How to Potty Train a Rottweiler Puppy

Medium
1-6 Months
General

Introduction

One of the first things any new puppy owner has to face is that their first job as a new puppy owner is to teach your pooch not to go potty in the house--better known as potty training. Your little Rottie is smart, quick to learn, and loves to please you. This is the perfect combination for anyone who is trying to potty train their pup. One of the biggest reasons for unsuccessful potty training is that the owner has not learned how to show their pup what is expected of him right from the start. One of the other major players in the game is not having enough time to properly train your pup. It will take time and consistent practice in order to succeed with potty training your Rottweiler puppy. 

Defining Tasks

Today's assignment, should you decide to accept it, is to take your new Rottie pup and train him that the only place he is permitted to go potty is outside in the yard. At the same time, you will be teaching him to hold his bladder and bowels for longer periods of time and that going potty in the house is never an acceptable form of behavior. Bear in mind that you should pick one spot in your yard for your pup to use as his potty. This will help with the whole training process and keep the rest of your yard much cleaner. 

Getting Started

Keep in mind that the best time to potty train your Rottie pup is from the moment you get out of the car with him on his first day home. Start out by taking him to the spot in your yard you have designated as his personal potty area the moment you bring him home, even before you take him inside for the first time. This helps set the stage for future potty training. 

To complete training, you will need:

  • A crate – To give your pup a place to go when you have to go out, go to bed, or can't watch him
  • Treats – No training is going to be successful without a way to reward him
  • Leash – For taking him out
  • Cleaning supplies – For those occasional accidents

Along with all of this, you are also going to need a large supply of patience and, of course, the time to spend taking your pup outside until he gets the idea and starts going potty outside where he should and not inside the house. 

The Leash Method

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Step
1
Find a spot in your yard
Spend a little time looking around your yard looking for the perfect spot to turn in to your pup's potty spot. It should be close enough that your pup won't have an accident on the way there. At the same time, try to choose a spot where any odors are not likely to make it into your home.
Step
2
Let's go outside
Pick a verbal cue, one that is easy to remember, such as "Let's go out" or "Time to go outside" and use it each time you go through the door with your pup on the way to the potty. Go ahead and hook him to his leash, use the cue and take him out to his spot. Wait for him to do his business.
Step
3
Good boy!
When your pup finishes going potty, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
Build a routine
The best way to potty train your Rottie is to set a timer, put him on his leash, and take him out every half hour at first, as well as after naps, meals, large drinks, playtime, first thing in the morning, and last thing at night. Each time you take him out and he does his business, be sure you praise him and give him a treat.
Step
5
When you are inside
While you and your pup are inside, it is your job to keep a close eye on him. Any time he looks like he might need to go, take him right out. When he goes, reward him. If not, take him back inside, watch him like a hawk and get back on schedule. It won't take long and he will be fully potty trained.
Recommend training method?

The No, Not There Method

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Step
1
First, choose your spot
The first thing you need to do is choose the spot in your yard where your pup can go potty. This is important, as he needs to have a place to go that he can call his own. It will also make the training go faster.
Step
2
This is your potty
Put your pup on his leash and take him outside. Walk him over the spot you want him to use. Give him some time (up to 15 minutes) to go. If he does, that's great! Praise him and give him a treat. If not, no worries, just take him back inside.
Step
3
Eyes on the target
In this case, the target is your pup. Watch him like a hawk and the moment he looks as though he might be thinking about going potty in your home, say "NO!" in a firm, but not angry voice. Then hook him to his leash and take him straight outside so he can potty.
Step
4
Rewards for success
Every time your pup goes potty where he should, be sure to give him a treat and praise him. The idea is to teach your pup that he gets the goodies when he goes potty where he is supposed to.
Step
5
Add to his time
Start slowly building up the amount of time between when gets to go outside. This will help him to build the necessary stamina and control over his bladder and bowels needed for him to go for several hours at a time between potty breaks.
Recommend training method?

The By the Clock Method

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Step
1
If you don't have a clock
If for some reason you don’t have a clock or timer handy, run out to your local discount department store and grab one.
Step
2
Set your schedule
Set your schedule up so you can take a break and take your puppy out every 30 minutes to go potty. Consistency is very important at the beginning, it helps to set the stage for what you expect of him in the future.
Step
3
Take your pup out
When the timer goes off, be sure to put your dog on his leash and then take him outside to the designated spot in the yard.
Step
4
Keep him there
Keep your pup out in the yard until he goes potty. If he has not gone after 15 minutes, you can take him back inside and try again in another 15 minutes.
Step
5
While inside
While you are inside with your pup, be sure to keep a close eye on him. If at any time your pup looks like he might need to go potty, go ahead and take him straight outside. When he does go, be sure to praise him and treat him.
Step
6
The rest
The rest is all about working with your pup, to extend the time between when you take him outside. With time and patience, your pup will soon learn where his potty is and that he gets good things for going potty there.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Athena
Rottweiler
10 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Athena
Rottweiler
10 Weeks

My beautiful little girl won’t use the bathroom outside! She’s very scary of the outside and when I do finally get her out there she either just sits or plays. How can I break her?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Declan, First, spend a lot of time outside with her, playing, teaching commands, and simply hanging out reading a book. You want to make going outside familiar, normal and pleasant for her so that she gets over her fears. Whenever she investigates something that she is scared of, praise her and give treats - carry small treats or pieces of her food in a ziplock bag in your pocket while outside with her to help her get over her fears. Once she is over her fears, being distracted while outside is completely normal at her age. It can take a lot of patience to keep puppies focused while outside. Take her potty on a leash even if you have a fenced in yard. She should be taken on a leash for several months, until she is fully potty trained and has learned to focus while outside. If off leash, she will likely just play and not understand why you are outside. The leash helps her focus. While she is outside on the leash, walk her around slowly to get things going and encourage her to sniff the ground to find a spot to go. Stay patient and persistent. Check out the Crate Training article linked below. That article will improve your potty trip timing, prevent more accidents while training, and give further tips on how to encourage pottying while outside. You can also combine the Crate Training method with the Tethering method while you are at home. The Tethering method can be found in the article linked below also. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Kioda
Rottweiler
14 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Kioda
Rottweiler
14 Weeks

Cn not stop him from urinating in his metal crate

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Val, First, if there is anything absorbent in the crate take it out. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed. Second, make sure that the crate is the right size. It should be just big enough for him to lie down, turn around, and stand up. Any larger and it won't encourage his natural desire to hold his bladder in a confined space. You can use something like a crate divider to make a current larger crate smaller, then adjust the divider as he grows to give more space. Third, a puppy can only hold his bladder for the number of months he is in age plus one during the day (at night their bladders slow down while asleep to let them hold it longer). At 14 weeks he cannot hold it for longer than 3-4 hours during the day. Any longer will force him to have an accident and after enough accidents he will loose his natural desire to keep the space clean and you won't be able to use the crate for potty training anymore. Fourth, puppies that have been forced to eliminate in a confined space often will loose their desire to hold it in a small space, so if that happened at your house or if you purchased him from somewhere that kept him in a confined space too long, such as a pet store, then he may have lost that desire. If that's the case you will need to use a different method for potty training. When you are home use the Tethering method from the article linked below for potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you must leave, until he is potty trained, set up an exercise pen in a room that he will not be able to go into as an adult - such as a laundry room (when nothing is loud or hot), a guest bathroom, office, or some of space that you can close off when he is older (he will learn its okay to potty in that area so you want it to be a space he won't have access to later). Inside the exercise pen put a real grass pad and follow the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. Since your end goal is to have him only potty outside and learn to hold it while in the rest of the house, you will not phase the exercise pen out and give him more freedom like the method mentions. Instead, you will use the exercise pen until he can hold his bladder the entire time you are gone and no longer needs the grass pad at all, but can wait to be taken outside to go potty when you get home. At that point you will get rid of the grass pads cold-turkey. Exercise Pen method - it mentions using a litter box but use a disposable real grass pad instead and the steps are the same for both: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real-grass pad: https://www.freshpatch.com/products/fresh-patch-standard?variant=3477439297¤cy=USD&gclid=Cj0KCQjwxMjnBRCtARIsAGwWnBOJqxh1RqYYFk-H-J2IzG5pju6J-5i4VVN71dcx8l-8kcMfq-cxX_AaAvnWEALw_wcB To help him learn not to potty in the crate anymore so that you can use it later once he is potty trained to prevent destructive chewing if needed, start leaving the door to it open and feeding him his meals in there, so that he can go in and out and will eat food in there, to help him associate it with eating and not peeing. Right now he should not be confined in there if he has lost his desire to hold his bladder in a confined space though - try removing anything absorbent and resizing the crate for him, to find out if you truly cannot use the crate though, before moving onto more complicated methods. Finally, also thoroughly clean the crate with a cleaner that contains enzymes to remove the pee and poop smells - only enzymes remove those smells well enough for a dog not to still smell it. Look for the word enzyme or enzymatic on the cleaner bottle - not all pet cleaners have enzymes so be sure to look. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Ocho
Rottweiler
10 Weeks
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Ocho
Rottweiler
10 Weeks

We have been trying to potty train our puppy and it hasn't been consistent. We've gotten it down to him going out in the morning and and in the evenings when we get home, but he tends to pee often in the house regardless. Sometimes after he comes in from using the restroom he immediately pees moments after coming inside on the carpet.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Prez, Check out the article that I have linked below. I suggest following the "Crate Training" method to stop the accidents from happening. As long as regular accidents are happening inside he won't make a lot of progress going potty outside. Also be aware that at this age he physically cannot hold his bladder for longer than 2-3 hours during the day. Puppies can generally hold their bladders no longer than the number of months they are in age plus one, meaning that at ten weeks he can hold his bladder for 3 hours maximum, 2 normally. After that time he will be forced to have an accident. For potty training to be successful he needs to be taken outside about every 1.5 hours to help him learn faster. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside For the peeing as soon as he gets inside it sounds like he is either submissive/excited peeing, or has a medical condition that needs to be evaluated by your veterinarian, such as a urinary tract infection for example. If the peeing is happening when you touch or yell at him it is probably submissive peeing. If it happens when he gets really excited, such as when someone comes home or rough houses with him, then it is probably excited peeing. If it happens even when things are calm, I suggest speaking with your vet to rule out medical causes that can make it hard for him to hold his bladder. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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