How to Train a Husky to Not Pee in the House

How to Train a Husky to Not Pee in the House
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon1-4 Weeks
Behavior training category iconBehavior

Introduction

When your Husky pees in the house, it can be one of the most frustrating moments. Whether he is a puppy, a newly adopted member of the family, or a former outdoor dog, correcting this behavior quickly is incredibly important. If you're not sure how to train a Husky to not pee in the house, you've come to the right place.

Huskies are beautiful and unique dogs, but they can be stubborn and are not as eager to please as some other dogs. You've got to earn his respect and create a firm foundation for training. If you've just been introduced to the breed, you may be scratching your head trying to figure out how to train a Husky to not pee in the house. There are a few tips and tricks that will make this easier for you.

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Defining Tasks

Before you focus on training, make sure there isn't a medical reason your Husky is peeing in the house. The cause might be a painful bladder infection or a sign that something else is wrong. Starting with a dog you know is healthy is essential. When you know the problem isn't related to health, you can begin training.

Ideally, you will start house training your Husky before he ever has a chance to pee in the house but sometimes that can't be avoided, especially if you have an older dog that is just learning about living inside the house. No matter what, never yell or scare your dog if he does make a mistake and pees in the house. You want to make going outside to pee a fun experience.

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Getting Started

Training your Husky to not pee in the house can be straightforward and doesn't require anything too fancy. In fact, many trainers advise against things like puppy pads because they may actually encourage him to pee inside. Here are a few items that can help you during house training.

  • A leash
  • High-value treats like cheese or liver
  • A bell
  • A "potty spot"
  • A comfy dog crate

With consistency and hard work, you'll be an expert at teaching your Husky not to pee inside. Look through the three methods below and choose the best one for you and your Husky. 

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The Crate Method

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1

Set up a comfy crate

Buy a comfy crate for your dog, big enough to stretch out and turn around, but not so big that he could pee in a corner and keep his bedding clean.

2

Crate train

Spend time crate training your dog so he enjoys being in the crate.

3

Follow a schedule

Create a schedule that your dog can get used to. Take him to pee right when you get up in the morning and first thing when he leaves the crate.

4

Make peeing a habit

When you take him outside, make sure he isn't too distracted by being outside to relieve himself. Make this a habit, so he knows when he'll have a chance to pee.

5

Crate him when you leave

Anytime he will be unsupervised in the house, put him in the crate. This will keep him from peeing in the house when you are gone.

6

Keep an eye on him

When he's not in the crate, watch for any indication he has to pee. Circling, pawing the ground or sniffing are indications. Let him outside immediately. Eventually he will tell you when he needs to go, and he'll adjust to his crate schedule.

The Schedule Method

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1

Pick a "potty spot"

Choose a spot outside that you want your dog to use to relieve himself.

2

Set a feeding schedule

Feed your dog at the same time every day. this way you can predict at least two times he will need to go out each day.

3

Set a bathroom schedule

For the first few weeks, make a bathroom schedule and stick to it. Right when he wakes in the morning, 15 to 20 minutes after he eats, right after play time, right when you let him out of his kennel. Take note of when he needs to pee and stick to it consistently.

4

It's time to pee

Each time you get ready to bring him outside, say the same phrase in an excited voice. Your phrase can be something like "It's time to pee!"

5

Take him to the spot

Put a leash on him and take him to the spot where you want him to pee. Wait for him to go, and don't look at him or move until he does. You may have to wait a while.

6

Reward him for a pee

When he does relieve himself, tell him "good boy" and give him three of those high-value treats.

7

Keep an eye out

Keep an eye on your dog and anytime you notice him circling or digging like he might need to go to the bathroom, say "It's time to pee!" and take him out to his spot. Soon he'll realize that peeing outside is fun and rewarding.

The Bell Method

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1

Choose a door

Choose which door will be the one you always let the dog out of to go to the bathroom. Hang a bell on the door.

2

Ring the bell

Take him out to go to the bathroom through the same door every time. On the way out, ring the bell before you open the door and make sure he is watching.

3

Take him to the same spot

To start out, take him to the same spot and wait for him to pee. When he does, give him three really good treats.

4

Ask him to ring the bell

After a week or two of ringing the bell before you open the door, bring him to the door and encourage him to ring it, either with his nose or a paw.

5

Pay attention to his needs

Anytime you notice him circling or pawing like he has to pee, take him to ring the bell. Soon he'll be ringing the bell on his own.

By Katie Smith

Published: 02/16/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Macleod

Dog breed icon

Husky

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Seven Months

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Question

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He is crate trained and can hold his pee while in cage with no accidents. He’s been in there 8 plus hours sometimes. We let him outside any time we let him out of the cage, first thing in the morning, after meals, before bed, and a few extra times between. He makes no indication or noise if he needs to go outside. My issue is, he still pees in the house constantly. Not lifting his leg. He will just be walking around and stops moving and pees. He’s not sniffing the ground or circling around, he just stands still. What can I do to correct this behavior?

Aug. 2, 2022

Macleod's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, When he isn't crated, how often are you taking him potty? Generally a dog can hold it during the day for the number they are in months of age plus one, until they reach 8.5 hours - which is the adult maximum, BUT they will only do that if crated until they associate your home with cleanliness, and to get them to the point where they associate your home with cleanliness accidents in the home have to stop for at least three months. To stop accidents, often freedom needs to be very limited. Most healthy dogs this age will have at least two hours of an empty bladder after going potty outside if they emptied all their pee and didn't just pee a little then get distracted (watch pup only peeing part way by accompanying pup outside when they go out, and if you notice that that's the case, take pup on leash, tell pup to "Go Potty" and walk them around slowly, insisting them go again if the first pee was small and using the leash to keep them focused). If pup can hold it for at least two hours after pottying outside and you notice accidents happen after that point, then I would commit to limiting freedom when pup's bladder isn't completely empty. This can look like either taking pup back outside to try again in two hours, tethering pup to yourself with a hands free leash until it's been four hours since pup last went potty outside (if you find pup won't pee when right next to you), or putting pup in the crate until it's been 3-4 hours since pup went potty outside last. Often a dog this age will need to pee every 3-4 hours when not crate. Take pup out that often while home. Pup's bladder will start getting full after about 2 hours though, so limit freedom after the 2 hour mark until time to take pup back outside again. Be sure to clean up accidents with a cleaner that contains enzymes since only enzymes will remove the smell to the extent that pup will need to not encourage pup to go potty there again due to pee scents a dog can still detect. If pup is having accidents sooner than 2 hours since the last pee trip and you know that pup peed well when they went outside to go last, then I would consult your vet to see if something is causing a form of incontinence or bladder irritation. I am not a vet though so speak with your vet. Other possible causes in that case could be marking (some dogs will still mark without leg lifting), submissive peeing (watch pup's body language and notice if the peeing happens when people act angry, touch pup, or scold them), or excited peeing (which will accompany pup being really excited or events like someone coming home or a new guest). The marking is addressed with normal potty training measures, but a belly band to prevent spreading scent while indoors (take it off when you take pup potty outside), and tethering pup to yourself with a hands free leash and clapping when they attempt to mark to interrupt while also giving pup a treat for going potty outside - so they know that it's peeing inside and not peeing in front of you that's the issue. Any correction like clapping is meant to interrupt, not be super harsh because that can create other issues, so keep your attitude calm but firm - no yelling, rubbing pup's nose in anything, or spanking, clap loudly to interrupt then take pup outside and reward if they go there instead, keeping pup tethered to yourself inside so pup will learn to stop going inside since you are nearby and they can't sneak off to mark. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Aug. 2, 2022

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muffin

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Siberian Husky

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3 Months

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Question

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we have tried the schedule method but she is still having accidents and when we go somewhere without her for a few hours we will take her out before we go and right after but she will still have accidents in the house and sometimes we will go outside with her and she will use the bathroom but we get inside and she still pees in the house she also has no medical issues

March 16, 2022

muffin's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lauren, First, how long is pup being left for and is she in a crate while you are gone? If pup isn't staying in a crate while you are away, I highly recommend starting with that - extremely little potty training progress is generally made when an untrained puppy is left alone for hours without being crated. How long are you gone for? At this age the maximum amount of time a puppy can hold it for it the number they are in age plus one, generally pup should be taken out twice that often most of the time, and that time only applies if pup is crated because the crate encourages pup's natural desire to keep a confined space clean, otherwise if not crated, the time pup can be expected to hold it for is only one hour. Third, at this age every time you take pup outside to go potty, you will need to go with pup and I recommend taking pup on a leash, so you can keep pup moving to encourage pup to go potty, watch them to ensure they went - and that they fully went (some puppies will only partially empty their bladders if distracted which might be what's happening here). Tell pup to "Go Potty" then reward with a treat after, to help motivate pup in the future to really focus on fully going potty. After pup goes potty, repeat walking pup around again for ten minutes, telling pup to "Go Potty" and giving a treat if they poop or pee again. Often puppies need the extra encouragement to finish until they get good at focusing on going potty. Pup might also be submissive or excited peeing when you get back inside if they did fully go. Submissive peeing: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-submissive-peeing Excited peeing: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-pee-when-excited If pup is having an accident at least thirty minutes after coming back inside, then after it's been thirty minutes and pup's bladder is a little fuller again, you will need to tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash or crate pup with a dog food stuffed kong for entertainment, until it's been 1.5 hours since the last potty trip - at which point take pup back outside when home. Check out the Tethering and Crate Training methods from the article I have linked below. When struggling with potty training I recommend a more strict method like that, since the more accidents you prevent the sooner pups will usually become potty trained. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If pup is still having accidents when coming back inside despite doing all of the above mentioned, then I would tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash any time pup is not crate for the next couple of months until pup is potty trained. I would also speak with your vet about the issue to make sure there isn't something preventing pup from emptying their bladder all the way while outside or an infection. I am not a vet so consult your vet for anything that could be medically related. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

March 16, 2022


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