How to Train a Great Pyrenees Puppy to Not Bite

Medium
1-5 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Great Pyrenees puppies are incredibly cute and fluffy, and they love to play. When that play and roughhousing turns into biting, it can be hard to discipline them. If your puppy has started to develop a habit of biting during play or for attention, it's important to put a stop to it as soon as possible. Teaching your Great Pyrenees puppy to not bite is easy with some patience and consistency. 

When she was with her mom and littermates, they all taught her what was acceptable. If she played too hard with her brothers and sisters, they would yelp and stop playing with her. If she bit her mom for attention, her mom would push her away and pay attention to another puppy. Now that you're the leader, it's your job to show her that biting is not very fun and doesn't get her what she wants.

Defining Tasks

Training your Great Pyrenees puppy not to bite may look a little different than with other dogs. This breed is known for being smart, stubborn, and on their own schedules sometimes. Patience and firmness will be your biggest allies. When you give her a command, she may take 10 or 20 seconds to perform the activity, so make sure you wait it out and refocus her if she gets distracted.

When you're training your Great Pyrenees to not bite, you need to be firm and you need to show her that biting means the fun ends and she doesn't get attention. Never yell, scream at, or hit your puppy for biting. Though she will grow into a big dog, she'll always be sensitive and yelling at her could harm your relationship. The best thing you can do is spend time with her, be consistent with training, and strengthen your bond.

Getting Started

Training your Great Pyrenees puppy to not bite needs to start immediately, Take note of the times she does it--during play, trying to get attention, meal times, etc.--and be ready to prevent it. In addition, you can gather these items to help your training.

  • A favorite toy
  • Dog-safe bitter spray
  • Special treats
  • Lots of patience

With practice and patience, you will soon break her of the biting habit and you can get back to having fun together. Below are three methods you can try. Read through them and pick the best one for you and your puppy.

The Favorite Toy Method

Effective
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Step
1
Find her favorite toy
Pick up a toy your puppy really likes and keep it with you.
Step
2
Start to play
Start to play and roughhouse with her, until right before she starts to bite
Step
3
Give her the toy
The minute she moves from wrestling to biting, say "no" and then give her the toy instead.
Step
4
Practice
Continue to practice with her favorite toy. If she continues to try and bite instead of taking the toy, you can end play time and try again later.
Step
5
Toys are more fun than biting
Eventually she should learn that toys are more fun than biting people and she'll keep her teeth to herself.
Recommend training method?

The Ignore Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Observe her behavior
Spend some time observing her behavior, taking note of when she starts to bite.
Step
2
Say "no"
Be aware of when she starts to bite you and tell her a firm "no." There is no need to shout.
Step
3
Turn your back
Turn your back with your hands folded over your chest so she can't reach them. Don't give her any attention until she settles down.
Step
4
Give her attention
When she settles and stops trying to get your attention, give her attention and positive praise for not biting.
Step
5
Repeat
When she bites again, immediately stop what you are doing and ignore her.
Step
6
Good behavior is more fun
Soon she'll realize that respectful behavior gets her the attention and fun she's looking for, and biting is no fun at all.
Recommend training method?

The Bad Taste Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Learn when she bites
Watch her for a few days and take note of when she starts to bite.
Step
2
Purchase dog-safe bitter spray
You can find bitter tasting dog spray in many pet stores. This is a deterrent for chewing furniture, but you're going to use it to stop her from chewing you.
Step
3
Spray on your hands
When you are going to play with her or engage in another activity where she is likely to bite, spray your hands with the bitter tasting spray.
Step
4
Say "no"
When she bites you, say a firm "no."
Step
5
Go back to playing
The bitter taste of your hand and the firm no might have her reeling, so be sure to go back to playing. It won't take too many bites before she learns that nibbling on you is not fun.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Luna
Great Pyrenees
13 Weeks
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Question
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Luna
Great Pyrenees
13 Weeks

She has a biting problem. She bites when playing. She bites my grandchildren when they are around her just playing I'm sure and she bites my dachsund which is driving my other dog crazy. I've tried everything from telling her no bite to squeezing her lips to her own teeth as to biting herself. Nothing works so HELP ! What should I do to stop her from biting ? Thank you !!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lori, Check out the link to the article that I am including bellow. I recommend using both the "Leave It" method and the "Ouch!" method together from that article to address Luna's biting. The article is written for Australian Shepherd puppies but should work just as well for Great Pyrenees puppies too. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-an-australian-shepherd-puppy-not-bite It is extremely normal for a three month old puppy to mouth things. It is part of the teething process, one way that they learn about the world, and one way that they communicate. Because she lives with people she needs to learn not to bite, but if you consistently use both the "Leave It" method and the "Ouch!" method, then the mouthing will usually improve with age also. Set up a calm area for her with chew toys stuffed with dog food in either an exercise pen, crate, or gated off. Whenever she gets too excited to calm back down let her have some time in that calm location to calm down while chewing on her own toys before you bring her back into the family's activities. You might also want to consider hiring a professional trainer to help you teach her better all around self-control and respect and social skills at this age, or join a puppy class that includes puppy topics such as mouthing and teaching self-control to the puppies. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Betty
Great Pyrenees
3 Months
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Question
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Betty
Great Pyrenees
3 Months

She always bites my daughter because she is the smallest, so how do I get her to stop?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shannon, Check out the article that I have linked below and work on teaching Betty the "Leave It" command from the "Leave It" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Also, when she gets too excited and mouthy around your daughter, get between your daughter and her, tell her to "Out", point to where you want her to go to, and firmly walk toward her (don't be afraid to bump into her a little if she doesn't move) - until she backs a few feet away from your daughter. Stand between your daughter and her until he stops trying to get around you and go back to your daughter. When she gives up, praise her, and walk a few feet away. If she tries to go back to your daughter to mouth her, repeat the "Out" command, point to where she should go, and walking toward her. Repeat this every time she tries to return until she stops trying to bother your daughter. When it is okay for her to go back over to your daughter, tell her "Okay!" and encourage her to go back while she is being calm. If she leaves when you tell her "Out" without you having to walk her out of the area or repeat the command, then you can also give her a treat or favorite chew toy when she is away from your daughter, as a reward for her obedience. By using the "Out" command and your body language walking toward her, you are telling her that your daughter is yours and she needs to respect her space. Her respect for your daughter is then an extension of her respect for you and not as dependent on your daughter being able to gain her respect on her own. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Ravt
Great Pyrenees
11 Weeks
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Question
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Ravt
Great Pyrenees
11 Weeks

Ravioli gets in these moods where he likes follow us through the house biting our legs and ankles. We have tried all methods and can’t get him to stop. No matter what we do, he thinks we are playing. If I stop walking and ignore him he, will just bite my legs. And draw blood! Please help. He is very smart, potty training was easy. Sit, down, stay, no problem. Help. Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Bite Inhibition" method, while also working on teaching him the "Leave It" command. Once he knows the Leave It command and you have practiced with clothing articles, you can start using Leave It, and if he disobeys, you can use the "Pressure" method to enforce your Leave It command. The order of what you teach first, second and third is import because if you go straight to the Pressure method without helping him understand self-control and what Leave It means, he will probably think you are wrestling when you discipline, and will fight back instead of listen. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite When he gets in the feisty moods, have a crate or an exercise pen with a couple of wonderful chew toys inside, like dog food stuffed Kong's. Put him in the crate or exercise pen with the durable chew toys to calm down when he is overly excited. At this age puppies typically bite like that because they are overtired and need time to rest (sort of like a toddler getting wound up if you keep them up too late), or because they are trying to get your attention (so you want to end the game and remove attention by giving them something calm to do instead). Young puppies need calm times to do something relaxing like chew. This will take time and that is normal, but if you are consistent about the training and rules he should gradually improve as he matures and stops teething. Also, make sure that you are mentally stimulating him during other times of the day by teaching him new things or giving him toys that challenge him, like food stuffed Kong's, puzzle toys, or Kong wobble toys. Training sessions that challenge your pup a bit mentally and physically are great for puppies. Expect a puppy to only be able to focus for 10-30 minutes at a time (depending on the puppy), so shorter and more frequent sessions are best, or sessions fit into your daily routine as you go along. Best of luck, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Ravioli
Great Pyrenees
4 Months
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Question
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Ravioli
Great Pyrenees
4 Months

I’ve tried ALL these methods. Ravioli then bites my legs, ankels pants, anything he can get his mouth on. I give him his toys and he still would rather chew me. His tail wagging the whole time. So I put him in his crate. After he calms down a will let him out. But he still does not get it. This dog seems to just love to use me as s chew toy and I’m feeling very defeated. I’m starting to use a loud firm no, and that still does t discourage him from biting . I tried a can with change in it to shake at him, but his tail still wags and he thinks I’m playing. . Help. Thank you in advance.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, Check out the "Leave It" method from the article that I have linked below. It sounds like he does think you are playing, teaching "Leave It" will help him understand what to do instead. AFTER he has learned what the Leave It command means, you can use the Pressure method from the article linked below to gently discipline him for disobeying your leave it command. You need to teach a good Leave It first though or else when you use the Pressure method he will just think that you are wrestling instead or understanding it as a consequence. Expect the training to take several weeks. Puppies learn control of their mouths gradually as they practice control with you over time. Very few puppies can control their mouths right away. As long as you are seeing gradual progress that is a good sign, so keep at it and be consistent. The "Leave It" method and then "Pressure" method of he disobeys: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Ugh I have the same problem with my puppy. Almost to the point of regretting getting her. I have never had this much trouble with a puppy before.

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