How to Train Your Deaf Dog to Stop Barking

Medium
1-4 Weeks
General

Introduction

One would think a dog that couldn't hear wouldn't be as apt to vocalize as much as a hearing dog. Unfortunately, this is not necessarily true! Dogs that are deaf may bark for a number of reasons, some the same as hearing dogs, some because of their hearing impairment. A deaf dog may bark out of increased anxiety or frustration due to their inability to hear. Even though deaf dogs cannot hear they can see, or come to associate certain activities like their owner approaching the door with someone arriving, and will bark in response to a person approaching, another dog passing by on the sidewalk, or a squirrel in a tree, the same as any other dog would. Most people train their dogs not to bark, or to stop barking, by giving verbal commands. Obviously, this will be ineffective with a deaf dog that is unable to respond to audible commands, so owners of deaf dogs need to find other ways to teach their dogs to stop barking.

Defining Tasks

When a deaf dog is barking, owners need to get their dog's attention and then provide them a non-audible command to stop barking. A dog that incessantly barks and cannot be stopped is annoying, not just to their owners, but to neighbors and anyone else within hearing distance, so being able to stop your dog from barking is an important skill. Teaching a deaf dog to stop barking is not necessarily any more difficult than teaching a hearing dog to stop barking, but it requires an alternative method to get your dog's attention, and a non-verbal command to cease barking. Many dogs do not develop deafness until they are older, and teaching an older deaf dog to stop barking is a matter of substituting a new visual or tactile command for the previous verbal command. A puppy that experiences deafness will need to be taught not to bark just like any other young dog would be taught, just with an alternative method of communicating the ‘stop barking’ signal.

Getting Started

Ensure you understand what triggers your dog to bark, so you can use these stimuli to teach your dog to stop barking. Have treats available to reward compliance and any equipment that you will use to get your dog’s attention and communicate the 'stop barking' command, such as a light source or vibrating collar. You may employ an assistant to create situations in which your dog begins barking. You will need to conduct training over several weeks, as situations in which your deaf dog barks arise and provide the opportunity for training, so you will need to have treats and tools for signaling your dog readily available and on hand at all times in order to maintain consistency.

The Signal Collar Method

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Step
1
Vibrating collar
Provide your dog with a vibrating collar to attract their attention when you want to give them a command. Note this is not a shock collar, but a collar that gently vibrates to provide tactile stimulation and get your dog’s attention. Vibrating collars are used to get a deaf dog's attention prior to providing a command in many different situations, and a deaf dog that is trained to attend to you and wait for your command, should orient to you when signaled with the vibrating collar.
Step
2
Alert
When your dog barks, wait for them to pause in their barking and then signal them with the collar to get their attention.
Step
3
Signal
Give a hand signal for ‘stop barking’ that is an alternative to a previously learned audible signal, or in a young dog, introduce a visual hand signal asking them to stop barking.
Step
4
Reward
Provide a treat immediately.
Step
5
Practice
After repeated cycles of barking, pause barking, vibrate, attend, hand signal, and treat, your dog will come to associate the ‘stop barking’ hand signal and treat provided with a cessation of their barking behavior. Going forward, you can provide the hand signal to signal your dog to stop barking if they can see you, or use the vibrating collar to get your dog’s attention followed by the visual signal.
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The Trigger Method

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Step
1
Trigger barking
Employ an assistant to create a visual stimulus that starts your deaf dog barking, such as walking by the house or approaching the door. Have your dog on a leash waiting for the event.
Step
2
Capture quiet
When the event happens and your dog starts barking, wait for them to stop, even just for a moment to catch their breath, then signal your dog with a flashlight aimed at your dog's feet and provide a treat.
Step
3
Practice
Repeat the procedure every day for a few minutes each day. Provide the light signal as soon as your dog hesitates in their barking and looks at you and provide a treat.
Step
4
Add signal
After several days of practice, when your dog has come to associate the light signal with stopping barking and getting a treat, start adding a hand signal to signal your dog to stop barking.
Step
5
Reinforce
Eventually you can use the light to get their attention and provide the ‘stop barking’ hand signal to communicate to them to stop barking. If the dog can see you, just use the hand signal without the light. Continue to practice and reinforce over a period of weeks, until you can provide just the hand signal, or get attention with the light and then hand signal your dog to cease barking.
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The Alternative Behavior Method

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Step
1
Make a place
Provide your dog with a mat or crate, where an activity such as a chew toy or puzzle feeder is present. Make sure this is a safe, positive place for him, and not associated with punishment.
Step
2
Trigger or wait for barking
Engage an assistant to create a situation where the dog barks while your dog is on a leash, or wait for your dog to bark due to boredom or frustration, and then put them on the leash.
Step
3
Signal
Give your dog a signal, such as hand signal or light signal or use a vibrating collar and then take them over to their mat or crate.
Step
4
Diversion
Once at their spot, provide a treat, toy, or chew toy, such as a rawhide bone to reward them for not barking, and provide an alternative activity to barking such as a puzzle feeder. With a toy or chew in their mouth, not only are they distracted from barking and rewarded for quiet, but having an item in their mouth makes continued barking difficult or impossible.
Step
5
Practice
Repeat this procedure frequently every day, until the signal causes your dog to stop their barking behavior and go to their target spot to receive their toy, activity or treat
Recommend training method?
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Written by Amy Caldwell

Published: 01/02/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Chester
Springer spaniel
13 Years
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Question
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Chester
Springer spaniel
13 Years

Hello. We have a deaf dog and recently fostered a very scared 11 year old Springer and our deaf dog barks so much at the foster dog and lunges at him quite a lot in the house. How can we stop this? Many thanks Angela

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I will direct you to a guide to read about helping a dog accept a new dog in the home: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-dog. All of the methods are good but in particular, the Respect the Resident Method points out that Chester's routine must be keep the same - remember, this is a big change to his world. The What Not to Do Method has very good pointers on the safety of both dogs. Of course, it is fine to command Chester to not lunge at the new dog - it is a fine balance between understanding the position of both dogs in this situation. The following guide is called Accept a Puppy but the concept can be carried over to the Springer and Chester. (Not the clicker method, of course.) Good luck!

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Tino
Border Collie
5 Years
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Tino
Border Collie
5 Years

My dog does an extremely high pitched bark/ scream when out walking, I know it is a mix of excitement and frustration from being on the lead but i don't know how to stop him, people look at me as if I've just beaten him, I've tried stopping and changing direction also showing his stop signal things work for a bit then stop we walk for 2 hours everyday and in all other respects he is a perfect dog but am starting to dread walk time !!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tracy, First, work on a structured heel where he is walking slightly behind you and paying attention to you - this can help with the over-excitement: Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Second, teach the Quiet command using the Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Third, when he barks spray his side with a small puff of air from a Pet Convincer to interrupt his arousal. Do this as soon as he starts to stare, get over-excited, and tune you out - he will learn more easily if you interrupt him early. Use the unscented air, not citronella, and do it at his side not face, Reward with treats when heeling calmly, focused on you and not aroused. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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George
Lhasa Apso
14 Years
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George
Lhasa Apso
14 Years

Someone dumped him after 14 yrs because she was moving. We took him in (I have 4 dogs already). He is deaf. I had him for about one month. Whenever I am out of his sight he barks continually.....I have an inside camera and I figured he would stop after awhile...barked 3.5 hrs til I got home. Even if he loses sight of me in our house he will bark until he sees me or I get his attention. It's stressing out other dogs and others in the house(he still barks even if my husband is home...just me that he wants). Previous owner worked all day. I am unable to even leave him.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Debi, I suggest using an automatic bark correcting device. I suggest getting something that can be used both manually and automatically and includes vibration. Garmin Delta with Barklimiter is one option. Do some research to find out if there are other high quality options you prefer though. Start by simply using the collar on manual vibration mode, and when he barks, vibrate the collar to interrupt his barking. If he finds you, using his sense of smell, then give him a treat. You want to encourage him to learn how to find you in other ways, rather than him demanding that you come to him. Use just the vibration on the collar for a couple of weeks, until you are sure that he understands that the vibration happens when he barks. After he understands that, then you can use the automatic bark mode, which will likely be stimulation, when you are gone or unable or unwilling to correct him manually. By that point he should understand why he is being corrected and how to stop it though. Also work on reducing his stress in general. Try things like large hollow chew toys stuffed with his food and a little liver paste, setting up a stationary area in a central part of the house against a wall, and possibly putting a bed and food stuffed chew toys into an exercise pen in a central room in your home, to put him in when the house is busy and he can't seem to keep up with everyone moving around. Make this area pleasant by sprinkling some treats in there right before you put him in every time for a couple of months, and by giving him food stuffed chew toys in the area, for him to learn to entertain and sooth himself with. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hi George, I recently adopted a deaf 8 year old daschund/Chihuahua mix. She also barked a lot when I was out of her sight. She is still a work in progress but after almost 3 months now she is only just beginning to feel safe and adjusting to our home which includes two other senior dogs. I always make a point of making sure she sees me leave a room and she used to always follow me, but now I think she is just gaining trust that no one is abandoning her. As long as I give her some kinda of wave or point where I am going she seems to be ok and won’t jump up to follow me. She can now lay quietly in her crate when I am not home or out of sight. This meant a whole night of her barking and whining in her crate next to my bed which is key so she can see me but it got less after night two and by night three she was silent all night. Just like a baby and sleep training! She also would bark for hours on end when I first got her. I do use a vibration collar to get her attention as the trainer above instructed , when I want her to come to me. She is a typical little dog in the fact that she is stubborn but the vibration gets her attention and then I hand signal her to come to me. (Treats work well) I think deaf dogs can be more anxious because think of all the noises they can’t hear you make to let them know where you are at. I also want to say that time and patience which you need a lot of is the key. I almost gave up a few times but now I am happy to have waited it out . I read a lot of deaf dog websites and watched videos for hand signals and training deaf dogs. She also was stressing out my other two dogs but like I said after time they have all adjusted and she is still a barker as I said a work in progress. My main tip is just give her lots of time to feel safe.

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Minnie
American bully
6 Weeks
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Question
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Minnie
American bully
6 Weeks

Hi there. I’m a little concerned my 6 weeks old puppy is deaf. She’s been with me for 5 days. She still doesn’t respond to her name. She also sleeps deeply and doesn’t wake up when called or making loud noises such as clapping hands, whistling, Kitchen blender on, etc. although sometimes I snap my fingers, and I get a little response from her ears but not always. Any advise would be appreciated. Thank you

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Beautiful! I would take Minnie for a vet checkup to explain your concerns as you have done here. The vet can decide if a hearing assessment is needed (based on your description, I'd say most likely but I am not a vet). Has Minnie had a checkup yet? I doubt this is the problem, but ear mites can block sound if the infection is bad enough. But even if you find out she is deaf, you can still train her and enjoy her. You can look for support forums online and also the vet can refer you to support. I have a dog born without eyes and she does just fine! She is well trained and has a great spirit. Good luck and all the best to you and Minnie!

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JR
Chihuahua
15 Years
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JR
Chihuahua
15 Years

He’s deaf, vision problems and has started to howl when alone. No matter the time or day/night. It’s causing the neighbors to call animal control. What can I do to fix it??

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Natalie, I suggest combining a couple of things. First use the Signal Collar method to teach your your pup that a vibration from the collar means quiet. Since he doesn't have good eye sight, you may have to wait until he howls or barks on his own, then vibrate, then reward when he gets quiet, instead of triggering the barking with a visual. At first, reward him as soon as he gets quiet, then gradually increase how long he must be quiet for before getting the treat. You want to transition to staying quiet being rewarded and not just howling and stopping over and over. https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-barking-8 Once he understands that the vibration means quiet, then have him wear a vibration bark collar that will go off automatically when he barks. Also purchase an automatic treat dispensing device that can be set to release a piece of food when it detects quietness for a certain amount of time. Keep him confined somewhere where he will be close enough to the device to smell the treat and spend time while you are home leading him to the device so he will know to look for it and the treat. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Timmie
Jack Russell Terrier
9 Years
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Question
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Timmie
Jack Russell Terrier
9 Years

Timmie is a rescue, I am his 7th home. He was abused and he is totally deaf. I have had him 6 weeks. He is very anxious and whimpers constantly. It is hard to pick him up as to console him as he had broken bones from other owners. He is getting better, but still cry's and paces all day. He sleeps when he is not pacing,but then only sleeps 5 hours a night.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kathy, I do suggest working with a trainer who specializes in behavior issues like anxiety in your case. I also suggest working on commands that add structure and build confidence. Not all of these will be easy for him but the desire is to calmly work him through them so that his confidence builds as he does develops self-control, calmness, impulse control, and new skills. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Distance Down Stay on a long leash outside: Crate Manners - great calmness and gentle respect building exercise : https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method - for introducing crate for first time: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Work on him staying on Place in one room while you move about the room and go in and out of the room (work up to that part). You want pup to have to exhibition and practice self-control. Practice pup staying on Place instead of always trying to follow you. Teach pup a Quiet command. When pup whines, tell pup Quiet once he knows that command well. Quiet - teach with a bark at first, then start using the command when he whines too and reward when he stops whining to help him generalize it to mean stop whining as well as barking. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Agility obstacles are great for building confidence. You can create your own for cheaper out of Pvc pipes, wood, or other natural obstacles that he can go over, under, or through. You can also buy dog agility equipment online. https://youtu.be/BPxUXvWawpk https://youtu.be/elvtxiDW6g0 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Akita
Boxer
8 Months
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Question
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Akita
Boxer
8 Months

My dog is deaf and has been mistreated before I got her and anytime I leave the room or go out she constantly barks and howls, She obviously doesn't like being left alone but I dont know what to do she is only 8 months old and had a bad start. I take her out for walks and spend lots of time with her and she has toys and treats but if I leave the room or even go outside to put the bins out she constantly barks and howls

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

So nice of you to adopt Akita and give her a loving home. She's had a rough start, so please continue to be patient and supportive. I do think that once she is more secure in her surroundings, she will eventually cease the barking. She is suffering from a bit of separation anxiety is seems but I would continue what you are doing - putting out the bins, etc because it teaches Akita that you will be back shortly and soon she'll learn that. Have you ever tried a toy like the Kong? Take a little bit of dog-safe peanut butter (no xylitol!) and put it in the Kong. Freeze it and then give it to Akita to enjoy. Give her this only when you have to leave and she will associate the short times away with good things. Does she have a crate? Many dogs love a crate as a cozy den to feel safe in. You do not even have to close the crate - it just gives her a secure place to call her own (give her blankets and toys in the crate). You can also discuss pheromones with your vet; they are a safe synthetic product that calms an anxious dog. It is not harmful and the scent is released into the room giving them a sense of comfort. It may be just what she needs! Good luck and enjoy Akita!

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Zelda
Aussie-Mix
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Zelda
Aussie-Mix
6 Months

Hello! I have recently adopted a 6 month old deaf dog! She is vary smart and beginning that “I’m starting to get comfortable and bonded so I’m going to start testing you” she has a vary high pitch almost scream. And a bit of separation anxiety. We are working on create training for the separation anxiety. She is leaning as a marker that thumbs up means good girl and a Different sign for attention. I cannot get a vibration collar yet. But much like everyone else she experiences some excitement/ frustration when on walks when other dogs/ people are around. And when people walk through the door when she is in her create (the create is covered she cannot see out of it) she gets really worked up. I’m investing in some Kong’s and dog puzzles. But I’m at a loss on what to do until I can get a vibration collar. She has an outdoor kennel for when I am at work but place if her inside of it and walking away or just standing outside of it give the same results and I have people walking over to my house asking in not so nice ways what am I doing to my dog. Anything will help thanks. I work 40 hrs a week at an animal shelter. Deaf dogs are out of the dog behaviorist range.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question about cute Zelda. First off, I think there are other alternatives besides a vibration collar. If Zelda is anxious, this will only exacerbate the problem. I have attached links to two sites that have excellent tips on how to help Zelda deal with what is going on (separation anxiety, how to deal with exciting stimulus, frustration, and more.) This site will be very informative and there are resources here, too: https://deafdogsrock.com/deaf-dog-barking. As well, https://www.dogtrainingnation.com/how-to-train-a-dog/stop-deaf-dog-barking/. Consider having a professional trainer come to see Zelda to help her through this before it gets worse. Why not let Zelda out of the crate for socialization with people when they visit as opposed to crating her where she cannot see? As well, you should always only cover three sides of a crate so that air can circulate - not all 4. This may add to the barking. Consider crate training her for inside during the day instead of outside - she may feel more anxious when left outside. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate and https://wagwalking.com/training/crate-train-a-beagle-puppy. Leaving her inside where she feels secure may quiet her and help calm the neighbors. Try dog appeasing pheromones in the room via an infuser. Ideally, you want Zelda to feel confident in her place in the home - remember, it has only been two weeks. Positive reinforcement obedience training classes will go a long way to helping Zelda reach her potential. All the best!

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Question
MAE
Maltese
10 Years
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Question
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MAE
Maltese
10 Years

my rescue Maltese is deaf. She vocalizes a lot. When I sit down to read or watch television, she barks at me loudly.Last evening it was 2 straight hours of barking at me. What does she want from me?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jill, She may want your attention, she may need to go potty, or may want to eat. If it's close to dinner time, eating may be the obvious fix. If it has been a little while since she last went potty and the barking doesn't continue after taking her potty, that could be the issue. Many dogs simply bark to get your attention. Some older dogs can only hear certain frequencies if they are not completely deaf so she might be barking at an odd sound - like something high pitched, in her otherwise quiet world (I am not a vet so you can ask your vet about that). Barking is also a self-rewarding behavior though. Because of the aroused state a dog gets into when they bark - especially repetitive barking, certain chemicals are often released into the brain that make the barking itself rewarding - a dog may simply bark just to bark. If there isn't an obvious reason that's worth addressing, like her needing to go potty, and it's likely attention seeking or barking just to bark, I suggest giving her something fun to do during quiet times - this will also reward her for being quiet to create a good habit of calming down quietly when you are sitting. A dog food stuffed hollow chew toy, treat filled puzzle toy, Kong wobble toy, or automatic Treat dispenser such as Pet tutor or AutoTrainer are good devices to help her learn to be quiet during your quiet times and also help her feel happier overall. Reward her for automatically being quiet during the times when she would normally bark as well, to create a habit of being quiet. A good way to do this, is to simply walk over to her while she is lying down quietly and place a treat between her paws, then walk away. At first, she may jump up and get excited - ignore that. She should learn with practice to stay calm when rewarded and choose calmness more often. I suggest trying those things without adding any form of correction first due to her age. If you are not seeing improvement, you may need to use a gentle corrective interrupter when she barks also, such as a small puff of air unscented air blown at her side from a Pet Convincer (Don't use citronella and avoid her face), or a vibration bark collar. It would also be worth consulting your vet about any other possible medical issues that could be contributing to this. If she is declining mentally, there could be fear and confusion. I am not a vet, so ask your vet about anything medical to see what they advise and feel is or is not going on. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rusty
Puggle
14 Years
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Rusty
Puggle
14 Years

My dog barks to eat, barks when he wants to go out, barks when my other dogs bark. He is also recently deaf. I can’t control the barking with any device.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nina, First, I suggest teaching pup alternative ways to ask to be fed and let out, ect...and rewarding pup for those polite behaviors. The behaviors you are describing are attention seeking - for the purpose of getting what pup wants. You might teach pup to ring a bell or dog doorbell device - especially one that you can turn off the sound for if pup is overdoing it. First, teach pup to ring the device whenever you point to it - putting a bit of peanut butter on the device to get pup to touch it, pointing to the peanut butter to draw their attention to it - and later teach the pointing hand signal, and giving a treat right after they touch it as well. When pup gets good at ringing the device when you point, remove the peanut butter, point to the device, then reward with a treat when they go to touch it without peanut butter or liver past on it. Next, point to the device each time you go to take pup outside, giving a treat right after. Finally, point to the device each time you take pup outside, but wait to give the treat until after pup goes potty too. Continue practicing this until pup starts to ring the device on their own to go out. When pup barks to go outside, first just send them to the device to ring. After they ring the device, get up quickly to let them out - showing that you respond to the device well but not the barking as much. For the meal barking, teach pup the Out command (which means leave the area) using just hand signals and treat tosses. After pup knows out, send pup out of the room whenever they are barking for their food, but also teach them another, more polite way to ask for food instead, and respond to them at mealtimes by feeding when they do that polite behavior instead - such as sitting by their food bowl quietly. Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ When pup barks when the other dogs are barking, its probably due to the other dog's aroused body language and excitement level, even though pup may not be able to hear them (if pup has slight hearing still that may be one of the only things they can still hear though). Work on teaching all of the dogs the Quiet command using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark You can either teach Rusty this command too by catching pup whenever they bark in general, putting your finger to your lips like you would to shhh someone, and getting closer to pup very calmly to get their attention (your calm, quiet body language can help pup match your behavior), and wait until they pause their barking, then reward them as soon as they get quiet, even briefly - this might take waiting a few minutes for the quietness at first. OR do that same thing but practice this with another dog who is being triggered to bark by the door bell - causing Rusty to bark along, so you can catch their quietness to train this - the finger to your lips will be their quiet hand signal instead of the word Quiet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Digger
Labrador retriever (87.5%) Border Collie (12.5%)
12 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Digger
Labrador retriever (87.5%) Border Collie (12.5%)
12 Years

I am fostering a rescue dog that was abandoned and is deaf. Digger is an older dog and will bark if he is not able to see me. If I am in the house, but not in his sight, he will bark; if I leave the house he becomes very anxious and continues to bark until I return. I have two dogs of my own and he will still bark even if left alone with them. I have not had experience with a deaf dog, so I am at a loss as to what the best way is to stop him from barking. Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Fran, I actually suggest using a remote training collar that has both vibration and highly adjustable low level stimulation, such as E-collar's mini educator or EZ-900. The EZ900 will also allow you to adjust virbration intensity to a lower vibration feeling if needed. Teach him that the vibration means "Quiet", then the stimulation is a way to gently discipline if he disobeys, and you will return and reward with treats if he becomes quiet and stays quiet. I also suggest giving him something interesting to focus on while you are away, such as an Automatic treat Dispensing device such as AutoTrainer or Pet Tutor, which can be set to recognize when he is quiet an dispense a piece of kibble. Cheaper options include a dog food stuffed Kong, Kong wobble, and durable treat filled puzzle toys. Before you get started with the formal training, you will need to know what the lowest level of stimulation on the e-collar that pup can feel is. The mini educator has 100 levels and he will probably respond to a level on the first 30, but some of the lowest levels he will not even be able to feel, so you need to find the lowest level he indicates he can feel at all. Put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video. Have him wear the e-collar around while it is turned off to introduce the feel of the collar first: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM A modern, high quality collar will have so many levels that each level should be really subtle and he will likely respond to a low level stimulation. It's uncomfortable and should get his attention and curiosity but not the harsh shock many people associate with such collars if done right. Once you know what stimulation level to use, set the vibration collar for the gentlest vibration mode the collar allows - if your collar has multiple options. Set up scenarios where he is likely to bark with you in the room - like a person or animal walking past the window. Encourage him to look out the window - or be triggered to bark by whichever trigger you are using. When he barks, briefly vibrate the collar at the same time he is barking, then wait. Have the trigger leave or stop doing whatever is causing him to bark, then when he pauses his barking, reward with a treat. Repeat this until he immediately stops barking when he feels the vibration of the collar. Practice this often until pup no longer barks at the trigger because he is expecting to be "told" quiet with the collar, and simply waits for his rewards - which you can give him for not barking to begin with. At that point, when he knows that vibration means Quiet, set up scenarios where you leave the room to trigger his barking. When he barks, vibrate the collar and wait. One of two things will likely happen - either he will get quiet - in which case you will return while he is quiet, sprinkle a couple treats on the ground, then leave again. OR he will ignore the vibration and continue barking - when he does this, that's when you use the stimulation setting you have predetermined and briefly push the button each time he barks, until you get a pause in the barking. He won't connect the corrections with his barking at first, so he may continue to bark seven or so times before you get a pause. When you get that pause, quickly return, sprinkle treats, then leave again before his barking can resume. Practice this scenario, with leaving the room for an hour at a time very often. When you end the training session, return to the room and ignore him - you don't want to make a big deal of your return. Act like nothing exciting happened - getting him really excited about your return can make anxiety worse overall. Gradually increase how long you are gone for and how long he must remain quiet for before you return and reward - so that he is finally being rewarded for staying quiet not just getting quiet. Also, begin to practice this going outside, either set up a camera like tablets with skype on mute on his end, to spy on him, or listen from outside the door - walking away from the house and sneaking back so that he really think you are gone. Repeat the vibration Quiet commands, corrections, and returns with rewards in that scenario too - gradually increasing how long you "stay gone" for outside as he improves. At this point in the training, remember to still give him something to occupy him while you are truly away, like a dog food stuffed kong. When you are home, don't respond to his barking, wait until he gets quiet for a couple of seconds before giving him something he wants like food - he has likely learned that if he barks people will come, since he can't hear them to locate them instead. You want to teach him that being quiet is how he gets people to return, and to use his nose and eyes to locate people instead of barking. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Frosty
Koolie
2 Years
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Frosty
Koolie
2 Years

Frosty is deaf and despite our best efforts he barks constantly, especially at night, i like the idea of the collars but impractical at 3am.
We have another dog of the same breed and they get along fine are the best of buddies, they have a huge backyard, walked every day but Frostys night barking is starting to upset the neighbours, need help
Thanks
Sally

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sally, I actually suggest using a remote training collar that has both vibration and highly adjustable low level stimulation, such as E-collar's mini educator or EZ-900. The EZ900 will also allow you to adjust vibration intensity to a lower vibration feeling if needed. During the day, practice him being alone like he is at night. During that time, teach him that the vibration means "Quiet", then the stimulation is a way to gently discipline if he disobeys, and you will return and reward with treats if he becomes quiet and stays quiet. During the day while alone, I also suggest giving him something interesting to focus on while you are away, such as an Automatic treat Dispensing device such as AutoTrainer or Pet Tutor, which can be set to recognize when he is quiet and dispense a piece of kibble. Cheaper options include a dog food stuffed Kong, Kong wobble, and durable treat filled puzzle toys. Before you get started with the formal training, you will need to know what the lowest level of stimulation on the e-collar that pup can feel is. The mini educator has 100 levels and he will probably respond to a level on the first 30, but some of the lowest levels he will not even be able to feel, so you need to find the lowest level he indicates he can feel at all. Put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video. Have him wear the e-collar around while it is turned off to introduce the feel of the collar first: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM A modern, high quality collar will have so many levels that each level should be really subtle and he will likely respond to a low level stimulation. It's uncomfortable and should get his attention and curiosity but not the harsh shock many people associate with such collars if done right. Once you know what stimulation level to use, set the vibration collar for the gentlest vibration mode the collar allows - if your collar has multiple options. Set up scenarios where he is likely to bark with you in the room - like a person or animal walking past the window. Encourage him to look out the window - or be triggered to bark by whichever trigger you are using. When he barks, briefly vibrate the collar at the same time he is barking, then wait. Have the trigger leave or stop doing whatever is causing him to bark, then when he pauses his barking, reward with a treat. Repeat this until he immediately stops barking when he feels the vibration of the collar. Practice this often until pup no longer barks at the trigger because he is expecting to be "told" quiet with the collar, and simply waits for his rewards - which you can give him for not barking to begin with. At that point, when he knows that vibration means Quiet, set up scenarios where you leave the room to trigger his barking. When he barks, vibrate the collar and wait. One of two things will likely happen - either he will get quiet - in which case you will return while he is quiet, sprinkle a couple treats on the ground, then leave again. OR he will ignore the vibration and continue barking - when he does this, that's when you use the stimulation setting you have predetermined and briefly push the button each time he barks, until you get a pause in the barking. He won't connect the corrections with his barking at first, so he may continue to bark seven or so times before you get a pause. When you get that pause, quickly return, sprinkle treats, then leave again before his barking can resume. Practice this scenario, with leaving the room for an hour at a time very often. When you end the training session, return to the room and ignore him - you don't want to make a big deal of your return. Act like nothing exciting happened - getting him really excited about your return can make anxiety worse overall. Gradually increase how long you are gone for and how long he must remain quiet for before you return and reward - so that he is finally being rewarded for staying quiet not just getting quiet. Also, begin to practice this going outside, either set up a camera like tablets with skype on mute on his end, to spy on him, or listen from outside the door - walking away from the house and sneaking back so that he really think you are gone. Repeat the vibration Quiet commands, corrections, and returns with rewards in that scenario too - gradually increasing how long you "stay gone" for outside as he improves. At this point in the training, remember to still give him something to occupy him while you are truly away during the day, like a dog food stuffed kong. When you are home, if he is barking for attention , to be fed or otherwise get what he wants - which many deaf dogs do, don't respond to his barking, wait until he gets quiet for a couple of seconds before giving him something he wants like food - in case he has learned that if he barks people will come, since he can't hear them to locate them instead. You want to teach him that being quiet is how he gets people to return, and to use his nose and eyes to locate people instead of barking. Once pup has learned all of this, then at night when he barks, simply use the collar to tell him to be quiet and correct if he disobeys, each time that he barks without returning to him or giving any additional type of attention. Give breaks in wearing the collar during the day while he is wearing it during the night for training. The goal is that he will learn how to settle down in the evening and just sleep with practice - at which point you can start taking the collar off at night too for comfort. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Henry
American Pit Bull Terrier
1 Year
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Henry
American Pit Bull Terrier
1 Year

Henry is a deaf dog and he’s overall a good boy, one of the things we are having trouble with is getting his attention. Whether at home or during a walk. I don’t really like the idea of a vibrating collar and would much rather have him know to keep eye contact with me frequently. Thank you!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brandon, To teach pup to automatically check in with you often, whenever pup is looking in your general direction throughout the day, way your arms or make a motion that causes pup to look at your. When pup looks at you, toss a treat. Repeat this until pup is watching for you to make a motion and get a treat. When pup is checking in and watching for the motion, stop making the motion, but if pup looks at you anyway, toss a treat. Carry treats with you in your pocket in a small ziplock bag throughout the day, so that you will be ready to toss one whenever pup looks your way. Overtime, doing this should condition pup to automatically looking at you frequently. Practice this in a variety of environments, and eventually around distractions - starting with small distractions like a second person in the room, and progressing to harder ones like squirrels in the yard or other dogs walking past - as pup improves. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Frankie
Maltese Shih Tzu
2 Months
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Frankie
Maltese Shih Tzu
2 Months

Our Maltese wakes up many times each night, startled. He moves around in circles, as if he is in a panic. When I get up to stop him, he always goes to the end of the bed and waits for me to pick him up and put him on the bed. It is at that point that he calms down. Steve Swanson. Sswanson01@gmail.com

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
214 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Is it possible for you to sleep with a fan on, or a white noise machine? If so, that would be my suggestion. Dogs can hear EVERYTHING. And if a neighbor or someone is routinely up at that time, that could be the cause.

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Luffy
Australian Shepherd
2 Years
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Luffy
Australian Shepherd
2 Years

[My dog ​​is a deaf]

1. My dog ​​is very pulling when walking.

2. My dog has long hair, so it's difficult to feel the vibration through the collar. So it’s difficult to train

3. My puppy has no concentration. When taking for a walk with me, he never focuses on me, only focuses on snuffing.

4. My dog ​​likes people very much and jumps a lot to people.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello, 1. Check out the Turns method from the article linked below. That method will use body language to help pup learn. Instead of saying heel, pat the leg on the side where pup is walking, in front of them so they can see the visual cue. Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel 2. I suggest switching collar brands to something like E-collar technologies EZ-900. That collar is a stimulation collar, but it also has adjustable vibration settings and you can change out the short prongs it comes with for longer prongs to help pup feel the vibration better. It is not the only collar that would work but look for something with various vibration intensity levels and prongs that can be switched out for longer prongs for long haired breeds. 3. The Turns method and a better vibration collar combined with teaching pup to look at you when the collar is vibrated should help the lack of concentration. Using a good vibration collar, practice vibrating the collar while inside and waving and jumping around to get pup to look your way when you do so. When pup looks your direction, toss a treat. Repeat this in calm locations until pup consistently looks with just the collar vibration. Work up to pup looking in other environments too until pup will look even when highly distracted outside. This will be a gradual process with a lot of repetition to get consistent obedience and focus - consider it a skill pup needs to practice in order to master, just like dancing and art, ect...with people. You start easy and get better as you practice and learn harder things gradually. Check out the Step Toward method from the article linked below. With family members practice that. With strangers, check out the Leash method found in the article below also. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Once pup has learned to look at you when they feel the vibration from the collar with longer prongs, then practice teaching pup commands using hand signals instead of words. When in real life, you can then vibrate to get pup to look at you, then give pup a hand signal command as needed for general training from there on out. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jack
English Cocker Spaniel
13 Years
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Jack
English Cocker Spaniel
13 Years

Jack has become deaf and 95% blind His barking has become excessive in the house. Outside walking is not an issue. No barking. When he is barking I need help to have him stop. Very frustrating He never barked like this when he could hear and see😞

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Terri, The barking is likely due to anxiety and pup trying to locate you. I would try a combination of things. I would try something soothing like a thunder shirt for anxiety. Tethering pup to yourself with a hands free leash or having pup stay in a large exercise pen or room cordoned off with baby gates with dog food stuffed chew toys when you aren't with them might help with disorientation. I would also try something that will automatically reward pup's quietness with food (which pup will be able to smell and taste - senses that are still functioning well). Either an automatic treat dispensing device like AutoTrainer or Pet Tutor, programmed to release treats when it detects quietness, or at least a Kong stuffed with treats to keep pup quiet and busy. When pup is not barking or stops on their own, reward calmness with a treat, to encourage the calmness instead. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chica
Chihuahua
14 Years
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Chica
Chihuahua
14 Years

Chica is blind and deaf and has began barking non stop unless you are petting her, what can I do to stop the barking?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would use a vibration collar or scent marker with pup. Teach pup that the vibration sensation or scent means that a treat is about to be delivered by spraying the scent near pup (not at pup though - and use something that's pleasant for a dog and not overly strong - not something like citronella), or vibrate the collar on the lowest setting, and each time you do immediately give a treat. Once you have done this enough over several days for pup to look happy whenever the vibration or scent occurs because they expect a treat, then begin to spray the scent or vibrate the collar whenever you catch pup quietly when you aren't petting. At first, expect just a few seconds out of pup before you reward, then gradually work up to pup staying quiet for longer when you aren't petting, until pup can stay quiet for hours, not just seconds. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Scout
Cocker spaniel mix
12 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Scout
Cocker spaniel mix
12 Years

He has very bad separation anxiety. Any tips to get it to stop.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
214 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. Because this behavior issue is complex, I have a lot of information to send you. With some time and practice, this is something that can be turned around over the next month or so. The first step in treating separation anxiety is to break the cycle of anxiety. Every time a dog with separation anxiety becomes anxious when their owner leaves, the distress they feel is reinforced until they become absolutely frantic any time they are left alone. Owners should give the dog an acceptable item to chew, such as a long lasting food treat when they go out. The goal is to have the dog associate this special treat with the owner’s departure. Treats might include hollow bones stuffed with peanut butter or soft cheese, drilled out nylon bones, or hollow rubber chew toys such as Kong toys with similar enhancements (place these in the freezer before giving them to your dog to make them last longer). Give the bone to your dog about 15 minutes before preparing to depart. The chew toy should be used only as a reward to offset the anxiety triggered by your departure. Hiding a variety of these delectable food treats throughout the house may occupy the dog so that the owner’s departure is less stressful. In an effort to prevent destructive behavior, many owners confine their dog in a crate or behind a gate. For dogs that display “barrier frustration,” the use of a crate in this way is counterproductive. Many dogs will physically injure themselves while attempting to escape such confinement. Careful efforts to desensitize and counter condition the dog to crate confinement before leaving them alone may be helpful in some cases. However, some dogs rebel against any form of restraint, including restricting barriers and, for them, crate training may never be a positive experience. Crate training and utilizing the crate while people are home can be a positive way to make the crate a safe place. If you utilize it when people are around, your dog won’t necessarily associate the crate with departure and being left alone. Creating nap time in the crate throughout the day can also be helpful. Building Independence Independence training can help fight separation anxiety and loneliness. Independence training can help build confidence and instill obedience. “Doggie Daycare” or hiring a pet sitter may be a better alternative for dogs that are initially resistant to treatment. It can be expensive, but prices vary. Independence training is one of the more important aspects of the program. It involves teaching your dog to “stand on their own four feet” when you are present, with the express intention that their newfound confidence will spill over into times when you are away. You need to make your dog more independent by reducing the bond between both of you to a more healthy level of involvement. Decreasing the bond is the hardest thing for owners to accept. Most people acquire dogs because they want a strong relationship with them. However, you have to accept that the anxiety your dog experiences in your absence is destructive. Essential components of the independence training program are as follows: Your dog can be with you, but the amount of interaction time should be reduced, especially where attention-seeking behaviors are concerned. You should initiate all interactions with your dog, and they shouldn’t be permitted to demand attention. If you give your dog attention every time they whine, it helps to foster the dog’s dependence on you and increases its anxiety in your absence. You should ignore your dog completely when they engage in attention-seeking behavior, and avoid catering to them when they appear to feel anxious. This means no eye contact, no pushing away, and no soothing talk or body language, all of which will reward their attention-seeking mission. Attention is encouraged only when your dog is sitting or lying calmly. The goal is not to ignore your dog, but to stop reinforcing attention-seeking behaviors so that your dog develops a sense of independence. Minimize the extent to which your dog follows you by teaching them to remain relaxed in one spot, such as their bed. To accomplish this, it is helpful if you train them to perform a sit-stay or down-stay while gradually increasing the time that they hold the command and remain at a distance from you. Providing a treat or toy and encouraging individual play time can be helpful. Once your dog has learned basic obedience commands, you can train them to hold long down-stays while you move progressively farther away. First, your dog should be trained to perform a “down-stay” on a mat or dog bed using a specific command, such as “lie down.” Your dog may have to be gently escorted to the designated spot the first few times. Initially, they should be rewarded every 10 seconds for remaining there, then every 20 seconds, 30 seconds, and so on. Once they have figured out what is wanted, you should switch to an intermittent schedule of reinforcement [reward], as this will strengthen the learned response. Each time your dog breaks their “stay,” issue a verbal correction, indicating that there will be no reward, and then escort them back to their bed. First, your dog can be made to “down-stay” while you are in the room. Next, they can be asked to stay when you are outside of the room, but nearby. The distance and time you are away from your dog can be increased progressively until your dog can remain in a down-stay for 20 to 30 minutes in your absence. Your dog should be warmly praised for compliance. Of course, they need to accept the praise without breaking the stay. Your dog should become accustomed to being separated from you when you are home for varying lengths of time and at different times of day. You can set up child gates to deny your dog access into the room you’re occupying (i.e. reading, watching television, or cooking). Instruct your dog to lie down and stay on a dog bed outside the room. As previously mentioned, you can provide an extended-release food treat or toy to keep your dog calm and distracted. Once they are able to tolerate being separated from you by a child gate, you can graduate to shutting the door to the room so your dog cannot see you. Allowing a dog to sleep in bed with the family can increase dependence. If you decide to prevent your dog from sleeping in your bed, there are some steps to take to establish this routine. First, you need to train your dog to sleep in their own bed on the floor in your bedroom. They may have to be taken to their bed several times before they get the message that you really want them to sleep in their own bed. Alternatively, you can train your dog to enjoy sleeping in a crate to prevent unwanted excursions. Do not use a crate if it causes more anxiety and distress for your dog. Once they tolerate sleeping in their own bed in your bedroom, you can move their bed outside of the bedroom and use a child gate or barrier to keep them out. Always remember to reward your dog with praise or a food treat for remaining in their bed. Develop Departure Techniques Many owners erroneously feel that if separation is so stressful, then they should spend more time with their dog before leaving. Unfortunately, this only exacerbates the condition. Everyone in the family should ignore your dog for 15 to 20 minutes before leaving the house and for at least 10 to 20 minutes after returning home. Alternatively, your leaving can be made a highlight of your dog’s day by making it a “happy time” and the time at which they are fed. Departures should be quick and quiet. When departures (and returns) generate less anxiety (and excitement), your dog will begin to feel less tension in your absence. Remember to reward calm behavior. Teach your dog that your departure and return are just normal parts of the day and are not times to be stressed. You should attempt to randomize the cues indicating that you are preparing to leave. Changing the cues may take some trial and error. Some cues mean nothing to a dog, while others trigger anxiety. Make a list of the things you normally do before leaving for the day (and anxiety occurs) and the things done before a short time out (and no anxiety occurs).Then mix up the cues. For example, if your dog is fine when you go downstairs to do the laundry, you can try taking the laundry basket with you when you leave for work. If your dog becomes anxious when you pick up your keys or put on a coat, you should practice these things when you are not really leaving. You can, for example, stand up, put on a coat or pick up your car keys during television commercials, and then sit down again. You can also open and shut doors while you are home when you do not intend to leave. Entering and exiting through various doors when leaving and returning can also mix up cues for your dog. When you are actually leaving, you should try not to give any cues to this effect. Leave your coat in the car and put your keys in the ignition well before leaving. It is important to randomize all the cues indicating departure (clothing, physical and vocal signals, interactions with family members, other pets, and so on). The planned departure technique can be very effective for some dogs. This program is recommended only under special circumstances because it requires that you never leave your dog alone during the entire retraining period, which can be weeks or months. Timing is everything when implementing this program. If your dog shows signs of anxiety (pacing, panting, barking excessively) the instant you walk out of the door, you should stand outside the door and wait until your dog is quiet for three seconds. Then go back inside quickly and reward your dog for being calm. If you return WHEN your dog is anxious, this reinforces your dog’s tendency to display the behavior, because it has the desired effect of reuniting the “pack” members. The goal is for your dog to connect being calm and relaxed with your return. Gradually work up to slightly longer departures 5 to 10 minutes as long as your dog remains quiet, and continue in this fashion. Eventually, you should be able to leave for the day without your dog becoming anxious when you depart. When performed correctly, this program can be very helpful in resolving separation anxiety. Other Treatment Options Obedience Training Obedience training helps to instill confidence and independence in your dog. You should spend 5 to 10 minutes daily training your dog to obey one-word commands. It may be helpful to have training sessions occur in the room where your dog will be left when you are gone. All positive experiences (food, toys, sleep, training, and attention) should be associated with this area of the home. Exercise Your dog should receive 15 to 20 minutes of sustained aerobic exercise once, preferably twice, per day. It is often helpful to exercise your dog before you leave for the day. Exercise helps to dissipate anxiety and provides constructive interaction between you and your dog. It is best to allow your dog 15 to 20 minutes to calm down before you depart. Fetching a ball is good exercise, as is going for a brisk walk or run with your dog on a leash. Even if your dog has a large yard to run in all day, the aerobic exercise will be beneficial since most dogs will not tire themselves if left to their own devices. This is incredibly helpful in dogs that are working breeds that need a job to expend energy and work their brains. Supplements Recently, supplements have been released to the public that can help dogs with anxiety. Purina created a probiotic that has been shown to reduce anxiety and provide a calming effect on some dogs. Your veterinarian may recommend this product for treating anxiety, or other products that contain L-Theanine or L-tryptophan.

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Blue
Ausiedoodle
9 Months
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Blue
Ausiedoodle
9 Months

Blue is still a puppy of course but he is deaf. We are working on many behaviors and using signs. One thing he absolutely loves is to play fetch. To the point where he's constantly begging for it. No one in the house can relax b/c he's asking to fetch any and everything all the time. We hide his favorite balls but he finds them or tries to fetch with something else. We try to provide lots of exercise and a routine. He is crate trained. We assume b/c he is a working breed and wants a job. Are there other things we could have him "do" without requiring us to be involved. Hoping to not have to buy something expensive. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mary, A few thing you can do with pup in general: regularly practicing commands or tricks that challenge pup a bit mentally, incorporating training into exercise, like heeling during walks, Sit and Down during Fetch, games like Round Robin or Hide and Seek for Come. Giving pup jobs like cleaning up their own toys into a basket. Trick ideals: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZzFRKsgVMhGTxffpzgTJlQ For things that require less supervision and are cheaper: Feeding part of meals in durable hollow chew toys like Kongs, puzzle toys, Kong wobbles. More expensive devices are Pet Tutor or AutoTrainer automatic treat dispensing devices that can be programmed. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Archie
Austrian Shephard / Border collie
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Archie
Austrian Shephard / Border collie
3 Years

Our dog Archie has been deaf from being a pup. For the last 3 months he starts to bark in middle of the night for no reason
Our other dog that can hear doesn’t bark so what is Archie barking at and how can we get him to stop. We have left a light on in living room which seems to help
Any advice would be appreciated

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
780 Dog owners recommended

Hello Al, Pup may be dreaming and waking up disoriented or even barking in their sleep while dreaming, if pup has a small amount of hearing - pup may be hearing something like a high pitched signal - something that is strange to pup because they are not able to hear most noises. There could also be something pup is feeling that is waking them - like the floor vibrating from a appliance or heat/air coming on. I would work on teaching pup a Quiet command using a remote training collar with various vibration settings. You can teach pup to expect good things when they feel the vibration by setting the collar to the lowest vibration setting and practicing gently vibrating the collar during the day and rewarding pup each time you do so - so the vibration is associated with something good. See if you can then find scenarios during the day where pup likes to bark, like when they see something out the window. Vibrate the collar and as soon as pup gets quiet and looks at you, give a reward. Make sure pup is quiet before you reward. After pup is good at stopping the barking by looking at you, then have pup watch the thing they normally bark at and vibrate the collar and reward ONLY when they don't bark at all while watching it. At first pup may think they are being rewarded for barking then stopping, so the second part of the training where you reward pup only if they don't bark at all is essential to pup learning that the vibration means quiet. This training also helps pup learn to associate what they normally bark at with good things, to feel less anxious about it. At night, you can vibrate the collar from upstairs whenever pup barks once pup understands what that means - like giving pup a Quiet command from a distance. You may also want to try having pup sleep in another location and see if that improves things - in case there is something you can't find in that room, like a high pitched frequency causing the reaction. If you know of anything that could be triggering the barking, like a strange light, high pitched noise or vibration, also try adjusting that. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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