How to Train a Dachshund Puppy to Not Bite

Easy
2-5 Days
Behavior

Introduction

Believe it or not, the little Dachshund is one of the likeliest dogs to bite as they get older. Because they were bred to hunt small critters and work independently, to be their own version of the pest patrol, Dachshunds can behave in a dominant and even aggressive way,. If not trained early as puppies that nipping and biting, even in play, is not acceptable, they are more likely to display dominant and aggressive biting later in life.  

While it is easy to think your pin-sized Dachshund puppy is cute as a button while he is playing and gnawing on your hand, he won’t be cute at all when as an adult, he bites at your hand when you remove his food dish or snaps at someone else see when they reach towards you while you are holding him. Your best bet is to teach him early that biting is not OK.

Defining Tasks

Daschunds are independent hunters that are prone to dominance and prey driven behavior. What is play as a puppy can quickly become aggression as an adult. Sensitive, intelligent Dachshunds do not respond well to being hit, so this is not an effective deterrent for puppy biting. Instead, deter them with a withdrawal of attention and play, make chewing you unpleasant, and provide alternative, appropriate chewing items. Be consistent with your method of preventing biting and teach your Dachshund puppy that chewing is for toys and bones, not hands, furniture, feet or the cat!

Getting Started

You can use commercial chewing deterrents on your hand or clothes to discourage your Dachshund puppy from chewing on you. You will also need everyone in the household to be consistent by not rewarding chewing and biting or allowing your puppy to continue playing if he bites. Provide appropriate chew toys, like rawhide bones or hard rubber toys, that your puppy can work out his need for chewing with, instead of your limbs.

The Extinguish Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Play tug of war
Play with your Dachshund puppy using a chew toy or rag. Let him play tug or war, a Dachshund's favorite game.
Step
2
Simulate sibling
When your puppy, accidentally or intentionally, grabs onto your hand or arm with his mouth, make a loud noise to startle him. This simulates what a puppy sibling would do, which is to yelp when bitten too hard. Let your arm go limp, do not pull it away, which inadvertently reinforces your puppy by continuing the tug of war game.
Step
3
Cease play
When your puppy releases your arm or hand, turn away and temporarily stop playing.
Step
4
Be consistent
Continue to withdraw play if your Dachshund bites or nips. Have everyone in the household be consistent with this. If your puppy bites, startle him and cease play, affection and attention.
Step
5
Continue play
Resume play after a few minutes, so your puppy learns that play can continue when he is not biting.
Recommend training method?

The Redirect Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Play
Play with your Dachshund puppy.
Step
2
Tap on side
When your puppy bites, nips or mouths your hand or sleeve, tap him on the side with a chew toy to redirect him. Your puppy will turn to look at what is tapping him on the side, and release your hand.
Step
3
Redirect
When your puppy turns his head, wave the chew toy to get his attention focused on it rather than the hand he was trying to chew.
Step
4
Play with toy
Allow your puppy to grab and chew on the toy. Play with the toy, including tug of war or fetch.
Step
5
Practice
Never let your Dachshund continue biting your hand, always redirect to an appropriate toy.
Recommend training method?

The Deter Biting Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Use bitter spray
Purchase a safe bitter spray from a pet supply store. Put it on the sleeve of a long-sleeved shirt and your hand. Initiate play with your Dachshund puppy.
Step
2
Reprimand biting
When your Dachshund puppy grabs your arm, do not pull your arm out of his mouth. Instead, make a loud noise and grab with your other hand on his flank. Do not grab hard, but rather make a motion similar to what another, older dominant dog would do to reprimand a wayward puppy.
Step
3
Add command
When your startled Dachshund gets a mouth full of yucky taste and an unpleasant reprimand, add the command “no” or “leave it”.
Step
4
Be consistent
Repeat over several days making sure everyone in the household is consistent.
Step
5
Use command
Gradually start providing the command “leave it” or “no” as soon as your puppy starts mouthing your arm or hand. Your Dachshund should start to respond to the command as he learns that biting has unpleasant consequences.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Mo Mo
dauchund
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Mo Mo
dauchund
1 Year

He is very possessive and bites myself and my husband when he try to take things back he has stolen out of his mouth. He has swallowed earplugs ect and will try to swallow things before we can get it and bite anyone who tries to approach him or run away. He will also roll into his back when he doesn't want to be picked up and will nip at us and bite us if we try to pick him up. He also hates kids and tries to nip them. After getting bite over 10 different times, I've tried all the nice ways and nothing works so we hold him down or hit him on the face to get him to stop biting. I feel really guilty but have no idea how to get him to stop

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainier
30 Dog owners recommended

Hello Angie, First of all I would recommend getting him used to wearing a basket muzzle. A basket muzzle will allow him to open his mouth still so that you can reward him with treats or a straw dipped in a bit of peanut butter, through the muzzle. To get him used to the muzzle, feed him his dinner one piece of food at a time, and give him a piece every time that he sniffs the muzzle, touches it, lets you touch it to him, lets you hold it onto his face, and finally when he will let you put it on him completely. Expect this to take one to two weeks before you can put it on him. After he is used to the muzzle, then he needs to be put on a routine to build his general respect for you. Check out this Wag! article bellow for how to do that: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Focus on the "Working" method the most from that article. All of those methods can be implemented at the same time though and would be beneficial. If you can only do one though, do the "Working" method. While you are working on building his respect, have him wear the muzzle so that his biting does not get him what he wants. When he tries to bite and he cannot, and he is still required to follow through with whatever you have asked of him, then that will partially help to decrease the biting. He also needs to be desensitized to touch and learn to "Drop It". To desensitize him to touch, practice the following with the muzzle on. Gently touch him in an area and then giving him a treat. For example, touch his ear and give him a treat. Touch his paw and give him a treat. Touch his tail and give him a treat. Practice this will all of the areas of his body, including his head, for a few minutes everyday until he is completely comfortable being touched and even enjoys it. When he is not wearing the muzzle, then practice the "Drop It" command with an item that he only moderately likes, and when he drops it, give him something else that he likes even more. He will need you to follow through when he does not drop the item though, so you will want a pair of thick gloves in case you need to get something out of his mouth safely. The goal is to prevent that sort of interaction in the first place though, and to build trust by showing him that if he gives you something, you will give him something else. Later this can be implemented by trading him one of his own toys for your item when he steals something. He will need a lot of practice before then though. His issue is likely two fold. One is a definite lack of respect for your family, which needs to be dealt with using the methods described in the article I included above. The second issue is trust, which needs to be built through handling exercises and practicing "Drop It". He needs both dealt with. If you are not seeing at least a small amount of progress in a month, then I would recommend hiring a local trainer with experience with aggression, who uses both positive reinforcement and fair corrections and is good at creating structure and boundaries for dogs. This training will not cure everything in a month or even two, but if it is working, then you should see a small amount of improvement to encourage you to continue it, so pay attention. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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