How to Potty Train a Rottweiler Puppy

Medium
1-6 Months
General

Introduction

One of the first things any new puppy owner has to face is that their first job as a new puppy owner is to teach your pooch not to go potty in the house--better known as potty training. Your little Rottie is smart, quick to learn, and loves to please you. This is the perfect combination for anyone who is trying to potty train their pup. One of the biggest reasons for unsuccessful potty training is that the owner has not learned how to show their pup what is expected of him right from the start. One of the other major players in the game is not having enough time to properly train your pup. It will take time and consistent practice in order to succeed with potty training your Rottweiler puppy. 

Defining Tasks

Today's assignment, should you decide to accept it, is to take your new Rottie pup and train him that the only place he is permitted to go potty is outside in the yard. At the same time, you will be teaching him to hold his bladder and bowels for longer periods of time and that going potty in the house is never an acceptable form of behavior. Bear in mind that you should pick one spot in your yard for your pup to use as his potty. This will help with the whole training process and keep the rest of your yard much cleaner. 

Getting Started

Keep in mind that the best time to potty train your Rottie pup is from the moment you get out of the car with him on his first day home. Start out by taking him to the spot in your yard you have designated as his personal potty area the moment you bring him home, even before you take him inside for the first time. This helps set the stage for future potty training. 

To complete training, you will need:

  • A crate – To give your pup a place to go when you have to go out, go to bed, or can't watch him
  • Treats – No training is going to be successful without a way to reward him
  • Leash – For taking him out
  • Cleaning supplies – For those occasional accidents

Along with all of this, you are also going to need a large supply of patience and, of course, the time to spend taking your pup outside until he gets the idea and starts going potty outside where he should and not inside the house. 

The Leash Method

Most Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Find a spot in your yard
Spend a little time looking around your yard looking for the perfect spot to turn in to your pup's potty spot. It should be close enough that your pup won't have an accident on the way there. At the same time, try to choose a spot where any odors are not likely to make it into your home.
Step
2
Let's go outside
Pick a verbal cue, one that is easy to remember, such as "Let's go out" or "Time to go outside" and use it each time you go through the door with your pup on the way to the potty. Go ahead and hook him to his leash, use the cue and take him out to his spot. Wait for him to do his business.
Step
3
Good boy!
When your pup finishes going potty, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
4
Build a routine
The best way to potty train your Rottie is to set a timer, put him on his leash, and take him out every half hour at first, as well as after naps, meals, large drinks, playtime, first thing in the morning, and last thing at night. Each time you take him out and he does his business, be sure you praise him and give him a treat.
Step
5
When you are inside
While you and your pup are inside, it is your job to keep a close eye on him. Any time he looks like he might need to go, take him right out. When he goes, reward him. If not, take him back inside, watch him like a hawk and get back on schedule. It won't take long and he will be fully potty trained.
Recommend training method?

The No, Not There Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
First, choose your spot
The first thing you need to do is choose the spot in your yard where your pup can go potty. This is important, as he needs to have a place to go that he can call his own. It will also make the training go faster.
Step
2
This is your potty
Put your pup on his leash and take him outside. Walk him over the spot you want him to use. Give him some time (up to 15 minutes) to go. If he does, that's great! Praise him and give him a treat. If not, no worries, just take him back inside.
Step
3
Eyes on the target
In this case, the target is your pup. Watch him like a hawk and the moment he looks as though he might be thinking about going potty in your home, say "NO!" in a firm, but not angry voice. Then hook him to his leash and take him straight outside so he can potty.
Step
4
Rewards for success
Every time your pup goes potty where he should, be sure to give him a treat and praise him. The idea is to teach your pup that he gets the goodies when he goes potty where he is supposed to.
Step
5
Add to his time
Start slowly building up the amount of time between when gets to go outside. This will help him to build the necessary stamina and control over his bladder and bowels needed for him to go for several hours at a time between potty breaks.
Recommend training method?

The By the Clock Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
If you don't have a clock
If for some reason you don’t have a clock or timer handy, run out to your local discount department store and grab one.
Step
2
Set your schedule
Set your schedule up so you can take a break and take your puppy out every 30 minutes to go potty. Consistency is very important at the beginning, it helps to set the stage for what you expect of him in the future.
Step
3
Take your pup out
When the timer goes off, be sure to put your dog on his leash and then take him outside to the designated spot in the yard.
Step
4
Keep him there
Keep your pup out in the yard until he goes potty. If he has not gone after 15 minutes, you can take him back inside and try again in another 15 minutes.
Step
5
While inside
While you are inside with your pup, be sure to keep a close eye on him. If at any time your pup looks like he might need to go potty, go ahead and take him straight outside. When he does go, be sure to praise him and treat him.
Step
6
The rest
The rest is all about working with your pup, to extend the time between when you take him outside. With time and patience, your pup will soon learn where his potty is and that he gets good things for going potty there.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Athena
Rottweiler
10 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Athena
Rottweiler
10 Weeks

My beautiful little girl won’t use the bathroom outside! She’s very scary of the outside and when I do finally get her out there she either just sits or plays. How can I break her?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Declan, First, spend a lot of time outside with her, playing, teaching commands, and simply hanging out reading a book. You want to make going outside familiar, normal and pleasant for her so that she gets over her fears. Whenever she investigates something that she is scared of, praise her and give treats - carry small treats or pieces of her food in a ziplock bag in your pocket while outside with her to help her get over her fears. Once she is over her fears, being distracted while outside is completely normal at her age. It can take a lot of patience to keep puppies focused while outside. Take her potty on a leash even if you have a fenced in yard. She should be taken on a leash for several months, until she is fully potty trained and has learned to focus while outside. If off leash, she will likely just play and not understand why you are outside. The leash helps her focus. While she is outside on the leash, walk her around slowly to get things going and encourage her to sniff the ground to find a spot to go. Stay patient and persistent. Check out the Crate Training article linked below. That article will improve your potty trip timing, prevent more accidents while training, and give further tips on how to encourage pottying while outside. You can also combine the Crate Training method with the Tethering method while you are at home. The Tethering method can be found in the article linked below also. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Athena's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
bruno
Rottweiler
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
bruno
Rottweiler
6 Months

my dog is 6 months old and ever since we got him we have been poddy training him but he would always pee and poop inside even though we take him out 4 times a day. and also is it bad that my dog is 6 months old and he is not poddy trained?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Antonella, Not all puppies are 100% trustworthy by 6 months, but you should be past the point of daily accidents. If you are having daily accidents, I would say you should switch approaches. I highly recommend a strict crate training protocol - the accidents need to happen to make further progress, the way to stop the accidents is to limit pup's freedom to only times when their bladder is empty. Any time they don't go potty when you take them, or it has been more than an hour since they last pottied outside, they should be in a crate (with a chew toy). This can seem harsh, but strict crate training now can solve this problem much quicker than anything else and lead to years of trustworthiness and future freedom. Where as if you don't do it, this could be an ongoing issue that gets harder and leads to less freedom later in life. It's short term strictness to gain something super important for life. Check out the article linked below. Since pup is older, pup can be crated for as long as 6 hours when you are at work when absolutely necessary (no longer than that though at this age during the day). When you are home, take pup outside to potty every 3 hours though. If pup goes potty outside, give one hour of supervised freedom out of the crate. After that one hour, put pup back in the crate until time for the next potty trip, to ensure pup doesn't have an accident (which need to stop for outside potty training to work well). If doesn't go potty when you take them, bring them back inside after 15 minutes of walking them around, put pup in the crate, then try again in 30-60 minutes. Repeat taking pup potty every 30-60 minutes until pup finally goes, then you have give the one hour of freedom again before crating. As pup becomes potty trained, you will be able to push the freedom to 1.5 hours, then 2 hours, then 3 hours, but don't rush that process or the whole thing might take longer. Potty training usually takes most puppies at least 2 months. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to bruno's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Kioda
Rottweiler
14 Weeks
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Kioda
Rottweiler
14 Weeks

Cn not stop him from urinating in his metal crate

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Val, First, if there is anything absorbent in the crate take it out. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed. Second, make sure that the crate is the right size. It should be just big enough for him to lie down, turn around, and stand up. Any larger and it won't encourage his natural desire to hold his bladder in a confined space. You can use something like a crate divider to make a current larger crate smaller, then adjust the divider as he grows to give more space. Third, a puppy can only hold his bladder for the number of months he is in age plus one during the day (at night their bladders slow down while asleep to let them hold it longer). At 14 weeks he cannot hold it for longer than 3-4 hours during the day. Any longer will force him to have an accident and after enough accidents he will loose his natural desire to keep the space clean and you won't be able to use the crate for potty training anymore. Fourth, puppies that have been forced to eliminate in a confined space often will loose their desire to hold it in a small space, so if that happened at your house or if you purchased him from somewhere that kept him in a confined space too long, such as a pet store, then he may have lost that desire. If that's the case you will need to use a different method for potty training. When you are home use the Tethering method from the article linked below for potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you must leave, until he is potty trained, set up an exercise pen in a room that he will not be able to go into as an adult - such as a laundry room (when nothing is loud or hot), a guest bathroom, office, or some of space that you can close off when he is older (he will learn its okay to potty in that area so you want it to be a space he won't have access to later). Inside the exercise pen put a real grass pad and follow the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below. Since your end goal is to have him only potty outside and learn to hold it while in the rest of the house, you will not phase the exercise pen out and give him more freedom like the method mentions. Instead, you will use the exercise pen until he can hold his bladder the entire time you are gone and no longer needs the grass pad at all, but can wait to be taken outside to go potty when you get home. At that point you will get rid of the grass pads cold-turkey. Exercise Pen method - it mentions using a litter box but use a disposable real grass pad instead and the steps are the same for both: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real-grass pad: https://www.freshpatch.com/products/fresh-patch-standard?variant=3477439297¤cy=USD&gclid=Cj0KCQjwxMjnBRCtARIsAGwWnBOJqxh1RqYYFk-H-J2IzG5pju6J-5i4VVN71dcx8l-8kcMfq-cxX_AaAvnWEALw_wcB To help him learn not to potty in the crate anymore so that you can use it later once he is potty trained to prevent destructive chewing if needed, start leaving the door to it open and feeding him his meals in there, so that he can go in and out and will eat food in there, to help him associate it with eating and not peeing. Right now he should not be confined in there if he has lost his desire to hold his bladder in a confined space though - try removing anything absorbent and resizing the crate for him, to find out if you truly cannot use the crate though, before moving onto more complicated methods. Finally, also thoroughly clean the crate with a cleaner that contains enzymes to remove the pee and poop smells - only enzymes remove those smells well enough for a dog not to still smell it. Look for the word enzyme or enzymatic on the cleaner bottle - not all pet cleaners have enzymes so be sure to look. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Kioda's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Roxy
Rottweiler x Japanese Akita
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Roxy
Rottweiler x Japanese Akita
4 Months

Why does she keep trying to hump my other female dogs face?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question about Roxy. This is most likely a dominance-related behavior that she will grow out of as she gets older. Check with your vet about Roxy's vaccine schedule to see when she can begin her positive reinforcement obedience training and socialization. She is a mix of two headstrong breeds and you will need to know how to handle her in all situations. She's a cutie and I am sure she will excel at every level of training. Give her a chance to shine (and to release energy) by engaging her intelligent mind in training! She'll love you for it and no longer have time to continue the mounting behavior. Good luck!

Add a comment to Roxy's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Ocho
Rottweiler
10 Weeks
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Ocho
Rottweiler
10 Weeks

We have been trying to potty train our puppy and it hasn't been consistent. We've gotten it down to him going out in the morning and and in the evenings when we get home, but he tends to pee often in the house regardless. Sometimes after he comes in from using the restroom he immediately pees moments after coming inside on the carpet.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Prez, Check out the article that I have linked below. I suggest following the "Crate Training" method to stop the accidents from happening. As long as regular accidents are happening inside he won't make a lot of progress going potty outside. Also be aware that at this age he physically cannot hold his bladder for longer than 2-3 hours during the day. Puppies can generally hold their bladders no longer than the number of months they are in age plus one, meaning that at ten weeks he can hold his bladder for 3 hours maximum, 2 normally. After that time he will be forced to have an accident. For potty training to be successful he needs to be taken outside about every 1.5 hours to help him learn faster. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside For the peeing as soon as he gets inside it sounds like he is either submissive/excited peeing, or has a medical condition that needs to be evaluated by your veterinarian, such as a urinary tract infection for example. If the peeing is happening when you touch or yell at him it is probably submissive peeing. If it happens when he gets really excited, such as when someone comes home or rough houses with him, then it is probably excited peeing. If it happens even when things are calm, I suggest speaking with your vet to rule out medical causes that can make it hard for him to hold his bladder. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Ocho's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
zoey
Rottweiler
6 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
zoey
Rottweiler
6 Weeks

we have four dottie pups that we have raised from birth. they have been using puppy pads to go potty on for the past so. weeks and are finally ready to start potty training. is there any tips to kind of break them from the puppy pad and help them learn they need to go outside to potty now and now on the puppy pads ?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. You've got training to do times four! I hope you have some help! I think key to training a puppy to potty outside as opposed to inside is to make many visits outside per day. Six week old puppies do not have mature bladders, so I would suggest every thirty minutes. As they get the idea, you can extend the time frame bit by bit. Be sure to clean any accidents inside the house with an enzymatic cleaner because it is really the only thing that removes the odor so that the puppies do not continue to pee inside. As well, make it a habit to take the puppies outside immediately upon waking, right after eating, and after playtime. This guide has many excellent suggestions and tips. Take a look to see what may work for your gang of four: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. All the best and have fun with the puppies!

Add a comment to zoey's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Beauty
Rottweiler
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Beauty
Rottweiler
9 Weeks

I’m finding it really hard to potty train her. I’ve tried putting her in her cage for 30 minutes after eating and she still goes in her cage. I have also tried watching her.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Potty training can be very difficult. One thing to keep in mind is that puppies as young as yours typically have to go to the bathroom about 20 minutes after they eat. And she will only be able to hold her bladder for up to 2 hours after her last drink of water. I am going to provide you with a bunch of information on potty training to help speed the process along for you. House-training your dog or puppy requires patience, commitment and lots of consistency. Accidents are part of the process, but if you follow these basic house-training guidelines, you can get the newest member of your family on the right track in a few weeks’ time. Establish a routine Like babies, puppies do best on a regular schedule. The schedule teaches them that there are times to eat, times to play and times to do their business. Generally speaking, a puppy can control their bladder one hour for every month of age. So if your puppy is two months old, they can hold it for about two hours. Don't go longer than this between bathroom breaks or they’re guaranteed to have an accident. Take your puppy outside frequently—at least every two hours—and immediately after they wake up, during and after playing, and after eating or drinking. Pick a bathroom spot outside, and always take your puppy (on a leash) to that spot. While your puppy is relieving themselves, use a specific word or phrase that you can eventually use before they go to remind them what to do. Take them out for a longer walk or some playtime only after they have eliminated. Reward your puppy every time they eliminate outdoors. Praise or give treats—but remember to do so immediately after they’ve finished, not after they come back inside. This step is vital, because rewarding your dog for going outdoors is the only way to teach what's expected of them. Before rewarding, be sure they’re finished. Puppies are easily distracted and if you praise too soon, they may forget to finish until they’re back in the house. Put your puppy on a regular feeding schedule. What goes into a puppy on a schedule comes out of a puppy on a schedule. Depending on their age, puppies usually need to be fed three or four times a day. Feeding your puppy at the same times each day will make it more likely that they'll eliminate at consistent times as well, making housetraining easier for both of you. Pick up your puppy's water dish about two and a half hours before bedtime to reduce the likelihood that they'll need to relieve themselves during the night. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without needing a bathroom break. If your puppy does wake you up in the night, don't make a big deal of it; otherwise they will think it is time to play and won't want to go back to sleep. Turn on as few lights as possible, don't talk to or play with your puppy, take them out and then return them to bed. Supervise your puppy Don't give your puppy an opportunity to soil in the house; keep an eye on them whenever they’re indoors. Tether your puppy to you or a nearby piece of furniture with a six-foot leash if you are not actively training or playing. Watch for signs that your puppy needs to go out. Some signs are obvious, such as barking or scratching at the door, squatting, restlessness, sniffing around or circling. When you see these signs, immediately grab the leash and take them outside to their bathroom spot. If they eliminate, praise them and reward with a treat. Keep your puppy on leash in the yard. During the housetraining process, your yard should be treated like any other room in your house. Give your puppy some freedom in the house and yard only after they become reliably housetrained. When you can't supervise, confine When you're unable to watch your puppy at all times, restrict them to an area small enough that they won't want to eliminate there. Browse Dog Crates on Amazon.com The space should be just big enough to comfortably stand, lie down and turn around. You can use a portion of a bathroom or laundry room blocked off with baby gates. Or you may want to crate train your puppy. (Be sure to learn how to use a crate humanely as a method of confinement.) If your puppy has spent several hours in confinement, you'll need to take them directly to their bathroom spot as soon as you return. Mistakes happen Expect your puppy to have a few accidents in the house—it's a normal part of housetraining. Here's what to do when that happens: Interrupt your puppy when you catch them in the act. Make a startling noise (be careful not to scare them) or say "OUTSIDE!" and immediately take them to their bathroom spot. Praise your pup and give a treat if they finish there. Don't punish your puppy for eliminating in the house. If you find a soiled area, it's too late to administer a correction. Just clean it up. Rubbing your puppy's nose in it, taking them to the spot and scolding them or any other punishment will only make them afraid of you or afraid to eliminate in your presence. Punishment will often do more harm than good. Clean the soiled area thoroughly. Puppies are highly motivated to continue soiling in areas that smell like urine or feces. It's extremely important that you use these supervision and confinement procedures to minimize the number of accidents. If you allow your puppy to eliminate frequently in the house, they'll get confused about where they’re supposed to go, which will prolong the housetraining process. Make plans for when you're away If you have to be away from home more than four or five hours a day, this may not be the best time for you to get a puppy. Instead, you may want to consider an older dog who can wait for your return. If you already have a puppy and must be away for long periods of time, you'll need to: Arrange for someone, such as a responsible neighbor or a professional pet sitter, to take them for bathroom breaks. Alternatively, train them to eliminate in a specific place indoors. Be aware, however, that doing this can prolong the process of housetraining. Teaching your puppy to eliminate on newspaper may create a life-long surface preference, meaning that even as an adult they may eliminate on any newspaper lying around the living room. If you plan to paper-train, confine them to an area with enough room for a sleeping space, a playing space and a separate place to eliminate. In the designated elimination area, use either newspapers (cover the area with several layers of newspaper) or a sod box. To make a sod box, place sod in a container such as a child's small, plastic swimming pool. You can also find dog-litter products at a pet supply store. If you have to clean up an accident outside the designated elimination area, put the soiled rags or paper towels inside it afterward to help your puppy recognize the scented area as the place where they are supposed to eliminate. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

Add a comment to Beauty's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Lilly
Rottweiler
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Lilly
Rottweiler
5 Months

Potty training

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

I am sending you information on potty training as well as crate training if you decide to utilize a crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

Add a comment to Lilly's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
zeus
Mastiff
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
zeus
Mastiff
4 Months

our puppy was doing well with his potty training for a couple weeks and now he all of a sudden is peeing all over the house, on the carpets, the couch and even our bed. we take him outside after he eats, after naps, after he takes large drinks of water, after play time and after naps. when he does his business outside he is rewarded with a treat. we also reward him with a treat if we catch him trying to go and he stops and goes outside. if he does go in the house we leave him in his crate for awhile. we have also tried the spanking method by putting his face to the mess and spanking him and then putting in his crate. we have tried many methods but nothing seems to be working. we have been potty training him since we've had him he was about a month and a half. we have tried so many different methods and noting seems to help. something to know about zeus is that since we've had him he's been very shy and quiet. he very rarely cries or barks

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training just in case you decide to use a crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

Add a comment to zeus's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Debo
Rottweiler
16 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Debo
Rottweiler
16 Weeks

My husband is opposed to crate training so we are training Debo using the leash method. It has only been 4 days that we have had him. He grew up with his Mum, Dad and brothers/sisters in a wonderful outside area and family kennel. So he is new to being an indoor dog. He is doing fantastic as long as I keep an eye on him. Today his 'accidents' occurred when we weren't doing our job. My question is, what are male dog potty patterns usually like? He's my first male. When I take him out in the morning, I can get him to poo in about 5 minutes and then pace him up and down to get him to wee in about 15 minutes. In the day, I take him out and he spends most of the time wanting to go back inside. Again, we pace up and down together and then I stop for him to handle business. He will either poo or wee but I can't get him to do both in one session. Once he urinates or defecates...he just sits and pulls to go inside. As we are out already for 15 minutes, I take him back in. Keep him on the lead and take him out in 15-20 minutes. Then he will do the other. I have always had girls (black lab and American Staffordshire)and they alaway did both in succession. Is this normal for a male dog? Is he being stubborn and trying to dominate? I have stopped giving treats as I thought it distracts him. I do say good boy tee-tee (dink-dink) outside in the best chipper tone I can and give him a pat on the head. I look forward to your response as I haven't found any answers online! Kind Regards,
Danielle

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello Danielle, Males do tend to pee more easily than they poop due to a desire to mark with their urine. They may also not empty their pee all the way if you don't insist due to a desire to mark several areas instead of one area. Those tendencies may not start until pup is more sexually mature though, so that isn't necessarily what's going on here. At this age, if it's cold where you live this time of year I suspect pup isn't doing both at once because they want to get back inside where its warmer so it's an issue of motivation. Pup's potty schedule also may not be regulated yet since they will need to pee far more often than poop at this age. Once pup is older they should be able to hold their pee better so that they both pee and poop at the same time. Most puppies will need to pee right when they wake up and every 1-2 hours after that. They will need to poop 15-45 minutes after eating, after running around a lot, and usually 2-3 times per day. If you are taking pup outside to pee, bringing them back inside and feeding, then taking them outside again after their meal to poop - that is actually a pretty normal potty schedule for a young puppy, since a puppy generally won't have to poop after waking up, but instead after eating. Pup may also simply not be finishing going potty because of the discomfort being out in the cold. I would work on teaching a potty command, like Go Potty. Walk pup around on leash like you are doing, tell pup to "Go Potty", then praise and reward pup after they go (you can try treats again for this, but hide them in your pocket to distract pup less and just use pup's kibble so its rewarding but not overly exciting). After pup pees, walk pup around for another 15 minutes to encourage pooping if pup hasn't pooped during that part of the day (expect pup to likely need to poop in the morning, afternoon and evening, one time each - sometimes only in the morning and evening), telling pup to Go Potty, and repeat the praise and reward if pup goes. If it's very cold where you live you may need to give pup a doggie jacket that won't hinder movement or going potty, to keep them warm enough while outside so they can focus on going potty better. Something for sports and outdoor use not made for cute looks, like www.ruffwear.com type jackets. Once pup has learned the Go Potty command, you can phase out the treats again if you wish. This issue will also most likely improve as pup gets older and has better control of their bladder to coordinate the two together. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Debo's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Roxy
Rottweiler
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Roxy
Rottweiler
3 Months

I need my pet to be potty trained

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

Add a comment to Roxy's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Gritty
Rottweiler
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Gritty
Rottweiler
5 Months

This is a tough one. My babes is so well trained. An amazing listener and pleaser. So so awesome with kids of all ages. Oh my gosh, he loves so much and we absolutely love him more!! Anyway, we have potty training down almost fully. The only problem is that he just expects us to know he has to go and gives no warning. If you don’t catch him right away at the door he will pee. I bought door bells for on the door handle and he doesn’t like them at all. He doesn’t wine or speak to us, nothing to get our intention if it’s not already on him anyway. When he does pee in the house after waiting on us to let him out he will go to the kitchen and pee in the same spot. I don’t know how to teach him to somehow tell me he has to go or to stop the habit of peeing in one spot after only waiting to go out. And by waiting, I mean he’s impatient (I get that when you gotta go, you gotta go.) and doesn’t stand at the door very long at all. I’ve watched to know what I’m looking for.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This is something that will improve with age. Which I know isn't quite the answer you want to hear. Every time you take him out to go potty, ask him to sit by the door and make him wait for a few seconds, and increase the amount of time as you go along. He will associate sitting by the door with going potty. But with younger dogs, they often wait until the last minute and then suddenly have to go NOW. But he is at an age where he is going to start maturing exponentially over the next few months, so you can really start to fine tune this. By 9 months of age, you should have this potty routine down pretty well.

Add a comment to Gritty's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Daisy
Rottweiler
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Daisy
Rottweiler
11 Weeks

She does not go to the bathroom fully. She is almost 3 months old, and refuses to hold her bladder. Even using the crate. We have attempted multiple times. I took her outside for about 15 mins. she did not go. I decided because she did not go to put her back in the crate. The crate is only big enough for her to lay down stand up and change positions. there is not any extra room. While in the crate for approx. 20 mins she pooped. I also used the crate when going out to dinner. She was taken outside and peed. I was gone for under two hours, and she peed in the crate. Its almost as if she needs to be taken outside every hour, or she will have an accident.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
836 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Are recently have you begun potty training? If you just started it can take practice for pup to learn to hold it and she really may have to go every hour if awake. She should be able to progress to 2 hours, by increasing 15 minute increments once pup shows she is holding it consistently for the hour between potty trips. Make sure there isn't anything absorbent in the crate like a dog bed or towel. If there is, remove it and use something non-absorbent like www.primopads or k9ballistics crate mats. If there is something absorbent in the crate, removing that alone could fix the issue. When outside, walk pup around slowly on leash, telling pup happily to "Go Potty" (even if you have to fake the happy). After pup goes, praise and give three small treats, one at a time. Hide the treats in a pocket in a baggie so seeing the treats doesn't distract while pup is still looking for a spot to go. After pup pees, repeat the process again, walking pup around for 15 minutes when you know they may need to poop (the movement helps stimulate the urge to poop), telling pup again to "Go Potty" and rewarding with treats if pup also poops. If pup won't go, you may need to tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash and watch for signs they need to go, instead of crating between outings. Puppies tend to have to poop 15-45 minutes after eating or after moving a lot. Even if pup just peed, if you take pup out too soon after eating, they may not feel the need to poop until 20 minutes later. Keeping them tethered to yourself can help you spot sniffing, circling, whining, pulling away, or squatting - which can all signal pup is ready to go back outside and go. Pay attention to pup's body's schedule. Most puppies have a somewhat regular time they poop, like fifteen minutes after eating, or 45 minutes after eating, or right after a fast paced game of fetch during a certain part of the morning. If you can notice the trend, then you will be more likely to succeed in trying to get them to go when you take them. Don't expect pup to pee and poop at the same time. Most puppies take another 10-15 minutes of walking around to also poop, until they are older and learn to do both together naturally. Taking pup to a calm area for pooping needs can help pup focus also. Pooping is more vulnerable and takes more concentration than peeing. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Daisy's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd