How to Train a Husky to Not Pee in the House

Medium
1-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

When your Husky pees in the house, it can be one of the most frustrating moments. Whether he is a puppy, a newly adopted member of the family, or a former outdoor dog, correcting this behavior quickly is incredibly important. If you're not sure how to train a Husky to not pee in the house, you've come to the right place.

Huskies are beautiful and unique dogs, but they can be stubborn and are not as eager to please as some other dogs. You've got to earn his respect and create a firm foundation for training. If you've just been introduced to the breed, you may be scratching your head trying to figure out how to train a Husky to not pee in the house. There are a few tips and tricks that will make this easier for you.

Defining Tasks

Before you focus on training, make sure there isn't a medical reason your Husky is peeing in the house. The cause might be a painful bladder infection or a sign that something else is wrong. Starting with a dog you know is healthy is essential. When you know the problem isn't related to health, you can begin training.

Ideally, you will start house training your Husky before he ever has a chance to pee in the house but sometimes that can't be avoided, especially if you have an older dog that is just learning about living inside the house. No matter what, never yell or scare your dog if he does make a mistake and pees in the house. You want to make going outside to pee a fun experience.

Getting Started

Training your Husky to not pee in the house can be straightforward and doesn't require anything too fancy. In fact, many trainers advise against things like puppy pads because they may actually encourage him to pee inside. Here are a few items that can help you during house training.

  • A leash
  • High-value treats like cheese or liver
  • A bell
  • A "potty spot"
  • A comfy dog crate

With consistency and hard work, you'll be an expert at teaching your Husky not to pee inside. Look through the three methods below and choose the best one for you and your Husky. 

The Crate Method

ribbon-method-3
Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Set up a comfy crate
Buy a comfy crate for your dog, big enough to stretch out and turn around, but not so big that he could pee in a corner and keep his bedding clean.
Step
2
Crate train
Spend time crate training your dog so he enjoys being in the crate.
Step
3
Follow a schedule
Create a schedule that your dog can get used to. Take him to pee right when you get up in the morning and first thing when he leaves the crate.
Step
4
Make peeing a habit
When you take him outside, make sure he isn't too distracted by being outside to relieve himself. Make this a habit, so he knows when he'll have a chance to pee.
Step
5
Crate him when you leave
Anytime he will be unsupervised in the house, put him in the crate. This will keep him from peeing in the house when you are gone.
Step
6
Keep an eye on him
When he's not in the crate, watch for any indication he has to pee. Circling, pawing the ground or sniffing are indications. Let him outside immediately. Eventually he will tell you when he needs to go, and he'll adjust to his crate schedule.
Recommend training method?

The Schedule Method

ribbon-method-1
Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Pick a "potty spot"
Choose a spot outside that you want your dog to use to relieve himself.
Step
2
Set a feeding schedule
Feed your dog at the same time every day. this way you can predict at least two times he will need to go out each day.
Step
3
Set a bathroom schedule
For the first few weeks, make a bathroom schedule and stick to it. Right when he wakes in the morning, 15 to 20 minutes after he eats, right after play time, right when you let him out of his kennel. Take note of when he needs to pee and stick to it consistently.
Step
4
It's time to pee
Each time you get ready to bring him outside, say the same phrase in an excited voice. Your phrase can be something like "It's time to pee!"
Step
5
Take him to the spot
Put a leash on him and take him to the spot where you want him to pee. Wait for him to go, and don't look at him or move until he does. You may have to wait a while.
Step
6
Reward him for a pee
When he does relieve himself, tell him "good boy" and give him three of those high-value treats.
Step
7
Keep an eye out
Keep an eye on your dog and anytime you notice him circling or digging like he might need to go to the bathroom, say "It's time to pee!" and take him out to his spot. Soon he'll realize that peeing outside is fun and rewarding.
Recommend training method?

The Bell Method

ribbon-method-2
Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Choose a door
Choose which door will be the one you always let the dog out of to go to the bathroom. Hang a bell on the door.
Step
2
Ring the bell
Take him out to go to the bathroom through the same door every time. On the way out, ring the bell before you open the door and make sure he is watching.
Step
3
Take him to the same spot
To start out, take him to the same spot and wait for him to pee. When he does, give him three really good treats.
Step
4
Ask him to ring the bell
After a week or two of ringing the bell before you open the door, bring him to the door and encourage him to ring it, either with his nose or a paw.
Step
5
Pay attention to his needs
Anytime you notice him circling or pawing like he has to pee, take him to ring the bell. Soon he'll be ringing the bell on his own.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Katie Smith

Published: 02/16/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
muffin
Siberian Husky
3 Months
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Question
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muffin
Siberian Husky
3 Months

we have tried the schedule method but she is still having accidents and when we go somewhere without her for a few hours we will take her out before we go and right after but she will still have accidents in the house and sometimes we will go outside with her and she will use the bathroom but we get inside and she still pees in the house she also has no medical issues

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1106 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lauren, First, how long is pup being left for and is she in a crate while you are gone? If pup isn't staying in a crate while you are away, I highly recommend starting with that - extremely little potty training progress is generally made when an untrained puppy is left alone for hours without being crated. How long are you gone for? At this age the maximum amount of time a puppy can hold it for it the number they are in age plus one, generally pup should be taken out twice that often most of the time, and that time only applies if pup is crated because the crate encourages pup's natural desire to keep a confined space clean, otherwise if not crated, the time pup can be expected to hold it for is only one hour. Third, at this age every time you take pup outside to go potty, you will need to go with pup and I recommend taking pup on a leash, so you can keep pup moving to encourage pup to go potty, watch them to ensure they went - and that they fully went (some puppies will only partially empty their bladders if distracted which might be what's happening here). Tell pup to "Go Potty" then reward with a treat after, to help motivate pup in the future to really focus on fully going potty. After pup goes potty, repeat walking pup around again for ten minutes, telling pup to "Go Potty" and giving a treat if they poop or pee again. Often puppies need the extra encouragement to finish until they get good at focusing on going potty. Pup might also be submissive or excited peeing when you get back inside if they did fully go. Submissive peeing: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-submissive-peeing Excited peeing: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-pee-when-excited If pup is having an accident at least thirty minutes after coming back inside, then after it's been thirty minutes and pup's bladder is a little fuller again, you will need to tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash or crate pup with a dog food stuffed kong for entertainment, until it's been 1.5 hours since the last potty trip - at which point take pup back outside when home. Check out the Tethering and Crate Training methods from the article I have linked below. When struggling with potty training I recommend a more strict method like that, since the more accidents you prevent the sooner pups will usually become potty trained. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If pup is still having accidents when coming back inside despite doing all of the above mentioned, then I would tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash any time pup is not crate for the next couple of months until pup is potty trained. I would also speak with your vet about the issue to make sure there isn't something preventing pup from emptying their bladder all the way while outside or an infection. I am not a vet so consult your vet for anything that could be medically related. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Sasha
Husky/German s
3 Months
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Question
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Sasha
Husky/German s
3 Months

I have taking my pet outside to pee morning when she wakes up do this seems like all day and night and stay outside with her for a while and she comes inside and still pees and poop on the floor don't know what to do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1106 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rebecca, Check out the Crate Training and Tethering methods from the article I have linked below. I would use a combination of those methods. Each method goes over what to do when you take pup outside and pup doesn't go potty. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Jabba
Siberian Husky
10 Months
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Question
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Jabba
Siberian Husky
10 Months

My dog is still not fully potty trained. He is outside constantly, and will pee outside. And when he come back inside, he owes again. This will be anywhere from the carpet to furniture.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1106 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ariel, If pup is going potty in your home within three hours of letting him inside, and you actually saw him go potty fully while outside (some dogs get distracted while out and come back to the door before actually going potty, then go inside), then pup is likely either marking inside to spread his scent or there is something going on that needs to be addressed with your vet contributing to incontinence, like an infection. I am not a vet, so if pup seems unable to hold his pee for longer than a couple hours, I would see your vet. If the issue is a combination of needing potty training and pup marking, I would do the following. Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently than the method suggests. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip - at which time you will take him outside to go potty again. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. You want him to get into the habit of holding his bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever he feels the urge, and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is marking, the crate will only be half the battle. During the 1.5 hours he is out of the crate between potty trips he will probably still try to pee to mark his scent - since the issue isn't needing to pee but wanting to "claim" things by peeing on them. To deal with that behavior, use the crate training method, but also keep him tethered to you while he is out of the crate between potty trips using a 6 or 8 foot leash. Have him wear a belly band - which is a sling/diaper for male dogs that catches urine, and when he tries to lift his leg to mark, clap your hands loudly three times. Use a cleaner than contains enzymes to remove the smell from any new or previous accidents - since lingering scent will only encourage more marking and only enzymes fully remove the smell. Look on the bottle for the word enzyme or enzymatic. Many (but not all) pet cleaners contain enzymes. The belly band will keep marking from being fun and successful for him and stop the spreading of the smell - which encourages more marking (and keep your things clean). Attaching him to yourself with the leash will keep him from sneaking off to pee uninterrupted, and clapping will make peeing unpleasant for him without it being too harsh. Reward him with treats when he potties outside so he understands that pottying outside in front of you is good, it's only inside where he shouldn't do it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Katia
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks
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Question
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Katia
Siberian Husky
11 Weeks

Hello,
My dog keeps peeing in the house even when we take her to the bathroom during a set schedule. We have two Huskies and she is the only one that is still peeing in the house. Our white Husky is a year and 2 months and he was potty trained fully around 7 months. Katia doesn’t have any medical issues but she does have a whine a use to tinkle when she seen people but stopped. She also pee in her crate from time to time. She is too hyper for the bell method. I am out of suggestions and I really want to see if there is another way of trying to potty train her.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1106 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shequita, I would make sure the following are being done first. Some dogs won't need things as strict but if pup is struggling it's important to cover all of your bases first. 1. How often is pup being taken potty? I wouldn't go longer than every 2 hours at this age or you will run into accidents more often. Even in the crate, expect pup to need every 3 hours maximum during the day, and at least once at night. 2. How is your crate set up? The crate will need to be only big enough for pup to stand up, turn around, and lie down. If it's so big pup can go potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it, pup may not be motivated to keep it clean. You can use a metal crate divider for wire crates if your current crate is too large, without having to buy an entirely new crate. Is there anything absorbent in the crate, including a soft bed or towel? If so, take those out. You can use something like www.primopads.com or k9ballistics crate mats for a non-absorbent bed option. Anything absorbent may not encourage holding it in the crate. 3. What do you use to clean up accidents? I recommend a pet safe cleaner that contains enzymes. Look for the word enzymatic or enzyme on the bottle somewhere. Only enzymes will fully remove the smell to the level a dog needs, so pup won't be reattracted to that spot to potty there again. 4. When you take pup potty outside, are you taking them on leash going with them? If not, pup may be getting distracted and not finishing going potty. Check out the crate training method from the article I have linked below. Especially pay attention to the section on what to do if pup doesn't go potty when you take them outside, how often to take them out, and how to reward pup when they do go potty. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you non of the above need to be changed and you still want to change methods, check out the Tethering method section from this article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Stephanie macnab
Siberian Husky
10 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Stephanie macnab
Siberian Husky
10 Years

10 year old outdoor sled dog. Starting to house dog. Having issues with her messing in the house. And with leaving her outside when we are at work. She is an outside dog.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
1106 Dog owners recommended

Hello Stephanie, What exactly is the issue while pup is outside? Is she digging, chewing, barking, or something else? For the inside potty training needs, is pup having potty accidents or chewing, or both? Either way I would crate train pup. For potty training, check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for her to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that she can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if she has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return her to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since her last potty trip. When you have to go off she should be able to hold her bladder in the crate for 5-6 hours - less at first while she is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have her wait that long when you are not home though, take her out about every 3 hours while home. You want her to get into the habit of holder her bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever she feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Since she is older, I would also keep in mind that there could be potential urinary incontinence due to age. If you find she really can't hold it more than 3-4 hours even while crated and doing the above, it may be due to a medical issue and not a behavioral one. In that case I recommend speaking with your vet, and the method will need to be adjusted to account for what she is capable of at this age. If she is not already used to a crate, expect crying at first. When she cries and you know she doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give her a dog food stuffed hollow chew toy to help her adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If she continues protesting for long periods of time past 1-2 weeks, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks and cries. If she gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If she disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at her side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If she stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. If pup is chewing, check out the article I have linked below, especially the part about crate training, teaching Leave It, teaching Out, and providing dog food stuffed chew toys to entice pup to chew toy instead - to teach good chewing preferences. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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