on the leash, then he may not believe that it is alright to pee outside for some reason. Possibly because of other dogs in the area. Keep doing what you are doing but carry him down the stairs instead of having him walk until he is having less accidents. I normally advise against that but in his case he may pee on the way down if you do not. Walk him out the door before picking him up if he is not about to have an accident though, so that he will learn to walk over to the door himself when he has to pee. After you spray the pee encouragement spray on an area outside, if he does pee, then have several of his favorite treats with you and give him five of them, one at a time, while praising him. Do this so that he will be more likely to pee outside again next time and will learn that it is okay to go out there. If you do not wish to use Puppy Pads for the rest of his life, then do not use them now. Many dogs struggle with telling the difference between pee pads and carpet, rugs, and clothes. Once the pee pads are removed a lot of dogs begin peeing in other locations inside. Some even pee on other locations while the puppy pads are present. If you cannot get Salvador to pee outside following the above recommendations this coming week, then you may want to teach him to use a doggie toilet on the balcony temporarily. For this toilet use a litter box filled with cat litter or make your own grass toilet. You can make a grass toilet by placing a piece of grass sod in a large shallow plastic bin. If cat litter boxes are too small for him, then you can also use those types of plastic bins and fill one part of the way with cat litter to make your own litter box. Purchase an Exercise Pen and place the litter box or grass toilet in one end of the Exercise Pen and spray the toilet or litter box with the pee encouraging spray. Place Salvador in the Exercise Pen where the toilet is and leave him there until he pees or poops. Make sure that he has shade and water if it is hot. Take care not to let him overheat. Go far enough away that he does not feel like you will scold him if he has an accident, but close enough that you can still see when he goes potty. Right after he goes potty at some point, praise him and go over to him and give him several treats, one treat at a time, then let him out of the Exercise Pen. Do this for all of his potty trips. When he becomes more willing to go potty in there, then tell him "Go Potty" when you take him there. A litter box will be less smelly and messy to clean but the grass toilet will be better for training him to go potty outside and easier to transition away from. Continue to take him outside to go potty, even if he will not go yet, while you are teaching him to also go in the Exercise Pen toilet. If he does not go outside, then put him in the Exercise Pen until he goes. When he has learned to go in the Exercise Pen toilet, then take the piece of grass sod or liter box outside and take him to it outside and tell him to "Go Potty" there. Reward him if he does. When he will go potty there, then gradually decrease the size of the grass sod or deconstruct the litter box a bit at a time until the litter is just on the ground. Finally, there should be no litter or grass sod left and he should be going on the ground normally. If you feel confused about whether or not he is afraid of peeing outside or how to apply any of this, then I would recommend hiring a local trainer with good recommendations and showing that person this response and your question and seeking their help. They should be able to evaluate why is not willing to go potty outside and choose a good course of action. You can also try getting him used to being outside and used to a leash or a long leash first, and then move onto the Exercise Pen and grass toilet after if you are not sure where to start. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Marley
Australian Cattle Dog Mix
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Marley
Australian Cattle Dog Mix
1 Year

My girl has been out of the shelter for four weeks, but when leaving the apartment to go to the bathroom or for a walk she refuses to leave past the building door to the outside. She becomes extremely fearful only when she sees the outside. She has no trouble going in the backyard at my parents house, but has to be carried to the doggie encloser at my apartment. How can we work past this fear, so she can go potty and go for walks regularly?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Naeema, Work on generally building Marley's confidence in a variety of locations between your apartment entrance and where you take her to go potty. Grab several of her favorite toys, treats, people, dogs, or whatever else she enjoys and bring to several spots along the path between the apartment and bathroom. Spend time practicing tricks and giving her favorite treats, act silly and exciting, play games with her with the toys. Do this often so that she Will anticipate those areas being fun and not scary and her association with being outside will change. At first, practice in the furthest area she will walk to by herself. As she progresses, move the fun sessions farther and further away from the apartment toward the bathroom. If she will not progress, then you may need to carry her to the different spots at first and then play with her there. Start closer to the apartment and have her walk on her own and let the fun be a reward if she will walk a little bit though, then gradually go further as time passes with practice Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Blue
Siberian Husky
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Blue
Siberian Husky
9 Months

We just re homed a 9 month old Siberian Husky and we have had him for 3 days so far and he has yet to go to the bathroom outside , we take him on super long walks and to the park ect (because we don’t have a back yard) but we live right beside a park. And he still won’t go 😞 we even tried to have our yorkie also go when he was taken out and he saw sniffed and just didn’t care.
He will not go at all and will hold it all day long until he really has to go and than he will go in the house.
I talked to the owners before us , and she mentioned that he only went In their backyard , not even on walks ect that he would always wait until he returned home and was in the back yard ... what can I do for him? Because he’s perfect but I can’t have him relieving himself in the house when we were told her was house trained already.
Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cheyenne, Check out the "Crate Training" method from the article that I have linked below. Follow that method very strictly until he begins to go potty when you tell him to "Go Potty" outside. Do not skip giving him treats, giving him a very strict crate schedule for now, and purchasing a potty encouraging spray and spraying that in the yard. The combination of schedule, crate, spray, "Go Potty" command, and treats should all work together to help him go. Using the crate very strictly for a month or so, until he stops having accidents inside and goes potty outside consistently, should also prevent most accidents in your home in the meantime. Since he is older, instead of taking him outside every one-to-two-hours like the method describes, take him outside every four hours and then every hour after that if he does not go when you take him the first time. Repeat the trips outside every hour until he goes potty one of those times, then he can have up to two-and-a-half hours of freedom in your home if you are there to supervise, before going back into the crate until it is time to take him potty again after it has been four hours since he last peed outside. If he is still having accidents with that schedule or has an accident in the crate, then take him more often and give him thirty minutes less of freedom in the house after he pees outside before putting him back into the crate until it is time to take him again. Here the link to the article. Follow the "Crate Training" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside That method should force him to start using the bathroom outside fairly quickly, and the spray and the treats will help him to want to go there more again in the future. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

I am having a similar issue- I just took in a large 9 month old Labrador-golden retriever-poodle who had 0 obedience training. He never walked on a leash and was outside most of the time.
He will pee mostly to mark trees and bushes. Out of 5 nights he has slept in my house, he has pooped once and peed and pooped once in the middle of the night. My husband and I work full time so we haven't been able to crate train him properly and he refuses to go near the crate we got him!

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Question
Sissy
chihuahua mix
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sissy
chihuahua mix
1 Year

I rescued a second dog as a companion to my now retired service dog. They play together really well, but we are having issues with feeding and potty training. Sissy was puppy pad trained, and she's a real chow-hound. She took to using the doggy door immediately and going potty outside, but she's started going inside the dog door, and running back upstairs if I follow her down to get her to go outside instead. I started putting potty pads down near the door, but then she'll go in the middle of the floor instead. Along with this frustrating regression, she peed in my bed the other night, so I kept her in the kitchen overnight (since she won't go into the kennel). As soon as I let her out this morning, she ran straight into my room and peed in my bed before I could take her downstairs. On top of that, my first dog has gotten scary skinny since she eats his food after finishing hers. I called a local behaviorist and the want hundreds of dollars to work with her, but I'm afraid the bedwetting is a dealbreaker.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Leslie, First of all, get both dogs used to eating at two designated times per day, typically morning and evening. Watch the dogs and discipline the younger dog if she attempts to eat your older dog's food. Your older dog will not stop her so you need to be the one to, and the food should not be left out all the time for free feeding. Feed the dogs in two separate areas of the kitchen while you are in there eating your own food, to supervise. Give both dogs fifteen minutes to eat, and whenever the younger dog tries to eat the older dog's food, get between her and the older dog's food, tell her "Out" firmly, and then walk toward her calmly but firmly until she gets out of the area. Repeat this until she stops trying to get to the food that meal. You are telling her with your body language to leave the food alone because it belongs to you. Since it's your food, which it is, you decide who gets to eat it, not her. After fifteen minutes, take both food bowls up whether they have eaten it or not. If you come home during the middle of the day, then lock the older dog in a room where the younger dog cannot get to him while he has fifteen minutes to attempt to eat. Feed both dogs again in the evening the same way that you did in the morning by supervising them on two separate ends of the kitchen. If you cannot supervise them one meal, then lock them in separate rooms or crates with their own food bowl for the fifteen minutes. Give the older dog extra food at night if he did not eat all of his other food earlier during the day when you put it down for fifteen minutes then. Sissy needs to be formally potty trained. She needs to be taken outside to go potty on a leash every four hours unless she is in a confined area where she will hold her pee. When you take her outside, tell her to "Go Potty", and when she goes give her three treats, one at a time. If she does not go, then confine her in a small space like an exercise pen or crate or attach her to yourself with a six or eight foot leash so that she cannot sneak off. Take her outside to try again in an hour, or sooner if she starts to act like she needs to go, sniffing, circling, trying to sneak off, or trying to get your attention. Repeat this every hour until she goes. Taking her outside on leash so that she has to focus on going potty, giving her treats to motivate her to go potty outside instead of inside, and keeping her on a schedule and confined or attached to you should help. Once she learns to go quickly while on the leash with you and is motivated to go potty outside because of the treats, then you can walk her over to the doggie door, tell her to "Go Potty", and watch her from the window while she goes potty outside. When she comes back in after going potty, then you can give her a treat, without having to go out with her. From there you can phase out the treats and always walking her to the doggie door. If you are not home during the day, then you will either need to crate train her so that she will hold it for eight hours without an accident or you will need to hire a dog walker to take her out mid-day and she will need to stay in an exercise pen while you are gone. You can give her a food stuffed kong that has been filled with dog food, soaked in water and mixed with a bit of peanut butter, and frozen to entertain her in the crate or exercise pen. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Mousse
pit mix
4 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Mousse
pit mix
4 Years

We just rescued Mousse about 4 days ago. We adopted her knowing she was a very anxious dog. She was extremely reclusive the first day but slowly came downstairs. Now she just likes being in the same room. Mousse will hold her pee and poop for over 12 sometimes 24 hours until shes about to burst then relives herself at night for us to clean up in the morning. She is terrified of being outside. She might have been tied up so walks are a no go. Keeping her outside for long periods of time is difficult since we don't have a fence and she pulls very strongly towards the door every couple minutes when she gets scarred.

Ive been taking her outside ever couple hours for about 20 minutes or so and give her treats to reinforce that outside is good. Sometimes she is too nervous to be interested in treats but has never relieved herself outside. We've been using "go here" spray but she is yet to find interest in that. She never potties inside in front of us. It's always at night or when were gone.

We feel at a loss. I work from home and feel like I can barely get anything done in between taking her out and cleaning up messes.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hillary, In your case, I would actually suggest training her to use a real grass pad inside of an exercise pen in your house right now, while you also work on getting her used to being outside in general, then transitioning her to peeing outside later on. I suggest using a real grass pad because you want her to get used to going potty on grass so that her training will transition to outside and she will not learn to pee on fabric type material, like pee pads, carpet, and rugs. I suggest the exercise pen because that will help her differentiate between the "bathroom" and the rest of the house, and it will make this process easier for you. You will need a strong, reinforced exercise pen for her. The type that's used at pet stores for training. There are a lot of options online. Just look for one that is very sturdy or that can be physically attached to the walls in a corner so that she cannot knock it over with her strength. Since you are also working on her socialization with you, set up the exercise pen in a room where you spend a lot of time, without carpeting, so that she can be in your presence. You can occasionally toss or hand feed treats to her while she is in the pen learning, after she has started peeing on the right spot, to help her with her fear of people. At first reserve treats for when she pees on the grass though, until she will do that regularly, then you can reward her at additional times to help with socialization too. When you are in the house and her bladder is empty and she is out of the exercise pen, then keep a zip lock bag of treats or her dog food if she likes it, in your pocket, and occasionally drop treats on the ground beside you as you move about. Later you can work on teaching her commands and making her work for that food to also build trust and respect, but that step will be a litter bit in the future. Check out the article that I have linked below for how to teach her to use the exercise pen and real grass pad. The article mentions litter box training, but in your case you can simply substitute the litter box for the grass pad. Only use one litter box because Mousse is larger and do not remove the exercise pen at any point, since you will be transition her to peeing outside and don't want to remove the exercise pen until she is potty trained to go outside, to discourage her from peeing inside at that point. Follow the "Exercise Pen" method from the article below. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Here is a link to a real grass toilet. Each one is advertised as lasting a couple of weeks. It might last a bit less with her size though. You will have to experiment. https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI You can also make your own grass pads by dividing up pieces of grass sod into sections and putting one section into a wide, shallow plastic bin. Continue to work on getting her used to being outside over the next couple of months, and then you can transition to regular potty training when she is not afraid of your yard. As she gets more used to being outside overtime, if she happens to pee outside while you are practicing overcoming her fears, then keep treats in your pocket and reward her a whole lot any time she happens to pee out there. That will help potty training go faster when you get ready to officially start outdoor potty training. Congratulations on the new dog! Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Katie
Running Walker Hound
4 Years
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Katie
Running Walker Hound
4 Years

We are the third owners of Katie. She is a Walking Runner Hound and was trained as a hunting dog but failed in the eyes of the hunter. She was rescued by a family who housed her in a barn for a year with the other farm animals. They wanted a better situation for Katie which is how we ended up adopting her. We have had her for three months. Mostly she is doing great but does have pee accidents a couple of times a week. She will come in from spending time outside and will pee in the room where she sleeps. We don't feel like we can trust her. If I am in the kitchen I am always checking on her in the other room to make sure she is content and not having an accident. I started by taking her out many times a day and having her pee and poop. She has a runner since we have not been able to fence in the yard yet. I feel she is capable of holding her pee. We are baffled at why she does this. It seems like it is when my husband is home with her and not so much on my watch. What do you think? Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kris, Katie is probably use to peeing in the barn so doesn't understand why she can't pee in the house. I highly suggest crate training her. I know that might feel discouraging but the confined space of a crate should encourage her natural desire to hold her pee, and help her get into the habit of peeing only outside when you take her. It will also give you a break when you cannot closely supervise her. When she is regularly peeing outside for at least two months, has not had any accidents inside for at least one month, and is generally doing well, then you can transition her to being attached to a leash to you when you are at home and willing to supervise her. She needs to be rewarded with treats when she does go potty outside, her accidents need to be cleaned up with a cleaner that contained enzymes, and she needs to be given less freedom (and treated like a puppy in this area right now). Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Crate Training" method and when she is doing better the "Tethering" method also if you would like. Since Katie is older, you can take her potty every three hours when you are at home (to give her lots of opportunities to be rewarded for peeing outside so that she will learn faster), and after she pees, she can be given 2 hours of freedom outside of the crate. After the two hours, put her back into the crate until it is time to take her again, so that she is never loose when her bladder is full at all. When you are not at home, at this age she should be able to hold it up to eight hours in the crate, but I suggest going no more than five-to-six while she is still learning how to hold her pee right now. Potty Training Article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Abbey
Redbone Coonhound
1 Year
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Abbey
Redbone Coonhound
1 Year

We adopted Abbey a couple days ago and picked her up from her foster home. They said that she was doing well with her potty training and the only accidents she would have is when she gets excited. The first night we got her, we took her outside a few times (after a lot of hesitation on her part) and she didn't pee or poop at all. We took her out again in the morning and she would not pee or poop. As soon as we got home and we were not in the room, she peed on the carpet. She held it for so long but wasn't showing any signs of discomfort. The second day I took her out and she was still very scared and hesitant to leave our place. She shakes and pulls hard to go back inside and I have to coax her with treats. We were out for a long time and she pooped a few blocks away from our apartment but no pee. I then took her to a park a couple hours later, and she pooped again but still would not pee, but she was more comfortable when we were away from our apartment. She finally peed after all day of holding it in my parents' backyard, not tethered to a leash. She had another accident in her crate again today after we left the house. But before this, I tried to take her out various times throughout the day around our apartment, bought a longer leash, and potty training spray to encourage her. None of this helped:( She seems so uncomfortable on the leash with me but we know she knows where to go pee. What should we do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Zoe, It sounds like the issue is fear adjusting to her new home - and the accidents are simply a bi-product of that. She needs time outside in a calm area (an area where you can later take her to pee regularly). The long leash and potty training spray are great - keep using those even though it may seem like it's not helping right away. As much as possible, simply spend time with her outside on the long leash, letting her sniff around. If she will eat food or play with toys outside, drop large treats in the grass for her to hunt, toss her a toy a couple of feet away (within the distance of the length of her leash), play tug of war with her if she is interested, or stuff her favorite hollow chew toys with her dog food and a bit of real chicken, peanut butter (Avoid Xylitol sweetener - it's toxic), soft cheese, or liver paste. Let her sniff some options to see what she likes. If she isn't interested in playing or eating, simply sit in the grass calmly and read or do something relaxing and let her see you relax while she explores around you while on the long leash. If she wants treats, reward her for calmness and focus on you with them. She likely needs time, calmness and confidence from you, and opportunities to spend time in the places she is uncertain of without too much pressure or other people or animals around while she warms up. There are a lot of cars, people, other dog smells, other dogs, and overwhelming things outside of an apartment for a new dog. Help her ease into the transition gradually by giving her time to explore and adjust out there - instead of each time you go out just be for potty training and rushed. Letting her spend time outside the other day was great. Do more things like that. That should help but it will take practice. Once she is warmed up to the area outside the apartment, work on a strict crate training schedule, so that she is only free from the crate when her bladder is empty to avoid accidents. For right now, try to find areas to take her potty within walking distance, that are quiet and might have less smells and sights. As she gets used to the apartment, gradually work on going to areas closer to your own apartment that require less walking. Use the potty spray to continue encouraging her too. Tell her to "Go Potty" when you take her, even though she won't understand it right away. If she goes, give her four treats, one at a time. Even though she won't respond to the command right away, the more times she "happens to go potty after you say "Go Potty" and then is rewarded, the more she will learn what the command means, and eventually will know to go potty quickly when you tell her to "Go Potty" - making potty training easier then. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Murphy & Ollie
Shitzu & shitzu poodle
10 Years
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Murphy & Ollie
Shitzu & shitzu poodle
10 Years

At the risk of sounding like a big jerk, I am going to be honest and say we are not good pet owners. We are a family of 5. We have a hectic and an irregular schedule. We rescued Ollie and Murphy about 5 years ago. We were told thy were house broken, so we were surprised to find them peeing in the house. We don't have time to dedicate to training them correctly and feel it is time to say good-bye. The stress of constantly finding pee in the house even though they are caged up near a doggie door when we are not home is too much. Is it wrong to send them to a new home at this point. I want my home back. I am tired of the gates that we have up around the house that keeps them off the carpet. I feel like I am living in a jail. My dogs growing up were never like this, but we never had a rescue either.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lora, Only you can decide what is best for your family. If you do decide to give them up I suggest looking into foster rescues who will spend time preparing them for a new home and fitting them with the right person who is willing to work with them, knowing their needs, opposed to someone who adopts them without any information. Check out www.petfinder.com to locate some rescues in your area. Those that keep the dogs in their homes until they are placed with new families are considered foster rescues. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kramer
Labrador Retriever
9 Months
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Kramer
Labrador Retriever
9 Months

We can recently adopted a 9 month old medium mixed breed named Kramer. He was very nervous when we first got him, but is really starting to open up in our house. We are currently trying to house break him and having a very hard time. We are taking him outside every few hours, and while we have had a few successes, the majority of the time he will pee right after we get inside. We often catch him mid-accident and rush him outside, but he doesn’t go. He can get nervous outside. The biggest issue is the fact we can’t spend much time outside - we live in the northeast and currently have lots of snow and ice. We’ve tried shoveling him a spot on the grass and bring him there each time to pee, but it’s not working. Help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kim, I highly suggest crate training him so that the only time that he is free in your home is when his bladder is empty right now. Once he gets used to the crate it can also give him a safe space to go to help him relax with the door open later. Also, where able try to provide him with an area to pee that is not covered in snow. The shoveled spot is a great start, continue that or something similar along with the crate training. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Crate Training" method. Be sure to also follow the steps found there for teaching him the "Go Potty" command, rewarding him when he does go potty outside, and possibly using a potty encouraging spray to help him learn. If he seems really cold while outside you might want to get him used to wearing a dog jacket around his chest so that he can relax more instead of just trying to hurry back inside because of the weather. Since he is older, when you follow the "Crate Training" method you can take him potty every 3-4 hours instead of every 1 hour. After he goes potty outside, you can give him 2 hours of freedom before putting him back into the crate until the next potty trip - while his bladder fills backup since we want to avoid him being loose while his bladder isn't empty. The more accidents you can prevent inside, which equals more successes outside too, the quicker he will learn and earn more freedom in your home. Giving him a food-stuffed Kong in the crate can help him enjoy being in there also. Since he is older, When you need to leave your home for longer, he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for six hours (and longer once he is potty trained), but taking him more frequently when you are home will help the training go faster and make it more pleasant for him. If he has accidents with the two hours of freedom even though he pottied outside beforehand, then decrease the amount of freedom that you give him by thirty-minute increments before putting him back into the crate until the accidents stop between potty trips and crate time. Follow the Crate Training method from the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Abbi
Border collie mix
2 Years
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Abbi
Border collie mix
2 Years

Our new rescue is terrified of, well, almost everything, including my partner and I. We are trying hard to give her space and support, but she doesn’t want to leave her crate. If we do get a collar on her, she doesn’t want to walk. We try using treats, but she is not interested. We’ve carried her a couple times, but this definitely doesn’t help with her trusting us. How can we start house training her if we can’t get her out of the house?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, with Abbi's fear issues, you may have a challenge. There is a lot to cover and there are different ways to go about it. Trust and removing fear is essential to success. Remember, you have had her only a short while and even a non-fearful dog takes a while to adjust. This is an excellent article on fearful dogs and how to help them. https://www.companionanimalpsychology.com/2018/08/eight-tips-to-help-fearful-dogs-feel.html. Here are a few guides on trust: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-trust-you and https://wagwalking.com/training/trust. Perhaps set up an exercise pen area for Abbi as opposed to the crate. Give her a dog bed, toys and water. She'll still feel safe but it will be easier to get her out for the potty training. https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. You can buy a real grass pee pad if you think that may help, and keep it in the pen area away from the bed. Then, when she feels more comfortable and relaxed, you can transition her to outside. Try some of the methods in the guides I gave you (sit beside her, offer treats from a distance, etc). If you still have trouble after a few weeks, call on a behaviorist. All the best!

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Bayley
Pit bull
3 Years
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Bayley
Pit bull
3 Years

I've had my dog Bayley, almost two months now, adopter her from a shelter. I walk her every morning before work, and every evening when I get back, she usually pees and poops on both of those. However, when left in the house she will pee on the carpet, but will never poop in the house. Because of this, and frustration from my roommates, I have to leave her outside when I'm gone. Obviously I don't want to keep doing this. What can I do to get her to stop peeing in the house, or go out in the yard to pee on her own when I'm not around?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Christopher, First, you need to stop the accidents from happening. I suggest crate training her. If you will be gone for longer than 8 hours between potty trips, then you will need to hire a dog walker to let her out during the day. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate Training method (since she is older she can go longer between potty trips): https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside She will not learn to be potty trained as long as she is having regular accidents still though, so stopping those through confinement and supervision is the first step. Next, when you do take her potty, tell her to "Go Potty" and give her four small treats, one a time after she goes. Keep the treats somewhere convenient by the door where you will remember them on your way outside, but she can't reach them. Spend time teaching her HOW to go through the doggie door. Many dogs simply do not know they can go through, do not know where it is located, or are afraid to go through because it might hit them. Spend time every day luring her through the doggie door with treats and giving her the treats for attempting to go through and going through all the way. When she can go through it, then when you take her potty (she still needs to be taken everytime at this point), then have her go through the doggie door while you go through the normal door, then once she is outside tell her to "Go Potty" - which she should know by that point if you practice it beforehand, and reward with treats when she goes potty. When she initiates going outside to go potty by going through the doggie door on her own in between when you take her potty when you are home, then she might be ready to be given more freedom again. If she starts having accidents again, go back to crating her for longer again right away - she is not ready yet and needs more practice. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Dahlia
Sheltie/beagle mix
2 Years
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Dahlia
Sheltie/beagle mix
2 Years

She is a rescue dog..we were told she was house broken. She wants to go out...she has picked a spot ahead likes. But she will go out several times and not use the bathroom. With persistence she will finally go. But she has had some accidents. Usually urine but today she did both. What can we do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sherry, She probably needs a refresher course on potty training. Check out the "Crate Training" method from the article liked below. Because she is not a puppy when you are away she should be able to hold her bladder for 5-6 hours, and up to 8 once fully trained, when necessary. When you are home take her outside every 3 hours. If she does not go potty when you take her, bring her back inside, put her into the crate and try again in an hour. Repeat taking her outside every hour until she goes potty. When she does go potty, reward her with three small treats, one at a time, then give her 2-3 hours of supervised free time out of the crate before putting her back in the crate until the next potty trip. Decrease the amount of free time if she still has accidents during that time. Also, when you take her potty tell her to "Go Potty" and be sure to bring the treats with you as a reward. Clean up any accidents with a pet safe cleaner that contains enzymes- because only enzymes remove the smell fully so that the dog will not be attracted to pee in that same spot. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside https://www.walmart.com/ip/Natures-Miracle-Stain-and-Odor-Remover-Trigger-Spray-24oz/576075856?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=3611&adid=22222222228158820046&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=m&wl3=269451593753&wl4=aud-566049426705:pla-448686025103&wl5=9010791&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=576075856&wl13=3611&veh=sem She may also need to be taught to alert you when she needs to go potty. If so you can teach her to ring a bell. Check out the article linked below. If he accidents are happening when it has been at least six hours since she last peed then the ability to alert you might be the issue. https://wagwalking.com/training/ring-a-bell-to-go-out Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Betsy
Beagle
4 Years
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Betsy
Beagle
4 Years

Hi! We adopted a "former" hunting dog a week ago. I say "former" because we realized once a hunting dog - always a hunting dog. She was kept in a rabbit hutch outside and not socialized or housebroken. She ended up in a foster home for 10 months (7/2018 until we adopted her). Her foster mom did a great job with getting her closer to being housebroken. They did not have any rabbits in their area. We have a ton of rabbits. When we take her outside, she smells the rabbits and gets so distracted she will not go outside. She just cries and whines and yelps because she can smell the rabbits. We have a fenced in yard but keep her on a lead because she is a known escape artist. She pees and poops in the house even though she was just outside 10-15 minutes prior. She would pee outside the first few days but now she won't go outside. We do have another beagle that does her business outside so our yard is "marked" and there are places she can go. I thought about getting that "Out" spray that you put in the yard. However,we shouldn't need that because our other dog has done the marking, right? Betsy can not be confined to a cage because she has containment phobia. She has chewed her way out of plastic crates and fought her way out of wire crates - literally bent the wires open. She is a really loving dog. Very generous with the tail wags. Comes to you when you call her (in the house) and wants to sit on your lap all the time. She is so cuddly and affectionate to us. She is petrified of new people due to lack of socialization. I just want her to pee outside but her lack of focus is maddening.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Deb, You have several options here. The first option is a bit unusual but with her specific circumstances I suggest using the rabbit smell as a reward. Take a couple of days where someone can stay outside with her all day (this could take 8 hours but hopefully won't if done first thing in the morning). Take her outside first thing in the morning on a long leash, coiled up so that she only has the normal six feet of length. Walk her around the yard to sniff where your other dog has gone potty in a fifteen foot area (you can try the spray but you are correct that your other dog's marking probably does the same thing for her). Tell her to "Go Potty" every five minutes (you may be out there for a while). Keep her from being able to sniff for the rabbits outside of the fifteen foot area you will be taking her to. If she takes longer than 30-45 minutes to pee while walking her around that fifteen foot area, you can sit and simply hang out in that area after a while, but walk her around that area again every hour to remind her why you are there (you may want to bring a book and water). In between walking around keep things boring - no rabbit sniffing in other areas. A couple of things should happen. 1. She will eventually have to go potty - when she does (even if it takes hours), then as soon as she does, praise her enthusiastically, tell her "Go Sniff!" And uncoil the long leash to let her sniff around the yard where the rabbits have been. You are using the desire to smell rabbits as a motivation to go potty quickly in the future when you take her. She should learn that the quickest way to get to sniff for rabbits is to pee or poop lightening fast when you tell her to "Go Potty". 2. The fifteen foot area she is being walked in should start to get boring after staying in that same area for long enough. When it gets boring she is more likely to pee there. Your other options are: To tether her to yourself with a leash while inside (which you may still want to do), and take her potty every hour, keeping her in a fifteen foot area outside so that that area will become boring, then rewarding her with treats after she goes potty. To teach her to use a real grass pad inside or on an enclosed porch if you have one she can't escape out of. The article linked below mentions using a litter box, I suggest a real grass pad instead, but you can follow the rest of the steps. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad options: Fresh Patch: https://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Patch-Disposable-Potty-Grass/dp/B005G7S6UI Porch Potty brand: http://www.porchpotty.com/Articles.asp?ID=274 If you decide to teach an indoor potty, I suggest using fresh Patch first since it's less expensive than porch potty, and transitioning to porch potty once she he has learned to pee on the grass indoors if you want to switch to porch potty at all - you can use fresh Patch long term too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mikey
Great Dane
4 Years
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Mikey
Great Dane
4 Years

We bought Mikey last year from a rescue shelter that rescued him from a puppy mill. He was starved, beaten, used for breeding, locked in a cement cage his whole life. We have had him for over a year and he is still HORRIFIED of us.

He likes us in his own way, (i.e. coming over to us to pet him, not staring at us on walks, letting us touch him) but he is still scared of us. He RARELY lets us walk up to him inside the house and NEVER allows us to get near him when he is outside. Sometimes he won't even come inside. there have been days where we leave the door open for him for hours on end and he just sits in the doorway. if he sees or hears someone coming he runs back out, tail tucked.

He loves walks. It is currently the only thing that makes him wag his tail. But if he is outside, it can be very hard to get him in to put the leash on. He will make the saddest sound when it's offered because he wants to come so badly but cannot bring himself the courage to come inside.

The greatest problem we have been having is house training. There have been MAYBE 10 days total where he has not peed or pooped in the house. in this case, someone has been there for the majority of the day.

Despite putting pee pads down, scolding him (not harshly because we don't want him to be scared of us even more) and more frequent potty breaks, it has not stopped. whenever something changes (my mom goes out of town, I go back to college, my brother leaves for his new job) he FREAKS OUT and all progress we made is shattered and its almost like it is back to day one.

After a year it has taken a toll on the wood and furniture of the house as well as our spirit. we don't know what to do and the damage he is causing is going to be extremely expensive to fix. We don't know what we can do to make life better for him and we are DESPERATE for suggestions.

I should note something that we believe is causing an issue with him. We have another great dane at home named Mini. We have had her for 8 years. for all 8 years she has been the sweetest dog we have ever owned. never snapping at anyone, playing with her toys 24/7, being so friendly and affectionate to all people and animals. for the first two weeks or so Mini and Mikey LOVED each other. Now, Mini HATES him. she snarls, snaps, and barks at him whenever he tries to enter a room she's already in. there have been times where if he walks past her she tries to bite him. we have no idea where this came from at all because in 8 years we had never seen it. I personally feel mini is a potential factor in his issue.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Thomas, Mini is likely slowing down the progress inside the house, but Mini's behavior may actually be in response to Mikey's nervousness. Dogs are often not tolerant of another dog acting so unbalanced, that is why fearful dogs tend to get picked on more than other dogs, which then makes the fearfulness worse. Honestly, you need a lot of professional help. I suggest looking up Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training and some of the confidence building exercises that he does, his structured obedience like heeling, place command and general obedience. The website linked below has links to YouTube, podcast and other free information. https://www.solidk9training.com/free-resources When you have him outside, if it's in a fenced in area, I suggest keeping a thirty foot drag leash (no handle and made to slide through the grass more easily) on him so that you can calmly approach him, step on the leash, get it tight, then reel him in. Reward him with a treat if he will take it when he gets to you. Be careful doing this not to get pulled over. Drop the leash if you have to and make sure the leash is pretty taught before you start reeling in so that the leash doesn't pop suddenly and pull you forward. It has to be done carefully but I actually suggest using a remote e-collar with vibration, paired with positive reinforcement to help interrupt his anxious state, give you an opportunity to reward him, and prevent injury because of his size. This has to be done extremely carefully on a low level and combined with a lot of repetition and positive reinforcement so seek professional help for the training. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Walli
Silky Terrier
4 Years
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Walli
Silky Terrier
4 Years

We adopted this little man who has lived in a garden for four years he is not used to being in the the house and wee’s all the time. How should we train him to wee just outside and will he improve when he’s sterilised?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Pam, Neutering him will only help if he is marking, opposed to peeing to relieve himself. It will likely not solve the issue completely though, many neutered dogs still mark, but it might make that urge less strong so training is a bit easier - especially if you have another dog in the house. You will need to crate train him for potty training. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently than the method suggests. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip - at which time you will take him outside to go potty again. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. You want him to get into the habit of holding his bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever he feels the urge, and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is marking, the crate will only be half the battle. During the 1.5 hours he is out of the crate between potty trips he will probably still try to pee to mark his scent - since the issue isn't needing to pee but wanting to "claim" things by peeing on them. To deal with that behavior, use the crate training method, but also keep him tethered to you while he is out of the crate between potty trips using a 6 or 8 foot leash. Have him wear a belly band - which is a sling/diaper for male dogs that catches urine, and when he tries to lift his leg to mark, clap your hands loudly three times. Use a cleaner than contains enzymes to remove the smell from any new or previous accidents - since lingering scent will only encourage more marking and only enzymes fully remove the smell. Look on the bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic. Many (but not all) pet cleaners contain enzymes. The belly band will keep marking from being fun and successful for him and stop the spreading of the smell - which encourages more marking (and keep your things clean). Attaching him to yourself with the leash will keep him from sneaking off to pee uninterrupted, and clapping will make peeing unpleasant for him without it being too harsh. Reward him with treats when he potties outside so he understands that pottying outside in front of you is good, it's only inside where he shouldn't do it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Abbi
Border Collie
2 Years
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Abbi
Border Collie
2 Years

My partner and I just got our rescue dog, Abbi. And she’s in shock, depressed and quite frightened of everything, including us. The day after we got her we had to take her to the vet and they said she had an UTI. Because of all this, she’s had many accidents in the house. We try taking her out, but she doesn’t want to leave her crate. We’ve tried treats, but she doesn’t seem interested. We’ve tried pee pads, but she doesn’t want to use them. We’ve tried carrying her out, but that seems to erode her trust in us. What should we do? How can we house train her if she won’t leave the house?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I remember answering your question 2 days ago but I guess you did not get the response. Sorry about that! Here it is again. I an glad that you took her to the vet, I think when the medication begins to work, things will be better. A UTI can be uncomfortable! Answer from the other day: Hello, with Abbi's fear issues, you may have a challenge. There is a lot to cover and there are different ways to go about it. Trust and removing fear is essential to success. Remember, you have had her only a short while and even a non-fearful dog takes a while to adjust. This is an excellent article on fearful dogs and how to help them. https://www.companionanimalpsychology.com/2018/08/eight-tips-to-help-fearful-dogs-feel.html. Here are a few guides on trust: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-trust-you and https://wagwalking.com/training/trust. Perhaps set up an exercise pen area for Abbi as opposed to the crate. Give her a dog bed, toys and water. She'll still feel safe but it will be easier to get her out for the potty training. https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. You can buy a real grass pee pad if you think that may help, and keep it in the pen area away from the bed. Then, when she feels more comfortable and relaxed, you can transition her to outside. Try some of the methods in the guides I gave you (sit beside her, offer treats from a distance, etc). If you still have trouble after a few weeks, call on a behaviorist. All the best!

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Daisy
Mix
8 Months
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Daisy
Mix
8 Months

We just adopted Daisy from a shelter yesterday! We did not have a lot of information about her because she came from a shelter down south and we are in Minnesota. We did not know if she was potty trained or if she was a stray or a surrender to the shelter. She does know how to sit.

Anyway, she refuses to go to the bathroom outside. We have brought her outside multiple times during the day and for long periods of time. At first when she was going outside she was hesitant, but now she walks right out the door. She has multiple chances to go to the bathroom outside. When we bring her back inside, she will go in a corner and pee. I have tried making a noise and stop her while she is peeing but by the time I get out there with her, she does not go anymore. Is there a reason that she is wanting to pee in the corner? I have sprayed the areas where she has had accidents with enzyme spray. I am worried that she will get an infection from holding it for so long. Do you think that she would go in a corner outside? I am desperate for answers! Thank you!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Chelsea, One of two things is most likely going on: 1. She was pee pad trained or allowed to have constant accidents in the house in the past so she associates that with pottying instead of outside. Or 2. She is too nervous or excited/distracted while outside to focus on pottying, then goes in the house when she comes back inside because due to a lack of previous potty training from her old owners she doesn't see pottying outside vs. inside as any different. With either scenario you will do mostly the same things. I suggest following the crate training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Continue using a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take her potty less frequently. I suggest taking her potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) or freedom out of the crate, return her to the crate while her bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since her last potty trip. When you have to go off she should be able to hold her bladder in the crate for 5-7 hours - less at first while she is getting used to it and longer once she is accustomed to the crate. Only have her wait that long when you are not home though, take her out about every 3 hours while home. You want her to get into the habit of holder her bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever she feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If she is not already used to a crate expect crying at first. When she cries and you know she doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give her a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help her adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If she continues protesting for long periods of time past three days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks and cries. If she gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If she disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at her side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If she stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward her quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. It is extremely important that you follow the method's tips. You need to take her potty on a leash (you can let her out into a fenced in yard without it later in life after she is potty trained - but this probably won't work unless you take her on a leash to keep her focused. Teach her the "Go Potty" command and reward with treats when she goes. Strictly limit her freedom to only times when her bladder is empty - the first 1-2 hours after she has pottied outside - the accidents need to mostly stop before the rest will catch on. If she still seems nervous about being outside, spend a lot of time with her outside playing and relaxing just to desensitize her to it outside of times when you need to go potty - when she is less fearful and less excited because being outside is more normal - it should be easier for her to focus on pottying out there and not take as long. Finally, once she is doing really well you can also use the Tethering method from the article I linked above in combination with the Crate Training method if you want to give her more freedom, but wait until she isn't having regular accidents anymore before doing that. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Yogi
Australian Cattle Dog
5 Months
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Yogi
Australian Cattle Dog
5 Months

Adopted Yogi one week ago (Texas Heeler from Oklahoma). He's good in his crate and will hold his pee in his crate-- for hours and hours and hours. He doesn't seem to know it's a bad idea to pee in the house and will do this less than 15 minutes after having been outside. It happens when he's not getting attention and happens multiple times a day despite many walks, not getting negative attention for peeing indoors, and getting a treat every time he pees and poops outdoors. Seems that he may have not been indoors except for being crated when he was in foster care. Any tips for helping him learn not to pee in the house? Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Anne, First, when you take him potty, tell him to "go Potty", then give the treat after he goes. Be sure that you are taking him potty outside on a leash and he is actually finishing going while outside - if you suspect he didn't finish, tell him to "Go potty" again and slowly walk him around again to help him go - giving another treat if he finishes. Many puppies will rush and not completely finish and need to be slowed down to focus more on it. Teaching "Go Potty" can help a puppy remember what they are out there for. Second, while inside and not in a crate - because he just pottied outside, keep pup attached to you on a leash during the potty training process. Pup should either be outside, crated, or attached to you with a leash right now. Only off leash outside if the area is fenced (a long leash is also good if you don't have a fence). Crate Training method and Tethering method - combine both: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Peeing so soon could also be marking territory (a bit early for that but possible) or submissive/excited peeing. Keeping pup tethered to you will help you tell if that's the issue - pup will be less likely to have accidents with you close by if the issue is potty training. If the issue is marking, you can have pup wear a belly band inside - which is like a male dog diaper, that just covers his private area to catch urine. The belly band will keep things cleaner during training and also prevent further spread of scent - which encourages more marking and creates a cycle. When pup goes to mark - while attached to you with the leash, clap your hands a couple of times to interrupt pup and quickly take pup outside. You don't have to act mad or scary, you just want to surprise pup, then reward for pottying outside instead. If the peeing is excited or submissive peeing, pay attention to when pup does it. Is he excited or nervous? This type of peeing is often outgrown and the best way to deal with it now is to try to anticipate when it might happen and manage those times - such as only playing exciting games with pup outside, taking pup potty right before someone else gets home, having people ignore pup for 10 minutes when they first get home, and not getting pup too worked up through excited tones of voices, lots of touch, or silly movements except while outside - those exciting things are good, just do them outside. If you can prevent the majority or accidents inside through management, most puppies will outgrow the behavior with age if it hasn't become habitual inside before then. Outgrowing it will take a bit of time, so be patient. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lola
German Shepherd
14 Weeks
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Lola
German Shepherd
14 Weeks

We adopted lola a week ago, and we are having trouble getting her to go to pee outside, she's been pooping outside, but won't pee. She pees in the house when she's excited, or scared or laying down, but we can have her outside playing, then bring her back in, and she pees. I've been cleaning up her accidents with an enzyme cleaner. She usually refuses to go in the grass to play or pee, at most she'll pee on the deck. We've never had a puppy, and we're trying to be patient, we try to encourage her with treats and praise, even when she goes on the deck, but I'm not sure what else to do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Follow it very carefully. This method essentially ensures that the only time pup is free in your home is when their bladder is empty - switching the habit of peeing inside to peeing outside because they are only given two options - pee in a crate (which goes against a dog's natural instincts if you make the crate the right size, don't leave them in it so long they can't help but pee, and don't put anything absorbent in it) OR pee outside. Since most puppies have an instinct to keep such a small space clean, a pup will normally try to hold their bladder whenever they are in a crate and will eventually go potty when taken outside - if pup doesn't go when you take them, return him to the crate for 30 minutes, then try again after 30 minutes. Repeating this process until pup finally goes potty outside. As puppy learn the Go Potty command and becomes comfortable going potty outside, it should become easier to get pup to go potty the first time you take him outside. Stick to it. After peeing outside, Pup then earns freedom in the house for 45 minutes - after 45 minutes of freedom, pup is put back into the crate while their bladder is filling up again - until they go potty outside again; this ensures pup isn't free while needing to pee. Repeat the cycle throughout the day until peeing outside and keeping the house clean becomes a long-term habit in a couple of months. The more carefully you follow the method, the sooner a puppy is typically trained. Keep the end goal in mind to help you be structured and willing to limit freedom now - to ensure pup becomes trustworthy in the house and can have tons of freedom later. This is also a great time to give pup part of his meals in dog-food stuffed Kongs - to teach good chewing habits, quietness, self-soothing, and self-entertaining while in the crate. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Free PDF puppy e-book download - AFTER You Get Your Puppy www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sokka
Border Collie
5 Months
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Sokka
Border Collie
5 Months

My dog only pees inside. We just got him and he isn't potty trained. We take him out every hour and he doesn't pee outside. What do I do?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This guide gives excellent instruction on how to potty train. I would use either the Crate Method or the Timing Method. If you don't plan to use a crate with Sokka, the Timing Method will work with consistency. Remember, that a dog typically has to go every time they eat, so that is essential. Long walks may be needed since you are already trying every hour and that is not doing the trick. On a long walk, when he pees, be sure to verbally praise and offer him four treats, one after the other. I have trained my dogs doing what you are doing but instead of every hour, I take them every 30 minutes. I know it is a lot but once they catch on, it's worth it. If you are taking Sokka in the yard, buy a pee encouraging spray. Spray it on an area before you take him out and then when you go, lead him to that area directly. As for the peeing inside, you have to clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to fully remove the odor. This is the only thing that removes the smell so your dog cannot smell it and repeat the behavior. If these pointers don't work, consider crate training as described in the guide. Good luck!

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Callie
Labrador Retriever
3 Years
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Callie
Labrador Retriever
3 Years

We just adopted a Rescue named Callie yesterday. She is three years old, has had a litter of puppies (about a year ago), jumps fences (she is on a leash at all times in the fenced in back yard until we stop that), she was fostered with a family that had a cat (which is another reason she was a good choice for us), good around other dogs, we were told she was house broken and crate trained but is afraid to go into it (she has a few scars on her face to prove it). When we go her home, we let her explore and gave our established cats a safe area to view her from (the bottom of our stairs has a gate on it to give them a safe place). She is a bit shy and will follow us everywhere but when she gets outside, she is confident! Her tail is up, her ears are perked and she is sniffing everything. During the day, I have taken her outside every hour and a half, to get her trained that outside is her time to pee / poop. I praise her when she goes (she is not afraid to do it with me so close) and she gets a treat when we come back in. It has been less then 24 hours and she has peed in the house twice so far. Once right is front of me ( I stopped that immediately) and the other was while we were asleep for the night. I stepped in the pee on the carpet when checking on Callie. My husband, oldest daughter and I all work full time jobs. Callie will have to be crate trained, unfortunately there is no other choice. My concern is training her not to pee while in her crate. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Theresa, Most dogs will naturally hold it in a crate if you set up the crate correctly. The only exceptions to that is if pup was crated for so long before that she was forced to go potty in the crate, or if pup has extreme separation anxiety. The confined space of a crate utilizes a dog's natural desire to keep a confined space clean. To ensure that this happens, do not put anything absorbent in the crate. Check out www.primopads.com for an example of a non-absorbent bed that can be anchored down on the sides to decrease chewing and isn't absorbent. Also, the crate should only be big enough for her to turn around, lie down, and stand up. Too big while potty training can allow pup to potty on one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - defeating the purpose of the crate. Unless pup has a history of pottying in the crate I wouldn't worry about accidents in it. The rescue can probably shed some light on how she did holding her bladder while in the crate before. Also, know that just because she doesn't like going into the crate, that doesn't necessarily mean there is a lot of anxiety while in the crate - it's more fun to be out, so it could just be boredom. That's far more common. If pup is having accidents in the crate and has other signs of separation anxiety, then to stop the potty accidents in the crate the separation anxiety will need to be addressed to stop it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Olad
Maltipoo
2 Years
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Olad
Maltipoo
2 Years

I have recently rescued Olaf from a shelter. He was a street dog that we have no idea of his life before us. He was only in shelter a couple weeks. He will urinate outside many times, 4-6 every time I take him out but then will urinate on the carpet in the house with in an hour of coming inside. I take him right back out and he pees more, but will still urinate inside. I have another maltipoo who has an occasional accident but not anything like this. How can I train him not to go inside, when he is going outside too?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tara, First, I would speak to your vet and make sure there isn't something medical going on like a urinary tract infection - an infection could make him need to go potty super often until it's cleared up. If it's not a medical issue, the issue might also be marking - pottying inside to spread his scent and not just because he needs to pee. This is even more likely with two dogs in the house, because he might be trying to complete with your other dog. If the issue is behavioral and not medical I would start by crate training him for potty training. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently than the method suggests. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip - at which time you will take him outside to go potty again. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. You want him to get into the habit of holding his bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever he feels the urge, and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is marking, the crate will only be half the battle. During the 1.5 hours he is out of the crate between potty trips he will probably still try to pee to mark his scent - since the issue isn't needing to pee but wanting to "claim" things by peeing on them. To deal with that behavior, use the crate training method, but also keep him tethered to you while he is out of the crate between potty trips using a 6 or 8 foot leash. Have him wear a belly band - which is a sling/diaper for male dogs that catches urine, and when he tries to lift his leg to mark, clap your hands loudly three times. Use a cleaner than contains enzymes to remove the smell from any new or previous accidents - since lingering scent will only encourage more marking and only enzymes fully remove the smell. Look on the bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic. Many (but not all) pet cleaners contain enzymes. The belly band will keep marking from being fun and successful for him and stop the spreading of the smell - which encourages more marking (and keeps your things clean). Attaching him to yourself with the leash will keep him from sneaking off to pee uninterrupted, and clapping will make peeing unpleasant for him without it being too harsh. Reward him with treats when he potties outside so he understands that pottying outside in front of you is good, it's only inside where he shouldn't do it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Abby
cockapoo
3 Years
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Abby
cockapoo
3 Years

Hi! My family adopted a 3 year old cockapoo from a family friend. She's truly a great dog! We had to take away her dog door and trained her to pee on command, but she will not pee without a treat. ( She was spoiled before we got her with tons of table food). The issue is that she does excited pee when people come over, and if she won't pee before we have guests she pees on the floor.
I have no-issue giving her treats for tricks and even for a quick potty in the snow, but I'm not sure how to encourage her to pee without always giving her treats, because I do ot always have them.

Should I create train her for potty as if she were a puppy, and just excessively praise her when he pees on command, and if she doesn't go, just calmly place her in her crate and try again in 30 minutes?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. I think the routine method described in this article is a good one for Abby; if you take her outside often then she'll soon start to pee whenever she's out there. As for treats, feel free to give her the odd dog-safe vegetable like green beans or a small carrot if necessary. As for the submissive peeing, this guide has great suggestions: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-submissive-peeing. Remember, Abby has had to make some adjustments so please continue to be as patient as you have been and yes, praise her when she does pee on command. Don't let her associate the crate with punishment for not peeing - be careful about that. Good luck and keep up the good work!

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Rudy
Shepherd rough collie mix
10 Months
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Rudy
Shepherd rough collie mix
10 Months

1 week ago today we rescue Rudy. The shelter said he was potty trained but of course things are different here so hes having accidents. He sleeps through the night no problem. I take him outside about the same time every morning. He pees pretty much immediately. Today I spent 20 more minutes outside. He doesnt poop. We come inside he runs up to my daughters room and immediately poops. I work from home. Im here ALL day. I take him out every 1.5 to 2 hours on a leash in the yard where he has peed before. Unfortunately its snowing hardcore so its kinda hard to tell where hes gone before. We live on a busy street. We do not have a fence. I cant let him out. I have to take him on a leash. The road noise is distracting for him. He seems to be more interested in eating the snow, sticks and leaves that using the potty. I am at a loss. Not one single of our other rescue dogs have been like this.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, I suggest going back to the basics with him for a couple of months and act as if he isn't potty trained at all to stop all accidents from happening so that he will develop a habit of holding it consistently while in the house and wanting to keep your home clean. After a couple of months if he has been completely accident free, very gradually give him more freedom. I highly recommend crate training pup and temporarily pup should always be either tethered to you with a hands free leash or in the crate while learning, unless you know he has just peed AND pooped and you have eyes on him 100%.. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 2.5- 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. If he hasn't gone poop yet during that half of the day, he needs to be tethered to you or returned to the crate, then taken back outside again in 30-45 minutes if you know he likely needs to go, less frequently if he likely doesn't need to poop. Pooping outside equals more freedom. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is not already used to a crate, expect crying at first. When he cries and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give him a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help him adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. Work on teaching "Quiet" by using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Arlo
Mixed breed
1 Year
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Arlo
Mixed breed
1 Year

Hi,

We adopted Arlo 2 weeks ago from a private shelter, all we know is he lived in the country and still was with his mum and dad until we adopted him. He seems to be unsocialised and will stop on the street and refuse to move if we meet other people and people with dogs. He took a while to use the bathroom at all and will only go in the flat. We are on the 3rd floor with an elevator and the times that i've caught him as he's about to pee and taken him downstairs, he just holds his pee until we're back in. We're at a bit of a loss as to what to do because he is slowly coming out of his shell with us but we can't seem to make any progress on this. We did get him pooping outside for about 4 days. Now that we're on lockdown for Coronavirus we're unable to take him to the spot he liked to poop at and he'll only poop in the house. Any advice would be much appreciated!!

Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Morag, First, check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. When you take him potty and he doesn't go, return him to the crate, then try again in 30 minutes. Repeat these trips every thirty minutes to an hour until he potties outside. When he potties outside, give three treats - one treat at a time with lots of praise. Pottying outside equals freedom outside the crate. After he has been out of the crate for 3 hours, either take him potty again, or crate until it has been 4-5 hours - at which point he should need to go potty when you take him. If accidents happen before 3 hours, give less free time. The goal is to minimize the time he is free while his bladder is full. You can also attach him to yourself with a six foot leash if he is comfortable being so close to you now; doing so will prevent him from sneaking off to potty somewhere. Maintain a strict potty schedule while doing that also. I still suggest crate training him even if you tether him to yourself most of the time though, so that when you take him potty after he has been tethered to you, if he doesn't go, you can crate him and keep trying every 30 minutes to 1 hour until he goes. Unless he has lost his natural desire to keep a confined space clean, a properly sized and setup crate (nothing absorbent, check out www.primopads.com for a non-absorbent crate bed option), then the crate should encourage him to hold his bladder until he gets back outside. Depending on your shelter in place options. If there is a good place to spend time outside while respecting that, you can also simple spend time sitting outside reading with him with you, to expose him to being outside in general. Give treats when he shows signs of being relaxed - to further encourage that mindset, and help him learn that the outside world is normal and safe for him also - which can help him relax enough to go potty when you do take him in the future. Crate Training and Tethering method fro potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Surprise method for first introducing a crate (you can combine the Surprise method with the other two methods in that article also): https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate When it's safe to take him places again after the virus threat has passed, also check out this article for ways to help shy dogs: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Evie
miniature poodle/Bicon Frise
2 Years
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Evie
miniature poodle/Bicon Frise
2 Years

Yes I just got my little Evie yesterday. She was with her foster parent before me who had three dogs. The foster parent would just leave door open and dogs would go in and out as they wanted to. Thus showing Evie to pee outside. Now she is with me and has to be on a leash for now because we do not have a fenced in yard. I take her out every hour for 15 to 20 mins and she does nothing.Then she comes in and will poop and pee in the house. Idk what to do I have read some routines and I am going to start with 1st one and work down but any other tips?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Danielle, suggest following the Tethering method from the article linked below whenever you are home, and the crate training method at night, when pup can't be tethered to yourself, and when you leave. You can also follow just the crate training method. Since pup is older, potty trips can be spaced further apart, to every 3-4 hours. During the time between potty trips, keep pup tethered to yourself to prevent her from sneaking off to have accidents right now. When you can't have pup tethered to yourself, pup should be crated. You can give a dog food stuffed chew toy in the crate to help entertain pup. You can even freeze a Kong that has been stuffed with dog food soaked in water. Place a straw through a Kong's holes, loosely stuff the mushy dog food around the straw, freeze, then remove the straw and give to pup after it's frozen, while pup is in the crate for a time-released treat that's more interesting. Tethering and Crate Training methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside The crate training method will prevent pup from having freedom when their bladder isn't empty, making it so that pup's only potty option is outside, then they are given freedom after finally going potty outside. The article includes tips for getting pup to go, how long to stay outside trying, and how to reward when they do go, to encourage pup yo fo even faster the next time. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean up any new or previous accidents that you know of. Only enzymes will fully remove the smell and the smell needs to go for pup not to be re-attracted to that same spot to go potty there again. Look on the pet cleaner bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic somewhere - not all normal or pet cleaners contain it so you have to read for it - Nature's Miracle makes some sprays with it (but not all of theirs). Also, avoid ammonia containing cleaners on the floor in general - because ammonia smells like urine to a dog. If you want pup to learn to go potty outside, I also suggest immediately removing inside pottied like pee pads, and just sticking to outside potty training, to avoid confusion that could make the training harder for you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pippy
Chihuahua
10 Years
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Pippy
Chihuahua
10 Years

Hi! I adopted Pippy from a rescue two weeks ago. She is very anxious outdoors, getting less with each walk but has yet to pee or poo outside. She only pees once a day, which seems way too few, and will wait for me to not be looking. How do I make her comfortable peeing in front of me and how do I make her understand that she needs to go outside?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lana, Some dogs will hold it because going potty puts them in a vulnerable position, and they feel unsafe while outside to a certain extent. I suggest continuing what you have been doing but also spending a lot of time simply hanging around outside, doing fun and relaxing things with pup for 1-2 hours at a time. Take a book, meals or even work outside if you can - you want outside to become almost as familiar as inside so that she will relax while out there enough to start going potty. Play games like finding treats in grass (pesticide free areas), giving a dog food stuffed chew toy, playing fetch, sitting and relaxing, come games like round Robin on a long leash, ect... Second, try taking pup potty on a long leash - 20-30 feet and letting pup wander several feet away from you to go, pretending not to watch, but be ready to toss treats over if they go. Some pups think it's not okay to go in front of people so won't go while on a short leash, especially if they had an accident inside and got in trouble and misunderstood, thinking the discipline was for pottying in front of a person rather than in the wrong location. If this is pup's issue and they will go while on a long leash, then you can slowly reel the leash up to shorten it over time, tossing treats to pup after they do go to help pup learn its acceptable to go in front of you. Third, when you do get that pup to potty outside, don't get too loud but do praise her genuinely and offer several small treats one at a time. Once she is doing it more often, tell her to Go Potty each time you take her, then give treats after, to teach that command so that pottying outside will get faster. If she is having accidents in the house between pottying outside, I also suggest the Tethering pr crate training method from the article linked below - so that pottying outside on the long leash is her only go to potty option, then be sure to reward when she pottied outside. Since she is an adult, you can adjust the method's potty times to taking her out every 3-4 hours, giving 3 hours of freedom before crating again or taking back outside, and crate for 1.5 hours before taking her potty outside again every 1.5 hours until she finally goes. Crate training and tethering methods for potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Claude
Great Pyrenees
1 Year
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Claude
Great Pyrenees
1 Year

We got Claude from a rescue 2 days ago after being in a shelter for an unknown amount of time. We live on the second floor in an apt in NYC and he is terrified of the wooden stairs. He only went down them once the first day and now refuses to go down at all. As a result, he hasn’t been able to go outside to the bathroom. We have been sitting on the stairs with treats, praise, and breaks since the beginning. He will now sit by the door to go outside and then happily approach the top of the stairs then back up. The furthest he’s gotten is to lay down on the top step and rest his feet on the second step down. He waited a full 24 hours to pee/poop before going in the kitchen. Then went again in the kitchen later that night. It was not a good experience and he was very stressed out. He has now not gone to the bathroom for another 24 hours, and we are worried. He is mostly napping, but acts restless and Pyrenees stubborn every now and then. What should we do about the stairs and bathroom? The stairs have clear treads on them. We would call in a trainer or friend with another dog to watch them go down the stairs, but we are under coronavirus quarantine. We just want him to feel comfortable and happy, not afraid and anxious.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Anne, Check out the article linked below. There are a couple of different methods to try, plus some ideas for trouble shooting issues. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/teaching-a-puppy-to-climb-stairs/ It might be worth purchasing or borrowing a small set of workout-bedside stairs to practice going up and down the stairs on also, such as the one from the link below. https://rd.bizrate.com/r/10114790937?rf=gpl&rtp=audience_id:pla-77535312517&rtp=device_type:c&af_rid=Cj0KCQjwncT1BRDhARIsAOQF9Ln2Kc4QsW_Aus1wOWLNK_lZK-E-m5iDOoM3xQr8P_7zjC1HdpAWUj8aAnaUEALw_wcB&b=https://www.chewy.com/zinus-4-step-easy-pet-stair-grey/dp/184987%3Futm_source%3Dshopzilla%26utm_medium%3Dcpc%26utm_content%3DZinus%26utm_campaign%3Dhg I also suggest watching the video linked below. This is not the preferred way to teach this, but due to the situation you may have to take a similar approach. Try the methods from the Petful article first though. Be careful to avoid a fear bite if pup may be prone to that. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AivnQUnTy2s&t=43s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cricket
Puggle
1 Year
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Cricket
Puggle
1 Year

Hi,
I adopted cricket about 5 days ago and he has really come out of his shell. He is very affectionate and follows me everywhere. This has made crate training a real problem. He still has a lot of puppy energy, and since he came from the shelter as a stray, he is super averse to his crate. He shakes and whines for the entire time he is in it unless I am in the room and he can see me. I feel like I have to trick him to get inside it and it making him more fearful of it than ever. He also was fixed at the shelter the day before I picked him up, so he has to wear a cone for 2-3 weeks, which makes crate life even more difficult. I have been taking him for up to 8 walks a day and he hasn't shown the slightest interest in peeing or pooping outside. He is curious about every sound, person and dog, but also fearful and will freeze if he hears or sees anything. I would spend a day outside with him, but he's not supposed to have too much exercise because of his stitches. He has only peed and pooped a couple times since being home (he seems to have insane bladder control) and every time it has been in the house almost immediately after he is left alone. It seems the only time he wants to go to the bathroom is if he can't find me, as if it's a stress reaction. I think we are going to have issues with separation anxiety, but my biggest concern is the potty training. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
best,
Becca

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Congratulations on your new companion! You have a few issues to deal with - remember, this is all new so give things time and keep doing as you are - showing patience and kindness. I would not trick Cricket into going into the crate. That may make things worse. I like the feeding method described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. I can see that the cone would present a big problem. I am not sure where Cricket sleeps at night? If it is in a dog bed and not the crate, that is fine - often pet parents will use the crate only when they have to go out and I agree with that if that is your preference. Cricket will definitely need reassurance and help to not develop separation anxiety and this is expected. When you have to go out (and keep sessions short for now since Cricket is so new in his surroundings), make sure Cricket has fun things to keep him occupied such as interactive feeder toys. Lastly, the fear of going to the bathroom outside, take him often and praise and treat highly when there is success. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-pee-in-the-house. If Cricket has fear right now when outside, consider litter box training with real grass. Then you can transition him to outside as he becomes more comfortable with his new home. Good luck and enjoy!

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Sandy
Cavapoo
4 Years
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Sandy
Cavapoo
4 Years

Hello I adopted Sandy 3 days ago. She is still very nervous and shy so I have been leaving her to settle in. I have a crate which she is very attached to, she will come out for food or a treat but then goes straight back. She is terrified of the lead and harness. I live on 2nd Floor so I took her down to pee the first night and she did, then again the next morning, but she has become extremely terrified of the harness and even if I carry her to go downstairs she will start to poo before I even get to the door. She has only had one acciident with peeing inside, which she did on a training pad. But she has now become totally fearful of being taken down to go to the toilet. As I said she is still getting used to her new home and only really feels at ease in her crate, I don't want to keep traumatising her with trying to get her down and reinforce it as a punsihment. Do you have any advice?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Congratulations on your new dog! You are right to be aware of her sensitive nature and I agree giving her time is good. How about training her on a grass litter box and then once she is more comfortable, transition her to outside? I would set her up with an exercise pen area, with a crate and litter box. Then, she 'll still feel safe but also will come out of the crate to use the litter. Take a look here:https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. Once Sandy gets more comfortable with you, remove the pen and maybe she'll feel like coming out of the crate more. As well, sit on the floor and bring her out of the pen area. Have high value treats to toss to her, moving them closer to you over a span on a few days. Good luck and I am sure she will become more comfortable soon. She has a caring owner in you and that is great. Once she is used to you, she will be happy to go on walks and explore the outside. Good luck and enjoy Sandy!

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Buddy
chihuahua mix
10 Years
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Buddy
chihuahua mix
10 Years

We adopted Buddy from a shelter. He was rescued from a hoarders puppy mill who had 150 dogs locked up in cages outside. Then Buddy went to a shelter that euthanizes & was then rescued by the place we adopted him from. We are doing all that's recommended on your website & don't know what else to do to potty train him. He says used to going potty in his cage & he doesn't seem to know he can go outside in the grass. He has some major anxiety issues as well that we are successfully working on. Please advise.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Wonderful of you to adopt Buddy and he really looks like he feels secure with you. How about trying a litter box with a grass pad? A grass pad is often a successful and works well when you transition your dog outside. Keep the litter within easy reach and encourage Buddy to go to the box often. Buy a spray from the pet supply store that has an odor that encourages peeing where it is sprayed. Spray it on the litter and even outside on the grass before you take him out (and then lead him to that spot). It may take Buddy awhile to transition from the litter to outside, but that's okay. One step at a time. When Buddy pees inside, be sure to clean it up with an enzymatic cleaner because it is the only thing that takes up the odor completely. You may not smell it, but Buddy does. Here is an article on litter training: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy. All of the methods are good. All the best and keep giving Buddy lots of love.

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Hattie
terrier
7 Years
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Hattie
terrier
7 Years

When we rescued Hattie two weeks ago, she pees and pooped on our grass on her own. Later I brought her back to the same spot to do it again. Ever since I brought her back to the grass in the backyard, she refuses to go. She held her pee and poop 20 hours! I am now taking her other places to get her to go. What happened?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Very cute! As long as Hattie is peeing and pooping outside, that is the main thing. I would keep walking her and encouraging her verbally with praise and a few treats one after the other to cement the habit. Once she has been with you awhile, if you want her to pee in one spot in the yard, take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/pee-in-a-specific-area. The Environment Method may do the trick. Make sure that the area is clean and not full of poop - that may discourage Hattie from going there. You can also buy a pee encouraging spray. Before you take Hattie out, spray the designated area and then take her to that spot. But in the meantime, keep walking her and while she is out on her adventures with you, I am sure she'll go. If that is what you have to do, then do so for now. Holding it 20 hours is not good for the body. Remember, she is still setting in, too. All the best!

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Mr. Beasley
Bichon Frise
10 Years
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Mr. Beasley
Bichon Frise
10 Years

My dog is very anxious. I live in an elevator building. I adopted him 4 months ago. He does not mind the elevator, and he seems to want to go out. However, construction in the neighborhood has picked up and he is afraid to leave the building. All he has to do is see a truck and he turns around to go home. He is so panicked that treats do not work; he just turns around and goes back into the building. He is taking 1.5 mg. melatonin and 100 mg gabapentin 2/day

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Dobby
Chihuahua cross
3 Years
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Question
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Dobby
Chihuahua cross
3 Years

Dobby keeps stopping on his leash we will be on his walk and he will just put his feet out (he has three legs) and stop dead without a reason on average he stops 5-10 times on his walks

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, work on heeling with Dobby. This gives him focus while on walks, and the Treat Lure Method will give him incentive to keep going. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. It is a tried and true method for helping a dog move along on walks. Good luck and happy training!

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Mia
Shih-Tzu
7 Years
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Mia
Shih-Tzu
7 Years

When I take Mia outside she always wants to go for long walks however my sister's dog just runs outside does their business and then runs back in! I don't have a backyard and neither did she so can you please give me any advice because I live in Arizona where it's a hundred ten degrees and I'm quite sure that's too hot for Mia. Thanks so much

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi! Yes I lived in Arizona for a short time and it was a bit brutal! So this one is a bit tricky because it will take some time to correct due to her age and the lack of an area to just let her roam a bit until she does go. So below is a routine to re-establish potty habits. It may seem a little remedial, but stick with it for a few weeks until you see improvement. Take Mia out at the same times every day. For example, first thing in the morning when she wakes up, when you arrive home from work, and before you go to bed. Obviously more than that, but that is an example. Praise her lavishly every time she eliminates outdoors. You can even give her a treat. You must praise her and give her a treat immediately after she’s finished and not wait until after she comes back inside the house. This step is vital, because rewarding your dog for eliminating outdoors is the only way she’ll know that’s what you want her to do. Choose a location not too far from the door to be the bathroom spot. Always take your dog, on leash, directly to the bathroom spot. Take her for a walk or play with her only after she’s eliminated. While Mia is eliminating, use a word or phrase like “go potty,” for example, that you can eventually use before she eliminates to remind her of what she’s supposed to be doing. Feeding your dog on a set schedule, once or twice a day, will help make her elimination more regular. Like I said, this may seem a bit remedial, but dogs learn by associating. If she starts to realize that no walk is happening until she potties, then she will start to do it right away. And soon enough, it will just become a habit and the association of the walk will begin to fade. The first few times, you may be out there for a good 5-10 minutes. But just stick with it. Usually after a few tries, they start to pick it up a lot quicker. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thanks for writing in.

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Duke
terrier
4 Months
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Duke
terrier
4 Months

I am fostering a 4 month old Terrier Mix. He is about 10-12lbs and very cute. I got him as he arrived in a van traveling from TN to NY. He has had a long couple of days. Day 1, yesterday he was not eating until I switched to wet food. He will not walk on a leash. I have to pick him up and bring him where we need to go. He has tried to run on the leash to go into small spaces/run away to them. I left him in the basement (finished 2 rooms) to have his own space and run around for a bit. He peed twice and pooped twice. Half on the pee pad half on the floor, poop was on the floor. He is warming up to the family by day 2. I brought him outside for about a half hour at 5am to see if he had to go. He shakes when I put him down. I held him for a bit and let him stand on his own. He never went. Throughout the day I brought him outside and he did not go. He has also not gone in the house. Its 6pm and I'm getting a little worried.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! It sounds like your hands are a little full. I will give you advice on potty training and leash walking. So this answer will be long, but full of good information. First, potty training. When potty training a puppy, it is important to understand both what you can do to help train them, as well as what they are able to do. Just as you cannot expect a 3-month-old baby to walk or use the toilet, you also cannot expect a young puppy to be housebroken. One thing to keep in mind is that dogs can typically hold their bladders for as many hours, as they are months old. So he should be able to hold his bladder 3-4 hours after his last drink of water. Also, dogs typically have to go #2 within about 20 minutes after eating food. This includes treats! Here are 5 tips on how to properly potty train your puppy: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Now onto leash walking... Leash training is essential for both dogs and their owners. Not only is it a part of good dog etiquette, but a leash-trained dog will be safer and more comfortable out for walks. Not all dogs adjust easily to leashes, however, and when a dog refuses to walk or pulls on the leash, there are several tricks that can help correct that behavior. Choose the Right Leash and Collar Before leash training can begin, it is important to have the right collar and leash. The collar should fit snugly but not tightly around the dog's neck, without chafing or pinching. Harnesses are not recommended when leash training, since a dog's pulling power is in its chest, and it will be harder to correct inappropriate behavior with a harness. The leash should be long enough to allow some slack, but not so long that the dog has free movement over a large range. Longer leashes can be introduced after training, but until the dog has learned proper leash manners, a length of 4-6 feet is best. Both the collar and leash should be in good condition without any fraying or damage that could break under unexpected pressure. The clip connecting the collar and leash should be firm and secure, and the collar and leash should be wiped clean as often as necessary so no dirt can build up that could cause irritation to the dog. Correcting Walking Problems There are many reasons why dogs may pull on a leash or resist walking. If the dog has not been leash trained before, the sight, smell and feel of the leash and collar could be frightening or make the dog nervous, which can lead to resistance or balking. A dog that has been cooped up may be overly excited to go out on the leash, which can lead to more pulling or ignoring commands. Similarly, if dogs are interested in nearby items, they may be more likely to pull, or if there is something in their sight that scares them, they may resist walking. Once you understand why a dog may have problems walking on the leash, there are several techniques that can encourage proper behavior… Familiarize the Dog If the dog is not used to the collar or leash, allow them to see and smell the gear first. Rub the leash through your fingers to transfer some of your scent along its length to help your dog adjust, and allow them to wear the collar without the leash long before going for a walk. Adjust Collar Position The upper part of a dog's neck is the most sensitive area. The collar should fit in this area, which will allow for more gentle corrections because the dog will feel the effects more quickly. If the collar is too loose or low, corrections will not be as effective. Shorten the Leash A shorter leash allows firmer control without the dog getting so far away that they are tempted by more distractions. The touch of the leash and collar is an important part of dog-owner communication, and a shorter leash keeps the owner in better control of their pet. Check the Feet If a normally well-behaved walker starts to have problems, check the dog's legs and feet for thorns, bruises, cuts or any swelling or tenderness that can indicate an injury. Visit a veterinarian to help with serious issues, or allow the dog to heal before resuming leash training. Use Verbal Commands Dogs have excellent hearing, and verbal commands can be an important part of leash training. Use an excited voice to say "Let's go!" to encourage forward movement, and use harsher, firm tones with "No!" to discourage improper behavior. Stay Still If a dog pulls, stand still and do not allow them to advance toward whatever has caught their interest. When the dog stops to look around at you, reward that pause with a friendly word or small treat. If they resume pulling, stay still until they stop again, then move in the proper direction to lead them correctly. Pick Up the Pace If a dog is easily distracted on a walk, a quicker pace can reduce unwanted behavior by giving them less time to notice new things that could lead to pulling. Dogs will also enjoy the excitement in their owners' pace, and a brisk walk is better exercise than a slow stroll. Walk More Frequently Any training is more effective if it is repeated and refreshed. More frequent walks will not only remind a dog about proper leash manners, but will be more exercise and more bonding between dog and owner. Try Treats Small treats can reward good walking behavior, though it is important to use them as a tool only, and reinforce the dog's successes verbally or with a happy pat as well. Eventually, the dog should have mastered easy, comfortable walking without a treat. For the best training, combine several techniques to continually reinforce your dog's behavior. Always be patient with your pet, and in time you both will enjoy hassle-free walks. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Ellie
Pit bull
2 Years
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Ellie
Pit bull
2 Years

We rescued her from a shelter, and before they got her she was chained to a tree. She’s having accidents in the house and everytime we take her out she refuses to go

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! What a sweet face she has! When adult dogs have potty training issues, I always suggest starting completely over as if your dog was a puppy. I have some great potty training information I am sending you. It is geared towards puppies, but the process is exactly the same. You will want to spend a few weeks practicing the advice, and you should see a quick turnaround. Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training if you decide to use a crate to aid in the potty training process. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Ivy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year
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Ivy
Labrador Retriever
1 Year

We just adopted a 1 year old Lab Mix. She has extreme fear of everything. She will not eat or drink and will hold her pee and as soon as I lift her to take her outside, she starts to pee all over herself, the floor and me. She won't walk so I have to carry her outside and she has no interest in food, treats or toys she is just terrified of everything. I'm taking her in my back yard to try to get her to relax but mostly she is just looking for an escape or a place to hide. It's truly heartbreaking and I have no clue how to train a dog that you can't even reward for good behavior because she just isn't interested in anything but hiding - so sad!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, know that time and patience will make the biggest difference here. Try to keep interactions calm and I would keep a drag leash on her when you are home, to get her used to the leash and to make directing her less confrontational. Check out the leash article linked below and the pressure method. Wait until she is less afraid to be in the same room with you, then begin the drag method, followed by the pressure method once she is not fearful with the drag method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-accept-leash You will need to give her enough time to feel comfortable enough with taking food from you - tossed gently toward her first and working up to out of your hand. That will take time. Once you get to that point, check out the article linked below and the section especially on shy dogs and humans. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/ I would work with a trainer who specializes in behavior issues like fear and anxiety, and knows a variety of methods to try, instead of only food - such as toys, obedience, training games that utilize a dog's natural instincts for rewards, and things like agility obstacles for building confidence. Right now this will take time, so I would work with a trainer over a longer period of time less often, giving pup time in between sessions to improve gradually, but having that person as a point person to know what to practice next as pup makes gradual progress. This person will likely need to be a private trainer opposed to a class instructor. Be sure to check into their reviews and references for experience with behavior issues. Many trainers are focused on obedience and you need behavior experience also for this. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ives
Yorkshire Terrier
9 Years
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Question
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Ives
Yorkshire Terrier
9 Years

Hi there

I recently adopted a little girl doggie yorkie . The first three weeks we had so had one accident inside but on the last 2 weeks she is wearing everywhere I the house and tonight on our bed . I took her out just before I went bed . I take her out at regular intervals but she she comes back in the house and it’s getting a bit out of hand . Any suggestions

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Justine, First, I would speak with your vet since she was doing fine before and is older, to make sure there isn't something causing incontinence. I am not a vet. I suggest going back to the basics with her for a couple of months and act as if she isn't potty trained at all to stop all accidents from happening so that she will develop a habit of holding it consistently while in the house and wanting to keep your home clean. After a couple of months if she has been completely accident free, very gradually give her more freedom - but when you start, still go outside with her at first to ensure she is going potty and not getting distracted. If you want her to go potty outside, I recommend crate training and tethering with a hands free leash to manage potty training. Crate training for at least two months to get her back on track more strictly at first. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com or k9ballistics.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take her potty less frequently. I suggest taking her potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return her to the crate while her bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since her last potty trip. When you have to go off she should be able to hold her bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while she is getting used to it and longer once she is accustomed to the crate. Only have her wait that long when you are not home though, take her out about every 3 hours while home. You want her to get into the habit of holder her bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever she feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you want her to use a potty inside, like pee pads, a doggie litter box or disposable real grass pads, I recommend following the Exercise Pen method from the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Phoebe
Pit bull
5 Months
0 found helpful
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Phoebe
Pit bull
5 Months

Phoebe is a rescue. We take her out very frequently limit her water intake and she still pees and poops all over the house. She also eliminates in her bed and our other dogs bed. We have tried treats, we have a crate, we take her out on a schedule and she also eats on a schedule. Running out of options! Help!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training just in case you decide to use a crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Mona
Yorkie
5 Years
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Mona
Yorkie
5 Years

We just brought her home from a rescue about a week ago. She has been with a family but they gave her up so she has really bad separation anxiety. When we come from work, she gets really excitied but doesn’t want to pee outside. Lately she been having accidents in the house. What can we do about the accident and help ease the separation anxiety?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Megan, Check out the tethering method from the article linked below, for potty training. Since pup is older, you can take pup potty every 3 hours instead of 1 hour, then every hour after that if pup doesn't go when you take her - or sooner if she starts whining, scratching, circling, trying to get away, or squatting indicating she needs to go. When you take her outside to go potty, follow the tips from the article on taking her on leash right now, walking her around slowly, saying Go Potty to teach that for the future, rewarding with treats if she goes, and using an potty attractant spray if needed. Only give her freedom off the tethered leash if she has gone potty outside within the previous two hours. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside At the same time, I would also work on introducing some alone time by practicing the Surprise method from the article linked below, so that the crate can be used later when you need to leave, or an exercise pen once she is potty trained. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate I would also start working on teaching Place and Down Stay also, then gradually work up to a distance Stay and 1 hour Place, where you can walk away from pup and go about your business in your home and pup practice some alone time that way, being rewarded periodically for staying there and extending the time gradually with practice. Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Midus
Husky mutt
7 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Midus
Husky mutt
7 Months

He wont go to the bathroom outside. I took him on an hour and a half walk, and as soon as we walked in the door he crawled up on my girlfriend and peed on her. We take him out about every hour he just wont go outside.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Gabby
Labrador Retriever
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Gabby
Labrador Retriever
2 Months

I can't get my rescue to go outside. Shes scared. Ive tried everything.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Question
Cheyenne
Australian Shepherd and Blue Muller
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Cheyenne
Australian Shepherd and Blue Muller
2 Years

I just got her from a friend and she has a hard time going outside. When she goes outside she tries to wander off. I’m trying to get her to go potty. I know I need to take her to the same spot, and give positive reinforcement. I just wasn’t for sure if there’s any other options to get her to potty.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Ivy
Basset lab mix
9 Months
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Ivy
Basset lab mix
9 Months

My puppy will not use the potty outside. I can stay outside all day and as soon as she comes back in she just pees wherever. We just put down new flooring and my hubby is not happy with her. I just don't know what to do... Please help!!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Christy, Some puppies who have been punished in the past for peeing inside will avoid going in front of you, regardless of where they are. Try taking her outside on a twenty or fifty foot leash, so that she can wander away from you safely, and go potty when she think that you are not looking, then when she goes praise her quietly and toss treats over to her. Tossing her treats should help her to warm up to going in front of you overtime. As she warms up, you can gradually get closer and closer to her while she pees, until you can use a normal leash again. The problem also might be an aversion to going outside, rather than an aversion to going in front of you. Something traumatic might have happened outside, she might be too distracted to go, or hates the wet ground or something similar. If that is the case, try taking her to different surfaces, such as grass, mulch, gravel, or leaves. She may hate going on grass, but be OK with going on gravel. Also go purchase a spray from your local pet store or online that is designed to encourage elimination. It's usually called something like "Go Here", "Hurry Spray", or "Training Spray", and can be found in the training or house breaking department. Right before you take her outside, spray the spray onto the area you want her to eliminate on, then take her over to the area quietly, and let her sniff the area, and wait patiently for her to circle around, sniff, and go. Also, make sure that you are cleaning up previous accidents with a cleaner containing enzymes that will break down the pee and poop enough to eliminate the smell well enough that she cannot smell it anymore. Cleaners that do not contain enzymes will not remove the smell enough for your dog to not smell it, and a smell left will encourage her to eliminate in the same area again. Also avoid any cleaners containing Ammonia because Ammonia smells like urine to a dog and will encourage elimination in that area. Last, look into crate training for house breaking. Overtime crate training will force her to eliminate outside by not giving her any freedom in the house until she goes outside, and by making the experience of eliminating outside pleasant again. Here is an article on how to teach that, all of the methods in this article can help, but the crate training will tackle the issue of not eliminating outside the quickest. Disregard that the article talks about pooing outside, it should work just as well for peeing outside too. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

I have the same issue except the advice won't work for my pup because he refuses to "wander" when outside. It is very frustrating and he has ruined our home with pee. We got him from a previous owner who instilled some extremely bad habits by irregular indoor-outdoor time and we are on the brink of asking her to take him back or bringing him to a shelter, which is something I normally wouldn't even consider. I have raised shelter dogs and pumps my whole life and had no issues training them before. I'm in desperate need of some advice.

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Nancy
Mixed breed
2 Years
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Nancy
Mixed breed
2 Years

We just got a dog from the pound a few days ago. She’s very sweet, super gentle and is very obedient. Only issues is that she does not pee outside, she has peed all over the house. We haven’t been able to get her to pee when we take her out. She also pulls on the leash when we walk her, but she’s been doing a bit better. We just don’t know how to encourage her to pee outside when we go. I read through your website and we got pee pads but she walked right over the pee pad and went on the carpet instead. We don’t know a whole lot about her past life either. She was with a family for 6 months but we think they left her alone a lot and they said she was destructive.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Kennedy
Dachshund
1 Year
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Kennedy
Dachshund
1 Year

My dog only pees on the pads and poops anywhere he wants inside the house. The dog that I used to own that was a Bichon (but passed away :/ ) was trained to go to the bathroom in the backyard so all I had to do was open the door at the patio and he would go. My new dog is too wild and I know that if he sees a squirrel he would run after it. Today, I bought a kid gate and I blocked the stairs off at the patio and put his pee Pad outside. However, it appears I’m having no luck. He does seem motivated to go outside but he doesn’t pee or poop. He hasn’t went to the bathroom at all today but I’m going to keep motivating him to go outside and use the bathroom.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Stella
Chihuahua
1 Year
0 found helpful
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Stella
Chihuahua
1 Year

I just adopted Stella last night from a foster, that foster dogs from a Texas Rescue. She has pooped twice so far and had one long pee this morning. I am concerned that she is not peeing enough. I am not sure what she has endured in the small amount of time she has been on this earth, but she is such a loving dog and super sweet. I have 2 other dogs, so I am not sure if that is what is causing the issue. I am not sure if she has ever peed outside. It is super cold in Wisconsin, so that doesn't help either. I have put pee pads, but she only utilized once. She is drinking and eating, so I know she is pretty comfortable here. Not sure what to do.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. That is fairly common when bringing a new dog home. Some can hold it for up to a few days! But know that she will most definitely go when she needs to. Just keep encouraging her to go in the area you desire and she will be back to normal within a few days.

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Blueberry
English Bulldog
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Blueberry
English Bulldog
3 Years

We adopted Blueberry a week ago from a shelter and are absolutely in love with her. The only issue is her refusal to pee outside. She generally seems very reluctant to go outside at all and is anxious when we are outside, which I'm sure has something to do with her reluctance to pee. We live in an apartment and don't have a backyard, but she probably is used to living in a house. She has held herself for 3 days at a time (!) - we have given her plenty of opportunities to pee outside but she will hold herself and then pee inside after holding herself for so long. Last night she also peed in her crate for the first time. She is not motivated by treats when we are outside because she is too nervous. She is willing to poop outside, just not pee.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Fuscas
Mixed
3 Years
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Fuscas
Mixed
3 Years

We adopted Fuscas 4 weeks ago. He is house trained and very calm..no behaviour issues at all. However, he is used to living in an apartment, so will not pee unless he is taken for a walk outside the house. How do i encourage him to pee in the garden? I have tried walking him around on his leash, but he pulls to go out the gate onto the street. Thank you

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Holly
Beagle
2 Years
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Holly
Beagle
2 Years

We rescued a 2 and half year old Beagle 2 months ago. She was in foster care for 3 months prior to that and was completely potty trained. She initially had a few accidents, which was expected. But since then, we have taken her out at regular intervals every day. She is still having pee accidents, usually in the evening, but not always. She regularly eliminates on our mid-morning walk, but after that, it is hit or miss whether or not she will go outside. Sometimes she will go 4 hours and we'll take her out and she won't go at all, only to come inside and pee on the floor a few minutes later. Sometimes she'll go several days without an accident, and then she'll go several days in a row with one or two. There is no rhyme or reason to it and she gives us no potty cue whatsoever. If we catch her in the act, she is startled by nothing. You can clap loudly or even nudge her, say "NO!" very firmly, and she will just keep on going. I've never been able to interrupt her when caught in the act. She is fine in a crate if the door is open, but the minute you close it, she gets frantic. We are working on desensitizing her, but it is a very long, slow, process. In the mean time, she only seems to have accidents where we have carpet, but there is no way to confine her in an area without carpet without her being frantic and anxious. We are treating her immediately when she goes outside, and we've even taken the towels we've used to clean up accidents and put them outside and had her sniff them, but she just walks away. She goes more than 12 hours overnight without peeing, so I know she can hold it, but we take her out every 3 hours like clockwork. Sometimes we're out for 10-20 minutes trying to get her to go and she won't. Sometimes she goes right away. There really is no pattern to it. We're stumped... and a bit desperate after 2 months with no improvement.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Nala
American Bandogge
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Nala
American Bandogge
4 Months

Hello we got our pup a few days ago , we live in an apartment and have a puppy area to take her to use the restroom the first day was successful getting her to use the bathroom there but when we tried taking her out again she wouldn’t want to be picked up if we tried she would jump out of our arms. Since we live in an apartment it’s hard for us to get her outside any tips? Please! :( lol

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Meredith
Unknown
6 Months
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Meredith
Unknown
6 Months

We have had a Romanian rescue dog for nine days now. Everything is alright, she has warmed up and come out of her shell a little bit. She is barking at me (over six foot, male, broad shouldered) and taken to my wife, but we expected that and I am now the only one feeding her and doing everything by hand. We are hoping patience is the key

One thing we are concerned about is that we can't get her outside whatsoever. It has been nine days and she hasn't left the flat. We do live two floor up so it's a bit of a trek to travel down. She really doesn't like being lifted down as we tried that and had a bit of an incident (all fine now though)

Is there any tips to get her outside? (we've tried chicken, cheese, and most available treats) Or should we not be too concerned and just give her time?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. Dogs usually need about 30 days to adjust to a new environment. It sounds like she has a wonderful home now. So continue doing everything you are doing as far as gaining her trust. Try daily to get her outside. If she doesn't, no big deal and try the next day. But she will need to eventually go out for your sanity. If you are not able to get her outside, I would suggest the use of potty pads or an indoor potty spot.

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Question
Bentley
Terrier mix
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Bentley
Terrier mix
2 Years

1 we have a crate that is lined with pads but still there are accidents
2 he takes treats but not on the outside
3 is fearful of the elevator and pees outside or inside
4 it’s hard for me take him out except on my days off

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. As far as the crate and elevator, you may want to remove the pads inside the crate and make it a space where he won't feel comfortable going potty. Put blankets, toys, and start feeding him inside the crate. And you may have to carry him outside so he doesn't have a chance to go anywhere else. Practice these things for a few weeks and you will see improvement. It may take a few days of continued accidents, but push through that and don't give up on your new routine. He WILL get it. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Cardamom
Corgi mix
1 Year
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Cardamom
Corgi mix
1 Year

We adopted Cardamom a week ago and so far she has only peed outside once.

She has a routine before she pees and even scratches at the door, but once we’re outside she won’t go. We’ve waited literal hours outside with her only to come in and have her eliminate immediately.

We’ve stood in the same place, reduced distractions, done walks, crate training, attractant, pee pads (which she does use inside), and our fair share of magical thinking.

She is very distracted/distractible outside and particularly latches onto possible prey; so we believe this might play a role.

Any advice for us?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nick, I would try a few things. 1. Take pup to a calm location if you can find one. 2. Walk pup around slowly on the leash to help stimulate the need to go. 3. Place a pee pad outside in case pup used to be pee pad trained. 4. Use a potty encouraging spray, and spray it on the area you want pup to go on right before you take them outside. 5. Use a long training leash, like 20 feet, and let pup wander to the end of the leash away from you so they feel they have more privacy to go. Some dogs learn from being disciplined for accidents not to go potty in front of people. If this works for them, you can toss pup a treat over after they go and praise genuinely, then gradually coil up the leash to make it shorter over time, until pup is going potty in front of you on six feet of leash again. 6. Take pup potty, walk them around slowly, telling them to Go Potty. Reward with a treat if they go. If they don't go, return inside but put them directly into a crate for one hour. After the hour is up, repeat the potty trip outside again. Do this until pup finally is desperate enough to go they relieve themselves outside and are then rewarded with a treat. Give pup 2 hours of freedom out of the crate in your home after they go potty outside, after that, start taking them outside and crating whenever they don't go potty, until they go potty outside to earn more freedom. This schedule limits pup's potential potty places to the crate and outside, and most dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean. You may need to do this method along with some of the above tips, like a longer leash, pee pad, or scent additive. When you let pup out of the crate, attack the leash before you open the crate door then run them to outside on leash, so they can't stop to pee on the way, if they are still having accidents to and from the crate to outside. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lily
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lily
Labrador Retriever
2 Years

She is not potty trained and wants to go on our carpet. I take her outside and she does not pee but when we come in she peers on the carpet.

She is a lab/german shepherd mix. WE got her from the Humane society.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Will, You will need to crate train her for potty training. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for her. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take her potty less frequently. I suggest taking her potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) or freedom out of the crate, return her to the crate while her bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since her last potty trip. When you have to go off she should be able to hold her bladder in the crate for 5-7 hours - less at first while she is getting used to it and longer once she is accustomed to the crate. Only have her wait that long when you are not home though, take her out about every 3 hours while home. You want her to get into the habit of holder her bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever she feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If she is not already used to a crate expect crying at first. When she cries and you know she doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give her a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help her adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If she continues protesting for long periods of time past three days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks and cries. If she gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If she disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at her side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If she stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward her quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. After she is doing better with peeing outside when you take her, you can also use the Tethering method part of the time when you are home, if you want her to be with your more often instead of in the crate as much. I would depend on the crate solely a lot at first though to help her make the initial connection of going potty outside more quickly. Tethering method - you can take her out every 2-3 hours instead of 1 hour since she is older than the pup this article was geared toward. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Loki
Mixed
10 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Loki
Mixed
10 Months

We adopted a 10 month old pup from the shelter. He seems like he knows some commands like stay or lay down. He will go in his crate so got him yesterday but he wines are night and if he is in there and doesn’t see me. We are having a lot of issues with him not peeing outside, when he is out there he will sniff for a minute then run right back to me. He also pees when someone lets him ( tail wagging, like in excitement) He also just follows me everywhere I go, directly under me, sometimes even pushing me to make sure he gets right by me. Any advice to help ease his anxiety and potty issues?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Josi, For the potty training: Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) or freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-7 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. You want him to get into the habit of holder his bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever he feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you take him outside, he will need to be taken on leash and not just let into a fenced in yard, for a few months, until fully trained. Walk him around slowly on the leash to help him focus. Follow the steps in the article for teaching Go Potty to help him learn to focus in the future. You can also use a potty attractant spray outside like the article mentions, if needed. When he cries in the crate and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. Two weeks of crying is normal, with the first three days being the worst, then it should gradually start to lessen. You can give him a dog food stuffed hollow chew toy to help him adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If he continues protesting for long periods of time past 3-5 days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If he disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at his side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If he stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. For the following, I would teach Out, Leave It, Place and Down, prioritizing Place and Out. These commands can also help build independence and confidence, which can help with anxiety. Out - leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Heel - Turns method - this method of Heel training can also help teach pup both not to pull and not to lean in so close. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Submissive and excited peeing - working on pup's overall independence and confidence as mentioned above, can also help some cases of excited/submissive peeing. This can be a behavioral issue or something pup is genetically prone to, most dogs outgrow it as they mature and confidence increases. https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-submissive-peeing Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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