How to Train a Puppy to Stop Barking at Night

Medium
2-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

You’re curled up in your bed, peacefully dreaming of the great times you’ll have with your puppy, when suddenly she starts barking her head off. You hurry to her side, thinking she must be hurt or sick. As soon as you get near her, she stops barking and wags happily at you. Your puppy got exactly what she wanted: your attention. Many puppies bark at night because they feel scared or lonely in their crate. By training your puppy to stop barking during the night, you can get a good night’s sleep and stop the worry.

Defining Tasks

It’s important to remember that very young puppies are rarely able to sleep through the night. They have little bladders and are used to having their mother and litter mates nearby for company. It can take several weeks for your puppy to become accustomed to the new environment and secure enough to sleep through the night. Keep in mind that a new puppy is just like a new baby. You’ll need to be patient with her and expect a few sleepless nights.

Getting Started

Be prepared to ignore some of your puppy’s barking. Get used to her noises and learn to recognize when she is distressed and when she just wants some attention. Invest in a crate that suits your puppy’s size so she can stretch and turn around, but still be comforted by a space her size. Keeping the crate in your bedroom is a good way to provide your puppy with a comforting environment as well.

The Schedule Method

Most Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Set up a schedule for your pup
If your puppy gets used to doing certain things at certain times, she will be expecting bedtime and be less likely to fuss. In the beginning, try to keep the schedule as consistent as possible for your puppy until she becomes familiar with the routine.
Step
2
Keep your puppy busy in the evening
Puppies love to sleep, but if you let your little one nap the evening away, she'll be awake and ready to play at bedtime. Play with your puppy in the evening, take her for a walk, or give her a stimulating toy to tire her out before bed.
Step
3
Choose designated dinner and bed times
Decide what time you want your puppy to go to bed and then select a dinner time that is a few hours before bedtime. You should also pick up her water after she finishes eating. The last thing before bed should be a trip outside so she can relieve herself.
Step
4
Bed means bed
At bedtime, confine your puppy to her crate. She will likely be most comfortable in your bedroom. However, if you don't want your puppy in the room with you, crate her elsewhere but provide something that makes noise, such as a fan or a white noise machine. Keep in mind that if your puppy is in another room, you will need to be more alert for signals that your puppy needs to go out to the bathroom.
Step
5
Make nighttime trips as calm as possible
Most young puppies can't make it through the night without a trip to the potty. Keep trips outside as calm as possible. The less stimulation your puppy gets, the better the chance she'll go back to sleep without barking or howling. Try not to talk to her or give her attention. As soon as she is back in bed, go back to bed yourself.
Step
6
Be strong and ignore false signals
When you know your puppy doesn't need to go outside to the bathroom, ignore her noises. If you pay attention to her, you will only encourage her to keep barking or howling. It can be incredibly difficult to ignore a little puppy's cries, but be strong and you will teach her to calm herself down and sleep quietly through the night.
Recommend training method?

The Alarm Clock Method

Effective
2 Votes
Step
1
Early morning is still night
Some puppies are able to sleep through most of the night, until the first rays of sun hit their crate. If your puppy is an early riser, you can teach her that early morning is still technically nighttime with the use of an alarm clock.
Step
2
Wake up before your puppy
Set an alarm clock to go off about half an hour before your puppy typically wakes up. It should be loud enough so it wakes both you and your pup.
Step
3
Keep things calm
Stay very quiet as you greet your puppy. Reward her for staying quiet, if she does, and calmly go through your morning routine with her. Let her outside to do her business, get her breakfast, follow a typical routine, just without any excitement.
Step
4
Make her wait
Set the alarm for the same time the next day, but wait for a few seconds before greeting your puppy and letting her out of the crate. Reward her if she stays quiet until you let her out.
Step
5
Sleep in a little longer
On the third day, bring the alarm forward a couple of minutes and make your puppy sleep a little bit longer before waking her up and calmly going about the morning routine.
Step
6
Alternate the changes
Repeat the process every day, either bringing the time forward or making your puppy wait a few additional seconds before letting her out, until you reach an acceptable wake-up time. Through this process, you are teaching your puppy that she doesn't need to make noise to wake you up and that mornings aren't all that exciting anyway. The combination should train her to sleep nicely into the morning.
Recommend training method?

The Crate Training Method

Least Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Make her crate a soothing environment
You want your puppy to feel comfortable and calm when she is in her crate. Put soft, cozy bedding on the bottom of the crate. You can also use scents, like pheromones or objects from her previous home to make her feel more content.
Step
2
Pick a cozy spot
The location of your puppy's crate will have a lot to do with how comfortable she feels in it. Place her crate in your bedroom. If your nighttime movements disturb her, you can try draping a thin blanket over the top of the crate.
Step
3
Get your puppy used to the crate
In the beginning, your puppy may react to the crate like you are putting her in puppy jail and abandoning her to sleep or leave the house. Choose small portions of the day to put your puppy into the crate while you are still in the house, so she doesn't associate the crate with being abandoned.
Step
4
Make the crate a place where good things happen
Supply your puppy with things she likes while she is in the crate. Give her attention, treats, or toys to play with. You can even make the crate part of her routine by feeding her meals while she is inside.
Step
5
Reinforce the crate as the sleeping spot
If your puppy falls asleep somewhere, gently carry her to her crate and shut the door with her inside. This process will make her associate the crate with sleeping.
Step
6
Reward your puppy for using the crate
If your puppy goes into the crate on her own, give her big rewards, such as extra special training treats or gentle affection. You want to stay calm though, so she doesn't connect her crate to play time.
Step
7
Be patient
Over time, crate training will make your puppy feel comforted by her crate, rather than punished. After a couple of weeks, she will associate the crate with pleasant feelings and stop crying for your attention during the night.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Christina Gunning

Published: 03/01/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Milo
Crestepoo
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Milo
Crestepoo
8 Weeks

My dog keeps barking in the middle of the night. We tried ignoring him, but he continues to bark louder and more. We can’t let him do that because we live in an apartment and it will disturb our neighbors. Do you have any advice?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nghi, First, practice the Surprise method from the article linked below during the day to help pup adjust quicker. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Know that a puppy this age will need to go potty a couple of times at night also, so if it's been at least 2 hours since pup last went when they wake, take pup potty on a leash, keep the trip as boring as possible - no play or treats, then put pup back into the crate to go back to bed after. I highly recommend ignoring the barking at night, in addition to practicing with the treats for being quiet proactively in the crate for a lot of short sessions during the day, to help pup make the transition quicker. The most consistent you are the quicker it will go. If you have somewhere you can stay with pup for a long weekend that won't disturb neighbors, you may even want to do that while teaching this. That's generally what's recommended when puppies are this young and simply needing to learn how to adjust. There is another protocol that is used with older puppies and dogs. I don't usually recommend it for puppies this young but it can be tried when you have no other option. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 2-3 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Don't give treats at night because that can cause issues, but DO practice with treats during the day for night training to be more effective. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Anous
Poodle x boomer
15 Weeks
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Anous
Poodle x boomer
15 Weeks

Hi, its now the 4th day we have him here, but we don’t really know what to do. We have to sleep in the living room, otherwise he will not constantly bark. But even when we sleep in the living room he will still bark, once or twice, and then stop. We don’t want to put his crate in the bedroom, so we feel like we don’t really have an other option. Can you please give advice for this. I do let him rest in the crate through at day time, and then he only whines and barks if we are in the same room.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joudia, First, check out the the Surprise method from the article linked below. I suggest following that method during the day to teach quietness in the crate when you aren't so tired. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Only give treats and use the Surprise method during the daytime. At night there are a couple of other things you can try: 1. Put him to bed a bit early (everyone else go to bed and do things like read so the house is quiet but you aren't exhausted and ready to go to sleep yet if he barks for a couple hours - ignore the barking and do NOT go in the den or sleep with him. Only go to him if it has been at least 4 hours since he last pottied when he cries. Get everyone ear plugs for this period. Any potty trips at night or early morning should be super boring, on leash, without play or treats, then straight back to the crate after. Two weeks of being firm about letting him cry it out at night and working on the Surprise method during the day works for most puppies - this approach feels gentler than option #2 but takes longer generally. After the three nights of being firm most puppies will cry for about 30 minutes for the next two weeks before going to sleep for the night, then stop crying in the crate normally after that. Those first three nights can involve long crying spells though and you have to be firm and consistent for th training to work best. #2 The second option is to discipline the barking. Work on the Surprise method during the day so he will understand how to be quiet in the crate and be rewarded for that. When he cries, use a small rolled up towel with rubber bands around it to keep it rolled or a pet convincer to interrupt the barking. You can either tell him "Ah Ah", and bump the towel against the crate to interrupt him, then leave again, or tell him "Ah Ah" and spray a small puff of unscented air through the crate wires at his side (NOT face), then leave. During the daytime when he stays quiet for a few minutes after doing this, then return and sprinkle a few treats through the crate wires as a reward for quietness, then leave again. Repeat correcting whenever he barks and cries, rewarding when he is quiet, and do all of this with a calm attitude and not in anger or excitement. At night only correct - don't give food. Only use unscented air. Don't use citronella - it lingers too long to not be confusing and is too harsh for a dog's sensitive nose. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Luna
Shorkie
4 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Luna
Shorkie
4 Months

My family just gave Luna to me for Christmas-shes a Shih tzu x Yorkie. They have had her for almost 2 months and she's been doing well with training- she's even been sleeping through the night for them, but not for me. I'm guessing its the change in routine (placement of kennel, me being around, its only been 3 days with me around). She's learning her name well, doing well with sit command but even though water/food isn't given a few hours before bed (cut off 7-8, bed at 10), and we play before bed ...she'll go in her kennel fine to GO to bed, not even a bark, but then is up in 3 hours, then every 2 hours all night long..barking like crazy to be let out.

I let her bark 5+ mins before getting up. Take her out, don't play with her and just outside to do her business and back in. She gets a 'good girl' or treat then back in kennel, cover down and bed. Her kennel is 10 ft from me.

Is there something i should be doing differently? I'm trying to disuade attention barking even at her young age, but don't want to miss the "i really need to pee' barking. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kellie, Congratulations on the new puppy. At her age she should be able to hold her bladder for up to four hours while awake. If she barks before it has been that long since the last potty trip, then I suggest ignoring her. I believe she is barking for attention. Also, when you take her potty at night, I suggest not giving her a treat. During the day treats are great for that, but you want to keep night trips super boring with no extra attention or rewards so that she won't ask to go just to get attention or food. The first three nights you try ignoring her barking before it has been four hours since the last pee trip expect a lot of barking, especially since the barking got her out of the crate before, but if you stay consistent she should start to improve within a week in most cases. Moving her out of your room and using a baby monitor to listen for any true pee related wake ups will probably help too. That is not completely necessary at this point if you want her in your room but it usually makes the process go faster. Many people choose to crate puppies in walk-in closets and bathrooms connected to their bedroom because then the puppy is close-by but can't see them so don't wake up as often. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Atlas
Shepherd/black mouth cur
6 Months
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Atlas
Shepherd/black mouth cur
6 Months

Dog wakes up everyday at 5 am. I get up then for the gym on week days but weekends I sleep in. Is he conditioned to get up at 5 am? He still gets up

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Eric, Dogs have internal clocks like people so his internal clock is likely set to 5am. I suggest crate training him and stuffing hollow chew toys, like large Kong with his breakfast the night before the weekend. When he wakes up at 5am, take him potty, put him into the crate with the food stuffed toys (so that he will work for his breakfast), and go back to bed. Correct or ignore any non-potty related barking in the crate. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pip
cockapoo
5 Months
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Pip
cockapoo
5 Months

Pip goes to bed in his crate no problem but wakes up and barks twice in the night, usually about an hour after bed and again at around 3am. It starts as a small wood then escalates to full barking. We can’t leave him to bark for long as we have close neighbours. What can we do to stop the barking?? We put the crate in our bedroom for a while which worked for 2 nights and then he went back to bad habits.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Esme, If the wake ups happen at least 5-6 hours since his last potty trip, he probably really needs to go potty once awake. When you take him potty, take him on a leash, keep the trip super boring (no play or treats or affection), give him about five minutes to do his business outside, then bring him back inside and put him into the crate. If he barks before 5-6 hours (like the one hour time after bed, or when you put him back into the crate after taking him potty), then use a Pet Convincer to correct him - A Pet Convincer is a small canister of pressurized unscented air. First, teach him what "Quiet" means by following the "Quiet" method from the article that I have linked below, practice during the day. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark When you put him back into the crate after taking him potty, or he wakes up and barks before he needs a potty break, tell him "Quiet". If he does not get quiet, spray a small puff of air from the Pet Convincer at his side through the crate holes (Do NOT spray him in the face). The puff of air will not hurt but it should surprise him enough to stop his barking. After you spray him, leave. Repeat this every time that he barks. Also, practice crating him during the day for at least an hour. Tell him "Quiet" if he barks. If he gets quiet and stays quiet for at least three minutes, go over to his crate and sprinkle a couple small treats inside, then leave again. Every 5-10 minutes that he stays quiet in a row sprinkle treats into his crate calmly without letting him out. Whenever he barks, correct him with a puff of air at his side, then leave again. Only use treats during the day because you do not want him to wake up to eat during the night or have to go potty from eating. The rewards during the day for being quiet will help him learn what to do instead of bark - be quiet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Teddy
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Teddy
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
5 Months

We have crate trained Teddy since we got him.His crate is in the kitchen. For the past few weeks he is barking constantly at night. We are going to let him out if it's been a few hours since he used the toilet but he often doesn't go. We don't make any fuss or give treats when we go to him in the night. He will bark for an hour then be quiet for a couple of hours then start barking again. Please help, we are all very sleep deprived.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sue, It sounds like he has a history of being fine in the crate - so this isn't a crate introduction need, and the barking might be related to him getting older and less sleepy and simply demanding your attention and wanting to play...If that's the case and there isn't some medical need like needing to potty constantly (which it doesn't sound like is the case), then I suggest correcting the barking at this point. Teach Quiet during the day by following the Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Once he understands a bit of what Quiet means, at night when he barks and it's been less than 6 hours since he peed, tell him Quiet. If he gets quiet, great! Go back to bed but don't give treats at night (quiet is just his warning to be quiet so he understands what comes next). If he doesn't get quiet or starts barking again after stopping you can do one of two things: 1. Walk over to his crate, tell him "Ah Ah" and through the crate wires, and spray a small puff of unscented air at his side (not face) through the crate. After correcting, leave again...the entire thing should be done calmly. Repeat the calm corrections whenever he barks until he goes to sleep. 2. Option 2, whenever he barks, tell him "Ah Ah" and use a rolled up dish towel with rubberbands around it to keep it rolled up, bump the rolled up towel against the side of the crate by his side, then leave again. Repeat this calmly each time he barks. During the day when you crate, when he stays quiet for longer periods of time in the crate, return to him and sprinkle treats in to encourage the quietness, and give a food stuffed hollow chew toy (if you stuff one and freeze, freeze it with a straw through it and take the straw out before giving it to him - to create a hole in it to prevent suction when he licks it). Correct barking the same way you did at night in the crate during the day, except you can also give treats if he stays quiet for a few minutes, then calmly walk away again after sprinkling the treats in. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cooper
Vizsla
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Cooper
Vizsla
8 Weeks

This is our pen setup at home for our pup, last night he went down at 9:15 and was completely knackered, he had a toilet break just before going in the pen, he slept till 3:30 and then barked, whined and was trying to get out of the pen for about an hour and half, we gave in and went down and he did stop and found he'd pooed in the pen on the pad but had also knocked some into his bed, we cleaned up let him outside and then put him back in the pen and left him and he continued for another half hour before going back to bed. We were leaving a bowl of water in the pen which we've seen is a mistake so we'll no longer do this. Is this setup ok? Should we continue to ignore his barks/whines as he's seeking attention? Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Liam, I would ignore the barking that's happening after you have already checked on him - which is just attention seeking. The initial barking was likely due to pup waking up needing to go potty, but not understanding where they are supposed to go potty yet (its early in the training process). You may want to set up an inexpensive video monitor to watch him at night - so that you can see whether you need to go in and clean something up while he is still learning where to go potty, or if the barking is just for attention and should be ignored. You can look for an inexpensive security type camera like Wyze or something less fancy online for monitoring at night, rather than spending more on an expensive baby or pet monitor (unless you prefer a nicer one for more). Check out the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below - which can be used with pee pads, a grass pad, or a litter box, to help pup learn where to go potty during the day - so that they will know where to go at night. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Carbon
Labrador Retriever
4 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Carbon
Labrador Retriever
4 Months

My pup needs my attention at nights and wants me to be with him ! Which I can’t do all times ! My sleep is getting disturbed ! I don’t know how to manage !

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kavya, If he doesn't have to go potty (it's been less than 5 hours while awake or 8 while asleep), then he doesn't actually need your attention at night - he needs to sleep too. Try to keep that in mind to help you stay consistent with the following. You need to let him cry when you know he doesn't have to go potty. He needs to practice learning to self-sooth and settle down and go to sleep. Whenever he cries and you go to him, he learns that crying gets him attention and fun so he cries even more. He is likely waking and crying because it has been rewarded with fun and affection and when you are a puppy, why sleep when you could be having fun...But sleep is what he needs as much as you do. Ignore the crying when he doesn't truly need to pee. Crate him at night so he will learn to settle down and sleep, and correct the crying with a Pet Conviner - which is a small canister of pressurized unscented air blown at his side quickly through the crate holes when he cries, if he continues to cry for more than a week even though you are ignoring the cries. It may sound very harsh and be hard to ignore his cries but he needs sleep for his proper development too, and you will do a better job of taking care of him and you if you get the sleep you need also - this may be a hard thing but he needs to learn it, and he is capable of learning. Know that most puppies will cry while adjust to the crate and sleeping alone, and if not crated many puppies will wake you up at night - so crating is an important part of raising a puppy to be healthy and happy and well trained so they can enjoy life with you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lucy
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Lucy
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks

We got the puppy on Monday. We are having trouble getting her to settle at night and she doesn't like been by herself. She goes outside for wees and poops. The only thing we need help with is at night time. She has her own little area under the stairs with her bed and some soft toys. Any help would be appreciated

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Miss Lynda, First, barking while crate training the first two weeks is completely normal. She needs to be given time to learn to self-sooth and learn to self-entertain. Don't let her out while barking unless she needs to go potty, and when you do let her out if you can try to wait until she is quiet for 1-2 seconds so her freedom is associated with being quiet and you are not encouraging more barking. Second, check out the article linked below. You can practice all of the methods but pay special attention to the Surprise method. Do this method whenever you can. If you don't have time to ease her into crate training most puppies will still adjust in two weeks (many only take three days), but doing the surprise method whenever you can should speed things up. In that method it talks about giving a food-stuffed Kong, I highly suggest doing that during the day to give her something to do while in the crate - you can even feed all of her meals that way and as treats at this age to keep her entertained. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Don't give food at night. She will likely wake up 2 times to go potty at night at this age. When you take her potty, take her on a leash, keep the trip very boring - no treats, play, food, or excitement, then calmly put her right back into the crate after she goes potty to go back to bed. Following this routine usually helps puppies sleep through the night sooner because they don't wake up for reasons other than needing to go potty - which they should outgrow and their bladders grow. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Ellie
Shih Tzu
14 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Ellie
Shih Tzu
14 Weeks

We work all day so Ellie is in a fenced in area with a pee pad that she uses very well, an eating section and then a play and bed section. She gets tons of toys that only are used in there. We do a little kong with peanut butter. Turn on tv and a fan. We come home and let her out for about an hour at lunchtime. She barks all day. She will bark for 15 min then lay down for 5. And continues the process. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rhonda, First, if you are less than 2 weeks into this, she may just need more time to adjust. If it is past the initial two weeks, work on teaching things that help develop impulse control: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Next, correct the barking early before she gets overly worked up. If she barks while you are home in another room, then you can use a Pet Convincer, which is a small canister of unscented, pressurized air. Tell her "Ah Ah", then spray a small puff of air at her side and leave again. If the barking only happens when you leave the house, then use a vibration collar - the smallest model you can find for her side, and with multiple vibration intensity settings if you can find it. Set up a camera to spy on her using something like two smart phones, tablets, or computers with Skype or Facetime on mute on her end, Go Pro camera with Live app, baby video monitor, or security camera. Every time she barks, vibrate the collar to interrupt her. When she stops for five seconds, then return to her, sprinkle a couple treats into the pen, then ignore her in the pen for 10 minutes while you pretend to get things done around the house - you don't want your entrance to be super exciting and always mean immediate freedom. Correct with the vibration if she barks at you. When she is quiet and it has been 10 minutes, then let her out of the pen, but when you do so, open the door slowly and when she tries to rush out, close it again. Practice opening and closing the door until you can open it all the way and she will stay inside the pen and wait. When she will wait, then tell her "Okay" and let her come all the way out - you want her to calm down in relation to the pen, and going in and out of it more slowly can help with that. Next, for longer term maintenance and entertainment you can also look into something like Pet Tutor or AutoTrainer - which will periodically reward her by releasing a treat for staying quiet if you set it that way. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Digby
Shih Tzu
13 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Digby
Shih Tzu
13 Weeks

Digby has been with us since Christmas eve, he has become a little brother to our 10 year old pug x pekingese lola and my 8 year old sons first pet of his own (we are responsible dog owners i promise!).

Digby was raised in a crate at the breeders and he is crated in our home. We have soft bedding, toys, crate buddies with heat and heartbeats etc. He slept soundly for the first two nights and since then has been very difficult, by screaming, whining, barking non stop and generally getting himself very worked up. If he is in the crate and we are in the room he puts up a fuss for about a minute but then settles down, when we leave him its another story. We have the Adaptil puppy collar and the plug in (vets recommendation) too but this seems to have made little difference.

Nighttime's were so bad we ended up putting the crate in our room, after a week we moved it to a different position in our room, a week later a bit further away.

At the breeders they put him bed at 9pm till morning and he wasn't a bother, apparently! Last night he woke up at midnight, 2am, 4am and barked non stop. We ignored for a short time and went to him during a 'silence'. We took him outside each time in case it was the toilet he needed. Once returned to his crate he started again and each time it took me sitting near his crate to settle him, eventually bringing his crate next to me in the bedroom. I am 99% convinced this was the wrong thing to do but i was desperate for sleep!

Digby follows me everywhere, he cannot stay in a room on his own. If he's dozing he will still jump up and follow. We have tried to follow all of the guidelines for crate training but thus far it's not seeming to help, we feel we have made very little progress.

We have set feed times, set walk times and set play times - never when he is removed from the crate as we do not wish to encourage this.

Our older dog Lola also dislikes him immensely! He ploughs into her, steals treats from her (by dropping his own and taking hers), takes every toy from her, sits on top of her, runs into her physically when she is standing or toileting and doesn't give her any peace. She is timid by nature, never barks, and is not the type of dog to 'put him in his place'. We try not to interfere in their interactions but do not know when enough is enough? I wish to reassure you we feed them separately, i refer to the little treats we offer.

We do not know what to do now, we are concerned that things seem to be getting worse not better. My partner regrets getting him when he has caused so much disruption which breaks my heart although this is said at 4am when we are woken yet again and feeling tired and frustrated.

We desperately need help and guidance and a plan for moving forward before it is too late and these behaviors become the standard with him.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Digby (love the name!) looks pretty cute and comfy in the picture you provided. First off, we have to remember that Digby has had a lot of changes to undergo since coming to your home. Leaving mom and siblings, moving from familiar surroundings, a new housemate, etc. Puppies crying at night in their crate is a very common problem and most of the time, it does not last forever! As well, puppies cannot hold their pee all night. Getting up a few times a night until the bladder has matured is also a common necessity. Although I cannot say for sure, it does sound as though Digby may have some separation anxiety. Or, he may yet need to develop a sense of security. Here are a few guides on the topic: https://wagwalking.com/daily/understanding-separation-anxiety-in-dogs https://wagwalking.com/condition/separation-anxiety As for having the crate in your room at night, I do not have an issue with that. If that is what it takes to enable the household to get sleep, then do it. If you eventually want to move Digby out of the room, move the crate inches at a time, not feet. But in the meantime, remember he may have the need to pee at night for some time. Some dogs like to have the crate covered at night, at least on the sides. It soothes them and makes them feel secure. Just make sure he is not chewing the covering. Lastly, exercise! Take Digby for a LONG walk in the evening to tire him out. Have your play fetch or roll the ball. This will help! As far as the behavior with Lola, this has to stop. Obedience classes are a great way to secure your bond and to give Digby manners and direction. Check with your vet about the vaccine schedule and inquire about when Digby can start classes. Good luck!

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Champion
Pomeranian
6 Months
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Champion
Pomeranian
6 Months

Hi.. we have this pomeranian since 4 days ago. I and my wife always go for morning walk and night walk with our puppy for 45 mins each. At night, we put him in the crate, outside of our bedroom. Our puppy keep barking at night (disturbing some of the neighbours); and only stop barking if we go outside of bedroom and sleep in front of his crate. What is the cause of his barking? What's your advice on this?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Champion is a cute little guy! Remember, he is young yet and this has been a big adjustment for him, the move to your home. I have a few suggestions. Make Champion's crate a place that he wants to go - cozy, welcoming and like a safe den. Give him a nice bed to lay on and a few toys. Some dogs like to have a blanket covering the sides and top of the crate - but leave the front so that he can see and make sure that he cannot chew the blanket as this is dangerous. As well, I think that for now, you should let Champion sleep in his crate in your room. This will enable everyone to get more sleep - you, Champion, and the neighbors! Once Champion is older, if you do not want the crate in your room, gradually start moving the crate out of the room but only by a few inches per night (not feet per night). Eventually it will be out of the room and by then your pup will have settled into his routine of sleeping peacefully in the crate. Enjoy your puppy and good luck!

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Buster
Parson Russell Terrier
12 Weeks
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Buster
Parson Russell Terrier
12 Weeks

Hi. We have had Buster for 4 weeks. He initially slept in a soft playpen in our bedroom and alerted me when he needed to pee and had already reached the point of one wake up at night to pee and slept through to 7.30. Then two nights ago we moved him to our downstairs utility/kitchen with his crate and a stair gate across the doorway. The first night he barked for several hours before going quiet until 5.30 when the boiler fired up (in the same room). He had pee’d and poo’d on the puppy pads. Last night we gave him a frozen stuffed puppy Kong at bedtime in his “room” and he stayed quiet while eating it then he started barking and crying again for a couple of hours before falling quiet until 5.30 again (had also pee’d and poo’d). Any ideas please? He is quite happy in the crate (with door open) but cries if closed. Thanks.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. I think Buster is doing really well for such a young dog. It is understandable that he is upset; he probably felt quite secure in your room and may now be less comfortable in his surroundings so isn't sleeping through the night. Then, he needs to go pee as a result (and remember his bladder is not yet mature). However, he is using the pee pads that you have provided - I am not sure, but you are pee pad training him as well? Typically when a puppy is sleeping in the bedroom with the owners, I suggest (when you want to move him out) that the move is made inches per night, not feet, Buster has gone from the security of your room to another level so you may have some crying for a while. You can try methods from here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-cry-at-night and here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. I'm sure little Buster will progress well as he gets a little older. You are doing the right things; he is only young and to cry at night is not unusual. Good luck!

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Belle
Vizsla
6 Weeks
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Belle
Vizsla
6 Weeks

We have done two nights of crate training and I had to love her crate to the living room last night cause she wouldn’t stop crying/howling. I set alarms and checked on her throughout the night and every time she was still howling/crying. I am concerned she cried all night. Is that ok and safe?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emily, Unfortunately, its normal for some pups to take two weeks to adjust. She is young so this is probably a bit harder for her than some puppies. I wouldn't worry just yet. Do make sure she is being taken potty VERY often at her age though. She will need yo go about every 2 hours during the night if awake. If asleep she can probably make it to 4 at this age at night. Check out the article linked below. Follow the surprise method during the day, practicing 30-60 minutes at a time when you are home. Using that method to reward quietness with your presence and treats and a Kong should help her adjust to the crate sooner. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Know that my own puppy really struggled at first and had to be crated without much transition due to being picked up from another state. She now loves her crate as an adult and is completely fine being left alone. Don't give up yet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hope
King Charles Spaniel
8 Months
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Hope
King Charles Spaniel
8 Months

Hi there, I have had Hope for 4+ months. I got her from a breeder so she’s been crate training from the start and I haven’t changed much since. She doesn’t really have a puppy bladder anymore.

About a week ago she started barking at night, I haven’t had this issue until now. We normally go to bed around 11pm, she wakes me around 2, I take her outside and put her back in the crate, normally get 30 minutes or so of silence before the barking begins again. Last night she barked on and off from 2 to 6:30 when I finally gave up. I ignored her for most of it with the exception of taking her outside at 5.

I have to be up at 6am every morning to go to work, I’m writing this at 3:30 in the morning as she barks. I am losing my mind from sleep deprivation. She’s perfectly fine in the crate during the day, she normally spends about 5 to 7 hours in there a day and normally has to be woken up.

I don’t know what else to do. I’ve tried making her run around before bed, exercising her more, taking water away an hour before bed, feeding her a few hours before bed, ignoring her, going to her, nothing works.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kerstin, First, see if there is a noise triggering the barking and if so, address that. If there isn't a noise, I suggest correcting at this point because the barking may be due to her simply wanting attention and demanding to sleep elsewhere. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As she improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating her during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. Whenever she cries in the crate, tell her "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries. Practice for a few days during the day. When she cries at night before it has been 8 hours, tell her Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Don't give treats at night. Practice during the day with treats though to help her learn how to be quiet and calm though - which will help nights go easier and corrections be more effective. Pet convincers can be purchased off of Amazon and Chewy.com typically. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Olivia (Ollie)
French Bulldog
12 Weeks
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Olivia (Ollie)
French Bulldog
12 Weeks

Hi! We've had Olivia for two weeks now and the first nights she would wake up through the night often. Then we bought her a crate and she loved it. She slept peacefully in it for three or four nights, but only with the door open, which was great because she didn't have to wake us up then for potty. Then one night, since her crate door was still open, she would stand beside our bed on two legs while whining and barking as soon as we got into bed. We would try putting her back in her crate, giving her chew toys, stuff with our smell, petting her, putting soft relaxing music. But she would get out of the crate and start over. She wouldn't stop no matter what and we were afraid we were disturbing our neighbors, so we would pick her up and put her in bed with us. It was the only way for her to stop whining and barking. I'm afraid she's getting used to that, but we just don't know what else to do...please help? Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Estefania, You need to crate train her during the day with the door closed. There will be crying but good crate training habits early can prevent future separation anxiety, help with potty training, prevent dangerous destructive chewing - which can get worse again at 5-7 months of age, and make travel and illness later easier. This age is by far the easiest time to do it, rather than having to go back when she is older and do it then because of a behavior issue, like increased chewing, that has occurred. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. It starts very similar to what you have already done - getting her used to an open crate, but then details how to get her comfortable with a closed crate also. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Stay strong - knowing it's the best for her. I have my own dogs and it's hard to hear them cry as puppies while first get used to the crate. They need the opportunity to learn that they are safe in there and that you always come back - which should be timed when they are calm and quiet, so encourage them to calm down sooner. Crate training now can means years of being trustworthy in the house out of the crate later as adults because dangerous habits are prevented during the first year of life though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kai
Boxer
5 Months
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Kai
Boxer
5 Months

Hi, my puppy used to sleep all night a week ago but one day my neighbors had a party that woke him up. Now he doesn't want to stay in his crate and barks a lot, wakes up a 3 am barks again and when I get there un the morning he pooped all his crate. The crate is appropriate for his size, I feed him 4 hours before sleep and try to tire him out with walks and play but nothing works. I need help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, I suggest to going back to some basics and following the Surprise method during the day - in case the incident made him nervous in the crate overall. Surprise method; https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Second, how often if pup pooping during the day. If it's not at least 2 times or you aren't seeing whether pup is pooping when let out into a fence, work on ensuring pup is pooping during the day. Follow the steps from the Crate Training method from the article linked below, for teaching pup the Go Potty command, rewarding with treats when they poop, taking pup potty on a leash to keep them focused, walking them around slowly to help things get moving physically, and giving pup an opportunity for 10-15 minutes after peeing to poop also while outside - keeping pup moving and focused during that time. Reward and praise when pup does poop outside! Many puppies hold their poop when they become more alert during the day, because they want to play while outside - and need help focusing on going potty first. Make sure play time outside always comes after finishing pottying. If pup doesn't potty, take them inside without play, so that play becomes a reward for pottying to motivate them to go faster, instead of avoiding potttying due to distractions. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Also, pay attention to whether pup seems nervous while outside now. If pup is afraid, they are probably holding their poop until they feel safer inside. Work on helping pup overcome their fear or being outside if so. What does pup's poop look like? Are they pooping more than 4 times per day. If their poop isn't solid, they are acting ill in other ways, or pooping more than 4 times in 24 hours, I suggest a trip to your vet. The accidents might be due to a digestive issue leading to pup having to poop during the night. (I am not a vet). Work on doing the above training for the next week. If things aren't improving, I also suggest practicing the following. First, you need a way to communicate with him so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. (You can go ahead and teach Quiet regardless of whether its still needed for the hall barking - because it's simply a good command to teach with lots of uses). https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, once pup understands what Quiet means you will choose an interrupter - neither too harsh nor ineffective. A Pet Convincer is one type of interrupter. A pet convincer is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air that you can spray a quick puff of at the dog's side to surprise them enough to help them calm back down. (Don't use citronella and avoid spraying in the face!). You can hold the canister further away from pup to make this gentler. During the day, practice crating pup (or practice in early evening if pup only barks at night while in the crate). Command pup to be Quiet when you put them into the crate. If they obey, and stay quiet, return a couple of minutes later and reward with a treat and very calm praise, then leave again (give the treat through the crate's wires instead of opening the crate). If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction with the air puff, then leave again. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward them. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Once pup is calmer in general after the initial training, practice in all the types is situations he barks in - like the pen and the crate. Whenever he DOESN'T bark when you leave, return sooner, calmly praise and reward him for staying quiet to continue the desensitization process. At bedtime, after having practiced this with treats during the day to teach pup what they should do also - be quiet, then practice this at night without treats, only using the corrections and Quiet command. When pup barks, you will need to take pup to potty since they are actually pooping once awake. Take pup on a leash and keep the trip super boring - no play, affection or treats. Return pup to the crate, command Quiet calmly, then if they bark, tell them "Ah ah" and correct with the Pet Convincer air at their side. Correct each time they bark, then leave again right after - until pup goes back to sleep. If there isn't a medical condition, pup is pooping fine during the day, and pup's schedule is fine, then pup will likely begin to sleep through the night again and will be able to hold their need to poop until the next morning - once awake pup will have to go potty quickly though, regardless of the time. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Skylar
Pomapoo
2 Months
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Skylar
Pomapoo
2 Months

My puppy keeps pooping and peeing all over the house. Trying to teach him to potty in the toilet but he still does not get it. He even poops in his crate. Please help me.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Arani, I suggest strictly following the crate training method from the article linked below. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside That method will also address how to properly set up the crate, and how often to take pup potty to help avoid pooping in the crate. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tillie
Goldendoodle
13 Weeks
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Tillie
Goldendoodle
13 Weeks

My puppy barks all night. She can sleep in the crate but the minute she wakes up she is barking. If i do not play with her she is barking. She is barking for what feels like 70% if the day.

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Teddy
Dogue de Bordeaux
9 Weeks
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Teddy
Dogue de Bordeaux
9 Weeks

He won’t settle at night he barks whenever he’s alone especially at night

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Coco
Shar-Pei
3 Months
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Coco
Shar-Pei
3 Months

i can get him to stay on his spot without barking. wave have tried many ways. we need help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, First, check out the articles linked below and work on the following commands. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Place command: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Second, I suggest giving pup a dog food stuffed hollow chew toy on Place (when he first gets on - before he starts barking), while working up to pup learning how to stay on place for longer. To stuff a kong you can either place pup's dry dog food loosely in it and cover 1/2 of the opening with a larger treat - so the dog food will dispense more slowly, or place pup's food in a bowl, cover with water, let sit out until the food turns to mush, mix the mush with a little liver paste, treat paste, or peanut butte (avoid xylitol! - it's extremely toxic to dogs and a common sweetener substitute), place a straw through the kong's holes, loosely stuff the kong with the mush, place in a baggie, and free overnight. Remove the straw before giving pup and grab the kong from the freezer as needed - for a time-released treat. You can also purchase several durable hollow chew toys and stuff them at the same time so that you have a stash in the freezer to grab from as needed. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Fievel
Chinese Crested
7 Weeks
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Fievel
Chinese Crested
7 Weeks

Our pup needs to learn our schedule, but no method worked to stop him barking until 2 am and he started again at 6am on the dot.
We have very close neighbors

How to we wait until he is quiet to let him out to pee?

How do we get him to stop barking?
Peeing on a soft bed teaches him to pee on a sofas doesn't it or other fabric/cushioning doesn't it?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello, At this age I would simply let pup out to pee when he wakes in the middle of the night barking - since the waking is because of a real need to go potty, and not primarily for attention. Ignoring the barking applies more to crate training during the day - when barking is for attention, and when you first place pup in a crate and they protest at that time. If you can distract pup enough to get a second of quiet before letting them out when they bark to pee, that's great, but taking pup potty before they have an accident is higher priority. (Making a funny noise, snapping, or making a tap noise can sometimes help pup get quiet for a second). When you take him potty when he wakes at night and asks to go, take him on a leash, keep the trip super boring - no treats, play, and little talk, then immediately return him to the crate. When you return him to the crate after he has gone potty, then ignore any barking that happens then. Crate training tends to take two weeks for many puppies; however, practicing the following during the day can help adjusting at night to go faster. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. Practice this for up to an hour several times throughout the day to help pup adjust to the crate sooner (during this, you will ignore barking to get out that's not pee related). Only give treats for quietness during the day, not at night. Practicing with the treats during the day, should help nighttime adjusting go easier too. Ignore pup's crying when you first crate them at the beginning of the night, and after you return them to the crate after they have pottied outside, but take pup potty immediately when they wake up barking because they truly need to go. Allowing pup to pee on a soft bed will encourage peeing in other unwanted places. Check out www.primopads.com or other similar non-absorbent crate mats for bedding options before pup is fully potty trained. Check out the Crate training and tethering methods from the article linked below for a bit of clarification with crate training and potty training in general. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Penny
Springer spaniel
12 Weeks
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Penny
Springer spaniel
12 Weeks

My daughters had Penny for 4 weeks now, first three weeks she slept downstairs with her but is now trying to crate train at night, the crate is in the open plan downstairs. It’s been a week now and she’s crying/barking non stop. She will sleep fine in the crate during the day when people are around (maybe it’s due to her being exhausted!) but at night it’s a different story. Do we persevere or consider moving the crate to the bedroom. Thanks

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I have no issue with moving the crate to the bedroom. Once Penny starts to sleep well in the bedroom, (maybe weeks later) you can begin to slowly move the crate back toward the downstairs if you feel the need. Move the crate an inch or two a night until it is back where it came from. It's slow, but typically works! You can provide white noise as a way to soothe her at this point, such as a fan, pointed away from her, to help her sleep. Alternatively, you let Penny sleep in the room in the crate from now on. Many pet parents do this and it works quite well. All the best and enjoy your pup!

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Allie
German Shepherd
8 Months
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Allie
German Shepherd
8 Months

My dog rarely barks in the daytime, yet at nighttime she barks at the same time everyday either 1 am or 3 am for an hour or 2. She sleeps outside in her crate. I live in an apartment and I do not want to disturb the neighbors, I tried ignoring, I tried the sonic hearing devices but they do not work. I need help I don’t know what to do.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, if my understanding is right, Allie sleeps outside in an apartment complex? Chances are she is frightened or nervous (there could be people or animals about that make her nervous). She is young - and for that matter, even an older dog could be afraid outside. Is it possible that she sleeps inside the apartment in her crate? I expect that this would calm her down without any issue. When inside, you can help her sleep by providing white noise such as a fan (not directed at her, just in the room where she is). You can try the methods described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-barking-in-his-crate, adapting them as you can to the outside. However, I do think that the environment is not conducive to having a dog sleep outside. I would be concerned with her safety, and with the right to peace for your neighbors. All the best, I hope it works out for you.

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Max
Jack Russell
12 Weeks
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Max
Jack Russell
12 Weeks

How can i stopmy puppy from bbarking at night time o have him in a cage at might woth hos blankets on that has him mam sense on and i habe a puppy pad down to if he need to do his bussness he can je start crying and barking about 1.30am

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, does Max use the pads at night? Or does he think he needs to go outside to do his business? If so, because of his age, I would take him out for a pee break. Take him out on the leash, no talking, no treats afterward - make it boring, just a pee break and then back to the crate. You may have to put up with the crying and barking for a few weeks until he gets the idea. The Jack Russell is a very energetic breed so be sure to exercise him well during the day. A couple of walks a day and as he gets older, they will need to be between 45-60 minutes long, with lots of opportunity for running so that he can burn off energy. Trips to the dog park are ideal, too. This will socialize him and is a necessary thing. Provide Max with plenty of interactive toys during the day so that he is mentally stimulated. A feeder toy is a good way to keep the brain working. Feed Max half of his meal in the bowl and the other half in the feeder. Take Max on a long walk before bed and keep him up until you go to bed. Put a fan beside the bed for white noise (not blowing on Max) which may help him sleep. Look at the Environment Method here, too: https://wagwalking.com/training/sleep-all-night Good luck!

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Ralphy
Golden Retriever
10 Weeks
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Ralphy
Golden Retriever
10 Weeks

Hello, Our current 5yr old dog Lola as a pup was amazing and quiet at night.

However, Our new pup is caged at night and the routine is as follows.
He falls as sleep at 9.30 pm with us in the lounge (we have tried to keep him awake),
we take him calmly to the toilet,
we then put him in his cage with a tiny biscuit and confirm “go to bed, night night” as these common regular words become a great pattern for Lola.
He has a little bark for 15 mins and then wakes at 4.30 with continuous barking. We try and go cold turkey but then need to go to him after 15 mins because of the neighbours.

We take Lola upstairs because she is not cage anymore as you would expect and all he wants to do is get to her. I guess he cannot understand why he is caged and she can move about which she may do a lot in the night. So by Lola being in the room it’s not very calming for anyone hence we split them!

Is this process right?
What would you suggest in changing this pattern.
PS (Lola will adapt to any proposal you give.)

Thanks Colin

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This is a very normal routine for puppies his age. I am actually surprised he is making it until 4:30am. Most puppies his age can only go about 4 hours at night without waking up. As he ages, he will be able to sleep (or stay quiet) until you get up. A few things you can try while he is "growing out of this"..... White noise is always a good place to start. Putting a fan or white noise machine in the area his kennel is in will help reduce any noise or outside stimulus that may be waking him up habitually. Dogs can hear everything! Also, covering 3 sides of his kennel with a blanket to make it a bit more sleep inducing can also help with this. As far as what you are doing with kenneling at the same time every night and offering a treat, that is wonderful. Keep that up, despite this small hurdle.

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Buddy
Cavachon
10 Weeks
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Buddy
Cavachon
10 Weeks

We didn’t crate train and have had Buddy for a couple of weeks. At the start his barking at night was ignorable but it’s got to the point where it’s not. One of us has to sleep downstairs with him from about 3am. Is it too late to crate train? And advice would be greatly appreciated by us (and our neighbours)

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It is definitely not too late to start crating him. That would be my suggestion. Below is some information on crate training. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Bronco
Shih tzu Yorkie mix
1 Year
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Bronco
Shih tzu Yorkie mix
1 Year

My little dog is a shih tzu Yorkshire terrier mix. His name is Bronco. Lately Bronco has been barking early in the morning, and I would like to sleep in for an extra 5 minutes. How can I make mornings calmer for little Bronco?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. When this happens, it is usually due to something waking them up for a few days in a row at the same time and then it's game over. Dogs are creatures of habit. And they seem to learn new (often undesirable) behaviors super quickly. Breaking those behaviors takes more time. They can hear everything. So even if a neighbor had a schedule change, this could be the cause. I tell people to do some trial and error. Some have had success with a fan or white noise machine to drown out the sound. Others have had success with pushing the last meal time back an house to keep their dogs bellies fuller longer. Sometimes a form of exercise before bed helps too. Try a few of those suggestions and see if anything helps. It may take a few days before you see some changes, but don't give up!

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Groot
Kelpie
5 Months
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Groot
Kelpie
5 Months

Hi! Our puppy has been barking a lot. He is an outdoor dog and sleeps in a kennel at night. He likes to play fight with our labrador but he tends to bark a lot while playing. He also barks at us quite often while we are outside, as if hes asking for attention. The biggest issue is barking late in the night and early in the morning, both while we are asleep. So far we have tried ignoring, yelling no/stop, a tap on the nose and using a spray bottle.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi! To help with barking, you will have to reinforce the quiet behavior. That works a little better than punishment for the barking. When your dog starts barking, say a command such as "quiet". When your dog has stopped barking, make sure to reward with tasty treats. You may have to keep treats handy or near you for the first few days to a week, but you should start to see results within a few weeks of consistent practice.

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Murphy
Peekapoo
6 Months
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Murphy
Peekapoo
6 Months

Murphy was nuetered a week ago and came home in a cone. He is unable to sleep in his crate because of the cone, so we put him in the laundry room with a big bed to sleep on with a gate up. Murphy has been great until last night. I typically take him out right before going to bed, put him in his bed and tell him Night-Night, put the gate up and don't hear from him until 6:30 the next morning, like clockwork. Last night, I put him to bed at 11:00, he started whining at 11:30, so I took him out again thinking maybe he needed to potty again, which he finally did. Then he woke me up at 1:30, 2:42, 4:10, 5:30 to which I didn't respond to his crying and sometimes barking, and finally got up a little before 7:00. Now I'm grumping and not really happy with him and he is sleeping right now. I'm not sure why he was great sleeping this way for a week and all of a sudden it changed. I will say that since we got Murphy in April during quarantine, I have taken on a second job and am gone most of the day with my husband home. I don't know if that is effecting him, because I have been his primary caregiver until last Monday when I started a new teaching job. HELP!!!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jayme, First, you have two options. 1. You can simply ignore the barking like you did last night. He may simply be testing boundaries and may go back to sleeping through after three or so nights of not giving into the barking. 2. You can correct the barking whenever he barks before it has been at least 5 hours since he last went potty (so you know it's not a potty issue when you correct). If it's been longer than 5 hours since he last went potty, you will need to take him potty, keeping the trip boring, then return him to the room and correct any barking that follows at that point. To correct the barking , first I suggest teaching the Quiet command during the day. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark I also suggest spending time practicing the following during the day - even just an hour in the evening or your husband practicing while you are away some since you work away. (In the day it will be easier to train and less exhausting, in preparation for pup learning this for night). Confine the dogs where they will be sleeping at night, and go out of sight. When pup cries, command quiet. If they get quiet, great. Toss them a treat after two minutes of staying quiet. If the barking continues or starts up again, calmly go to pup and spray a small puff of air from an unscented air canister, called a pet convincer, at pup's side (don't use citronella, only unscented air canisters - which can be switched out with citronella if yours came with citronella, and don't spray in the face). Tell pup "Ah Ah" calmly but firmly when you correct with the air, then leave again. If pup stays quiet for two minutes, return and give a treat. Repeat the corrections whenever pup barks, and rewards for staying quiet. As pup improves over the week, wait until pup has stayed quiet for longer and not whined to begin with, before giving the treat. Practice the above during the day to help pup learn faster. At night, simply correct but do not reward. Keep all interactions calm but consistent while training - getting loud doesn't tend to work as well as calm consistency. Depending on why pup has a cone, make sure that any medications pup is taking right now, or injuries or illness do not cause a need for more frequent pottying outside - such as possible steroids. I am not a vet so check with your vet if you feel that could be related. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jelly
Greyhound x staghound
5 Months
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Jelly
Greyhound x staghound
5 Months

We have saved a 4 month old pup, she was in an apartment, crate trained. We are in a house with a yard, but she’s inside most of the time, we’ve wanted to stop the crate as she is going to be big and don’t like it. She was in the crate for a while sleeping in the laundry and was quiet and holding on the whole night. Took out crate left same bed in same spot covers in each side and top (a tall table) so only open 2 sides, she is not holding on and is making big messes, she barks and scratches the door . Not to go out to toilet, we take her but she’s already gone in the laundry. We put her out then in then out then in. We have house trained during the day in the house and doing well. Help !

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Laura, The hard truth is that you have to continue the crate for a few more months, even if that means purchasing a larger one. The reason is that a space the size of a crate naturally encourages a dog to hold it, utilizing a dog's natural desire to keep a confined space clean - the laundry room isn't small enough to do that. Pup needs to be crated until the habit of holding it overnight becomes a long term habit - which takes months. Pup also needs to be out of the destructive chewing phase, which tends to temporarily get worse again before 1 year when jaws develop - which is why most dogs need to be crated until around a year - your pup will probably be ready sooner if they continue to sleep in the laundry room since there is less to chew there. Once you transition pup out of the crate when potty training is consistent for long enough, you can deal with the door scratching if it continues, by practicing the Surprise method from the article linked below with pup in the laundry room during the day. Surprise method - mentions crate training but same steps can be applied to another confined space like the laundry room. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Also, teach pup the quiet command. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Close pup in the laundry room and command Quiet. If pup stays quiet for five minutes, briefly open the door (or use a baby gate at the door entrance but go out of sight from pup when you leave), and toss a couple of treats or pieces of kibble in, then leave. If pup barks or scratches, tell pup "Ah Ah" and briefly spray a small puff of air from the pet convincer at pup's side (NOT face), then command Quiet again and leave. Only use unscented air and not the citronella ones - citronella is too harsh and lingers too long, so is confusing also. Repeat the rewards when quiet and not scratching and the air whenever pup barks or scratches. As pup improves, gradually space out rewards so that pup has to stay quiet for longer until rewarded. At night, only correct. Don't give treats. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Spark
Pomeranian
2 Months
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Spark
Pomeranian
2 Months

He is barking at night which is a disturbance to others
Not going out for the potty but wanted to pee and poo inside the house

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below and practice crate training with that method often for 30 minute -1 hour periods during the day to help pup adjust to being alone more quickly. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate At night, ignore any crying unless it has been at least 2 hours since pup last went potty. When it has been at least 2 hours and pup wakes up crying, take pup potty on a leash and keep the trip super boring - no treats, talking, or play, and return them immediately to the crate after they go, ignoring any crying that happens when you return them. Keeping trips boring helps pup learn to only wake at night for potty needs and not play or food, to begin sleeping longer sooner. Pup will need to go potty 1-2 times at night right now at this age, even when fully crate trained, but being consistent, practicing crating during the day, and keeping trips outside boring, can help pup wake less at night, cry less when first crated, and start sleeping through the night sooner as their bladder capacity increases with age. Know that its normal for pup to cry in the first two weeks. The first three nights tend to be the worse, with pup gradually getting better and better after that. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chas
Labrador
16 Weeks
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Chas
Labrador
16 Weeks

Chas goes to bed about 9.30 after being walked and playtime,He wakes up barking at 12am we let him out for a wee then he wakes up at 1.30am barking he goes outside for toilet,he wakes up at 4am barking,5.30am barking and then 6am barking

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, It sounds like half of the times are to go potty and the other half are just for attention. First, I recommend practicing the Surprise method from the article I have linked below during the day - you can skip to the part with the crate door closed if pup is already being crated at night. That method will work on teaching pup to be quiet in the crate at a time when you are less tired. If you go to work during the day, you can practice for an hour at a time in the evenings and several short sessions on weekends. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Second, when pup wakes after it has been at least 3-4 hours, take pup potty on a leash at night, but keep trips super boring - no play, treats, or affection at night. You want things to stay as sleepy and boring as possible. As soon as pup goes potty, return them to the crate and ignore any barking until they go back to sleep (don't give food or water at night). When pup wakes again and it's been less than 3 hours, ignore the barking. Pup will probably protest for an hour the first three nights you do this before falling back to sleep for an hour or two and waking again to really go potty that time. When its been at least 3-4 hours and pup wakes, then take them potty that time again. Wait until they go back to sleep or its been long enough they really do have to go potty - 3-4 hours since they have gone, to take them back outside though. Expect the first three nights to be hard - stay consistent! Or this will take much longer. If pup hasn't had an accident in the crate and it's not been 3 hours, ignore the barking so pup learns that night time is not time for play and fun, and begins to only wake when they truly need to go potty. When pup wakes at 4, 5:30, and 6 you can be sure its not to go potty unless there is a medical issue. Pup is simply wanting to start their day too early. If pup isn't sleeping in the crate, they absolutely need to be to teach them to hold their bladder at night and to allow you to not give pup attention for their barking - start with crate training if pup hasn't learned that yet - the surprise method linked above also details how to introduce the crate. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hannah Shepherd
Hungarian Vizsla
9 Weeks
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Hannah Shepherd
Hungarian Vizsla
9 Weeks

Good morning,

We have had our Hungarian Vizsla puppy for just under a week now. The first night we tried to put her in her crate in the kitchen for bed but she barked and whined non-stop (literally) for hours. Eventually, we went downstairs, moved the crate to the living room and slept on the sofas next to her, she still barked for most of the night. After 3 nights of this we decided to put her back in the kitchen on her own, but now we have added a pen around the crate so we can leave the door open and she’s got room to roam, which is the set-up she had with the breeder. We are making sure she is asleep before we leave her and she has no problem going in and out of the crate during the day although we haven’t mastered her being in there during the day with the door shut. The first night back in the kitchen she slept till about 00:30 and then barked for the rest of the night, with short quiet break here and there, but last night when she woke at 00:30 she has barked completely non-stop again.

Should we be doing something different? Some advice says to bring the crate into our bedroom, but she still barked in our presence when we slept in the living room with her. Some say to just stick with it and she will get used to it, but I’m just worried it’s causing her more distress by leaving her.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards

Hannah

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hannah, First, know that after 2-3 hours at this age, pup will need to be taken potty outside due to a small bladder. Once pup adjusts to the crate, that time should increase, but 1-2 potty trips is still normal at night even after adjusting until pup's bladder capacity increases more with age. The current setup with the crate and pen may or may not work depending on whether pup holds their bladder as well out of the crate, in the pen. If pup holds it well and sleeps just as well, you can keep that setup, but if you find it leads to accidents, I recommend only crating at night. The crate may also help pup go back to sleep better after waking up - they just have to get used to it first. With either set up, practice getting pup used to being alone during the day some too. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below to help pup adjust to being alone - which is the real issue here. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ If you want pup to sleep in the kitchen long- term I would keep the crate there, set up an audio baby monitor to listen out for pup waking needing to go potty. Ignore any crying outside of the potty needs. Practice the Surprise method during the day to help pup learn independence sooner - and gain more ground when you are less exhausted in the day time. When you do take pup potty at night, take pup on a leash, keep the trip super boring - no treats at night, no play, little talking, and immediately return pup back to the crate after they go potty, and ignore any crying that happens then. Most puppies take 2 weeks to fully adjust to the crate and crying is normal. The first 3 nights tend to be the worst, with gradual improvement after that, until pup learns to settle without crying in a couple of weeks. How persistent pup is depends a lot on personality and whether you also practice during the day. Some puppies get quite dramatic - it isn't only your pup. As hard as it is, crate training can actually prevent future separation anxiety when done early and correctly. If pup is still struggling after 1 month, you can use firmer methods, but the norm is to ignore the crying unless it's a potty need, give pup time to adjust, and practice crating during the day too, when you can reward. If pup is still crying in the crate, you can check back in 3-4 weeks, or sooner if you aren't seeing at least gradual improvement sooner. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Pedroo
Labrador Retriever
2 Months
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Pedroo
Labrador Retriever
2 Months

He bark & make noise when left alone .

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sethu, Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. Also, know that it typically takes about two weeks of regular practice for a puppy to adjust to being alone, the barking is normal. Work on the Surprise method during the day, and wait until pup is quiet for at least a couple of seconds before letting them out of the crate or returning to the room, unless they need to go potty urgently - to help them learn that quietness equals good things, and that they can calm themselves back down when needed. Giving a dog food stuffed chew toy in the crate like the method mentions can also help. The Surprise method can also be used for confinement in exercise pens and other alone spaces. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ You can also download a free PDF e-book, AFTER You Get Your Puppy at the link below. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jasper
Cavapoo
8 Months
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Jasper
Cavapoo
8 Months

Hello. We’ve had Jasper in a crate since having him at 8 weeks and he’s generally been fine. A few days ago he started crying/whining in his crate and wouldn’t stop for ages so we took him out. Didn’t need the toilet - he just clearly didn’t want to be in the crate. Now he is roaming around the house at night, barking at times and being a nuisance. What should we do??? Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Philip, It sounds like pup was either testing boundaries by barking in the crate the first time, or perhaps heard something or experienced something that triggered the barking - but then when you let pup out, they learned that they could bark for attention to get what they wanted, so have continued doing it. I would recommend returning to crating pup at night and correcting the barking, since pup was already used to the crate before. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. If pup doesn't bark when crated during the day, only at night, then just work on the Quiet method and skip the Surprise method practice during the day, then address nights the way I outline below either way. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If you go straight to nights and days like this you will probably have about 3 rough nights, with lots of correcting before he gets quiet - don't give in and let him out or this will take much longer! But the overall process will go faster if you can stay strong. You will need to stay very consistent for this to work - expect pup to protest and for you to have to correct a lot the first couple nights. You may want to pretend like you are all going to bed two hours early and read in bed with the lights off - anticipating having to get up a lot the first couple of hours to correct - so that you don't loose as much sleep. If pup is protesting the crate during the day too, don't skip practicing the Surprise method when you are home, some also, but don't give food at night. Ultimately, every ones relationships being healthy and rested is better for pup too. It may also be worth listening out for any noises that are happening in the middle of the night - like an appliance beeping or making a high pitched hum, or neighbor coming and going/dogs barking or howling, ect... that could be bothering pup. If you find that's the case, practice Quiet around that noise often to help desensitize pup to the noise and condition being quiet when they hear it, if it's not something you can simply turn off . Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lottie
Mini Dachshund
9 Weeks
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Lottie
Mini Dachshund
9 Weeks

We have had Lottie a week and she is doing well. She potties outside but doesn’t let us know when she needs to yet. We just take her every hour with success but I’m sure she could go longer. She has a crate and in the day we encourage daytime sleeps in. We give her a couple of strokes and put the flap down but don’t zip it up. She goes to bed at 9.30 pm and we take her to potty at 2am so we know she can go at least 4-5 hrs. The problem is after this potty when we put her back in her crate. We settle her with a stroke and she goes back to sleep and then is awake barking continuously. We have tried 2 things. 1) leave her to bark as we know she can go 4 hours but if we do this we come down to her crate covered in poo and pee but I’m sure this is due to her anxiety at being left as we know she can go 4-5 hours at the beginning of the night. 2) we have taken her to the toilet after 2am every time she barks, every 45 minutes or so and she goes to pee every time and we settle her with a stroke bit 45 minutes later she barks again and we take her to potty. But she is so well trained at going in her potty area that she goes every time regardless. I’m keen to leave her to bark and don’t mind clearing up any mess in the morning but not sure if this is fair that she is so anxious that she potties in her crate? I think taking her every time she barks is reinforcing that if she barks we come. I’m happy to do whatever is best but I just don’t know what is best. Let her pee and poo in her crate out of anxiety or reward the barking by going to her every 45 minutes to take her out to pee? Help?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training just in case you decide to use a crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Jane
Female
2 Months
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Jane
Female
2 Months

She​ 2month and​ half​ she​ alway​ like​ to​ bite​ more​ and​ more
I​ dont​ k​now​ how​ to​ stop​ her​ 🙏

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Pickle
Shih Tzu
6 Months
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Pickle
Shih Tzu
6 Months

Our 6 month old puppy goes though stages of sleeping fine at night and then not. At the moment she just refuses to be left in another room to sleep, and barks constantly until we cave and let her in our room (and bed). We try to ignore it but she doesn’t stop for hours and hours, we get no sleep and worry about the neighbours as we’re in a flat. We didn’t crate train her so I think it’s too late for that, but she has a very comfortable set up with a lovely big bed, cuddly toys, a plug in diffuser for calming dog anxiety. We’re taking her out more during the day to try and tire her out and always take her out for a last walk/run around in the evenings. Any ideas on anything else we can do?! Thank you, Mila

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It is never too late to try crate training. Dogs are naturally denning animals which means they like to burrow in a darker, small space to sleep or rest. Often I tell pet parents to not only crate a dog at night, but to cover the crate with a blanket on 3 sides to make it even more comfortable for them. I can send you information on crate training if you decide to go that route. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Skye
French Bulldog
12 Weeks
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Skye
French Bulldog
12 Weeks

Im finding it difficult to get my puppy to sleep through the night without waking up barking every 2 hours. We’ve had her for 2 weeks, and the first week she slept all the way through the night, however the last 5 or so nights she barks excessively until we give her attention. She sleeps in her crate next to our bed which is very cosy with blankets and a teddy, and we ensure she is tired out before bed. She is also weeing constantly all over the carpet even though we take her to her designated spot which she knows is to go to the toilet, and she never goes to the toilet outside on walks

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! You may want to consider moving her to a separate room at night. Dogs often wake up at the slightest sound. So any movement from you can wake her up. And if you're restless because she's waking up frequently, the cycle is just going to repeat itself. Once she is older, you can try to bring her back into your room. As far as potty training, I have a ton of information to send! Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Collete
Shitzhu
10 Months
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Collete
Shitzhu
10 Months

She’s used to bark at any time while other dogs are just behaving so well. She dont follow simple tasks she’s becoming annoying somehow

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I recommend desensitizing pup to the things they are barking at. Check out the Quiet method and the Desensitize method from the article I have linked below. I recommend working on both. Quiet and Desensitize methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark More desensitizing videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n_fPKPLA2g&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a&index=5 For the listening, I recommend using the Working and Obedience methods from the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ravin
Black Lab
3 Months
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Ravin
Black Lab
3 Months

How do I stop him from bitting me

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lydia, Check out the article I have linked below. I recommend teaching Leave It but this will take some practice, so while pup is still learning I also recommend using the bite inhibition method because that one can be used right away. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite I also recommend stuffing hollow durable chew toys like Kong's with pup's food to help pup focus some of their energy on that. You can use pup's own kibble to keep them healthy as part of their food portion. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Fern
German Shorthair Pointer
6 Weeks
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Fern
German Shorthair Pointer
6 Weeks

First time puppy owner trying to understand crate training and the difference between destress calls and attention calls.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! At this age, it is about 50/50 and your guess is as good as anyones. What you can do to help figure it out is know that puppies typically have to eliminate twice at night until they are about 12 weeks old. So if bed time is around 9 or 10, expect a midnight and 2am wake up call for potty breaks. Anything more than that is excessive and is likely attention. So try to keep the potty breaks uneventful. Simply take your dog to his potty area and then back to his sleeping area. This will help your dog realize that night time is for sleeping, and potty breaks only. No play time.

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Pinky
Crested Cavalier
4 Weeks
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Pinky
Crested Cavalier
4 Weeks

She keeps barking at night only in her cage not sure what to do to calm her

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kevin, At four weeks old pup may be too young for formal training and you don't want to encourage pup to go potty in the crate because that will make potty training and crate training very difficult later in life. I would move pup into an exercise pen with disposable real grass pads in the exercise pen area, attach pup's crate to the side of the pen, so pup can go in there just for sleep and not to go potty. I would check with your vet if pup needs a middle of the night feed at this age still - most puppies aren't ready to leave their mothers until 7-8 weeks, so pup won't be ready for a lot of the standard things other puppies who go to new homes can start right away. While pup doesn't have strong jaws yet, you could give pup a heartbeat stuffed animal in the pen - but only do this if pup isn't able to shred toys yet and get stuffing out. Once pup is stronger and can do that, you will need to remove it for safety. Once pup is close to 2 months old, you can start more formal training. know that what you are experiencing is completely normal. Pup is getting used to sleeping alone and that's an adjustment. Usually the first five days are the worst. It typically takes about two weeks for most pups to adjust completely. When pup is ready for more formal training in the crate, you can start the following in a couple of weeks, once pup has better bladder control. 1. When pup cries but doesn't have to go potty (like after you return them to the crate when they just went potty outside) be consistent about ignoring the crying until they go back to sleep. The more consistent you are the quicker the overall process tends to take even if it's hard to do for the first couple weeks. 2. When pup does truly need to go potty (when it's been at least 2 hours since pup last peed), take pup to go potty outside on a leash to keep pup focused and things calmer. Don't give treats, food, play, or much attention during these trips - boring and sleepy is the goal, then right back to bed after. This helps pup learn to only wake when they truly need to go potty and be able to put themselves back to sleep - helping them start sleeping longer stretches sooner and not ask to go out unless they actually need to potty. Pup will generally need 1-2 potty trips at night even after trained for a couple months though due to a small bladder. 3. Wait until pup asks to go potty by crying in the crate at night before you take them - opposed to setting an alarm clock, unless pup is having accidents in the crate and not asking to go out. This gives pup the chance to learn to start falling back to sleep when they wake in light sleep if they don't really need to go potty, instead of being woken up all the way when they could have held it a bit longer. 4. Practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below to help pup get used to crate time during the day too - so that there is less crying at night due to pup adjusting to being alone. You can go ahead and start the surprise method for short periods of time in the exercise pen or crate now - just know that pup won't be able to hold their bladder for long right now to expect too much from them. Surprise method - only give treats during daytime practice, not at night though: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Winston
Portuguese Water Dog
17 Weeks
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Winston
Portuguese Water Dog
17 Weeks

Winston is on day 3 of antibiotics for a UTI. Prior to the UTI, he has been sleeping in his crate at night like a champ. We moved his crate at 12 weeks from our bedroom to the family room. He goes into his crate around 10 pm and I set an alarm to let him out in the middle of the night. Since the UTI, He has been barking and whining to go out every hour. Usually he pees, but sometimes not. I don’t want to ignore him because of the UTI, but also would like him to go back to his regular sleep schedule. Any ideas?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Elizabeth, Because of the infection, pup probably really does have to go outside half of those times, and even when he doesn't the irritation is likely waking him still. The hard answer is that I would take pup out often at night for a few more days. If pup continues waking that frequently past the next three days. I would contact your vet and ask about a possible additional urine culture to make sure the uti really is improving. I am not a vet though so consult your vet about that. Once you know that the uti is better - either due to a culture or pup being able to hold it long during the day also, then I would ignore pup when they wake and it's been less than 2-3 hours since they last went potty. Gradually require pup to wait longer and longer as the days go on during the week, until pup is expected to wait as long as they were before. I also wouldn't withhold water like you normally would with a puppy, since a very empty bladder can actually make the irritation feel worse. If pup is drinking water excessively I would speak with your vet about it. I am not vet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Whiskey
Kelpie
9 Weeks
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Whiskey
Kelpie
9 Weeks

I’ve been trying to cage train my pup, he’s usually quiet throughout the day with the occasional bark. But every night he barks non stop and it is starting to get annoying because nothing stops him. I’ve bought him toys, played with him before bedtime. but none of it seems to work. We put him in the cage for food and naps, we toilet train him in there too which he does fine. We let him out throughout the day if he stays quiet for a period of time. It’s just the barking at night I do not understand but he only stops with me sleeping next to the cage, but i do not want him to get use to it and then i have to sleep next to him all the time. please advice :c

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on crate training. Some of these steps, you have already done. Crate training can take up to about a month, so keep that in mind as you're going along. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Poppy
cockapoo
8 Weeks
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Poppy
cockapoo
8 Weeks

she is waking up every 1-2 hours in the night, getting up to do a wee or poo, then it takes her a long time to settle back to sleep, she often wants to play. She needs a cuddle in my arms before she goes back to sleep. If I put her back in her crate when she is awake, she just whines. I am sleeping next door in the lounge. Please help!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this can easily work into a habit. And you cannot blame little Poppy, who doesn't love a little cuddle in the night? Remember, she is young and most likely misses her mom and siblings quite a bit. To help her love her crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate (all methods are great). As for the waking several times, make sure she has a long pee break before bed and some exercise to tire her out (mental stimulation with puzzle and teething toys and physical games like rolling a ball). Hold back food and water 2 hours before bedtime. If you do have to take her out, take her on the leash, just a quick pee, no talking, no playing, no cuddles. Straight back into the crate. She'll learn the nighttime breaks are for peeing only. She may cry in the crate when you put her back in, but she'll learn after a few nights. You can also try white noise to help her sleep (such as a fan, but not pointed at her). You can also try the crate in your room. But don't give in to crying after the pee break. Once she gets used to sleeping longer in the crate, you can gradually start inching it out of the room (inches only per week) until Poppy is back sleeping in the room she used to sleep in. Good luck!

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PICO
Patterdale/Lakeland cross
9 Weeks
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PICO
Patterdale/Lakeland cross
9 Weeks

whining in his crate at night

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Pico is displaying typical puppy behavior at 9 weeks. He is missing his mom and siblings, most likely. Many pups feel the same way. Where is his crate? Perhaps move it into your room so that he does not feel alone and anxious in another area by himself. As well, make sure that Pico does not have to pee in the night. It is normal for a young dog to wake for a pee break a few times a night - their bladders are tiny and need to be emptied often. When you take him out, put on the leash, no talking or playing, just out for a pee and straight back to bed again. Make sure he has a long pee break before bedtime and don't give him water 2 hours before bed. Make his pee break the last thing before retiring for the night. Play with him in the evenings to tire him out and if he likes to nap at night, engage him in play and games instead. Good luck and enjoy your pup!

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Trixie
Maltese s
6 Months
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Trixie
Maltese s
6 Months

We used to keep trixie in a crate attached with a playpen from day 1 we got her , so that the crate door was open and the playpen was locked during her sleep. The pen was setup in the living room and she was sleeping perfectly fine. We shifted house 2 weeks back and positioned her crate and pen to the laundry which we have planned to make her permanent sleeping and toilet space. First day she slept fine and from the next day she wakes up every 1 hour, barks and whines and once we open the pen , she run towards our bedroom and sit under our bed. We tried ignoring, but few times she jumped from the playpen. If we close the bedroom door, she sits outside and whines and barks for a while, and eventually sleeps outside the door. During day time, she sleeps wherever we are, even if we carry her and put her in her crate bed, she wakes up from there after a while. We even tried to close the crate door, but she wakes up and barks and tries to put her outside. We are worried she is gonna hurt herself doing so. How can we teach her to sleep her in her crate and not run to us during night?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Dogs struggle with any sort of transition. They often regress from learned behavior and you have to teach them all over again. The best thing you can do is to try your hardest to ignore the crying during the night. I would also suggest making her crate a little more sleep inducing. Maybe covering it with a blanket. Some people have had success with using a fan or white noise machine to help a dog sleep through the night.

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Pip
Jack Russell Terrier
15 Weeks
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Pip
Jack Russell Terrier
15 Weeks

Sleeping through the night in crate, will be asleep and as soon as we leave then barking starts, plus biting, nipping and generally stropping when told off

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. If you haven't yet, try covering the kennel with a blanket. Some folks have also had luck with using a fan or white noise machine. The sound is very calming for dogs. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Drogon
Dogo Argentino
7 Weeks
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Drogon
Dogo Argentino
7 Weeks

I've never raised a puppy this young before so this is all brand new. I need help with crate training,potty training, biting and sleeping at the appropriate times. Thank you

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Dudel
Cavapoochon
5 Months
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Dudel
Cavapoochon
5 Months

We can't get him to start either barking from 4/5 am or barking all through the night. He hates sleeping on his own in the kitchen but I am worried about potential allergies if i let him sleep in my room. We have tried lots of different things to make positive associations with the bed area- our scent, treats, clear routine, calm night routine. Nothing seems to work and we are being really kept up by it.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Esther, First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. You can either continue what you are currently doing at night during this process or go ahead and jump into what I explain below for night time training - waiting until the day is good before starting the night or starting the night and day both at the same time. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 5 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If pup may need to go potty because it's been at least 4 hours since they were last taken out and they are now awake, go ahead and take pup potty on a leash, keeping the trip as boring as possible, return pup to the crate after, then correct the crying if pup won't go back to sleep after returning them to the crate. At this age you will probably will have 1 normal true potty wake up at night occasionally since pup's bladder is still a bit immature. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tyson
Rottweiler
8 Weeks
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Tyson
Rottweiler
8 Weeks

We will feed tyson around 8pm and let him out around 9:30 to pee and poo. Then we play with him until 10:30 and then take him to his crate to sleep. The first 3 hours is quiet but then he starts whining and barking around 1or 2 so we let him out to go potty then take him back in his crate, then he tends to whine and bark for 20 mins straight then go to sleep and he will keep doing this every hour or 2

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Vincent, At 8 weeks of age I am guessing that you recently brought pup home? If that's the case, then know that what you are experiencing is completely normal. Pup is getting used to sleeping alone and that's an adjustment. Usually the first five days are the worst. It typically takes about two weeks for most pups to adjust completely; however, you can help that adjustment be as smooth as possible by doing the following. 1. When pup cries but doesn't have to go potty (like after you return them to the crate when they just went potty outside) be consistent about ignoring the crying until they go back to sleep. The more consistent you are the quicker the overall process tends to take even if it's hard to do for the first couple weeks. 2. When pup does truly need to go potty (when it's been at least 2 hours since pup last peed), take pup to go potty outside on a leash to keep pup focused and things calmer. Don't give treats, food, play, or much attention during these trips - boring and sleepy is the goal, then right back to bed after. This helps pup learn to only wake when they truly need to go potty and be able to put themselves back to sleep - helping them start sleeping longer stretches sooner and not ask to go out unless they actually need to potty. Pup will generally need 1-2 potty trips at night even after trained for a couple months though due to a small bladder. 3. Wait until pup asks to go potty by crying in the crate at night before you take them - opposed to setting an alarm clock, unless pup is having accidents in the crate and not asking to go out. This gives pup the chance to learn to start falling back to sleep when they wake in light sleep if they don't really need to go potty, instead of being woken up all the way when they could have held it a bit longer. 4. Practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below to help pup get used to crate time during the day too - so that there is less crying at night due to pup adjusting to being alone. Surprise method - only give treats during daytime practice, not at night though: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Teddy
Moodle
5 Months
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Teddy
Moodle
5 Months

Teddy is toileted & put to bed in his crate at 8.30pm each night, goes pretty much straight to sleep with minimal fuss. Always wakes (barking) every morning between 3.30-4.30 to toilet - does both wee & poo - then back into his cozy crate with no fuss, sleeps for another 45 mins - 1 hour maximum before the bark-athon begins! We are trying to ignore the barking for as long as we can, but are conscious of it waking our other family members & neighbors. What can we do to extend his sleep until daylight!!?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. You can try increasing his exercise before bed time. Games, a long walk, any sort of extended stimulation will help. I have had many people have great success with the sound of a fan or white noise machine to help induce longer periods of sleep. Do your best to not respond. It often gets a little worse before it gets better when you're trying to break attention seeking behaviors.

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Teddy
labroder
2 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Teddy
labroder
2 Months

My puppy is barking in night around 3am for past two to three days... How can I stop it?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mithun, At 8 weeks of age I am guessing that you recently brought pup home? If that's the case, then know that what you are experiencing is completely normal. Pup is getting used to sleeping alone and that's an adjustment. Pup also will need to go potty during the night for a few weeks because their bladder is too small to hold it overnight - if pup is only waking once, you are actually doing great and it's an age related thing you have to give pup time to mature before it can change. Usually the first five days are the worst if pup is crying several times during the night. Pup is going to need a potty trip at least once though no matter how much you train, until older. It typically takes about two weeks for most pups to adjust completely to being alone; however, you can help that adjustment be as smooth as possible by doing the following. 1. When pup cries but doesn't have to go potty (like after you return them to the crate when they just went potty outside) be consistent about ignoring the crying until they go back to sleep. The more consistent you are the quicker the overall process tends to take even if it's hard to do for the first couple weeks. 2. When pup does truly need to go potty (when it's been at least 2 hours since pup last peed), take pup to go potty outside on a leash to keep pup focused and things calmer. Don't give treats, food, play, or much attention during these trips - boring and sleepy is the goal, then right back to bed after. This helps pup learn to only wake when they truly need to go potty and be able to put themselves back to sleep - helping them start sleeping longer stretches sooner and not ask to go out unless they actually need to potty. Pup will generally need 1-2 potty trips at night even after trained for a couple months though due to a small bladder. 3. Wait until pup asks to go potty by crying in the crate at night before you take them - opposed to setting an alarm clock, unless pup is having accidents in the crate and not asking to go out. This gives pup the chance to learn to start falling back to sleep when they wake in light sleep if they don't really need to go potty, instead of being woken up all the way when they could have held it a bit longer. 4. Practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below to help pup get used to crate time during the day too - so that there is less crying at night due to pup adjusting to being alone. Surprise method - only give treats during daytime practice, not at night though: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Astro
Goldendoodle
2 Months
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Astro
Goldendoodle
2 Months

Crate training, night sleep, potty training

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello, At 8 weeks of age I am guessing that you recently brought pup home? If that's the case, then know that crying at night and in the crate right now is completely normal. Pup is getting used to sleeping alone and that's an adjustment. Usually the first five days are the worst. It typically takes about two weeks for most pups to adjust completely; however, you can help that adjustment be as smooth as possible by doing the following. 1. When pup cries but doesn't have to go potty (like after you return them to the crate when they just went potty outside) be consistent about ignoring the crying until they go back to sleep. The more consistent you are the quicker the overall process tends to take even if it's hard to do for the first couple weeks. 2. When pup does truly need to go potty (when it's been at least 2 hours since pup last peed), take pup to go potty outside on a leash to keep pup focused and things calmer. Don't give treats, food, play, or much attention during these trips - boring and sleepy is the goal, then right back to bed after. This helps pup learn to only wake when they truly need to go potty and be able to put themselves back to sleep - helping them start sleeping longer stretches sooner and not ask to go out unless they actually need to potty. Pup will generally need 1-2 potty trips at night even after trained for a couple months though due to a small bladder. 3. Wait until pup asks to go potty by crying in the crate at night before you take them - opposed to setting an alarm clock, unless pup is having accidents in the crate and not asking to go out. This gives pup the chance to learn to start falling back to sleep when they wake in light sleep if they don't really need to go potty, instead of being woken up all the way when they could have held it a bit longer. 4. Practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below to help pup get used to crate time during the day too - so that there is less crying at night due to pup adjusting to being alone. Surprise method - only give treats during daytime practice, not at night though: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate For potty training, check out the article I have linked below. I generally recommend the Crate Training method or a combination of the Crate Training method and Tethering method found there. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside At the link below, you can also download a free PDF e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bella
Tweenie dachshunds
16 Weeks
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Bella
Tweenie dachshunds
16 Weeks

My puppy won't stay in her crate at night. She mostly will go in on her own after her last potty break before bedtime at 10pm,but will wake sometimes by midnight sometimes a little later. I take her outside to the toilet no talking then try and put her back to bed. She will then bark continuously, night before last it was for 5 hours, not a distressed bark just a I need attention bark. If however I bring her into our bed she will happily sleep till 8am. How can I get her to go back into her crate and go back to sleep by herself in the night. I might add that we are home all day and she likes being very close to me, sleeping if allowed on my lap or next to me and if I leave a room she follows constantly. Even if I go to the bathroom she will sit outside and whimper.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Natalie, First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As she improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating her during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. Whenever she cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries. Practice for a few days until she is doing well during the day. Continue what you are currently doing at night during this process. Once she is doing well during the day, crate her at night too. When she cries at night before it has been 4 hours, tell her Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. When pup wakes and its been at least 3 hours, you can take them potty if they ask to go out. Keep the trip boring and straight back to bed like you are doing now, then correct if pup continues crying at that point. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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