How to Train a Pomeranian Puppy to Not Bark

Medium
3-9 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

The doorbell rings. Your Pomeranian puppy barks. You pick up your their food bowl. They bark. A friend comes over to the house. Your dog barks. A leaf moves nearby on your walk. Your Pomeranian barks. The house is quiet and still. But still, your puppy barks. Pomeranians are descended from watchdogs and they take their jobs very seriously, which is why it is so important to train your Pomeranian puppy to not bark from an early age.

Defining Tasks

The main thing to keep in mind while working on this behavior is you can't expect your dog to stop barking altogether. Barking for dogs is the same as talking for humans. Your Pomeranian is using their voice to let you know what is going on in their world. While you can't silence your puppy completely, you can work on minimizing excessive barking. Helping your dog learn when to bark is not just good for your stress level, it also teaches them to control their fear and feel safe and protected.

Getting Started

Get ready to be patient. When training your Pomeranian puppy not to bark, keep your cool and avoid yelling at your Pom no matter how much noise you hear. Your pup doesn't hear your words. They just recognize that you are matching their volume, which will only make them bark more. Stay calm and show your dog that you have control over the situation. This attitude will make them much more likely to listen to you.

The Be Quiet Method

Most Recommended
4 Votes
Step
1
Identify what is causing your Pomeranian puppy to bark
Figuring out what types of stimulus set off your pup's barking is a good way to break bad habits. When you know those stimuli will be present, keep some treats on hand to reward the "be quiet" command.
Step
2
Ask "What's the Matter?"
When your Pom starts to bark, tell them "good job" and then ask them "what's the matter?" Your calm reaction to the situation is important because it shows your pup that you are not worried about whatever has set them off.
Step
3
Pair the "be quiet" command with a treat
Tell your Pom pup to be quiet and then wave a treat in front of their nose. Most Pomeranians will instantly start trying to sniff or lick the treat, which will stop them from barking. When your puppy stops barking, praise them.
Step
4
Require quiet time
Don't give your puppy the treat right away. The first time you try this technique, wait for three seconds of quiet time before rewarding your Pom with the treat. This wait time teaches your pup that the reward is for quiet, not for barking.
Step
5
Keep increasing the quiet time
The first few times, only make your puppy wait for three seconds or so before giving them the treat. Then, make them wait six seconds. Then, nine. If you are feeling brave, you can continue up to requiring a couple of minutes. Reaching that point will require a lot of patience, but will help significantly in curbing your Pomeranian puppy's barking habits.
Recommend training method?

The Invisible Wall Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Stay calm when your puppy starts barking
With this method, your job is to show your Pomeranian puppy that loud noises and other things that cause them to bark are no big deal. When they start barking, stay calm and relaxed. Don't raise your voice or let them know you are frustrated.
Step
2
Create an invisible wall
Step in front of your puppy and don't move. If you can, put your back to whatever it is that is making your Pom bark, such as another dog or a visitor. This action shows him you do not feel threatened by the thing that is bothering him.
Step
3
Correct your puppy's behavior
Once you create the invisible wall, choose a type of correction to show him you are in control of the situation. You can use a noise, a stern look, or a soft physical correction, such as a poke or tap.
Step
4
Hold your ground
Your Pom puppy may stop for a moment in reaction to your correction and then go right back to barking. Keep up your invisible wall until your pup completely relaxes and recognizes that barking is not the right move.
Step
5
Reward for quiet
Once your Pomeranian puppy calms down, you can give them a treat or some physical affection to reward them for calming down. Use the same series of steps each time your puppy starts barking to show them there is nothing to fear and that you are in charge of the situation.
Recommend training method?

The Interrupt and Redirect Method

Least Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Find a good distraction for your Pomeranian
For this method, you will need something that can interrupt your Pomeranian puppy's bark fest and then a toy to redirect their energy. Designate a toy to use when your dog is barking. A good choice is a toy they don't usually have access to that effectively captures and keeps their attention, such as a squeaky toy.
Step
2
Make your Pom bark
The first step to train your puppy not to bark is to make them bark. Knock on the door or the wall and let your puppy bark a few times before intervening. Remember, you are not trying to stop barking altogether, but limit excessive barking.
Step
3
Interrupt your puppy's barking
A great way to interrupt your dog when they are barking is to use a command they are already familiar with. After a few barks, tell your Pom to sit. You can also try clapping or making another distracting noise.
Step
4
Redirect your Pomeranian's focus
Ideally, the 'sit' command has interrupted your pup's barking fit. Now as a reward, you can give your Pom the designated toy. It gives them something else to focus on and provides reinforcement for the quiet.
Step
5
Be consistent
Every time your puppy starts barking, use the same series of events to interrupt and redirect their actions. Eventually, your Pom will learn how much barking is allowed and when to keep quiet.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Christina Gunning

Published: 03/23/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Jet
Pomeranian
7 Years
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Jet
Pomeranian
7 Years

Jet has come to live with me as my granddaughter can't have him at their new rental property and we have a problem with him barking can't be calling out to him all the time to stop barking, he lived indoors previously but he has been living outdoors with me for over 6months and has adjusted to that but barks at anything can you advise me what to do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lorraine, Honestly I suggest using a stimulation based bark collar since it's happening outside, and often when you are not right there to work on it. There is a way to use a bark collar to help the dog learn with fewer corrections and more positive reinforcement though. Grab a bunch of treats, go outside where there are triggers, and whenever a trigger happens (something he normally barks at - like a squirrel, person going past, other dog, certain sound, ect...) if he doesn't bark give a treat. If he does bark, the collar will correct him and right when he barks tell him "Ah Ah". This helps him understand that he did something wrong and not just that the correction was random. When he seeing something he would normally bark at and doesn't bark (because he was corrected before or just in general), then he ready to calmly praise and reward to help desensitize him to those things. Training this way tells him "No, don't do that", "Yes, do that instead", to make the training fair and clear so he is more set up for success, the collar will also reinforce the lesson when you are not right there so he learns that he can't bark still just because you walked away - it gives a level of consistency that's hard to get otherwise. Do your research on collars - they are not all the same. You want a good one, that is accurate, can be used for smaller lbs dogs, and is made well. You may need one with longer prongs to reach through his long fur too. I don't recommend citronella collars - they are actually very harsh because of how sensitive a dog's nose is, and the scent lingers for a long time which means your dog is continuing to be corrected long after the barking stops - which is unfair and confusing. You want the correction to be paired with the behavior and to stop as soon as the unwanted behavior stops, so you can follow up with reward while quiet later. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Max
Pomeranian
1 Year
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Max
Pomeranian
1 Year

How to stop barking when seeing other puppies
How to not go to the bathroom inside

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tasha, For the barking, check out the Quiet method from the article linked below. Work on teaching Quiet, then also work on desensitizing pup to other puppies, using the Desensitization method also found in the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-to-not-bark For the potty training - to teach pup to go potty outside: Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 2.5- 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) of freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-8 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. If he hasn't gone poop yet during that half of the day, he needs to be tethered to you or returned to the crate, then taken back outside again in 30-45 minutes if you know he likely needs to go, less frequently if he likely doesn't need to poop. Pooping outside equals more freedom. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If he is not already used to a crate, expect crying at first. When he cries and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give him a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help him adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. Work on teaching "Quiet" by using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Misti
Pomeranian
3 Months
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Misti
Pomeranian
3 Months

Every time she is in the cage she starts barking up a storm for about 10-20 minutes straight every time. This is my first dog I’m takin care of mostly myself and would like to teach her how to not be so yappy i don’t know if i just have to let her get used to the cage or what. We got her from a pet store named shake a paw so i was just curious thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Connor, If you have had her for less than a month, then the barking is normal. The most important thing you can do is wait until she gets quiet before you let her out of the crate so she doesn't learn that barking gets her out. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below to help her adjust faster: Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate If the barking persists past a month, you can also purchase a small canister of unscented, pressurized air called a pet convincer. You can teach her the Quiet command, tell her Quiet when she barks in the crate, then spray a small puff of air through the crate wires at her side (NOT face) while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leaving again. If she gets quiet and stays quiet for five minutes, sprinkle treats into the crate calmly as a reward. Let her out only while she is being quiet unless you know she really needs to use the bathroom and there is no time to wait. Only use unscented air for this - NOT citronella - it is extremely harsh because of how sensitive a dog's nose is. I only recommend using the Pet Convincer when you have tried the Surprise method for a month without it first. Almost all puppies will cry in the crate at first and almost all puppies will adjust if you are consistent, given time. Only a small handful need corrections like a Pet Convinver used at an older age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocket
Pomeranian
3 Months
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Question
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Rocket
Pomeranian
3 Months

I have tried the be quiet method, the invisible wall method, and the interrupt and redirect method but none of these seem to work. Can you help?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Loli, In what situations is pup barking? If pup is barking at something like other dogs, new people, ect...This is likely a socialization issue and the main focus should be on desensitizing pup to those triggers (make a list) and rewarding calm responses around them, so that they become boring and not suspicious anymore - the barking is actually a clue that socialization is lacking if that's the case, and socialization is the bigger issue. Some puppies bark simply because it's a self-rewarding behavior and they are vocalizing excitement or wanting attention. If it's attention seeking, teaching commands like Quiet and Out can help, and having pup earn things thy want by doing nice commands, like Sit and Down before giving them what they want - pets, toys, affection, food, ect...Can also help. Check out the Desensitization method from the article linked below. I also suggest teaching Quiet and Out - which means leave the area, and crate training and teaching Place to help with general calmness and self-control skills. Desensitization and Quiet methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Poof
Pomeranian
6 Years
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Question
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Poof
Pomeranian
6 Years

He’s bark all the time at nothing or someone I don’t know what to do anymore I’ve tried everything I can think of

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alonnna, First, for the barking, I suggest combining a few things in your case. You need a way to communicate with him so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, once pup understands what Quiet means you will choose an interrupter - which will be a form of correction - neither too harsh nor ineffective. An e-collar or Pet Convincer are two of the most effective types of interrupter for most dogs. A pet convincer is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air that you can spray a quick puff of at the dog's side to surprise them enough to help them calm back down. (Don't use citronella and avoid spraying in the face!). An e-collar, aka remote training collar, uses stimulation to interrupt the dog. Only use a high quality e-collar for this, such as E-collar technologies mini educator, Dogtra, SportDog, or Gamin. A good collar should have at least 40 levels, the more levels the more accurately you can train - finding the lowest level your dog will respond to, called a "Working level" so the training is less adverse. In situations where you know pup will bark or is already barking (catch them before they bark if you can), command "Quiet". If they obey, reward with a treat and very calm praise. If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward then. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Most bark training only gives part of that equation. Fitting an e-collar - it should be put on while he is calm, just standing around - Ideally have him wear the collar around for a while before starting any training so he won't associate the training with the collar but just with his barking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Finding the level to use for him (sometimes you will have to go 1 or 2 levels higher during training while the dog is aroused but once he improves you can usually decrease back to his normal level again) - this training level is called a dog's "Working level": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Once pup is calmer in general after the initial training, practice exposing him a lot to the things that trigger the barking normally (make a list - even if it's long). Whenever he DOESN'T bark around something that he normally would have, calmly praise and reward him to continue the desensitization process. An automatic bark collar can also be used during times when he likes to bark while you aren't there after the initial training is done - so he understands that the correction is for his barking at that point in the training. While you are not home, confine him in a crate or room that doesn't look out the windows right now - barking at things out the window lets him practice the bad behavior over and over again and barking is a self-rewarding behavior because of the arousing chemicals released in a dog's brain - so once a dog starts he is naturally encouraged to continue it and stays in that state of mind if you aren't there to interrupt. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Koda
Toy pom
2 Years
0 found helpful
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Koda
Toy pom
2 Years

He is very high strung yet loving but is a terrible barker and bossy. Seems to have separation anxiety also.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carrie, I suggest increasing trust and respect, as well as pup's self-control and overall calmness by teaching and regularly practicing commands that help with those things. Also, don't tolerate pushy, demanding behavior like climbing into your lap, nudging your hand, barking at you to get what pup wants, or demanding other things from you and other people. If pup is barking at you for attention, use the Quiet command, and if pup continues to bark, offer a gentle consequence like making pup leave the room, or a small puff of air from a Pet Convincer at pup's side (Only use unscented air, do NOT use citronella and only spray briefly at pup's side to interrupt, never at their face). If pup is barking at other things, like sounds, also check out the desensitization method from the barking article (where the Quiet method is also located) below. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Place - gradually work up to pup staying on place for up to an hour at a time - this is a good respect, impulse control, and calming exercise: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite If you have additional questions, please feel free to comment back with more specific details about the behavior you have questions about, and some background information on pup and the situation, and I would be glad to help further. Increasing trust and respect and impulse control can often help many dogs with anxiety and is a good first step, even when additional things are needed for more severe cases. Providing mental stimulation can also help with hyper activity and helping pups to develop a good "off switch" too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hey I got a pomeranian from a breeder in Missouri, I asked for pictures of the mom and they send me Koda's picture, do you know anything about this?

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Question
Max
Pomeranian
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Max
Pomeranian
4 Months

Hi we just adopted a new puppy and When we invited friends it was put to bark one day we invited children and he jumped on them (they Whenweinvitedfriends it was put to bark one day we invited children and he jumped on them (they are afraid of dogs)he really scary
We get a lot of people at home and we have to lock him in a room. We need advice, thank you.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. You've got to keep working on socializing Max so that he learns how to act around people. Locking him in a room is bound to make it worse. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/be-calm-around-strangers. The Down and Stay, and the Densensitize Methods are great. Can you give Max an interactive toy that contains treats to distract him when guests arrive? Locking him in a room will be frustrating and will not solve the problem. How about obedience training? Call around for classes (ask your vet first whether Max's vaccines are up to date). As well, try the Obedience Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-be-calm. Make sure Max has had a long walk and plenty of exercise before guests arrive so he'll be calmer. Good luck!

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Chewie
Pomeranian
7 Months
0 found helpful
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Chewie
Pomeranian
7 Months

It’s constantly barking. It doesn’t listen. It lives with the owner and a very quiet 8 year old poodle-yorky terrier.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Pom's do love to bark! Has Chewie gone to obedience school yet? Doing so can change his attitude and teach him to listen. A very effective method for teaching a dog not to bark is the Quiet Method as shown here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-yorkshire-terrier-to-not-bark. Be patient, yet kind and firm. Try white noise in the home (such as a floor fan) to block out the outside sounds. Put a film over the lower windows to keep him from seeing activity outside that causes him to bark. Be consistent and work on training Chewie every day. Remember lots of exercise each day and obedience classes! Good luck!

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Lola
Pomeranian
1 Year
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Lola
Pomeranian
1 Year

Runs after cars and delivery Van's coming up the drive towards our house

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this is very unfortunate for Lola, as it is a dangerous behavior. My suggestion is to perfect her recall so that she comes to you no matter what. There are excellent methods here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-come-back. I like the Advanced Skills Method in particular. The other option, and a safe one, is to not let Lola outside without a leash. You could also consider fencing a portion of your yard and allowing her freedom in there where no harm can come to her. All the best!

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Molly
Pomeranian
5 Years
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Molly
Pomeranian
5 Years

I recently adopted Molly from a rescue lady, Molly barks at everyone and even the TV.. the only information we know of is she used to be a show dog and the owner no longer wanted her... is it to late to train a 5 year dog? So far nothing is working

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Without being able to ask follow up questions about what you have already tried, I will do my best to help you. Barking is one type of vocal communication that dogs use, and it can mean different things depending on the situation. Here are some reasons why dogs bark: Territorial/Protective: When a person or an animal comes into an area your dog considers his territory, that often triggers excessive barking. As the threat gets closer, the barking often gets louder. Your dog will look alert and even aggressive during this type of barking. Alarm/Fear: Some dogs bark at any noise or object that catches their attention or startles them. This can happen anywhere, not just in their home territory. Boredom/Loneliness: Dogs are pack animals. Dogs left alone for long periods, whether in the house or in the yard, can become bored or sad and often will bark because they are unhappy. Greeting/Play: Dogs often bark when greeting people or other animals. It’s usually a happy bark, accompanied with tail wags and sometimes jumping. Attention Seeking: Dogs often bark when they want something, such as going outside, playing, or getting a treat. Separation Anxiety/Compulsive Barking: Dogs with separation anxiety often bark excessively when left alone. They also usually exhibit other symptoms as well, such as pacing, destructiveness, depression, and inappropriate elimination. Compulsive barkers seem to bark just to hear the sound of their voices. They also often make repetitive movements as well, such as running in circles or along a fence. How to Treat Excessive Barking Getting your dog to bark less will take time, work, practice, and consistency. It won’t happen overnight, but with proper techniques and time, you can see progress. Here are two methods: When your dog is barking, say “Quiet” in a calm, firm voice. Wait until he stops barking, even if it’s just to take a breath, then praise him and give him a treat. Just be careful to never reward him while he’s barking. Eventually he will figure out that if he stops barking at the word “quiet” he gets a treat (and make it a delicious treat, such as chicken, to make it worth more than the barking.) Alternatively, you can teach your dog to “speak; once he’s doing that reliably, signal him to stop barking with a different command, such as “quiet”, while holding your finger to your lips (dogs often pick up body signals faster than voice commands.) Practice these commands when he’s calm, and in time he should learn to stop barking at your command, even when he wants to bark at something. A tired dog is a quiet dog. If your dog barks when alone, tire him out before you go. Take a long walk or run, play ball or take a trip to the dog park before leaving. Don’t allow problems to go on and on. The longer a dog does something, the more ingrained it becomes. Barking can give dogs an adrenaline rush, which makes the barking pleasant. And allowing a dog to bark in certain situations, such as when the mailman arrives, can eventually make a dog aggressive in those situations. What if your dog gets out one day as the mail is being delivered? Deal with barking problems as quickly as possible. Some medical problems can cause excessive barking, from bee stings to brain disease to ongoing pain. Older pets can develop a form of canine senility that causes excessive vocalizations. It’s always a good idea to have a pet checked by a veterinarian to be sure there’s no medical reason for a problem. If you have ruled out any medical problems, you can attempt to give Molly a little more stimulation. There are many mentally stimulating toys available for dogs. One called a Buster Cube is great. You can also go with a simple Kong. Anything that requires them to work for their food or a treat is a way to reduce boredom. Also lots of exercise helps also. If you have been walking her, maybe try splitting the walks into two. As she adjusts to her new environment, she will slowly start to learn what is expected of her. I know barking is a trying behavior. Do your best to remain patient and push through this time. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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baby
Pomeranian
11 Months
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baby
Pomeranian
11 Months

whenever we go on walks and as soon as he sees a person he will start to bark non stop to the point where sometimes he even snorts.Also when we take him in the car and he sees someone in the other car he will start to bark at them.if he hears the door open and feels like it’s someone he doesn’t know he will bark again and he won’t stop even if u tell him to stop.As well as if a police car comes by with the siren or lights he starts to bark at the car and will want to chase that car.We don’t know what to do anymore does this have to do with age?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this has more to do with the breed than the age. Pomeranians are very vocal and love to bark! Teach Baby the Quiet command. It is very effective and can be used at home, in the car, at the park - in all situations. (I have a Pomeranian and this was the only way we helped her to change her vocal ways.) Take a look here at the Quiet Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark. The Desensitize Method described in the same guide is also a good task to work on. Baby will probably always be a vocal dog, that's a trait of Poms. But you can diffuse the habit somewhat by consistently working to teach him to be quieter. Make sure that you take Baby to obedience classes to socialize him with other dogs and people. This is of major importance to helping him not bark at everything as well. Good luck and have fun with your puppy!

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Little Hank
Pomeranian
9 Months
0 found helpful
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Little Hank
Pomeranian
9 Months

I can’t get him to stop barking at other people, dogs, and bicyclists. Even while driving. This is my first puppy and he’s saved my life. I’ve spent the last two years every month in hospital until he came into my life. I’ve actually gone into remission. I wanna give him the world.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I am very happy that you and Little Hank have found each other. Pomeranians do love to bark -it is a trait that many of them have. You may be able to calm your puppy and teach him to bark less with the Quiet Method as described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark. The other methods may work with Little Hank as well. (The Desensitize Method is highly effective, too.) Work on these methods every day and you should see results. The Quiet Method is also explained here:https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-barking-in-the-car. This guide has good advice; look at the Do's and Don'ts Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-beagle-puppy-to-not-bark. You now have lots of reading to do and several ideas for working on Little Hank's barking. All the best to you and your new pup! Have fun training!

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Mini
Pomeranian
3 Months
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Mini
Pomeranian
3 Months

How to stop our dog from biting?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Munna
Pomeranian
10 Months
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Munna
Pomeranian
10 Months

My dog barks everytime we have a visitor and that barking is also in avery high pitch what do i do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
841 Dog owners recommended

Hello Aeysha, I recommend desensitizing pup to guests as well as the things pup associates with their arrival - like door knocking, cars pulling up, door bell ringing, ect...Start with the barking at guests video, then move onto the barking at people video as pup can remain calm when they are outside. Barking at guests: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA Barking at people: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXCELHDT2fs&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a&index=4&t=10s I also recommend teaching a Place and Quiet command from the article linked below to help with management and calmness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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