How to Train a Labrador Puppy to Sleep Through the Night

Medium
5-14 Days
General

Introduction

You thought babies were cute, but Labrador puppies take adorable to a whole new level. Even the grumpiest of neighbors can’t help but come over to say hello and give him a pat. He’s swiftly brought the whole family together. In fact, instead of watching TV in different rooms, you’re all spending your evenings together petting him. However, when night time comes so does trouble. He simply can’t sleep through the night. You’re woken up by him crying every hour or so until you eventually give in and let him join you.

Training your Labrador puppy to sleep through the night is essential. If you don’t, he may find it far harder to spend time away from you when he grows up. If he develops separation anxiety then leaving him to go work each day will be incredibly tough on him. 

Defining Tasks

Training any puppy to sleep through the night can be challenging to start with and Labradors are no exception. However, because Labradors are intelligent and fast learners, you could see results in a relatively short space of time. Training will consist of getting him into a regular bed time routine. You will also need to make his bed as appealing as possible. On top of that, you’ll need to ensure all his physical and emotional needs are met each day, so he’s ready to spend the night without you.

If he’s brave and relatively independent then you could see results in just a few days. If he’s fairly needy, then he may need a couple of weeks to get the hang of it. Succeed and he will be well rested when you wake up each morning and he will leave you to sleep undisturbed.

Getting Started

Before you start training, you will need to gather a few bits. A comfy bed with some soft blankets will be needed. A toy or two will also come in handy, as will food puzzles. In addition, stock up on treats or break his favorite food into small pieces.

Set aside a few minutes at the beginning and end of each day to get him into his new routine. 

Once you have all that, just bring willpower and some earplugs, then work can begin!

The Routine Method

Most Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
New bed
Make sure his bed or crate is in the right location. It needs to be somewhere relatively secluded to afford him some privacy. Two or three walls around him would be ideal. Also, make sure there are blankets to make it a comfy place that he’d want to spend time in.
Step
2
Good night
When evening comes, spend a couple of minutes gently stroking him and getting him calm. It’s important he gets this each evening before bed. It will settle him into a good night routine.
Step
3
Good morning
When you wake up in the morning, again spend a couple of minutes stroking him and saying hello. If he knows you will always come to give him attention each morning and evening he will find it far easier to spend the night away from you.
Step
4
Exercise
Make sure he gets plenty of exercise each day. Labradors are energetic dogs, so if he isn’t getting enough exercise, he may be too awake to sleep through the night. A tired dog won’t have any problem sleeping!
Step
5
Never punish him
It’s important you don’t punish him if he does wake you and can’t sleep through the night. If he becomes scared of you then he may seek your attention even more to try and win back your affection. So, you must calmly remove him or ignore him whenever he does wake you.
Recommend training method?

The Cold Shoulder Method

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Step
1
Door open
To start with, leave the door open and have him sleep in a room relatively close to you. If he knows you’re close by, he’ll find it easier to be left alone each evening. Make sure you also spend a couple of minutes saying good night to him in his bed.
Step
2
Cold shoulder
If he does try and wake you up or moans, ignore him. It may be difficult to start with, especially as Labrador puppies are so cute. But it’s a case of being cruel to be kind.
Step
3
Door ajar
After a couple of days of leaving the door open, move to closing the door a bit more, until it’s just ajar. This is the next step in making him more isolated in the evening. Again if he wakes you up or cries, you must ignore him.
Step
4
Door closed
After a few days of leaving the door ajar, you can now move to closing the door each evening before bed. At this point he will be more comfortable being away from you at night and this last step ensures he can sleep comfortably without you.
Step
5
Remove him
If he comes to you and wakes you each evening, it’s important you calmly remove him from the room and then ignore him. If you give him any attention, you are only teaching him that such behavior will get him what he wants.
Recommend training method?

The Temptation Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Toys
Spend a few minutes each day playing with toys in his bed. You want to make his bed a fun place that he looks forward to spending time in. You can also leave the toys in his bed overnight. This will make it feel even more like his own private space.
Step
2
Evening treat
Leave a treat in his bed each evening. This is a fantastic way to get him in his bed to start with. He will soon begin to associate his bed with tasty treats and look forward to going there.
Step
3
Morning treat
When you come downstairs in the morning, head over to him and wake him up with another treat. Make sure he gets the treat in the bed. If he knows he will get a treat there each morning, he will soon have an incentive to stay put each night.
Step
4
Toilet
Make sure you take him out to the toilet before bed each evening. Puppies have weak bladders and bowels to start with. He may be waking you up each night because he needs the toilet. So, make sure those needs are tended to.
Step
5
Food puzzles
Try giving him food puzzles in his bed in the day. They will keep him occupied for hours. But more importantly, they will make him associate his bed with food and fun. This will ensure staying there each evening will no longer seem like such a chore.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Charlie
Labrador Retriever
13 Weeks
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Question
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Charlie
Labrador Retriever
13 Weeks

FOr the first 3 weeks, CHarlie would fall asleep around 8:30, we would take her potty at 11;00 and she would wait for us to get up at around 6:45. For the past 10days, she starts barking at 5:10-5:30. When we take her pottty she just wants to play. How do I get her back to waking up around 6:45?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, my first thought is to keep Charlie up in the evenings. Do not let her fall asleep at 8:30. Instead, take her for an evening walk, play fetch, roll a ball, and give her interactive toys to play with in the evening for the mental stimulation that she needs. Then, take her to potty again the last thing before you all go to bed. Keeping her busy in the evenings may seem like a chore but in the long run, will help to train her to stay in bed. If you do have to take Charlie to potty at 5 a.m., make it boring. Leashed outing, no talking, no treats, and straight back to bed. She may fuss, but you will have to ignore her for the time being. She'll get the idea. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/sleep-later. You can try the alarm clock - for a week, set it for 5:10 and get up with Charlie. The next week, 5:30. The following week, every day at 6:00. The last week, 6:15 or so and finally, 6:45. She may then be trained only to wake and get up with the alarm. Good luck!

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Milly
Labrador Retriever
2 Months
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Milly
Labrador Retriever
2 Months

I need some help! We have had our sweet Milly for 4 days. Friday she will be 2 months old. We are crate training her, she loves to go in and out of her crate throughout the day and will even sleep inside it on her own. At night we let her out then put her in her crate by my bed, cover it up with a blanket. She will cry for about 20 to 30 mins then falls asleep. She cries just about every 3 hours so I get her and take her out to potty then put her back in the crate. She cries again for about 30 mins. I am exhausted!! What can I do to help her sleep longer and not cry once I put her in her crate? Also the science diet food I am feeding her suggests that I feed her 1 1/8 cup a day. She doesnt seem satisfied. She runs to her bowl of water and food throughout the day acting like she is hungry. What amount do you recommend?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Leslie, I suggest looking up the recommended feeding amounts for her age and weight in other dog foods brands, and perhaps feeding her more based on the general recommendations for those brands also. At 2 months of age my now 75 lb dog ate around 2 cups, and later 3 1/2- 4 cups by 4 months I believe. As a Labrador, your puppy will likely be a litter smaller, but metabolisms vary and the recommended feeding amounts are simply recommendations. Those foods will be formulate differently, so those recommendations will not be perfect for your puppy but that can give you an idea of what is normal. Many dog food brands base recommendations on expected adult size and not current weight, because if your puppy is underweight or overweight the recommended puppy amount will be off if it is based on current weight. Science Diet seems to base this amount on current weight, the way they would for an adult dog. Increase the food a bit if you feel she needs it, especially since she might be in a growth spurt, but watch her weight. You should be able to easily feel her ribs when you run your hands across and she should have a slight tuck up at her belly to be ideal weight and not overweight. Her spin, ribs, and hip bones should not protrude, and the tuck-up should not be extreme, or she is underweight. Also, first make sure that you are feeding her three times a day, splitting the food into three meals instead of two, because she might be getting enough calories but her blood sugar and metabolism is metabolizing the food between meals too fast. That can make her hungrier. Puppies need to eat more often while they are under four months of age. If you are offering her water at least four times per day, then she might be asking for water just for fun. Many puppies are obsessed with water and not good at knowing when they are full. For the crying, unfortunately she still needs more time to get used to the crate. It typically takes about two weeks for a puppy to acclimate. When you crate her during the day, put her food into a bowl, cover it with water, let it sit out until the food absorbs the water and turns into mush, and then mix a bit of peanut butter, liver paste, or soft cheese into the mush. Avoid Xylitol in peanut butter though because it is extremely TOXIC to dogs. Loosely stuff the mush mixture into Kongs, freeze them overnight, and whenever you crate her during the day put one of the food stuffed Kongs in there with her. This will help her learn to sooth herself, help with boredom, teach the right kind of chewing, prevent boredom barking, and help prevent separation anxiety later on. Also, when you crate her at night you can give her an empty kong to comfort her. Do not put food in it at night or it will keep her awake, but if you have been giving it to her during the day then it will be a familiar, pleasant item. Doing all of that will also help her learn to relax in the crate in general. Stay consistent and don't let her out when she cries when you know that she does not need anything. The more consistent you are, the sooner she will learn. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Emmie Lou
Labrador Retriever
5 Months
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Question
2 found helpful
Emmie Lou
Labrador Retriever
5 Months

My name is Taylor, and I have a 5mo old Chocolate Lab puppy. Our problems mostly arise at bed time. Emmie does not want to sleep at all. I have tried many many different strategies and none have worked so far. She also cant hold her potty all night as well. She is house trained, but begs to go out 3 or 4 times throughout the night, to which I cant say no to. How do I cope with this? Is there a good way to train her to hold her pee/poo through the night? The other issue we have, as I have read is common with most lab pups is her biting. She is getting bigger, and her adult teeth have grown in and the bites hurt a lot. Any recommendations on how I can curve this before any serious injuries happen?

Thanks, Taylor and Emmie

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Taylor, First, check out the article that I have linked right below and work on the "Leave It" method. Once she knows that method and you have reached the finals steps for teaching that, then if you tell her to "Leave It" to not bite you and she does anyway, then use the "Pressure" method from that article in combination with the "Leave It" as a way to enforce your "Leave It" command and make biting less fun for her. Even though this article talks about Shih Tzus the training is the same for any puppy. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite For the night wakings she should be able to hold it for ten hours through the night by this age, but some puppies may still need one potty break. In general a healthy five month old puppy can hold her bladder for five to six hours during the day and even longer than that at night while sleeping. Even if she does need to pee it should not be more often than every five to six hours. I would suggest crate training her, crating her in another part of the house where her crying will not keep you awake, and setting an alarm clock for five-and-a-half hours since she last went potty and then going to her to take her out just once at that time. She will be safe in the crate. She will likely cry but even if she were to stay awake that entire time she should still be able to hold her pee for that long. Give her a chew-toy in the crate but don't make it too exciting, and don't give her anything that she can shred up and ingest like a fluffy bed or a stuffed toy. If her current bed is not durable, then look into something like a PrimoPad and anchor down the corners of the pad to the crate so that she cannot pull them up to chew on. Primopads come with zipties. That pad will give her a little bit of padding in the crate without risking her ingesting something while you let her cry it out. Follow the crate training method from the article that I have linked below if she is not used to a crate already. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate You can utilize all the methods from the article above, or you can just use the "Surprise" method. Also, expect Emmie to protest the crate at night still because she likely wants your attention during the night and you will be removing it, but spending some time easing her into the idea of the crate during the day with the above methods should make the crate a place that is not scary at least. It is important to crate her so that she will not have the chance to get into things, physically wake you up, or keep herself awake by playing. You want nighttime to be boring and for her to be forced to learn to settle down by removing all of those other options. Expect a lot of crying at first. Since you will be going to her to take her outside every five to six hours at first, you can feel sure that her crying is simply because she does not want to go to sleep in her crate and not because something is truly wrong. You have to give her the chance to adjust and learn. If you have a baby monitor you can use that to check in on her, but if you can go to sleep and turn the monitor off after checking on her, do so! It may take her a few nights to learn the new routine but once she does she should start sleeping better. After she gets to the point where she no longer cries at night to go out, try not waking her up one night but leaving a monitor on. Wait to go to her until she wakes up on her own. When she wakes up needing to go potty after it has been at least six hours, then take her then and pay attention to how long she can go now that she knows to sleep at night. If she consistently only wakes after that long. For example, after sleeping eight hours, then you can either set your alarm for eight hours every night and take her then or you can let her wake you at that time as long as she does not start waking up to get out at other times too. If you use the alarm, then in a month, don't wake her one night to test it again and see if she can make it all of the way through the night yet. A couple of other things. Make sure that you take up all food and water two hours before her bedtime. Make sure that you take her outside to go potty RIGHT before you put her in her crate for the night and not thirty-minutes or an hour or more before. Her bladder will not "shut down" until she is asleep so anytime out of the crate awake will make it harder for her to hold it as long as she needs to during the night. If she is pooping during the night, then try moving her dinner time earlier so that she will be more likely to poop before bed. When you take her to go potty before bed, go with her and watch her to make sure that she actually goes potty. If you are not doing this now, she might not be going potty when you let her outside before bed. Finally, if she cannot hold her pee for at least four hours during the day when needed, then get her checked out for a urinary tract infection by your Vet. A urinary tract infection could cause her to pee more often at night and in that case she would genuinely need to pee more. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks
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Question
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Luna
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks

We are afraid to leave a a dog bed or comfy mat in the crate for fear of her ripping it apart and eating it...she hates the metal floor of crate and is up every hour. We have the crate nest to our bed but first two night s were awful. Can we keep dog bed or mat in crate?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Chris, Your concern about chewing is valid. I recommend using something like www.primopads.com Primopads are more durable, non-absorbent (which is necessary for potty training), and can be anchored to the sides of a wire crate to deter chewing. The pad is not squishy but it does offer a firmer foam support that is supposed to be good for supporting joints - its what I used with my own dog when she was that age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks
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Question
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Luna
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks

Hi there. My puppy freaks out whenever she is alone. Even though she can come in and out of the kitchen - has a lot of toys and blankets - even a big fluffy teddy. But still she freaks out. Im not always going to be here during the day and I need her to get use to staying alone. PLEASE any tips will be so helpful!! I really need her to be okay when I am not here.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marie, Even though it can be hard you actually need to intentionally give her safe times of being alone without you, either in a crate (what I recommend because it also helps with potty training), or an exercise pen. Follow the surprise method from the article linked below. Work on her being by herself for about an hour each day (it can be longer if you need to leave her, but at least an hour for training purposes). Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Most young puppies will cry in a crate or when left alone for up to 2 weeks (some adjust within just three days). Most grow out of this if you give them the opportunity to learn to self-sooth and self-entertain by not rescuing them while they are crying when you know that they are safe. If you go to her whenever she cries the training will take much longer though, so try to stay firm and use the Surprise method from the article linked above to help the process go more smoothly. Wait until she is quiet for at least a couple of seconds before you go back to her, so that she associates your return with her being quiet and not crying. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Rico
Labrador Retriever
7 Weeks
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Question
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Rico
Labrador Retriever
7 Weeks

My name is Sophia. We just got our 7 week black Labrador this past Friday and we are having most trouble at night. We typically take away her water supply at 9:00, we play with her till about 11:00, and before bed we take her out then put her in the crate. She barks for 30 minutes then falls asleep. She started barking again at 6:30, so we took her out on a leash then straight back in her crate. She barked from 6:40 to 8:00. Are we supposed to just let her bark? Or is there something we can do? PLEASE HELP! Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sophia, At 7 weeks of age and this early into crate training, the unfortunate answer is that you keep doing what you did. Take her out if she barks and it's been more than 2.5 hours since she last went potty. Keep the potty trip boring and on leash, then return her to the crate until it's the time you want her to learn to wake up for the day for. The early morning will likely be the hardest because she is less sleepy then, but consistency is super important. The first three days tend to be really hard, and you can expect two weeks of some type of protesting, but it should gradually get better. Stay consistent or it will take longer. As hard as it is, that amount of crying is actually not a bad amount compared to how long some puppies protest. She can learn this with your consistency and support. To help the overall process progress more smoothly, check out the aritlce linked below and practice the Surprise method, to crate train and build some independence at a time when you are less tired. Only give treats during the day though - not at night. At night, simply ignore if it's not time for potty and pup isn't injured or sick. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Ronny
Labrador Retriever
5 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Ronny
Labrador Retriever
5 Weeks

He vomited

Why so ???

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. There could be a few reasons for the vomiting. Ronny could have eaten something he shouldn't have. Or, if he was in a car, he may have had motion sickness, etc. There could be multiple reasons. If he vomits again in the near future, a visit to the vet is crucial due to his young age. It's important to rule out serious illnesses that can occur. Make sure that Ronny's vaccines are all up to date as well. The vet can verify that. Good luck!

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Question
Watson
Labrador Retriever
8 Months
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Question
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Watson
Labrador Retriever
8 Months

Our pup 8 months old and is crate trained. However, for the past month, Watson has been getting up between 2-4am. He doesn’t cry to go outside but seems he wants to be near us. We tried letting him cry/bark it out but we can only take so much that early in the morning. If you could shed any light or recommendations we’d really appreciate it.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kathleen, First, rule out a few things... Is he able to hold his bladder for at least 5 hours while crated during the day or is he asking to go potty every 1-2 hours during the day? If he is asking to go potty often during the day and actually needing to go, then a trip to your vet is in order because the night wakings could be related to something like a urinary tract infection. (I am not a vet) Is there a new noise at night that might be waking him up, like a baby, beeping sound, or loud neighbor? Does he have enough room to lie down in his crate well? Assuming he can hold his bladder for 8 hours in the crate, nothing is scaring him, his crate isn't super cramped (he doesn't need much extra space but he should be able to lie down comfortable to sleep), and he seems fine once he is given attention, he simply might be going through a phase where he is testing boundaries a bit and asking to be let out simply because he prefers sleeping somewhere else - your bed is softer after all. If the protests are just him acting demanding, you have two options. You can ignore the crying until he gives up and realizes after a few days that it doesn't get him out of the crate - so he stops, OR you can discipline the crying. To discipline the barking, start by teaching the Quiet command using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Practice the Quiet command method during the day until he learns the meaning of the word quiet. Since you want him to learn it quickly, I suggest practicing for a few minutes several times per day to speed up learning. Only give treats while practicing this during the day - no treats at night. Once he understands Quiet, if he wakes up and it has been less than 8 hours since he last went potty, then when he cries tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - great! Go back to bed, nothing else happens. If he doesn't get quiet or starts barking again right away, calmly say "Ah Ah" and use a small canister of pressurized air, called a Pet Convincer, to spray a quick puff of unscented air (do NOT use citronella) at his side through the crate's wires (avoid spraying him in the face). After spraying him, go back to bed. Repeat the corrections each time he barks until he goes back to sleep. Before you correct or ignore the barking though, evaluate his potty schedule just to make sure there isn't something causing him to need to use the bathroom more often that should be evaluated by your vet. If he really does have to go potty, that shouldn't be ignored, but at this age it also isn't normal so needs to be investigated - barking for attention is far more common than not being able to hold it through the night at this age. Make sure you are removing all food and water two hours before bed, and taking him potty immediately before you put him into the crate for the night (if he is getting a huge drink right before bed, that could be your issue). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Ruger
Labrador Retriever
6 Months
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Ruger
Labrador Retriever
6 Months

He won’t stay asleep at night

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joyce, First, if pup isn't already crate trained, you will need to crate train pup and have him sleep in there for a while - at least until he has developed a long-term habit of sleeping through the night. Second, make sure that pup is actually going potty when you take them right before bed - take them on a leash and walk them around slowly to encourage them to go - some puppies get distracted and don't go. Third, remove all food and water two hours before bed to ensure pup fully empties right before bed. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark If pup is waking up needing to go potty, the above tips may lead to him sleeping through the night. If pup is still waking up or needing to potty isn't the issue to begin with - it's wanting attention, then keep reading. Begin crate training pup during the day. During the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. You can also wait him out and see if he eventually gets quiet on his own - at which time you will reward him, but if he doesn't you will need to correct with the pet convincer. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. You can either continue what you are currently doing at night during this process or go ahead and jump into what I explain below for night time training. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 6-7 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue because he should be able to hold it that long in the crate if awake, and longer if asleep), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If he wakes and cries after 6 hours, you will still need to take him potty, but take him on a leash, keep the trips super boring and immediately put him back into the crate after - if the trips aren't fun, he will likely start sleeping longer and not asking to go within a couple of weeks or less. Once awake he will have to actually go after that long though. If you go straight to nights and days at the same time like outlined above, you will probably have about 3 rough nights, with lots of correcting before he gets quiet - don't give in and let him out or this will take much longer! But the overall process will go faster if you can stay strong. If you practice the daytime routine first for a few more days, then start the nighttime routine once pup understands the new rules, the night should go easier when you do make the transition. Either way you need to stay very consistent for this to work - expect pup to protest and for you to have to correct a lot at first. You may want to pretend like you are all going to bed two hours early than usual and read in bed with the lights off - anticipating having to get up a lot the first couple of hours to correct - so that you don't loose as much sleep. Choose whichever option seems less stressful for you ultimately and is something you can stick to. When pup has been reliably sleeping through the night for four months, no longer chews on things he shouldn't, and is fully potty trained, then you can transition pup out of the crate at night again if you want to. There is certainly no harm in having him sleep them routinely though if you prefer that. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Brownie
Labrador Retriever
4 Months
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Brownie
Labrador Retriever
4 Months

My dog doesn't find the difference between love touch and food. It always try to find food in our hands whenever we touch it. It never potties outside the house although we take it outside for a walk after food time and at the potty time. It never tries to sleep or stay without us. We like it but it is not possible always.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the photo of Brownie. He's got a great smile. At 4 months old, Brownie has a lot to learn and will have a lot of spunk so may seem not that affectionate - but it will come. The best way to form a lasting and fantastic bond with a dog is to go to dog training classes. Doing so helps both the dog and the pet parent to form a great relationship. I strongly suggest you start as soon as you can. When you are working with Brownie at home, be sure to speak with him in a happy and encouraging voice. Give him treats often, along with mentally stimulating toys like interactive feeders. As for the potty training, there are a few methods you can try. Take him out often every thirty minutes, praising and treating him every time he has potty success. As well, try The Crate Training Method or the Timing Method from this guide: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Both have excellent suggestions for potty training. When you clean up, use an enzymatic cleaner to completely remove the odor - it is still there even though you cannot smell it. But Brownie does and will keep going potty inside. As for sleeping near you, give Brownie a comfy dog bed right beside you. Put treats there often throughout the day when he isn't looking to encourage him to go there on his own. Good luck and have fun training!

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DAISY
Labrador Retriever
2 Months
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DAISY
Labrador Retriever
2 Months

My puppy sleeps right behind my bed, but she won't let me sleep she keeps on barking and scratching my bad untill i take her out to pee although i make sure she's done with toilet before tucking her in.
She's teething, so she keeps on biting us. I somehow can calm her down a little bit but my family members are terrified of her because she doesn't calm down with them.
what can I do?

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Gracie
Labrador Retriever
2 Months
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Gracie
Labrador Retriever
2 Months

Just bought her 2 days back. she barks at night and I have to wake up after every 2 hours and take her to washroom . After that she wines to stay out of crate and after 30-40 minutes she goes back to sleep . It is quite troublesome to wake up after every 2-3 hours plus neighbour's also get disturbed because of noise . She also keeps biting hands and clothes.
Can you suggest ways to make her sleep at night also how to potty train her ? She also keeps biting hands and clothes.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, my apologies for the delay in reply. Due to Gracie's age, it is not uncommon for potty breaks in the night. When you take her, put her on a leash, no talking, no exploring, pee only, no treat, and straight back to bed. You will have to put her back in the crate and ignore the barking for maybe several nights until she gives in and accepts the routine. This will be hard for the neighbors, I agree. Try keeping a fan (not pointed at her) in the room where the crate is as white noise for Gracie, which may help her sleep. Also, do not feed her or give her water at least 2 hours before bed. Keep her up as late as you can in the evenings and do not let her nap in the evening. Play with her and give her interactive toys. For the biting, take a look at the Leave It Method here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. Practice every day for 10 minutes. Lastly, for the potty training, this guide as excellent methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside. Take Gracie outside every 30 - 60 minutes. This may seem excessive but will be worth it when she catches on. Remember to take her after meals, naps, playtime, and excitement. Praise her highly and with a treat when she has success. Read the potty training guide I gave you in its entirety because it has excellent suggestions. Good luck and happy training!

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Xero
Labrador
12 Weeks
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Xero
Labrador
12 Weeks

Hi, Xero is a beautiful dog but continuously bites whoever wants to play or pat him. Its seems playful but he's starting to hurt everyone. I've tried disciplining him and he seems to do it a little less with me but always tries regardless. I have a 10year old who i need to supervise as i dont trust Xero at all. Because he continues biting i have been much firmer and a bit angrier with him and i dont want to have that type of relationship with him.

What can i do to teach him that biting us and visitors is unacceptable.

Thanks.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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sandy
Labrador Husky
4 Weeks
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sandy
Labrador Husky
4 Weeks

my pup doesnt sleep throughout the night what should i do

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This is very normal for dogs his age. They are essentially like human babies. They will wake up every few hours, usually to go to the bathroom. The best thing you can do is make night time as unexciting as possible. Try to not even talk to your puppy. Once your puppy is about 10 weeks, you can ignore one of the wake up calls to slowly phase her out of the habit of waking up. Once they are about 4 months old, you can expect your dog to not wake up to go to the bathroom at night.

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Smokey
Labrador Retriever
16 Weeks
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Smokey
Labrador Retriever
16 Weeks

Our black lab puppy had diarrhea from the first day we brought him home at 8 weeks. We are trying to crate train but it took the last 8 weeks for the vet to eliminate parasites, giardia and other health risks and settle on food sensitivity. We switched his food 4 times and he is finally now doing better. But for the last 8 weeks he has had to go out in the middle of the night 3-4 times with diarrhea. Now that the issue is getting better how do we get him to start sleeping through the night? He seems to wake up now and want to go out even though he often does not need to now.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! The best thing you can do right now is make his crate as comfortable and sleep inducing as possible. If you haven't already, try covering the crate with a blanket on 3 sides, and maybe try a white noise machine or fan. Make sure he gets lots of exercise during the day and right before bed time. It typically takes dogs about 30 days to adjust to any sort of change. They are very habitual creatures. So do your best to ignore his attempts to be let out at night and stick with a good routine. He should be adjusting over the next few weeks with no problems.

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Bella
labrador female
6 Weeks
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Bella
labrador female
6 Weeks

He do potty and pee in home!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jaspel, Check out the article I have linked below. At this age pup is going to have a very limited bladder capacity and need to be taken outside every hour, and several time during the night though. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside You may even need to set up an exercise pen with disposable real grass pads, in an area that can later be closed off, to keep pup from going potty in that room once trained to go outside, until pup can hold their bladder a bit better. Most potty training outside is formally started at 8 weeks of age because of how small pup's bladders are. As a general rule, puppies can hold it a maximum of the number of months they are in age plus one. Which means only about 1.2-2 hours for your pup. That time is a maximum, pup would need to be taken out twice that often when not crated during the day for training purposes - so about every 45 minutes to 1 hour. Disposable real grass pad brands - www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com If you do need to use a grass pad while pup is this little, I do recommend starting crate training for potty training as young as you can to avoid confusion from using an inside potty for too long though. Once you switch to outside potty training at that point, stop using the indoor potty. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Power
Labrador Retriever
10 Weeks
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Power
Labrador Retriever
10 Weeks

Power is a friendly and confident puppy. We socialize her with friends + other dogs as much we can and as safely as we can. She gets plenty of outside time after each nap/ meal and decent play time with toys. And she is fed three meals a day (last meal by 7:30 pm)

We are struggling with getting her to sleep through the night.
Seems Bed time is 11pm to midnight for her right now and she wakes up 2-3 times during the night. When I hear her whimper I turn on the dim light and take her to potty if she needs to or I pet her a couple times then remove my hand. If she whimpers again I give her my slipper for comfort and wait for her to fall back asleep after 30 minutes? My guess is she whimpers for attention if she doesn’t go potty when waking up in the night. Should we make sure she gets more mental stimulation before bed time? Power woke up 2-3 times max for the two nights she has slept in my room with me. No crate. Bed is across from me with blanket and toys. My fiancé and I are experiencing puppy blues and need advice to structure a healthy sleeping routine.

Much thanks in advance!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, waking 2-3 times a night is not unusual for a pup this age. Power has a small bladder and no doubt does need to empty it. Keep doing what you are doing. Take her out for a pee on the leash, no talking, no playtime, no treat. Just pee and straight back to bed. She'll learn that pee breaks are just for that and nothing else. It's also not unusual for a pup to cry at night at this age - she misses her mom and siblings. You may have to persevere through the whining for a few days or weeks until she gets the idea. But it is very important to determine whether Power needs a pee break; it is not nice to have to hold it. So as you are doing, continue to let her empty her bladder. Don't give her water for 2 hours before bed. You can also place white noise near her to help her sleep (like a fan, but not pointed on her). You can also have her crate in your room for closeness if she's lonely, and as she gets older slowly inch the crate out of the room back to its original place. This means inches only per night - it will take a while but works. Keep up the great work; your puppy will disturb your nights but that is what puppies do! Have fun and enjoy!

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Waylon
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks
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Waylon
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks

He won’t quit winning from the time I put him in to the time I take him out of his cage at night no matter what I do he won’t quit

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kyle, Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below and practice crate training with that method often for 30 minute -1 hour periods during the day to help pup adjust to being alone more quickly. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate At night, ignore any crying unless it has been at least 2 hours since pup last went potty. When it has been at least 2 hours and pup wakes up crying, take pup potty on a leash and keep the trip super boring - no treats, talking, or play, and return them immediately to the crate after they go, ignoring any crying that happens when you return them. Keeping trips boring helps pup learn to only wake at night for potty needs and not play or food, to begin sleeping longer sooner. Pup will need to go potty 1-2 times at night right now at this age, even when fully crate trained, but being consistent, practicing crating during the day, and keeping trips outside boring, can help pup wake less at night, cry less when first crated, and start sleeping through the night sooner as their bladder capacity increases with age. Know that its normal for pup to cry in the first two weeks. The first three nights tend to be the worse, with pup gradually getting better and better after that. Some puppies cry all night, falling asleep when they get too tired, waking up to go potty then starting again. It can make for a long night. I recommend some good ear plugs until pup falls asleep and know that it should get better with practice and consistency. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Whiskey
Labrador Retriever
1 Month
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Whiskey
Labrador Retriever
1 Month

Hi, I am not an experienced pet owner. Whiskey is cute but she always sleeps beside me. Even in day time also she sleeps either puting her head on my thigh or on my feet. I try to say her "NO" everytime she comes but she doesn't get it. What should I do? Also I am feeding her with wheat Cerelac in lukewarm water, but she smells a bit. Should I give her some other diet.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amanpreet, If pup is truly only 4 weeks old it is very normal for pup to need a lot of close contact because she would normally be sleeping on top of siblings and cuddled up. You can try providing her with a warm water bottle (not too hot) wrapped in a towel so it feels warm and soft like another dog or person would. Age should also help as pup becomes more curious and independent, and is ready to start practicing things like crate training close to 2 months of age. As far as diet goes, I would consult your vet about that, since that is more of a medical issue (I am not a vet). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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