How to Potty Train a Shiba Inu Puppy

Medium
1-3 Months
General

Introduction

The Shiba Inu is a small, agile, intelligent hunting dog, originating in Japan. They have a reputation for being stubborn to train. While it is true that they can be of an independent nature, making them appear stubborn, this natural independence coincides with natural fastidiousness that often accompanies hunting breeds. Tapping into this natural instinct while potty training your Shiba Inu may make potty training your dog more successful and less stressful. 

Consistency and a positive approach are key to training a Shiba Inu to do anything--including go potty! The trick will be getting your Shiba Inu to understand what bathroom habits you want him to pick up and to understand where you want him to relieve himself, and to reinforce desirable behaviors and location.

Defining Tasks

Shiba Inu puppies can begin house training or potty training as soon as possible, as early as  7 weeks of age, when they beginning to get control of their bladder. Shiba Inus can take up to 5 months of age to have full control of their bladder and other body functions, so be patient and do not expect more than your dog can deliver during potty training. Make sure to make bathroom opportunities frequent. Remember, Shiba Inus are small dogs that have correspondingly small bladders--be realistic about how often your dog will need the opportunity to relieve himself during training. Provide your dog ample opportunity to go potty in the correct area, avoid accidents with vigilance. Punishment for mistakes in potty behavior is generally not effective. Using positive reinforcement to put going potty on command, or associating going potty with a particular location like outside or in a designated corner of your yard, is the most effective way to train a Shiba Inu puppy or older dog to go potty.

Getting Started

Potty training your Shiba Inu means positive reinforcement, lots of treats, and lots of praise. Avoid negative reinforcement or punishment for potty training as it is usually counterproductive and confusing for a Shiba Inu. Shiba Inus are sensitive dogs and punishment is ineffective, often resulting in what appears to be stubborn behavior. Make sure you have a clearly established potty area and are consistent with your Shiba Inu. Establish a clear potty area,  either outside or with an indoor litter box or puppy pads. Be prepared to supervise your dog and watch for signs that he needs to have a potty break, such as sniffing around. Schedule meals for your dog so you can predict when he will need to eliminate. Have a deodorizer available so that when accidents happen you can counteract odors and prevent future occurrences of soiling the same area.

The Schedule and Monitor Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Schedule feeding
Feed and water your dog at regular intervals throughout the day so you can predict when he will need to go potty, usually an hour, to two hours after being fed. Younger puppies may need to go every hour.
Step
2
Follow with potty breaks
Take your Shiba Inu for frequent bathroom breaks, especially after eating and drinking.
Step
3
Do not leave for long periods
If you are not available to take your dog for required potty breaks, hire a dog sitter. A stay at home neighbor may be able to assist if you need to be away from the house or at work for several hours. A young dog can not be expected to go 8 hours without the opportunity for a potty break.
Step
4
Avoid odors
If your Shiba Inu has an accident, clean the area thoroughly with an enzymatic cleaner so that odor does not remain, as this will encourage your dog to use that area again as a bathroom.
Step
5
Increase time
Gradually increase the length of time you expect your dog to be able to “hold it” as he matures. Very young puppies need hourly breaks, puppies need breaks every 3 or 4 hours. A mature dog may be able to go up to 8 hours without a break. Remember that whenever you feed or water your dog he will need a break shortly afterwards to relieve himself, so maintain a workable schedule when you are available to let your dog out at appropriate times.
Recommend training method?

The Prevent Accidents Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Supervise
Supervise your Shiba Inu closely at all times, keep him in a room with you.
Step
2
Contain
If you can not supervise your dog, put him in a crate with a favorite blanket and toys. Shiba Inus like to “den up" so your dog will usually adapt to this easily. Your dog will not soil his bed so a crate prevents him from going potty while he is contained.
Step
3
Catch potty need
When your Shiba Inu shows signs of needing to go potty by circling, sniffing around, or squatting, say “no” firmly. Do not startle or punish your pup.
Step
4
Take to potty area
Take your Shiba Inu to his potty area, either outside, to a litter box, or puppy pads.
Step
5
Reinforce correct potty habits
Say, “go potty” and wait for your dog to go to the bathroom. Keep him in the contained area until he goes. When your dog goes in his potty area, give him treats and praise.
Recommend training method?

The Crate Training Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
Crate
Prepare a crate for your Shiba Inu with blankets and toys. Shiba Inus like to “den” and adapt well to crates. Keep your Shiba Inu in the crate.
Step
2
Take for potty breaks
Every hour, take your Shiba Inu outside to his potty area. If he does not relieve himself, immediately take him back inside and put him in his crate.
Step
3
Reward potty
If he urinates or has a bowel movement in his potty area, reward him with treats.
Step
4
Provide play
Play with your Shiba Inu for several minutes either outside or back in the house before returning him to his crate after a successful potty break.
Step
5
Increase time between breaks
Increase the length of time your Shiba Inu remains in his crate between bathroom breaks. Increase the length of time he can remain out of his crate after successful potty breaks until your dog has established where he can go potty and is controlling his body functions for an adequate length of time.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Laurie Haggart

Published: 01/25/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Simba
Shiba Inu
5 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Simba
Shiba Inu
5 Months

Simba eats his poops anytime he pooped in the house but he did not eat those if he went to the backyard.

I feed him all goof food , I made for him. I feed him minerals supplement once a day like a week alreay but he still eats his poop. Could you please help. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Vivian, Poop eating can unfortunately be a strong habit. Since he is not eating it while outside, then I suggest improving his potty training routine, until he is consistently no longer pooping inside. When you take him to go potty outside, clean up his poop right away to prevent him from learning to eat those too. When he is inside attach him to himself with a leash so that he cannot sneak away to poop out of your sight. If you can supervise him 100% without attaching him to yourself, then you can simply supervise him, but if he is still sneaking away, then he needs to be attached to you while free. When you cannot watch him, then place him into a crate that is large enough for him to stand up, turn around, and lay down, but not large enough for him to poop in one end and stand in the other end away from it. Too large of a crate might make the problem worse. If you already have a larger crate, then you can use a divider to block off part of the back of the crate to make it smaller, rather than buying a new crate. Work on his "Leave It" command, so that you can tell him to "Leave It" if he does have an accident and is getting ready to eat it. To teach "Leave It" check out this Wag! article bellow: https://wagwalking.com/training/leave-it I am not sure if the supplements that you are giving him are things like "Deter", "Forbid", or "Potty Mouth", but if you are not already trying those, you can add something to his food to make his poop taste bad, such as "Deter" or "Forbid". You can also try adding a few table spoons of pumpkin to his dog food, to make his poop taste bad. I would also recommend getting him checked out by your vet for parasites and worms. Eating poop is sometimes a sign of parasites. It can also be a sign of nutritional deficiencies, but if you are already sure that he is not lacking in a particular nutrient, you are making the poop taste bad by adding pumpkin or something similar, and he is parasite free, then you will simply need to attach him to you when he is free and crate him when you cannot watch him. If there is not an underlying health reason, you can break the habit, and you can help him to form other good habits, like chewing his own chew toys, then he will likely grow out of the habit when he can no longer practice it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
kino
Shiba Inu
8 Months
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Question
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kino
Shiba Inu
8 Months

How do I train Kino to pee on the pee tray? His pee tray is in his play pen, but he chooses to pee next to it instead.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Huishan, Use the "Crate Training" method from the article, "How to Litter Box Train a Chihuahua", that I have linked bellow until he is comfortable going potty on the tray. To use the "Crate Training" method simply substitute the litter box for the tray. Once is comfortable, then you can switch to whichever method you want to use for Potty Training or you can stick with that method. He also probably needs for you to add something more absorbent to the top of the pee tray until he gets used to going there. Plastic is not a normal surface for a dog to instinctively pee on. The holes in the plastic can also make the tray uncomfortable just to stand on, causing him to avoid even walking on it. To get him used to the tray you need to put something absorbent that reminds him of the outdoors on the top of the tray, in the middle area, for him to pee on at first. When he gets used to going potty on that, then you can gradually decrease the size of the absorbent area overtime. You can do this until you are able to remove it completely and he is only peeing on the tray. A small piece of grass sod or a pee pad covered with dirt or cat litter should work. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Rex
Shiba Inu
4 Months
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Question
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Rex
Shiba Inu
4 Months

Our dog Rex is only crated A night and when we are not home.. he can be he still does urinate in the crate, and he does not like the crate.. I am working on it to make it more homey to him any tips on how to correct that?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karalynne, First, you need to figure out why he is peeing in the crate. There are four common reasons why a dog pees in a crate: 1. The crate is too big or has absorbent material in it, like a plushy bed or towel. The crate should only be big enough for him to stand up, turn around, and lay down. If it's big enough that he can pee in one end and stand in the other end, then he will not be motivated by his natural desire to keep a confined space clean and will not hold his bladder in it. 2. Your puppy has learned not to hold his bladder in the crate through being forced to pee in a crate multiple times before --this usually happens when he is being crated for too long or you purchase a puppy from a pet store, shelter, or breeder that keeps the puppies in cages without potty breaks. 3. You are not letting him outside often enough -- A four month old puppy cannot hold his bladder for longer than 4-5 hours during the day --no matter what. They are physically incapable of it yet. 4. The dog has true separation anxiety --which is unusual for a 4-5 month old puppy unless something traumatic happened to him in a crate. Next, you need to thoroughly clean the crate with a spray or cleaner that contains ENZYMES. Only enzymes will break down pee and poop at a molecular level and fully remove the smell. Even bleach will not get rid of the smell completely because dogs' noses are so sensitive. If the area smells like pee or poop, it will confuse Rex and he will likely continue peeing in there. If the crate cannot be cleaned, then you will need a new crate -- preferably a different kind than he has now. For example, if he has a plastic one now, get a wire one instead. Next, once you know why he is peeing in the crate, then you need to address that issue. If his crate is too big, then either purchase a small enough crate OR if your crate came with a metal divider- which most wire crates do, then install that to block off the back of the crate and make it the correct size. You can then move the divider as he grows. If you have a wire crate, then you can also purchase metal dividers online by themselves. If there is any soft material that would absorb pee in the crate, then take it out. This includes pets, towels and newspaper. If he needs a bed in the crate, check out Primopads.com. They do not look fancy but their beds do provide firm support to make the crate more comfortable while being safe and encouraging potty training at the same time. They are great beds for puppies. You can do a soft bed later when he is not chewing household objects or having accidents any more. If he has been forced to pee in the crate so often that he has lost his natural desire to hold his pee in there, then you will need to use a different form of potty training. I suggest using the "Tethering" method from the article that I have linked below whenever anyone is home. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside When you are gone, then set up an exercise pen in an area of the house that he will never be allowed to go to as an adult, like a basement bathroom, safe heated garage, or unused guest bedroom with hard floors. Put him in the exercise pen with a food-stuffed chew toy and a chew-proof bed like a primo pad on one end, and put a disposable grass potty pad on the other end. Do NOT use pee pads for this. He needs to learn to ONLY go potty on grass inside the house and it needs to be in a room that is completely separate, behind a door that can be closed, so that after he is potty trained he cannot go back into that room to try to pee anymore - and will only pee outside. The grass needs to be real grass. Check out the link below of a real grass potty pad. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EQJ7I7Y/ref=psdc_3024225011_t3_B005G7S6UI Next, if you are not taking him potty often enough, then you need to change this or he will never be successful with crate training and it will end up causing him to loose his natural desire to hold his bladder in the crate. A puppy can only physically hold his bladder for the number of months he is in age plus one, and no longer than eight hours as an adult. At night, if the dog stays asleep, then he can hold it for longer because his bladder sort of shuts down while sleeping. You need to remove all food and water two hours before bed though. If you are gone all day, longer than he can hold it for, then you need to hire someone to come by the house to let him go potty midday or at least set up an exercise pen in an unused room with hard floors with a disposable grass pad in it and leave him in there when you are not at home. A crate will be easier for potty training in the long run though if you still have that option. The exercise pen should only be used as a last resort if he has lost his desire to hold his pee in a crate or you cannot get someone to come by to let him out if you are gone for longer than he can hold his bladder for. Finally, if his issue is true separation anxiety, then that is more complex than what I can get into here. You may need to hire a professional trainer to help you. Many puppies dislike the crate at first, but they do not have true separation anxiety. True separation anxiety usually involves at least a couple of other symptoms too, such as: Drooling, panting, self-destructive tendencies like licking, biting themselves, or trying to escape to the point of hurting themselves, unrelenting barking and whining that does not stop, shaking, peeing and pooping in the crate even though the dog is completely potty trained, or throwing up. A less intense dislike for the crate and boredom in the crate is common. To address that, follow the methods from the article that I have linked below - especially the "surprise" method, and make sure that you give him dog-food-stuffed chew toys like Kongs when you put him in the crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lily
Shiba Inu
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Lily
Shiba Inu
5 Months

Her doesn’t know how to let us know that she needs taken out to go potty. We have to take her out on a leash when she needs to go because we don’t have a fenced in area. We don’t know how to train her how to let us know when she needs taken out. I was thinking about setting up a bell, would that work?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bailey, A bell is a great way to train a dog to alert when they need to go outside. Also know that alerting when pup needs to go potty tends to come naturally several months AFTER pup is potty trained to hold it in between scheduled potty trips that you have initiated. The first goal is just for pup to no longer have accidents inside due to your diligence about confinement, supervision, and frequent potty trips outside. Once pup is only going potty outside and has developed a desire to keep your home clean - then that desire helps motivate pup to alert when they need to go. Most dogs will choose an alert on their own at that point, like barking, running to the door, nudging, ect...but if you don't like what they choose or want a more proactive approach, you can teach pup to ring a bell, just know that pup will probably need you to stick to the schedule and remind them to ring the bell on the way out for another month or two before they start ringing it on their own - expecting too much of pup in this area, and not sticking to your potty schedule because of that can cause potty training regressions. Bell ringing article: https://wagwalking.com/training/ring-a-bell-to-go-out Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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champ
Shiba Inu
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
champ
Shiba Inu
9 Weeks

so no matter what we do, champ does not poop on the pee/poop pad. I feel like it is because he is use to pooping and peeing outside. but we would like him to learn to use the pad as well. got any advice?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! If you’ve decided that pee pads are right for you and your dog, here are some training tips to get you started: Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Pollie
Shiba Inu
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Pollie
Shiba Inu
3 Years

I just adopted Pollie.. she is a sweetheart but due to her previous owner she is not potty trained or trained to do anything for that manner. I’m looking to teach her off leash heal and long stay as well as going pee outside only. Is this possible at this age? And where to begin?!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It sounds like you have your hands full. I am going to send you quite a bit of information. So just take your time with all of it. I am going to send you fresh information for potty training, and the commands. Some of this you might already know, so just think of all of this as a crash course, and start fresh. This potty training information is in regards to puppies, but is transferable to dogs of any age. It's more about the process. Potty training: House-training your dog or puppy requires patience, commitment and lots of consistency. Accidents are part of the process, but if you follow these basic house-training guidelines, you can get the newest member of your family on the right track in a few weeks’ time. Establish a routine Like babies, puppies do best on a regular schedule. The schedule teaches them that there are times to eat, times to play and times to do their business. Generally speaking, a puppy can control their bladder one hour for every month of age. So if your puppy is two months old, they can hold it for about two hours. Don't go longer than this between bathroom breaks or they’re guaranteed to have an accident. Take your puppy outside frequently—at least every two hours—and immediately after they wake up, during and after playing, and after eating or drinking. Pick a bathroom spot outside, and always take your puppy (on a leash) to that spot. While your puppy is relieving themselves, use a specific word or phrase that you can eventually use before they go to remind them what to do. Take them out for a longer walk or some playtime only after they have eliminated. As your puppy gets better at going outside, the same method can be applied to the potty pads. Reward your puppy every time they eliminate outdoors. Praise or give treats—but remember to do so immediately after they’ve finished, not after they come back inside. This step is vital, because rewarding your dog for going outdoors is the only way to teach what's expected of them. Before rewarding, be sure they’re finished. Puppies are easily distracted and if you praise too soon, they may forget to finish until they’re back in the house. Put your puppy on a regular feeding schedule. What goes into a puppy on a schedule comes out of a puppy on a schedule. Depending on their age, puppies usually need to be fed three or four times a day. Feeding your puppy at the same times each day will make it more likely that they'll eliminate at consistent times as well, making housetraining easier for both of you. Pick up your puppy's water dish about two and a half hours before bedtime to reduce the likelihood that they'll need to relieve themselves during the night. Most puppies can sleep for approximately seven hours without needing a bathroom break. If your puppy does wake you up in the night, don't make a big deal of it; otherwise they will think it is time to play and won't want to go back to sleep. Turn on as few lights as possible, don't talk to or play with your puppy, take them out and then return them to bed. Supervise your puppy Don't give your puppy an opportunity to soil in the house; keep an eye on them whenever they’re indoors. Tether your puppy to you or a nearby piece of furniture with a six-foot leash if you are not actively training or playing. Watch for signs that your puppy needs to go out. Some signs are obvious, such as barking or scratching at the door, squatting, restlessness, sniffing around or circling. When you see these signs, immediately grab the leash and take them outside to their bathroom spot. If they eliminate, praise them and reward with a treat. Keep your puppy on leash in the yard. During the housetraining process, your yard should be treated like any other room in your house. Give your puppy some freedom in the house and yard only after they become reliably housetrained. When you can't supervise, confine When you're unable to watch your puppy at all times, restrict them to an area small enough that they won't want to eliminate there. The space should be just big enough to comfortably stand, lie down and turn around. You can use a portion of a bathroom or laundry room blocked off with baby gates. Or you may want to crate train your puppy. (Be sure to learn how to use a crate humanely as a method of confinement.) If your puppy has spent several hours in confinement, you'll need to take them directly to their bathroom spot as soon as you return. Mistakes happen Expect your puppy to have a few accidents in the house—it's a normal part of housetraining. Here's what to do when that happens: Interrupt your puppy when you catch them in the act. Make a startling noise (be careful not to scare them) or say "OUTSIDE!" and immediately take them to their bathroom spot. Praise your pup and give a treat if they finish there. Don't punish your puppy for eliminating in the house. If you find a soiled area, it's too late to administer a correction. Just clean it up. Rubbing your puppy's nose in it, taking them to the spot and scolding them or any other punishment will only make them afraid of you or afraid to eliminate in your presence. Punishment will often do more harm than good. Clean the soiled area thoroughly. Puppies are highly motivated to continue soiling in areas that smell like urine or feces. It's extremely important that you use these supervision and confinement procedures to minimize the number of accidents. If you allow your puppy to eliminate frequently in the house, they'll get confused about where they’re supposed to go, which will prolong the housetraining process. Heeling: Teaching your puppy or older dog to heel can be easy and fun. Use this directed shaping technique to help your dog learn to love to walk beside you. Get a lot of yummy treats, cut up into small pieces. Start inside the house and walk around a spacious room or up and down a hallway. Call your dog’s name and point to the side that you want him to walk on (whichever side you choose but left is in the traditional heel side). As soon as your dog comes alongside you, use a clicker or say “yes,” then reward. Do this a couple of times, then stop calling him and pointing your side and allow your dog to willingly come up beside you. Mark and reward for each time your dog comes into position. Pretty soon, you will need to increase your pace, turn, or zig-zag in an effort to “lose” him so he can find his position again. As he gets better and better at this, start adding eye contact (“Look” or “Watch Me”). Handy Tips: “Heel” is traditionally on your left side for obedience and rally competitions. Hold your treat hand at your chest. This will prevent luring (dog just following the food) and jumping while walking if your treat hand is just out of reach. Be sure to treat with the hand next to your dog to prevent him from crossing in front of you to get the treat. Always tell your dog when he is correct with a “yes.” Sit stay: Start in a spot that’s familiar to your dog, without any tempting distractions around. Keep your dog focused on you by standing right in front of her, giving her your full attention, and looking her in the eye. With a treat in your hand, ask your dog to sit or lie down. If your dog holds the position for a second or two, praise her and give her a treat. Repeat the process, this time making your dog hold the position for a few seconds longer before you give her the treat. Once your dog is responding reliably, add the verbal cue. Ask your dog to sit or lie down, then tell her “stay,” holding your hand out with your palm toward her nose in the “stop” position. If she holds the position for a second or two, praise her and offer a treat. Repeat the sequence, gradually tacking on a second or so each time to ask for a longer stay. Once your dog has the hang of the “stay” command, you can slowly make it more challenging. Stand a foot away from your dog when you ask her to stay, then two feet away, and keep increasing the distance. Ask her to stay when your back is turned; when there’s another person or dog in the distance, then fairly close by, then right next to your dog; when you’re bouncing a ball; when there’s kibble scattered around her; and so on. Add a new challenge only if your dog is responding reliably. If your dog ever breaks a stay, take away a challenge–make the stay shorter, remove the distractions, or stand closer to her–and try again. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Kitsune
Shiba Inu
11 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Kitsune
Shiba Inu
11 Weeks

Going potty in house after his walks. He was going potty outside at weeks until recently. Now he goes outside & at random times in our home. Can Shiba’s use liter boxes & do they need liter like a cat?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would work with Kitsune as if you were starting from day one. He knows the drill but for some reason has had a relapse. Take a look at this guide and read all of the methods through, You may want to try the Timing Method or the Crate Training Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Taking Kitsune outside every 30-60 minutes may be required until he breaks the indoor habit. It seems like a lot, but it will be worth the effort and may only take several days. If you would like to teach your pup to pee both inside and outside, I suggest using indoor grass. Use a real grass pad (available online and at pet supply stores). Real grass makes it easier to transition from inside to out. This guide is excellent and gives good tips for making it work. https://wagwalking.com/training/use-indoor-grass. As for your question about Shiba Inus needing a littler box - no, they should not require one but again, for now, if it is helpful to try Kitsune on the indoor grass while teaching him to pee only outside, then give it a try. Do be sure to clean up all accidents inside with an enzymatic cleaner. This will remove all of the odor so that Kitsune does not repeat the behavior. Good luck!

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Ova
Shiba Inu
6 Months
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Ova
Shiba Inu
6 Months

Hello,

I have had Ova since she was 2 months old. She never learned to housebreak properly. If I am in my room she will tell me she has to go. If I am outside of my room she won’t give me a sign.

I want the house to stop smelling. My mother’s friend told me if she does not learn how to go now it will be hard for her to learn.

This is a constant problem. I don’t know if it’s still possible for her to learn. I only have a month left for her to learn before I go to school.

Is it too late to still teach her?!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would start training Ova all over again. But first, use an enzymatic cleaner to clean the house (you can buy this at the pet supply store). It is the only product that will completely remove the smell. It will remove the odor so she does not continue to pee inside. If you have area rugs, just remove them altogether and once Ova is trained, you can get new ones. Take a look at this guide for helpful hints: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-poop-outside and https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. You will have to dedicate your next few weeks to training her, staying right on top of the problem in order to solve it. Read the guides I sent you in full - they have a lot of instructions in them. Take Ova outside every 30 minutes until she is consistently housebroken to go outside. When she has success outside, praise her highly and give her treats. Do this every time. Make sure she is always taken out immediately upon waking, after meals, after playtime, after naps, etc. Take her on walks often and give her treats when she pees then as well. I suggest making her an exercise pen area for sleeping. This will prevent her from peeing or pooping in the house when everyone is asleep. If you are not having any luck, or she is doing well but still having the occasional accident, you can make her a pottying area in the exercise pen. https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Buy a real grass pad potty that she can pee on. This litter box area is better than having her pee all over the house. Using the grass pad will make it easier for her to associate going outside with the potty pad. Try her without first, and if she still needs help, try the grass pad. Good luck!

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Sky
Shiva Inu
3 Months
0 found helpful
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Sky
Shiva Inu
3 Months

Bathroom training friendly play

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

I am sending you information on potty training as well as crate training. There is a lot of information, but it should help you with this process. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Everett
Shiba Inu
6 Months
0 found helpful
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Everett
Shiba Inu
6 Months

Puppy seems to constantly need to pee. When I take him out he only pees a little in a few different spots and never fully relieves himself. I live in a apartment so every time I take him out which is about 6 times a day, I am out there for a long time waiting for him to pee. He just sniffs around and tries to eat every single thing.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Leah, It sounds like their is either a medical condition that needs to be addressed with your vet (I am not a vet) or pup doesn't actually need to go potty, but simply want to go out to mark the area and play. If you have ruled out any medical issue that would cause pup to have to go potty more often than normal, then I recommend teaching pup the Go Potty command, taking pup potty on a leash, and keeping bathroom trips super boring. To teach Go Potty, take pup potty on a leash, walk pup around slowly - keeping them from stopping to eat grass, and calmly command "Go Potty". If pup goes, praise and give a treat, then go back inside. Only give pup 15 minutes outside to go. If pup doesn't go during this time, go back inside, crate pup for an hour, then take them back outside to try again after an hour. If pup asks to go potty but doesn't go, or takes longer than 15 minutes, go back inside and crate pup for an hour before trying again. The goal here is to teach Go Potty so pup learns to go potty quicker on cue, to make the outing more boring by walking pup around on the leash - getting right to business, and making asking to go outside for play less rewarding by crating if pup doesn't go within 15 minutes. When you do take pup outside to play, try using a different phrase like "Want to go outside?" vs. "Need to go potty", and even exiting through a different door (if you have to doors - most apartments don't though). When pup only marks, withhold the treat, and walk pup around again, commanding "Go Potty". When pup more fully pees, then give the treat. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cookie
Shiba Inu
10 Months
0 found helpful
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Cookie
Shiba Inu
10 Months

My dog keeps peeing in the same areas when I am not looking. She is really sneaky. Especially in my mother’s room , in front of the bathroom ,and my brother’s room. I take her on a 20 minute walk before and after school. And taker out after that every 1-3. Despite all that she still pees in those areas. My mom is getting frustrated and is thinking of tying her up outside and I don’t want that to happen. My other pet is much older and she barks when she is let out on the other hand I take cookie by the schedule I made. Cookie does not show any signs and if she does I don’t know what they are. I am trying to reduce the number of accidents down to zero but I don’t know how. I am also going to start going to school in person and there will be no one to supervise her. Is there a way to teach her to go in a specific place after I start going in person?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mili, First, the accidents will need to stop for pup to make progress. To ensure that happens, I recommend tethering pup to yourself with a hands free leash so she can't sneak off to pee, and crating pup when she can't be tethered. Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Use a cleaner that contains enzymes on old and new accident spots to ensure the smell is fully removed for a dog's sensitive nose, so pup won't be encouraged to pee in the same spots. When you take pup potty, take pup on a leash, walk her around slowly, tell her to "Go Potty" and give four small treats or pieces of kibble, one at a time, to teach her to go quickly and motivate her to want to pee outside. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Shiba Inu
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Luna
Shiba Inu
10 Weeks

On the first day home after Luna's first pee accident, we placed her potty tray on the same spot. And the entire day she managed to pee and poo on the tray (despite having to stop her from licking her poo everytime). We tried leaving her to sleep on the balcony on the same night and when we woke the next day she had already eaten all her poo (it was outside of the tray). And the entire day she stopped releasing on her tray and pee and poo all over the floor. on the first day she only slept on her pee tray too. today she started sleeping on her pillow but we figured it might be cause the floor started smelling like pee too no matter how many times i mopped the floor. i dont know if im doing anything wrong today but thought she was doing so well on her first day :( this is how her play pen looks! could you please give any suggestion on how to help her potty training process thank you!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

oh and also, Luna hasn't had her 3rd and last vaccine so she's not allowed to go out yet so i'm focusing on indoor training at the moment.

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Frankie
Shiba Inu
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Frankie
Shiba Inu
9 Weeks

haven’t trained a dog before

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Peter, Check out the free PDF e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy that can be downloaded at the link below. It's a good overview of raising pup in their first year. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Check out this article on potty training as well. It has a few more details on the potty training process that you may find helpful. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside I also highly recommend finding a good puppy class. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Medusa
Shiba Inu
7 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Medusa
Shiba Inu
7 Months

How Can I get my dog to pee on the pee pad when she needs to go. I just started training her. I try to put her on the pad and keep her there until she pees

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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sakura
Shiba Inu
8 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
sakura
Shiba Inu
8 Months

it's a new dog and I don't no how to train my new dog.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Roscoe
Shiba Inu
1 Year
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Question
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Roscoe
Shiba Inu
1 Year

How can I get my Shiba to stop pooping in the house and poop when he goes outside instead of messing around?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katie, Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) or freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-7 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. You want him to get into the habit of holder his bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever he feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is not already used to a crate, expect crying at first. When he cries and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give him a dog food stuffed hollow chew toy to help him adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If he continues protesting for long periods of time past 3-5 days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If he disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at his side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If he stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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