How to Train Your Beagle Dog to Sleep at Night

Easy
1-6 Weeks
General

Introduction

Since you welcomed that cute little ball of Beagle fluff into your home, life has flown by. Beagles are known to be even-tempered, gentle, and intelligent. Your Beagle certainly lives up to all of those expectations. However, he doesn’t half seem to have a strange sleeping pattern. You put him to bed at night but you can hear him roaming and playing around from upstairs. Then he’ll spend half the day sleeping. So, when you do want to give him attention, he’s tired, and when he wants attention you’re getting your much-needed shut-eye.

You want him awake and lively when the kids are around and you want him on the same body clock as everyone else in the house. Training him to sleep at night will also be good for his health. Dogs, like humans, need a long and undisrupted sleep.

Defining Tasks

Training a Beagle to sleep at night is definitely achievable. They are smart dogs so they should respond to training swiftly. The first thing you’ll need to do is look at his routine. You need to ensure he has a consistent routine with plenty of exercise and attention. You’ll then need to take a number of steps to encourage him to sleep in the evening.

If he’s a puppy, he should need lots of sleep for growing. You could see results in just a week or two. If he’s older and had strange sleeping habits throughout his life then you may need up to 6 weeks to get him into a consistent routine. Succeed with this training and you won’t have to worry about coming downstairs to see he’s been up all night causing havoc on your furniture.

Getting Started

Before training can begin you will need to gather a few things. You may need to get him a comfy new bed. If he’s a puppy he will need a crate to sleep in to start with.

You’ll also need to set aside some time each day for playing and exercising. You’ll also need some treats and his favorite food to motivate him throughout. Some food puzzles will also be needed for one of the methods.

Apart from that you just need patience and a positive attitude. Once you have all that, you’re ready to go!

The Puppy Bed Time Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
A toy to chew on
Some young Beagle dogs are up at night because they are teething. This can cause serious discomfort. So, give him a chewable toy to sink his teeth into in the evenings. Leave one in his bed and he’ll have something to help him drift off and keep the pain at bay.
Step
2
Crate close by
Keep the crate relatively close to you to start with. Those first few weeks can be the hardest as Beagle puppies develop a close connection with their owners. So, let him sleep in just the next room or two to start with until he’s settled.
Step
3
Increase the distance
As the weeks go by, you can sleep further and further away from him. His confidence will quickly grow and any separation anxiety that’s keeping him up will quickly subside.
Step
4
Food puzzles
Beagle puppies have lots of energy. Energy that may be keeping them up at night. Leaving a food puzzle for him in the evening is a good way to tire him out. It will take time and effort to get to the food in the middle. By the time he has gotten there he’ll be in serious need of a sleep.
Step
5
Praise
Give him encouragement and praise whenever you see him in his bed in the evening. Also, make sure you give him lots of praise when you catch him in his bed in the morning. If he associates being in bed at night with attention from his owner then he’ll be more likely to stay put.
Recommend training method?

The Routine Method

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2 Votes
Step
1
Exercise
Make sure you take him out for a decent walk each day. Beagles have lots of energy so they need a good run around. You can make his current walk longer or you can throw a ball for him as you walk around. With enough exercise his body will force him into sleeping at the end of a long day.
Step
2
Meals
It’s important he gets his meals at the same time each day. If you can set a consistent routine then he will be able to relax in-between meals. It’s all about bringing his body clock in line with yours.
Step
3
Toilet time
Make sure you take him out to the toilet first thing in the morning and before he goes to bed. Some dogs don’t sleep because they need the toilet. If he knows he’ll get to go outside first thing in the morning he’ll be more able to relax and sleep in between.
Step
4
Attention
Make sure you spend a few minutes each day giving him attention. This play time will not only help tire him out but it will also satisfy any attention-seeking behavior. Simply playing tug of war for 10 minutes should do the trick.
Step
5
Good morning & good night
Make sure you say "hello" to him each morning and before you go to bed. If he can’t sleep because he has separation anxiety then this should remedy the problem. If he knows you’ll be there to greet him in the morning he’ll be able to relax. Some dogs simply need reassurance.
Recommend training method?

The Environment Method

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0 Votes
Step
1
Location
Make sure his bed is in a secluded spot. Dogs need privacy so try and position his bed in a spot where he has some walls around him. Three walls would be ideal. If the space feels like it’s truly his he’ll find it easier to relax and sleep.
Step
2
New bed
He may not be sleeping because he doesn’t like his bed. Go out and get him a new one. Make sure it’s big and comfy. The more blankets the better.
Step
3
Leave a treat out
When it’s approaching bed time, place a treat on his bed. This is the ideal way to lure him into bed in the first place. Beagles, like most dogs, have a weak spot for anything tasty. If a treat is always there he’ll start to look forward to going to bed in the evening.
Step
4
Down time
Spend a couple of minutes before you go to sleep calmly stroking him in his bed. This will help relax and settle him. You don’t want to get him animated so keep it calm and controlled.
Step
5
Never punish him
If you shout at him when you catch him up at night you’ll only scare him. If he’s terrified he’ll find it even harder to sleep. You must remain calm at all times through out training.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Belle
Beagle
6 Weeks
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Question
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Belle
Beagle
6 Weeks

She stays up ALL night and won't sleep when I want her to she goes to sleep on her time

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Catherine, First of all, make sure she is active and sees sunlight during the day and is not confusing her nights and days. At this age she will need to nap a lot during the day, so she needs short bursts of activity between naps, such as 45 min-1 hour at a time, possibly only 30 minutes at a time, but several times a day. Second, it takes most puppies two weeks to adjust to being alone at night. You can provide something with your scent on it if in an exercise pen. Take this item away as she gets older and can chew it up though. Only give something scented for very young puppies. Finally, I suggest putting a crate in the exercise pen, with a non-absorbent bed, such as www.primopads.com, and place a disposable grass pad on the opposite end of the exercise pen, so that she has a confined space to go into to feel safe. If you plan to train her to potty outside, you can also start crate training with the crate door closed, but because she is so little, you will need to take her outside frequently during the night still until her bladder develops more. Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate Training method for potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Disposable real grass pad: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07K3WS97D/ref=sspa_dk_detail_2?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07K3WS97D&pd_rd_w=4nGDd&pf_rd_p=8a8f3917-7900-4ce8-ad90-adf0d53c0985&pd_rd_wg=4rx05&pf_rd_r=3QKZQT0DXCFKSP0TYXAR&pd_rd_r=34e830db-8b99-11e9-b64c-d73dded6ffc7 She may cry at night for up to two weeks. If you ignore the crying unless she needs to be taken potty, and keep potty trips boring, taking her out on a leash, then the crying should get to be less and less each night. If you give in and let her out of the pen or crate or give her attention in the middle of the night when she doesn't really need to potty, then she will learn that crying is a good way to get your attention and will continue doing it at night and it will take longer to teach her to sleep. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bubba
Beagle
6 Weeks
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Bubba
Beagle
6 Weeks

my pup wakes up every 2-3 hours each night, to wake around and poop, then goes back to sleep and promply wake up 6-7am every morning, if i ignore him he will start howling or whinning.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
85 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this is very normal and acceptable behavior for a 6 week old puppy. Most puppies will have to go potty in the middle of the night for several months - sometimes even a year. Going every 2-3 hours may seem a bit excessive but if Bubba has to go, he has to go. If you are concerned, I would take him for a vet checkup to rule out any issues. Make sure that you are taking Bubba to potty the last thing before bed. Remove food and water 2 hours before bedtime. I think it is also very good behavior on Bubba's part to go back to sleep after each outing. Remember, his bladder is very tiny just yet. As he matures, the night wakings will lessen. All the best!

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Question
Levi
Beagle
8 Weeks
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Question
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Levi
Beagle
8 Weeks

Hi, I’m starting to Crate Train my Beagle Levi and just having a few problems. I’ve tried giving him treats and chew toys in the crate but he only just eats the treats and grabs his chew toy out the crate and to his “spot” in our living room floor. I also would like to know how long I should tolerate his crying/barking at night when he’s in the crate. He also tries to bite his way out of the crate. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jean, First, know that pup is young and still adjusting to time alone, so the crying is still normal. Most puppies will also need to potty 1-2 times during the night at this age while their bladder capacity is small. When they wake after it's been at least 2 hours since they last went potty, take them potty on a leash. Keep the trip on leash and as boring and quiet as possible, then return pup straight back to the crate after, so pup won't think that's a time to play and will begin to sleep through those wake-ups too as their bladder capacity increases. During the day, practice the Surprise method from the article linked below to help pup learn how to handle time alone. With this method pup won't be able to remove toys. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate When pup cries when you know they don't have to pee, as hard as it is, ignore the crying so long as pup is safe. Some puppies give up after just five minutes, others will cry for hours. The main concern is whether pup is safe and not hurting, both are time frames are normal if it's during the first two weeks and specific to that dog's personality. Don't let things go past when a potty trip is needed though. Most puppies protest the adjustment for a couple of weeks, practicing the Surprise method during the day and being consistent with expectations at night can help pup adjust the quickest. The first three nights are generally the hardest, with the longest stretches of crying. You should be seeing gradual improvement after that, even if there is still some crying for a while longer. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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ZOORO
Beagle
8 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
ZOORO
Beagle
8 Months

He wants to play at night and sleeps very late. barks very loudly at night.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Swapna, First, I suggest looking at his daytime schedule. Make sure that he is not sleeping the entire day (up to five hours is normal), is receiving mental stimulation (like short training sessions or walks where he has to heel and focus, or working for his food through things like puzzle toys and food stuffed chew toys), and is being given a moderate amount of exercise. If his daytime is fine, the playing is probably just habitual because playing is more interesting than sleeping for him. I suggest crate training him so that he cannot wake you up in ways other than barking. Ignore the barking. If the barking doesn't get better within three to five days of crate training him and ignoring his barking at night - so that he will learn to settle back down and go to sleep, then check out the protocol below for the night barking. Crate Training article: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Barking protocol: For the barking, first teach him the Quiet command by following the "Quiet" method from the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, purchase a Pet Convincer, which is a small canister of pressurized unscented air. When you put him in the crate during the day, tell him "Quiet". If he barks, return to him and spray his side with a small puff of air from the Pet Convincer (NOT his face), then leave again. If he doesn't bark, after five minutes return to him and sprinkle a few small treats into the crate, then leave again. Repeat correcting him with the air canister if he barks, then leaving again, and sprinkling treats into the crate if he stays quiet, then leaving again. As he improves, wait until he stays quiet for longer before you return to him. Once he can stay quiet for up to an hour in the crate during the day, then at night when he barks, correct him with the pet convincer. Do not give treats at night though. Practice this during the day first so that he learns through positive reinforcement to stay quiet for longer and through corrections to stop barking initially, so that when you correct at night he will understand why he is being corrected and what he should do to avoid the correction. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bandit
Beagle corgi
1 Year
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Question
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Bandit
Beagle corgi
1 Year

He only responds to me when I have treats. Without treats he completely ignores me. It’s only been 3 weeks since I adopted him from the shelter.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Elizabeth, First, know that what you described is normal for basic obedience - the initial goal is just to teach pup what a word means and motivate them to learn. You will practice with treats for about four weeks, then practice and only give pup the treat when they perform the command better, do it several times in a row, or are around a harder distraction - keep pup guessing when the treat will come and transition to using treats less and less so that pup is not feeling bribed for obeying. What comes next is intermediate obedience. For intermediate obedience, you will gradually work up to distractions and pup developing the skills to obey in those situations too - at first the distraction might be someone walking through the room, a squirrel in the yard, a leaf blowing by, ect...Start with less distracting environments, then gradually move onto harder environments and spend intentional time practicing in each of those new environments until pup can focus there too. For example, in your home without others around is easiest, your backyard is a bit harder, your front yard is even harder, your neighborhood is even hard, your home with guests present is even harder, a pet store is even harder, ect...Go out of your way to practice at the current level pup needs to learn at and to create the distractions pup is ready to learn to overcome during training sessions when you can control things - so that pup can also respond when things are more out of your control in every day life, but keep the distraction level what pup is ready for at that point in the training so pup can still succeed with your help - the goal is to guide pup and provide consistent, calm boundaries at this point. Second, you may need to switch some of your training methods once pup knows the commands and is sometimes choosing to disobey. This point doesn't come until you have done the above training though. At 3 weeks into training pup probably doesn't even know the commands consistently so a lot more practice just teaching the meaning of words is needed first. To transition to different methods when the time comes, for example, when teaching Sit I would first recommend using the Treat Luring method from the article linked below. Once pup knows that method well and has worked up to some distractions, I would enforce my command using the Pressure method from that same article when pup chooses to disobey something they know. The pressure method will still reward some but will also give a gentle consequence for disobedience to encourage pup to obey even when they don't find it as fun. Be patient with pup and know that he is still developing his attention span and ability to learn this early in training so I wouldn't be too strict at this point - keep things more positive and very gradually transition to intermediate methods for commands over the next 4 months. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit Some other methods to help enforce commands when pup is ready: Reel In method for Come: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Turns method for Heel: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel The Leash Pressure method for down: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-lay-down If pup doesn't know these commands really well already, start by using the treat luring methods with each command before using the slightly firmer methods to proof that command once pup has learned the command and just needs to be reminded. Right now you can also keep a drag leash without a handle (for safety reasons to get caught less around the house) on pup while you are home. That way when you give a command like Come and pup ignores you, you can calmly walk over to them and lead them back to where you were - gently teaching them that they need to listen in every day life too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Champ
Beagle
1 Year
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Question
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Champ
Beagle
1 Year

My beagle is a year old and very naughty. He loves chewing and tearing things up and bites and growls when we try to take it away. He hates going into his crate. To keep him in control and prevent him from tearing the house down, we have to lock him up forcefully. He bites very ferociously and tries to get his way. He doesn't even go to his crate in the night. We practically have to pick him up and put him in the crate. I want to keep him open, but I cannot due to his actions. How do I make his anger and biting go away along with his tearing things apart behaviour?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
662 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nupur, It sounds like it's time to hire a professional trainer to work with you in person - many trainers also offer Skype sessions right now. Look for someone who is very experienced with aggression. Pup's history, how you are interacting with pup now, how you are currently responding to the biting, and other details of the situation need to be discussed to come up with the best training plan. Likely, the training will include things like desensitizing pup to people approaching while he has an item to rebuild trust. Proactively teaching commands like Leave It, Out - which means leave the area, Place, Crate, and Drop It needs to happen. Pup's overall respect for family members needs to be improved by doing things like having pup work for everything they get in life - by doing a command first before it's given, such as sit before being taken on a walk, or Down before being petted, or wait before being fed. Consistency with enforcing commands needs to be evaluated - using things like a drag leash while you are home to safely supervise, so that you can calmly direct pup when they are not responding. Body language around pup needs to be seen by a trainer and details about body language explained and demonstrated as part of how to gain pup's respect. Your attitude around pup needs to be very calm while also business-like - without yelling, comforting pup while they are acting aggressive, or sounding uncertain while giving direction. Pup needs to be desensitized to touch and handling using pup's daily meal kibble - pairing touch with rewards each time an area is gently touched, having pup work for their meal kibble this way, to rebuild a good association with hands and being approached. Pup needs to practice entering, waiting, and exiting the crate calming using a leash, over and over again. Being rewarded for complying willingly but the training calmly enforced through the use of the leash and calm body language also. Check out trainers like Jeff Gellman from solidK9Training, and Sean O'Shea from the Good Dog Training. Both have free Youtube channels where you can see some of the work they do with resource guarding, aggression, and general manners and obedience. Training should be proactive, not just punishing the unwanted behavior only. Pup needs to practice commands that can latter be used to direct pup and manage the behaviors, using rewards for obedience and a good attitude, and corrections only coming in for disobedience to something pup understands in a fair and calm way - to build both respect and trust, and help pup learn how to behave differently. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bubba
Beagle
6 Months
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Question
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Bubba
Beagle
6 Months

Hey! I just got my new beagle puppy and I need all the help I can get. Like how things work with walks and sleep and potty training and all those things in general.

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Milo
Beagle
6 Weeks
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Question
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Milo
Beagle
6 Weeks

First time to have a dog need advise on what to do on 6 weeks

When to start potty training and how to do it?
Puppy shivers at night or while sleeping feel its an upset stomach is that normal?
What should i be doing with him at this age?
Any helpful advise

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
87 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to send you a lot of information on potty training and crate training. A crate really helps with potty training, and it also gives your puppy a safe space to sleep in or stay in when you have to leave. That should help with his overall sense of wellbeing. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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