How to Train a Pomeranian Puppy to Not Bark

Medium
3-9 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

The doorbell rings. Your Pomeranian puppy barks. You pick up your their food bowl. They bark. A friend comes over to the house. Your dog barks. A leaf moves nearby on your walk. Your Pomeranian barks. The house is quiet and still. But still, your puppy barks. Pomeranians are descended from watchdogs and they take their jobs very seriously, which is why it is so important to train your Pomeranian puppy to not bark from an early age.

Defining Tasks

The main thing to keep in mind while working on this behavior is you can't expect your dog to stop barking altogether. Barking for dogs is the same as talking for humans. Your Pomeranian is using their voice to let you know what is going on in their world. While you can't silence your puppy completely, you can work on minimizing excessive barking. Helping your dog learn when to bark is not just good for your stress level, it also teaches them to control their fear and feel safe and protected.

Getting Started

Get ready to be patient. When training your Pomeranian puppy not to bark, keep your cool and avoid yelling at your Pom no matter how much noise you hear. Your pup doesn't hear your words. They just recognize that you are matching their volume, which will only make them bark more. Stay calm and show your dog that you have control over the situation. This attitude will make them much more likely to listen to you.

The Invisible Wall Method

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Step
1
Stay calm when your puppy starts barking
With this method, your job is to show your Pomeranian puppy that loud noises and other things that cause them to bark are no big deal. When they start barking, stay calm and relaxed. Don't raise your voice or let them know you are frustrated.
Step
2
Create an invisible wall
Step in front of your puppy and don't move. If you can, put your back to whatever it is that is making your Pom bark, such as another dog or a visitor. This action shows him you do not feel threatened by the thing that is bothering him.
Step
3
Correct your puppy's behavior
Once you create the invisible wall, choose a type of correction to show him you are in control of the situation. You can use a noise, a stern look, or a soft physical correction, such as a poke or tap.
Step
4
Hold your ground
Your Pom puppy may stop for a moment in reaction to your correction and then go right back to barking. Keep up your invisible wall until your pup completely relaxes and recognizes that barking is not the right move.
Step
5
Reward for quiet
Once your Pomeranian puppy calms down, you can give them a treat or some physical affection to reward them for calming down. Use the same series of steps each time your puppy starts barking to show them there is nothing to fear and that you are in charge of the situation.
Recommend training method?

The Be Quiet Method

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2 Votes
Step
1
Identify what is causing your Pomeranian puppy to bark
Figuring out what types of stimulus set off your pup's barking is a good way to break bad habits. When you know those stimuli will be present, keep some treats on hand to reward the "be quiet" command.
Step
2
Ask "What's the Matter?"
When your Pom starts to bark, tell them "good job" and then ask them "what's the matter?" Your calm reaction to the situation is important because it shows your pup that you are not worried about whatever has set them off.
Step
3
Pair the "be quiet" command with a treat
Tell your Pom pup to be quiet and then wave a treat in front of their nose. Most Pomeranians will instantly start trying to sniff or lick the treat, which will stop them from barking. When your puppy stops barking, praise them.
Step
4
Require quiet time
Don't give your puppy the treat right away. The first time you try this technique, wait for three seconds of quiet time before rewarding your Pom with the treat. This wait time teaches your pup that the reward is for quiet, not for barking.
Step
5
Keep increasing the quiet time
The first few times, only make your puppy wait for three seconds or so before giving them the treat. Then, make them wait six seconds. Then, nine. If you are feeling brave, you can continue up to requiring a couple of minutes. Reaching that point will require a lot of patience, but will help significantly in curbing your Pomeranian puppy's barking habits.
Recommend training method?

The Interrupt and Redirect Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
Find a good distraction for your Pomeranian
For this method, you will need something that can interrupt your Pomeranian puppy's bark fest and then a toy to redirect their energy. Designate a toy to use when your dog is barking. A good choice is a toy they don't usually have access to that effectively captures and keeps their attention, such as a squeaky toy.
Step
2
Make your Pom bark
The first step to train your puppy not to bark is to make them bark. Knock on the door or the wall and let your puppy bark a few times before intervening. Remember, you are not trying to stop barking altogether, but limit excessive barking.
Step
3
Interrupt your puppy's barking
A great way to interrupt your dog when they are barking is to use a command they are already familiar with. After a few barks, tell your Pom to sit. You can also try clapping or making another distracting noise.
Step
4
Redirect your Pomeranian's focus
Ideally, the 'sit' command has interrupted your pup's barking fit. Now as a reward, you can give your Pom the designated toy. It gives them something else to focus on and provides reinforcement for the quiet.
Step
5
Be consistent
Every time your puppy starts barking, use the same series of events to interrupt and redirect their actions. Eventually, your Pom will learn how much barking is allowed and when to keep quiet.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Jet
Pomeranian
7 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Jet
Pomeranian
7 Years

Jet has come to live with me as my granddaughter can't have him at their new rental property and we have a problem with him barking can't be calling out to him all the time to stop barking, he lived indoors previously but he has been living outdoors with me for over 6months and has adjusted to that but barks at anything can you advise me what to do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lorraine, Honestly I suggest using a stimulation based bark collar since it's happening outside, and often when you are not right there to work on it. There is a way to use a bark collar to help the dog learn with fewer corrections and more positive reinforcement though. Grab a bunch of treats, go outside where there are triggers, and whenever a trigger happens (something he normally barks at - like a squirrel, person going past, other dog, certain sound, ect...) if he doesn't bark give a treat. If he does bark, the collar will correct him and right when he barks tell him "Ah Ah". This helps him understand that he did something wrong and not just that the correction was random. When he seeing something he would normally bark at and doesn't bark (because he was corrected before or just in general), then he ready to calmly praise and reward to help desensitize him to those things. Training this way tells him "No, don't do that", "Yes, do that instead", to make the training fair and clear so he is more set up for success, the collar will also reinforce the lesson when you are not right there so he learns that he can't bark still just because you walked away - it gives a level of consistency that's hard to get otherwise. Do your research on collars - they are not all the same. You want a good one, that is accurate, can be used for smaller lbs dogs, and is made well. You may need one with longer prongs to reach through his long fur too. I don't recommend citronella collars - they are actually very harsh because of how sensitive a dog's nose is, and the scent lingers for a long time which means your dog is continuing to be corrected long after the barking stops - which is unfair and confusing. You want the correction to be paired with the behavior and to stop as soon as the unwanted behavior stops, so you can follow up with reward while quiet later. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Misti
Pomeranian
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Misti
Pomeranian
3 Months

Every time she is in the cage she starts barking up a storm for about 10-20 minutes straight every time. This is my first dog I’m takin care of mostly myself and would like to teach her how to not be so yappy i don’t know if i just have to let her get used to the cage or what. We got her from a pet store named shake a paw so i was just curious thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
422 Dog owners recommended

Hello Connor, If you have had her for less than a month, then the barking is normal. The most important thing you can do is wait until she gets quiet before you let her out of the crate so she doesn't learn that barking gets her out. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below to help her adjust faster: Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate If the barking persists past a month, you can also purchase a small canister of unscented, pressurized air called a pet convincer. You can teach her the Quiet command, tell her Quiet when she barks in the crate, then spray a small puff of air through the crate wires at her side (NOT face) while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leaving again. If she gets quiet and stays quiet for five minutes, sprinkle treats into the crate calmly as a reward. Let her out only while she is being quiet unless you know she really needs to use the bathroom and there is no time to wait. Only use unscented air for this - NOT citronella - it is extremely harsh because of how sensitive a dog's nose is. I only recommend using the Pet Convincer when you have tried the Surprise method for a month without it first. Almost all puppies will cry in the crate at first and almost all puppies will adjust if you are consistent, given time. Only a small handful need corrections like a Pet Convinver used at an older age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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