How to Potty Train a Rottweiler Puppy

Medium
1-6 Months
General

Introduction

One of the first things any new puppy owner has to face is that their first job as a new puppy owner is to teach your pooch not to go potty in the house--better known as potty training. Your little Rottie is smart, quick to learn, and loves to please you. This is the perfect combination for anyone who is trying to potty train their pup. One of the biggest reasons for unsuccessful potty training is that the owner has not learned how to show their pup what is expected of him right from the start. One of the other major players in the game is not having enough time to properly train your pup. It will take time and consistent practice in order to succeed with potty training your Rottweiler puppy. 

Defining Tasks

Today's assignment, should you decide to accept it, is to take your new Rottie pup and train him that the only place he is permitted to go potty is outside in the yard. At the same time, you will be teaching him to hold his bladder and bowels for longer periods of time and that going potty in the house is never an acceptable form of behavior. Bear in mind that you should pick one spot in your yard for your pup to use as his potty. This will help with the whole training process and keep the rest of your yard much cleaner. 

Getting Started

Keep in mind that the best time to potty train your Rottie pup is from the moment you get out of the car with him on his first day home. Start out by taking him to the spot in your yard you have designated as his personal potty area the moment you bring him home, even before you take him inside for the first time. This helps set the stage for future potty training. 

To complete training, you will need:

  • A crate – To give your pup a place to go when you have to go out, go to bed, or can't watch him
  • Treats – No training is going to be successful without a way to reward him
  • Leash – For taking him out
  • Cleaning supplies – For those occasional accidents

Along with all of this, you are also going to need a large supply of patience and, of course, the time to spend taking your pup outside until he gets the idea and starts going potty outside where he should and not inside the house. 

The Leash Method

ribbon-method-3
Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Find a spot in your yard
Spend a little time looking around your yard looking for the perfect spot to turn in to your pup's potty spot. It should be close enough that your pup won't have an accident on the way there. At the same time, try to choose a spot where any odors are not likely to make it into your home.
Step
2
Let's go outside
Pick a verbal cue, one that is easy to remember, such as "Let's go out" or "Time to go outside" and use it each time you go through the door with your pup on the way to the potty. Go ahead and hook him to his leash, use the cue and take him out to his spot. Wait for him to do his business.
Step
3
Good boy!
When your pup finishes going potty, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
Build a routine
The best way to potty train your Rottie is to set a timer, put him on his leash, and take him out every half hour at first, as well as after naps, meals, large drinks, playtime, first thing in the morning, and last thing at night. Each time you take him out and he does his business, be sure you praise him and give him a treat.
Step
5
When you are inside
While you and your pup are inside, it is your job to keep a close eye on him. Any time he looks like he might need to go, take him right out. When he goes, reward him. If not, take him back inside, watch him like a hawk and get back on schedule. It won't take long and he will be fully potty trained.
Recommend training method?

The No, Not There Method

ribbon-method-1
Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
First, choose your spot
The first thing you need to do is choose the spot in your yard where your pup can go potty. This is important, as he needs to have a place to go that he can call his own. It will also make the training go faster.
Step
2
This is your potty
Put your pup on his leash and take him outside. Walk him over the spot you want him to use. Give him some time (up to 15 minutes) to go. If he does, that's great! Praise him and give him a treat. If not, no worries, just take him back inside.
Step
3
Eyes on the target
In this case, the target is your pup. Watch him like a hawk and the moment he looks as though he might be thinking about going potty in your home, say "NO!" in a firm, but not angry voice. Then hook him to his leash and take him straight outside so he can potty.
Step
4
Rewards for success
Every time your pup goes potty where he should, be sure to give him a treat and praise him. The idea is to teach your pup that he gets the goodies when he goes potty where he is supposed to.
Step
5
Add to his time
Start slowly building up the amount of time between when gets to go outside. This will help him to build the necessary stamina and control over his bladder and bowels needed for him to go for several hours at a time between potty breaks.
Recommend training method?

The By the Clock Method

ribbon-method-2
Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
If you don't have a clock
If for some reason you don’t have a clock or timer handy, run out to your local discount department store and grab one.
Step
2
Set your schedule
Set your schedule up so you can take a break and take your puppy out every 30 minutes to go potty. Consistency is very important at the beginning, it helps to set the stage for what you expect of him in the future.
Step
3
Take your pup out
When the timer goes off, be sure to put your dog on his leash and then take him outside to the designated spot in the yard.
Step
4
Keep him there
Keep your pup out in the yard until he goes potty. If he has not gone after 15 minutes, you can take him back inside and try again in another 15 minutes.
Step
5
While inside
While you are inside with your pup, be sure to keep a close eye on him. If at any time your pup looks like he might need to go potty, go ahead and take him straight outside. When he does go, be sure to praise him and treat him.
Step
6
The rest
The rest is all about working with your pup, to extend the time between when you take him outside. With time and patience, your pup will soon learn where his potty is and that he gets good things for going potty there.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Nyx
Rottweiler
3 Months
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Question
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Nyx
Rottweiler
3 Months

She’s a huge biter and chaser, she likes to bite clothes and when she’s told “no” she only bites more. She has a ton of chew toys she just enjoys biting clothes more! Just guidance on how to stop that, along with potty training tips.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, Check out the Leave It method from the article I have linked below. Expect this to take 1-2 months to teach at this age. Look for gradual improvement though. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the potty training, check out the Crate Training method, Tethering method, or a combination of the Crate Training method and Tethering method. Since pup is a little older, you can add 15-30 minutes to the times listed so long as pup doesn't start having accidents before the potty trips. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
LoKeto
Rottweiler
3 Months
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Question
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LoKeto
Rottweiler
3 Months

I am a truck driver who just bought a 3 month old Rottweiler pup who is use to using potty pads to go potty. I have been trying to potty train him outside but it’s hard because I don’t have a consistent home or spot to let him relieve himself. When I let him out he doesn’t go but just sniffs around for a long time but as soon as I get him back inside the truck he uses the bathroom. I’ve tried using potty pads outside and placing his poop and old pee to give him a reference of his smell but that doesn’t seem to work either. I can tell when he has to go potty he sniffs around the truck and sometimes gives me that look right before he goes and I’ve caught him right before he did so before and placed him outside to use it there but didn’t work and used it as soon as he stepped foot back in the truck. What should I do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello LeKeith, For this situation I highly recommend crate training pup. The use of the crate for potty training at first can help motivate pup to hold it while in the truck due to the confined space of the crate and a dog's natural desire to keep a confined space clean. For more details, check out the crate training method from the article I have linked below. You will just keep the crate in your truck instead of house in this case, crating pup when they don't go potty when you take them out, giving the amount of freedom listen in the article when pup does go potty outside, removing all pee pad options so pup's only option is going potty outside. Don't put anything absorbent in the crate or that can cause accidents in there; instead, use something like www.primopads.com or k9ballistics crate mats - the non-absorbent ones. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Circe (sir-cee)
Rottweiler
14 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Circe (sir-cee)
Rottweiler
14 Weeks

Hi, we are struggling to get our rotty house trained. I know it takes plenty of time, but it seems like she isn’t picking up on it at all. We take her out after naps, after food and water, every 30 minutes to an hour. She still seems to prefer going inside. Even when she has been playing outside for 2 hours she chooses to come inside and will pee shortly after.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karli, At this point pup shouldn't be given any freedom inside unless they have gone potty outside within the last thirty minutes. For details on what this looks like, check out the article I have linked below on potty training. In situations like this I would only give pup freedom off the leash or out of the crate when pup has gone potty outside within the past thirty minutes. If pup won't go when you take her outside or it's been more than thirty minutes or you can't supervise her, I would either crate her with a dog food stuffed chew toy in the crate for entertainment or keep her tethered to yourself with a hands free 6 or 8 foot leash. The goal here is to prevent pup from sneaking off to go potty and help you notice her signals that she is about to go potty (circling, sniffing, whining, barking, pulling to get away, squatting), so you can quickly get her outside. Once it's been more than thirty minutes, either tether her to yourself again until it's one hour since the last potty trip - at which point you take her back outside, or crate her for thirty minutes until it's been one hour since you last took her outside. You can get in play and exercise and snuggles during the thirty minutes pup's bladder is empty, with rest periods (which most pups need anyway) between those while the bladder is less empty. When you take pup outside to go potty, pay attention to the steps in the article I have included below on what to do while outside (walk pup around slowly on a leash, use scent to encourage pottying, tell pup to Go Potty, reward with a treat if they go - but keep that treat hidden until after they go, and give 15 minutes of opportunity to go before going inside and crating for 30 minutes then trying again). Right now it sounds like pup needs help with not getting distracted while outside, and pup needs less freedom when their bladder isn't empty while inside, in addition to the frequent trips outside you are already committed to. The more accidents you can prevent in those ways, the sooner pup will start to make the connection with potty training. If pup is having frequent accidents that is going to prevent potty training progress - a lot of strict supervision and confinement is needed temporarily in some cases to help pup make that initial connection between going potty outside and being motivated to keep your home clean. Check out a combination of the Tethering method and the Crate Training method from this article below, as well as the steps on how to get pup to go potty outside while out. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If pup is still struggling after a month of doing the above training and you aren't seeing at least some improvement, I would see your vet. There could be something medical leading to some incontinence or something else effecting potty training. I am not a vet though so consult your vet for anything medically related. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Zeke
mongrel
4 Months
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Question
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Zeke
mongrel
4 Months

His very cute and friendly, however, He doesn't listen to me when I tell him to sit, or follow me, or even to go and eat food. His very rebellious and does whatever he pleases. He also doesn't bark.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nishaat, Teaching Watch Me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zeZrOPzO-c For the following, an activity you can practice is walking around places like your yard or a field with pup on the long training leash and changing directions frequently without saying anything. Whenever he takes notice (at first because the leash finally tugs, but later just because you moved), then toss a treat at him for looking your way or coming over to you - without calling him; this encourages him to choose to pay attention to where you are and associate your presence with good things on his own, so he will want to be with you. For sitting and other basic commands, I recommend practicing that command in a variety of locations and working up to distractions. Often a puppy will just learn the command somewhere calm with a treat in view and will only be able to do the command in that setting. You have to intentionally work up to other locations and distractions through practice before pup can obey the command the majority of the time. Check out the Pressure method as well. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit Come - Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
zkei
Rottweiler
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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zkei
Rottweiler
10 Weeks

Hello
My puppy is staying in apartment balcony and is not in routine for potty. He does it anywhere and. everywhere at any time.

How to get this in order, tried various methods.

Regards,
Sunil
sunilmktan@yahoo.co.in

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sunil, Check out the Crate training method from the article I have linked below. I recommend strictly following that method for 2-3 months straight, so that pup is only given freedom when their bladder is empty, to stop the accidents happening inside. When pup doesn't go potty when you take them, return them to the crate when you get inside, wait 30-60 minutes with pup in the crate, then take pup back outside to try again, repeating this process until pup goes potty outside and can be trusted in the home supervised while their bladder is empty for a while. When you take pup potty, follow the tips for taking pup on a leash, walking pup around slowly, telling pup Go Potty to train that command, and reward with treats (which were hidden in your pocket before so pup isn't distracted). At first, pup will need to be taken out a lot. As pup learns the Go Potty command and will go more quickly when you take him, then pup won't need as many trips. Commit to the process for it to work though. At this age pup cannot hold it during the day even in the crate for longer than 3 hours, so if you are gone to work for a long time you will also want to hire a dog walker to take pup out a couple of times while you are away until pup is older, if there is no one else at home to take pup out. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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