How to Train Your Beagle Dog to Sleep at Night

Easy
1-6 Weeks
General

Introduction

Since you welcomed that cute little ball of Beagle fluff into your home, life has flown by. Beagles are known to be even-tempered, gentle, and intelligent. Your Beagle certainly lives up to all of those expectations. However, he doesn’t half seem to have a strange sleeping pattern. You put him to bed at night but you can hear him roaming and playing around from upstairs. Then he’ll spend half the day sleeping. So, when you do want to give him attention, he’s tired, and when he wants attention you’re getting your much-needed shut-eye.

You want him awake and lively when the kids are around and you want him on the same body clock as everyone else in the house. Training him to sleep at night will also be good for his health. Dogs, like humans, need a long and undisrupted sleep.

Defining Tasks

Training a Beagle to sleep at night is definitely achievable. They are smart dogs so they should respond to training swiftly. The first thing you’ll need to do is look at his routine. You need to ensure he has a consistent routine with plenty of exercise and attention. You’ll then need to take a number of steps to encourage him to sleep in the evening.

If he’s a puppy, he should need lots of sleep for growing. You could see results in just a week or two. If he’s older and had strange sleeping habits throughout his life then you may need up to 6 weeks to get him into a consistent routine. Succeed with this training and you won’t have to worry about coming downstairs to see he’s been up all night causing havoc on your furniture.

Getting Started

Before training can begin you will need to gather a few things. You may need to get him a comfy new bed. If he’s a puppy he will need a crate to sleep in to start with.

You’ll also need to set aside some time each day for playing and exercising. You’ll also need some treats and his favorite food to motivate him throughout. Some food puzzles will also be needed for one of the methods.

Apart from that you just need patience and a positive attitude. Once you have all that, you’re ready to go!

The Puppy Bed Time Method

ribbon-method-3
Most Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
A toy to chew on
Some young Beagle dogs are up at night because they are teething. This can cause serious discomfort. So, give him a chewable toy to sink his teeth into in the evenings. Leave one in his bed and he’ll have something to help him drift off and keep the pain at bay.
Step
2
Crate close by
Keep the crate relatively close to you to start with. Those first few weeks can be the hardest as Beagle puppies develop a close connection with their owners. So, let him sleep in just the next room or two to start with until he’s settled.
Step
3
Increase the distance
As the weeks go by, you can sleep further and further away from him. His confidence will quickly grow and any separation anxiety that’s keeping him up will quickly subside.
Step
4
Food puzzles
Beagle puppies have lots of energy. Energy that may be keeping them up at night. Leaving a food puzzle for him in the evening is a good way to tire him out. It will take time and effort to get to the food in the middle. By the time he has gotten there he’ll be in serious need of a sleep.
Step
5
Praise
Give him encouragement and praise whenever you see him in his bed in the evening. Also, make sure you give him lots of praise when you catch him in his bed in the morning. If he associates being in bed at night with attention from his owner then he’ll be more likely to stay put.
Recommend training method?

The Routine Method

ribbon-method-1
Effective
2 Votes
Step
1
Exercise
Make sure you take him out for a decent walk each day. Beagles have lots of energy so they need a good run around. You can make his current walk longer or you can throw a ball for him as you walk around. With enough exercise his body will force him into sleeping at the end of a long day.
Step
2
Meals
It’s important he gets his meals at the same time each day. If you can set a consistent routine then he will be able to relax in-between meals. It’s all about bringing his body clock in line with yours.
Step
3
Toilet time
Make sure you take him out to the toilet first thing in the morning and before he goes to bed. Some dogs don’t sleep because they need the toilet. If he knows he’ll get to go outside first thing in the morning he’ll be more able to relax and sleep in between.
Step
4
Attention
Make sure you spend a few minutes each day giving him attention. This play time will not only help tire him out but it will also satisfy any attention-seeking behavior. Simply playing tug of war for 10 minutes should do the trick.
Step
5
Good morning & good night
Make sure you say "hello" to him each morning and before you go to bed. If he can’t sleep because he has separation anxiety then this should remedy the problem. If he knows you’ll be there to greet him in the morning he’ll be able to relax. Some dogs simply need reassurance.
Recommend training method?

The Environment Method

ribbon-method-2
Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Location
Make sure his bed is in a secluded spot. Dogs need privacy so try and position his bed in a spot where he has some walls around him. Three walls would be ideal. If the space feels like it’s truly his he’ll find it easier to relax and sleep.
Step
2
New bed
He may not be sleeping because he doesn’t like his bed. Go out and get him a new one. Make sure it’s big and comfy. The more blankets the better.
Step
3
Leave a treat out
When it’s approaching bed time, place a treat on his bed. This is the ideal way to lure him into bed in the first place. Beagles, like most dogs, have a weak spot for anything tasty. If a treat is always there he’ll start to look forward to going to bed in the evening.
Step
4
Down time
Spend a couple of minutes before you go to sleep calmly stroking him in his bed. This will help relax and settle him. You don’t want to get him animated so keep it calm and controlled.
Step
5
Never punish him
If you shout at him when you catch him up at night you’ll only scare him. If he’s terrified he’ll find it even harder to sleep. You must remain calm at all times through out training.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Leroy
Beagle
8 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Leroy
Beagle
8 Months

He is always hungry and is hard to leave him alone when I go to work

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ivette, I would check with your vet to make sure pup is being fed the right amount of food or right type of food. I would also check with your vet to rule out something like a tape worm (which many parasite medications don't prevent and increased hunger is a symptom). I am not a vet though so refer to your vet for any health concerns. Outside of a medical issue, many dogs absolutely love food regardless of health and weight and would eat all the time if you allowed it. For these dogs, being consistent with not giving into begging, having pup work more for food, and using toys that require pup to work for the food can hold their interest better. You can place pup's meal kibble into a baggie, then use that kibble throughout the day to stuff puzzle toys, kongs, kong wobbles, automatic treat dispensing devices. You can play treat hiding games, hide and seek come, or use the kibble to train pup daily. This can help keep pup entertained better, and looking for the food on their own instead of just constantly asking you, if you are firm about not giving in and redirecting to their own dog food stuffed items instead of begging from you. How is pup reacting when you leave him alone? There are a couple of routes you can take with the separation anxiety, depending on how pup responds and the severity of it. There is also something called separation boredom, which is not really anxiety but rather boredom based. Giving pup things to do, like dog food stuffed kongs, can help with boredom based issues. For anxiety, the first step is to work on building his independence and his confidence by adding a lot of structure and predictability into his routine. Things such as making him work for rewards like meals, walks, and pets. Working on "Stay" and "Place," commands while you move away or leave the room, and teaching him to remain inside a crate when the door is open. Change your routine surrounding leaving so that he does not anticipate alone time and build up his anxiety before you leave - which is hard for him to deescalate from, and be sure to continue to give him something to do in the crate during the day (such as a dog food stuffed Kong to chew on). Also, practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below. If pup does fine out of the crate and the case is mild, you can do this in a dog proofed room instead of crate, but if pup is destructive when left alone or has potty accidents, pup is probably being given freedom out of the crate too soon, and needs to be crated while you are away until he is past that destructive phase around 18 months; this is the general protocol for separation anxiety. It is gentle but can take a very long time on its own for some dogs with more severe cases. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Another protocol involves teaching the dog to cope with their own anxiety by making their current anxious go-to behaviors unpleasant, giving them an opportunity to stop those behaviors long enough to learn something new, then rewarding the correct, calmer behavior instead. This protocol can feel harsh because it involves careful correction, but it tends to work much quicker for many dogs. If you go this route, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using both positive reinforcement and fair correction. Who is extremely knowledgeable about e-collar training, and can follow the protocol listed below, to help you implement the training. Building his independence and structure in his life will still be an important part of this protocol too. First, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3j882MAYDU Second, you will need an interrupter, such as an electronic collar, e-collar, with a wide range of levels. I recommend purchasing only high quality brands though. For example, E-Collar Technologies Mini Educator or Garmin Delta Sport or Dogtra for this. If you are not comfortable with an e-collar then you can use a vibration collar (the Mini Educator and Garmin should also have a vibration mode) or unscented air remote controlled air spray collar. DO NOT use a citronella collar, buy the additional unscented air canister if the collar comes with the citronella and make sure that you use the unscented air. (Citronella collars are actually very harsh and the smell - punisher lingers a long time so the dog continues to be corrected even after they stop the behavior). The vibration or spray collars are less likely to work than stimulation e-collars though, so you may end up spending more money by not purchasing an e-collar first. The Mini Educator has very low levels of stimulation, that can be tailored specifically to your dog. It also has vibration and beep tones that you can try using first, without having to buy additional tools. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM A modern, high quality collar will have so many levels that each level should be really subtle and he will likely respond to a low level stimulation. It's uncomfortable but not the harsh shock many people associate with such collars if done right. Once you have found the right stimulation level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours or days if you can (take it off at night to sleep though). Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking or see him start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time he barks or tries to get out of the crate, stimulate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. Do not go higher than three more levels on the mini-educator or two more levels on another collar with less levels right now though because he has not learned what he is supposed to be doing yet. For example, if his level is 13 out of 100 levels on the Mini Educator, don't go past level 16 right now. The level you end up using on him on the mini educator collar will probably be low to medium, within the first forty levels of the one-hundred to one-hundred-and-twenty-five levels, depending on the model you purchase. If it is not, then have a professional evaluate whether you have the correct "working level" for him. If he continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog, sprinkle several treats into the crate without saying anything, then leave again. Practice correcting him from outside when he barks or tries to escape, going back inside and sprinkling treats when he stays quiet, for up to 30 minutes at first. After 30 minutes -1 hour of practicing this, when he is quiet, go back inside and sprinkle more treats. This time stay inside. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around and get stuff done inside. When he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him also. He may not want it right now, but once he is less anxious after training he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more, especially since he is so food motivated. First, he may need his anxious state of mind interrupted so that he is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate for him to relieve his boredom instead of barking, since he will need something other than barking to do at that point. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Leroy's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Coco
Beagle
2 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Coco
Beagle
2 Months

I have difficulty putting on his sleep during night. He goes to his crate together with his toys and treats but as I go upstairs and turn off the lights in the living room where he slept, Coco cries and I think he is scared. I want him to train to sleep alone during the evening. What should I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hyacinth, At 8 weeks of age I am guessing that you recently brought pup home? If that's the case, then know that what you are experiencing is completely normal. Pup is getting used to sleeping alone and that's an adjustment. Usually the first five days are the worst. It typically takes about two weeks for most pups to adjust completely; however, you can help that adjustment be as smooth as possible by doing the following. 1. When pup cries but doesn't have to go potty (like after you return them to the crate when they just went potty outside) be consistent about ignoring the crying until they go back to sleep. The more consistent you are the quicker the overall process tends to take even if it's hard to do for the first couple weeks. 2. When pup does truly need to go potty (when it's been at least 2 hours since pup last peed), take pup to go potty outside on a leash to keep pup focused and things calmer. Don't give treats, food, play, or much attention during these trips - boring and sleepy is the goal, then right back to bed after. This helps pup learn to only wake when they truly need to go potty and be able to put themselves back to sleep - helping them start sleeping longer stretches sooner and not ask to go out unless they actually need to potty. Pup will generally need 1-2 potty trips at night even after trained for a couple months though due to a small bladder. Since pup is in another room (which is fine), I would use an audio baby monitor to listen out for pup's potty cries if pup's cry won't wake you from the other room without the use of a monitor. 3. Wait until pup asks to go potty by crying in the crate at night before you take them - opposed to setting an alarm clock, unless pup is having accidents in the crate and not asking to go out. This gives pup the chance to learn to start falling back to sleep when they wake in light sleep if they don't really need to go potty, instead of being woken up all the way when they could have held it a bit longer. 4. Practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below to help pup get used to crate time during the day too - so that there is less crying at night due to pup adjusting to being alone. This will help pup feel secure in the crate sooner more than anything else, without prolonging pup's night crying by giving too much attention or letting pup out of the crate at night. Surprise method - only give treats during daytime practice, not at night though: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate It's hard to listen to our pups cry. Know that the more consistent you can be, the sooner pup can see that nothing terrible happens to them while in the crate and you always come back once they have settled down and gotten the rest they need. If you go to pup, give a lot of attention or open the crate when pup doesn't need a potty trip though pup learns that crying gets the crate open or you to return, so they will continue crying indefinitely until you stop doing so. It's hard to be consistent but in the long run it tends to make the process easier. Practice the Surprise method during the day to help pup learn that they are safe in the crate. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Coco's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Buddy
Beagle
5 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Buddy
Beagle
5 Weeks

My pet buddy faces difficulty in sleeping he is of 40 days and often make noises at night and sleep alot during day. How should I control his sleeping problem

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1123 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aadi, I would start by speaking with your vet about pup's needs. Most puppies don't begin the weaning process until 4 or 5 weeks of age, and that transition is often gone by giving pup a mixture of puppy milk replacer formula and kibble, called gruel, to help them learn to eat. I would make sure pup is able to eat what they are being given during the day and that pup is okay not eating anymore at night. If pup's physical needs are being met, then I would try giving pup comforting objects like something they can't destroy with your scent on it and something like a heartbeat noise maker. If pup isn't a chewer yet, you might even want to try buying a heartbeat noise making toy bear that marketed for babies, to sleep with at night. Pup will be used to sleeping with siblings and is pretty young for a lot of the traditional puppy training you will come across for puppies at eight weeks - which is the age most puppies are recommended to leave their mothers and brought home. I would have pup sleep in an exercise pen with a disposable real grass pad, since pup won't be able to hold their bladder overnight. Around eight weeks old I would transition to outside potty training with crate training. You can go ahead and start getting pup used to the idea of a crate by sprinkling treats inside for pup to find in an open crate and spending time in your yard in areas where other possibly unvaccinated dogs haven't been, to prepare pup for next month. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Buddy's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Dexter
Beagle
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Dexter
Beagle
3 Months

How do I stop my beagle from biting and nipping?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, when Dexter starts to bite and nip, offer him an alternative in the form of textured teething toys that feel good on the teeth and gums. Teach him the Leave It Method as described here:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. And Dexter is the ideal age to start obedience classes - you can begin with these skills at home in preparation for classes: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-to-be-obedient. Dexter is a breed that will need a lot of daily exercise and mental stimulation. Buy him puzzle toys that offer a treat as a reward (he may need a little help at first to not get discouraged). Take him in the yard for games of fetch and more training; this will tire him out and leave less energy for biting. Teach Dexter to Heel - it's a great skill to have and a good combo of physical and mental stimulation: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Good luck and have fun!

Add a comment to Dexter's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Rolly
Beagle
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Rolly
Beagle
8 Weeks

We have two beagle puppies and one of them keeps having accidents in his crate. We take them out to potty before bed and we pick up their food and water about 2 hours before bedtime. Rolly wakes up at 3 or 4 in the morning and we take both of them out to potty then put them both back in their crates. Rolly will cry for the rest of the time that he is in his crate and he gets louder and louder the more we ignore him. Last night he woke my toddler up. When I let Rolly out between 3 and 4 in the morning his potty pad is already wet, and when I get both of them out at 7 his potty pad is wet again. Rolly’s brother Bingo never cries when we put him back in his crate and he doesn’t have accidents in his crate either. Please help, any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
257 Dog owners recommended

Hello! He is likely eliminating because he has some anxiety going on. This is a multifold issue because then the elimination becomes habitual and he will just want to go to the bathroom all of the time. I know this first hand because I experienced it with my new puppy a few months ago! Of all the dogs I have worked with, I never in my life saw a dog go to the bathroom as much as he was. Some dogs just need a little more security than others. So you may want to cover his crate at night with a blanket, and invest in a small fan or white noise machine to help block out any sound. You can also start feeding him in his crate. Dogs will often not eliminate in the same location as where they eat. Try these things and you will see improvement over the next week or so.

Add a comment to Rolly's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd