How to Potty Train a Shiba Inu Puppy

Medium
1-3 Months
General

Introduction

The Shiba Inu is a small, agile, intelligent hunting dog, originating in Japan. They have a reputation for being stubborn to train. While it is true that they can be of an independent nature, making them appear stubborn, this natural independence coincides with natural fastidiousness that often accompanies hunting breeds. Tapping into this natural instinct while potty training your Shiba Inu may make potty training your dog more successful and less stressful. 

Consistency and a positive approach are key to training a Shiba Inu to do anything--including go potty! The trick will be getting your Shiba Inu to understand what bathroom habits you want him to pick up and to understand where you want him to relieve himself, and to reinforce desirable behaviors and location.

Defining Tasks

Shiba Inu puppies can begin house training or potty training as soon as possible, as early as  7 weeks of age, when they beginning to get control of their bladder. Shiba Inus can take up to 5 months of age to have full control of their bladder and other body functions, so be patient and do not expect more than your dog can deliver during potty training. Make sure to make bathroom opportunities frequent. Remember, Shiba Inus are small dogs that have correspondingly small bladders--be realistic about how often your dog will need the opportunity to relieve himself during training. Provide your dog ample opportunity to go potty in the correct area, avoid accidents with vigilance. Punishment for mistakes in potty behavior is generally not effective. Using positive reinforcement to put going potty on command, or associating going potty with a particular location like outside or in a designated corner of your yard, is the most effective way to train a Shiba Inu puppy or older dog to go potty.

Getting Started

Potty training your Shiba Inu means positive reinforcement, lots of treats, and lots of praise. Avoid negative reinforcement or punishment for potty training as it is usually counterproductive and confusing for a Shiba Inu. Shiba Inus are sensitive dogs and punishment is ineffective, often resulting in what appears to be stubborn behavior. Make sure you have a clearly established potty area and are consistent with your Shiba Inu. Establish a clear potty area,  either outside or with an indoor litter box or puppy pads. Be prepared to supervise your dog and watch for signs that he needs to have a potty break, such as sniffing around. Schedule meals for your dog so you can predict when he will need to eliminate. Have a deodorizer available so that when accidents happen you can counteract odors and prevent future occurrences of soiling the same area.

The Schedule and Monitor Method

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Step
1
Schedule feeding
Feed and water your dog at regular intervals throughout the day so you can predict when he will need to go potty, usually an hour, to two hours after being fed. Younger puppies may need to go every hour.
Step
2
Follow with potty breaks
Take your Shiba Inu for frequent bathroom breaks, especially after eating and drinking.
Step
3
Do not leave for long periods
If you are not available to take your dog for required potty breaks, hire a dog sitter. A stay at home neighbor may be able to assist if you need to be away from the house or at work for several hours. A young dog can not be expected to go 8 hours without the opportunity for a potty break.
Step
4
Avoid odors
If your Shiba Inu has an accident, clean the area thoroughly with an enzymatic cleaner so that odor does not remain, as this will encourage your dog to use that area again as a bathroom.
Step
5
Increase time
Gradually increase the length of time you expect your dog to be able to “hold it” as he matures. Very young puppies need hourly breaks, puppies need breaks every 3 or 4 hours. A mature dog may be able to go up to 8 hours without a break. Remember that whenever you feed or water your dog he will need a break shortly afterwards to relieve himself, so maintain a workable schedule when you are available to let your dog out at appropriate times.
Recommend training method?

The Prevent Accidents Method

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Step
1
Supervise
Supervise your Shiba Inu closely at all times, keep him in a room with you.
Step
2
Contain
If you can not supervise your dog, put him in a crate with a favorite blanket and toys. Shiba Inus like to “den up" so your dog will usually adapt to this easily. Your dog will not soil his bed so a crate prevents him from going potty while he is contained.
Step
3
Catch potty need
When your Shiba Inu shows signs of needing to go potty by circling, sniffing around, or squatting, say “no” firmly. Do not startle or punish your pup.
Step
4
Take to potty area
Take your Shiba Inu to his potty area, either outside, to a litter box, or puppy pads.
Step
5
Reinforce correct potty habits
Say, “go potty” and wait for your dog to go to the bathroom. Keep him in the contained area until he goes. When your dog goes in his potty area, give him treats and praise.
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The Crate Training Method

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Step
1
Crate
Prepare a crate for your Shiba Inu with blankets and toys. Shiba Inus like to “den” and adapt well to crates. Keep your Shiba Inu in the crate.
Step
2
Take for potty breaks
Every hour, take your Shiba Inu outside to his potty area. If he does not relieve himself, immediately take him back inside and put him in his crate.
Step
3
Reward potty
If he urinates or has a bowel movement in his potty area, reward him with treats.
Step
4
Provide play
Play with your Shiba Inu for several minutes either outside or back in the house before returning him to his crate after a successful potty break.
Step
5
Increase time between breaks
Increase the length of time your Shiba Inu remains in his crate between bathroom breaks. Increase the length of time he can remain out of his crate after successful potty breaks until your dog has established where he can go potty and is controlling his body functions for an adequate length of time.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Simba
Shiba Inu
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Simba
Shiba Inu
5 Months

Simba eats his poops anytime he pooped in the house but he did not eat those if he went to the backyard.

I feed him all goof food , I made for him. I feed him minerals supplement once a day like a week alreay but he still eats his poop. Could you please help. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
30 Dog owners recommended

Hello Vivian, Poop eating can unfortunately be a strong habit. Since he is not eating it while outside, then I suggest improving his potty training routine, until he is consistently no longer pooping inside. When you take him to go potty outside, clean up his poop right away to prevent him from learning to eat those too. When he is inside attach him to himself with a leash so that he cannot sneak away to poop out of your sight. If you can supervise him 100% without attaching him to yourself, then you can simply supervise him, but if he is still sneaking away, then he needs to be attached to you while free. When you cannot watch him, then place him into a crate that is large enough for him to stand up, turn around, and lay down, but not large enough for him to poop in one end and stand in the other end away from it. Too large of a crate might make the problem worse. If you already have a larger crate, then you can use a divider to block off part of the back of the crate to make it smaller, rather than buying a new crate. Work on his "Leave It" command, so that you can tell him to "Leave It" if he does have an accident and is getting ready to eat it. To teach "Leave It" check out this Wag! article bellow: https://wagwalking.com/training/leave-it I am not sure if the supplements that you are giving him are things like "Deter", "Forbid", or "Potty Mouth", but if you are not already trying those, you can add something to his food to make his poop taste bad, such as "Deter" or "Forbid". You can also try adding a few table spoons of pumpkin to his dog food, to make his poop taste bad. I would also recommend getting him checked out by your vet for parasites and worms. Eating poop is sometimes a sign of parasites. It can also be a sign of nutritional deficiencies, but if you are already sure that he is not lacking in a particular nutrient, you are making the poop taste bad by adding pumpkin or something similar, and he is parasite free, then you will simply need to attach him to you when he is free and crate him when you cannot watch him. If there is not an underlying health reason, you can break the habit, and you can help him to form other good habits, like chewing his own chew toys, then he will likely grow out of the habit when he can no longer practice it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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