How to Potty Train a Cattle Dog

How to Potty Train a Cattle Dog
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon3-6 Weeks
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

The Cattle dog is very intelligent and ready to learn. Cattle dogs need lots of room to run, but at the same time, they still need to be trained not to go potty in the house. No one needs a dog that is going to make a mess inside. Cattle dogs are readily acceptable to new training, new behaviors, and make great family dogs thanks to their undying loyalty. In fact, the more you challenge them, the happier they are. Keep in mind as these dogs grow, they need plenty of exercises to keep them happy. 

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Defining Tasks

The task is pretty simple, or at least you might think it is. All you are trying to do is train your Cattle dog to understand it is never okay for him to go potty anywhere in your house. At the same time, you should be teaching him where he can go potty out in your yard. The good news is that the sooner you start training him the faster he will learn this important skill. Remember, younger pups tend to learn faster as their brains are still in full learning mode. 

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Getting Started

There isn't much in the way of supplies needed to get started on potty training your Cattle dog.  The biggest thing you need is plenty of time and patience to stick with the training and make it work out for both you and your pup. There are a few things you might find come in handy depending on the method of training you choose.

  • Crate or kennel – A safe place for your pup when you are busy or unable to be at home.
  • Leash – For taking your pup outside to his special potty spot.
  • Treats – You simply cannot have enough of these on hand for rewards.

Consistency is key to successful potty training. Your pup needs to understand what is expected of him. The more consistent you are the easier it will be for him to understand what you're asking of him, to become potty trained. 

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The Every 20 Minutes Method

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Clear your schedule

Start out by making sure you have room in your schedule to take your pup out every 20 minutes during the early stages of his training. If he goes great, praise him and give him a treat. If he doesn't go, no worries, just take him back inside and wait. If he shows signs of needing to go, take him out immediately or go back to the schedule.

2

Special potty breaks

There are certain times when no matter where you are on the schedule, you will need to take your pup out to go potty. These are before bed, after he wakes up in the morning, after playtime, and after meals and drinking large amounts of water.

3

Choose a cue

Choose a cue word for going outside and stick to it. Changing it will only confuse your pup. Start using it every time you take your pup out. This will help your pup to associate the cue with the required action.

4

Add more time

Start slowly working up to longer times between when you take your pup outside. This will help build his endurance for those times when you need to leave for longer periods of time.

5

And ever on

By now, your pup should be responding to verbal commands and should be starting to let you know when he needs to go potty. Enjoy an accident-free home, finally!

The Watch Like a Hawk Method

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Do you have enough treats?

You are going to need plenty of treats to potty train your dog. So, if you don't already have plenty of them, be sure to stock up.

2

Keep a very close eye on your pup

During the early stages of training, you need to keep a very close eye on your pup. If you see him getting ready to go potty, you need to firmly say, "NO" without getting angry at him--this would do no good. In fact, it can only cause harm.

3

Going out

Be sure you take your pooch outside immediately using a cue like "Potty time" to indicate it's time to go out and go potty. The more you do this the more he will associate the command with the action.

4

Patience pays off

Be patient, it might take a little while for your pup to figure out he is supposed to go potty. When he does, be sure you reward him with tons of praise and a treat or two. Then head on back into the house.

5

The long haul

The rest is all about continuing to work on your pup's training until he has finally mastered this all-important skill. Remember, patience is the key to your success. Keep working on it, he will figure it all out in good time.

The Smells Good Method

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Supplies

Run out to your local pet store and pick up a bottle of potty training spray.

2

Mark your spot

Use it to mark a spot on your lawn for your pup to call his personal bathroom.

3

Introductions all round

Put your pup on his leash and take him out to the marked spot. The spray is designed to make him feel like he needs to go potty. Give him 15 minutes to go potty. If he doesn't, take him in the house and watch him closely to see if he shows signs of needing to "go." When he does, take him back outside to go potty. When he goes, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.

4

Hit the peak times

No matter what your potty break schedule looks like, there are times you should always take your pup out. These are first thing in the morning, last thing at night, after playtime, after meals and long drinks, and of course after naps.

5

Keep it up

Keep working with your pup until he will come to you and let you know he needs to go potty. Be sure that when he does, you take him out immediately to reinforce his behavior.

By PB Getz

Published: 02/19/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Oakley and Cooper

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Blue Heeler

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9 Weeks

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Question

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They are having a hard time going to potty outside and leash training.

April 15, 2022

Oakley and Cooper's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tina, Check out the article I have linked below on leash introduction. If pups are afraid of the leash, I would use the Drag method. If pup's just don't know how to be directed by the leash, I recommend the Pressure method to teach pups to move toward you when they hit the end of the leash, instead of pulling away. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-accept-leash For potty training, I recommend either the crate training method, or a combination of the crate training method and tethering method from the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If pups are nervous about being outside and won't relax enough to go potty out there, spend time (30-60 minutes at a time) often, simply sitting or playing with pups outside to just get them familiar with the outside world, so they are comfortable enough out there to go potty when it is time. Bring them to calm locations for potty trips too when first starting out. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

April 18, 2022

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Royalty

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Australian Cattle Dog

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13 Weeks

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It’s hard to get her to go outside and use the bathroom she would just stand and run away

March 26, 2022

Royalty's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Asia, At this age puppies need to be taken on leash and slowly walked around, so that the movement stimulates the feeling of needing to go potty, and the leash keeps them from getting distracted. Using the leash to help pup not get distracted and keep moving slowly can facilitate pup learning what they are outside for - to go potty. I would also tell pup to "Go Potty" happily and feed pup a smalll treat or piece of kibble (that was hidden in your pocket) afterwards, so that pup will learn that command and go quicker when told that in the future, and so that that command can one day be used when you let pup out into your fenced yard without a leash and they will focus better. Don't expect pup to go potty outside without a leash to help direct until at least six months of age in general. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

March 28, 2022


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