Urinary Tract Infections Average Cost

From 344 quotes ranging from $200 - 1,000

Average Cost

$500

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What are Urinary Tract Infections?

Sometimes, urinary tract conditions can be associated with other diseases, including chronic kidney disease and hyperthyroidism. However, in many cases, there doesn’t seem to be an underlying cause at all – in this case, the technical diagnosis would be “feline idiopathic cystitis” (FIC).

Feline lower urinary tract disease, or FLUTD, is the umbrella term for urinary tract conditions in cats.  A feline urinary tract infection (UTI) is typically characterized by painful and difficult urination. Urinary tract infections in cats can range from severe to fatal, so it is important that you consult a vet right away if you suspect your cat is suffering from a UTI.

Symptoms of Urinary Tract Infections in Cats

Cats are notorious for hiding their symptoms from their owners. But if you suspect your cat may have a UTI, it is imperative that you don’t ignore it. If your cat is exhibiting any these symptoms, consult a vet immediately. An ignored UTI can lead to a urethral blockage, which can be fatal.

  • Difficulty urinating
  • Urinating outside of the litter box
  • Yowling while urinating
  • Frequent grooming of the genitals
  • Excessive urinating with little or no urine
  • Swollen penis
  • Gritty particles on the penis
  • Bloody urine

Causes of Urinary Tract Infections in Cats

The cause of UTI in cats can be difficult to pinpoint, particularly if the cat does not suffer from any type of bladder or kidney disease. This means that the bladder is inflamed, but there is no easily identifiable reason as to why. About 65% of cats who suffer from UTI and other urinary tract conditions are diagnosed with FIC.

Despite that, there are suspected causes of FIC:

  • Defects in the lining of the bladder
  • Inflammation of neurogenic structures in the bladder wall
  • Stress levels and abnormal reactions to stress

However, urinary tract infections in cats are often associated with other diseases of the bladder:

  • Urolithiasis: stones present in the bladder
  • Urethral obstruction: blockage of the urethra in male cats-- a severe condition
  • Bacterial infections: typically uncommon, usually prevalent in older cats
  • Neoplasia: tumor present in the bladder or urethra

Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Cats

Cystocentesis

Your vet may collect a sample of your cat’s urine by taking a urine culture. This is called cystocentesis. This process will involve inserting a needle directly into the bladder to collect an uncontaminated sample of urine. In order to reach an accurate diagnosis, the urine must be free from contaminants found in the environment.

The urine will then be placed in a lab and left for 48 hours in order for the cultures to grow. This way, the vet can see the specific type of bacteria present in your cat’s urine, which will aid with diagnosis and treatment.

Basic Urinalysis

The urinalysis will reveal the amount of blood present in the urine, as well as the urine’s pH balance, glucose, and protein levels. The vet will then analyze the urine using a microscope, looking for bacteria and uroliths, or stones in the urinary tract.

X-Ray

Your vet may perform an X-Ray on your cat in addition to the urine culture and urinalysis. Any crystals or stones in the bladder will show up on an X-Ray.

Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections in Cats

The most important part of treating a UTI is increasing your cat’s water intake. For general cases of FLUTD, treatment will vary based on the cause of the infection.

Urolithiasis

Surgery is often required to remove stones from the bladder. A change in diet may help dissolve certain types of bladder stones. If this is possible, your vet will prescribe a special diet that will help break up the stones and keep them from coming back.

Urethral Plugs

Urethral plugs must be removed right away, as they can cause kidney failure in as little as 2-3 days. In this case, your cat will be administered anesthetic and the vet will remove the blockage. This procedure will be painful and will make urination even more difficult, so your cat may be kept overnight or even for a few days.  Serious cases may require a catheter or the use of intravenous fluids. Your vet may also prescribe painkillers and a special diet to help prevent blockages from coming back.

Bacterial Infection

This type of infection, which is rare in cats, usually clears up easily with the use of antibiotics or other antibacterial drugs. The vet will determine which type of drug to prescribe based on the type of bacteria present in the urine.

Neoplasia (Tumors)

Unfortunately, by the time symptoms start to appear, neoplasia will likely already be at an advanced stage, making removal of the tumor impossible. Fortunately, though, this disease is quite rare in cats, and usually affects older cats. Chemotherapy treatment can help manage the tumor’s size. Your vet may also prescribe NSAID pain relievers, which can reduce tumor inflammation and help fight the cancer. 

FIC

Drugs may not help much when it comes to treating FIC. The primary way to relieve symptoms of FIC is by increasing your cat’s water intake. Switch dry food to wet, canned food. You will also want to ensure that your cat is not under high amounts of stress.

Recovery of Urinary Tract Infections in Cats

Your cat’s recovery will depend on the underlying cause of the infection. Generally, cats will start to show improvement within 2-3 days of treatment, if the case is not serious.

Always follow your vet’s treatment instructions. Be sure to provide clean water at all times. Encourage drinking where you can and ensure that litter boxes are clean. This can help reduce your cat’s stress and may speed up recovery.

Urinary Tract Infections Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Magic
dsh
4
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Spraying outside litter box anxiety
Spraying outside litter box

My 4 year old spayed female is spraying. She uses the litter box but seems anxious and stressed. I think it's because the neighborhood stray has decided to camp out on my front porch. I don't believe it's a UTI--she has no other symptoms and this has been going on for 6 weeks. I have been using calming spray and Feliway diffusers and while they help somewhat it hasn't stopped. Will the vet still do all the tests? I just had one cat to the vet and I don't have another $500.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
This behaviour may be medical or may be behavioural, if you are seeing some success with the calming sprays and diffuser it may just be the stray is causing her stress; if this is the case, don’t offer any food to the stray (if you have been doing - I know it is heartbreaking to see a stray but he’ll move on) and hope he finds a porch to make his home. It would be worth having at least a urinary test just to check for protein, blood etc… to be on the safe side which shouldn’t break the bank. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Church
Russian Blue
3 and a half
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

peeing outside the box

Medication Used

none

i looked up urinary tract infections for my cat, he only has one symptom which is peeing outside the box i got him when he was 10 weeks old he will be 4 in July, i have got any new pets or no new people in the house, he started about when he was 2 its a Russian Blue and he drinks a normal amount of water.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations

Peeing outside the litter box may be due to urinary tract infection, crystals, stones, anatomical disorders, he may not like the litter (crazy I know) or stress. A urinary sample would rule out infections, crystals and stones; x-rays and blood tests would be the next line in the diagnostic pathway. Bring it up with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My cat is peeing blood its a pinkish color and is also licking his privates and going outside the liter box. Im bringing him to the vet first thing in the morning.

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Prix
mixed
4 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

unable urinate in litter
unable urinate in litter,

I am taking care of a friends cat Prix. She was adjusting the 1st week but after I changed her litter box and set the rules not to climb my furniture she started to pee in the couch. Now she seems to have developed a UTI. Pinkish spots, strong odor oustside box. Seems uncortamble, licks constantly and no pee in litter box is found.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
It may be that Prix is acting out or that she is unable to make it to the litter box, have you changed the brand of litter in the box as this is a common cause for cats avoiding the litter tray. If there is a urinary tract infection, you would need to visit a Veterinarian for antibiotics. You should contact your friend to see if she wants you to wait until she returns or to take to her Veterinarian since you’re noticing streaks of blood. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tacks
Cat
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Medication Used

Prazosin
Metacam

Hi, my cat was diagnosed with a UTI Saturday night and it is now Monday night. He has bloody urine and that is what prompted us to take him to the vet. He looks to strain to urinate but it does come out in small urine and bloody dribbles. He tries to go in the litter box but it's like he cannot get it all out. He is also licking himself frequently. We have two medications, Prazosin twice daily and Metacam oral syringe. When can we expect for his urine to no longer have blood mixed with it and how long can we wait before we need to return?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
Was Tacks prescribed an antibiotic? Prazosin will relax his urethra and Metacam will be for pain/inflammation but I do not see an antibiotic. Was a long acting antibiotics given by your Veterinarian? With these medications the cause may also be urinary stones. Improvement should be seen within a few days with constant improvement until seven days or so from the start of treatment; if you are seeing no improvement or have concerns visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kylo
Unknown
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Blood In Urine
Peeing outside of litter box

Hello, my cat has been diagnosed with a UTI. There was blood in his urine and the Vet found bacteria and white blood cells in his sample, but no crystals. She prescribed Orbax antibiotics. We are on day 4 of antibiotics but nothing has changed, he is still peeing frequently but now he is peeing outside of litter box; however,I've dabbed tissue in the wet spots and it is not red, so no more blood. My question is how long should I wait to see if the antibiotics are working before I take him in to see if it's something else?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
Bacteria and white blood cells in the urine are highly suggestive of urinary tract infection, treatment may take a while and whilst pain and discomfort may still be present due to inflammation, the infection may be gone. I would complete the course of antibiotics before returning to your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Noir
Bombay
6 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Wont eat,drink, or go without me
Wont eat,drink, or go without me there
Peeing on bed
Dragging bottom on carpet
Running to litter box alot

Hey I'm a new cat mom and Noir, my 6 month old Bombay, has always been a good kitty. Not too long ago, I would say a month, my cat decided to pee on my boyfriend's side of the bed when we were asleep. Now he NEVER does this. He stopped after that. Today however he did it again but he kept running to his litter box and nothing came out like he's trying to force himself to go. I don't know what to do my boyfriend started talking about kicking him out and it's not an option in my view! He's my Baby Cat. I love him too long to do that to him. Can you PLEASE HELP ME?????

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
There are a few possible causes for this which may include behavioural issues, urinary stones, infections, inflammation among other causes. The first step would be to have urinalysis done (if you can get a sample) to see if there is anything unusual in the urine since he seems to be straining to urinate. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kovu
Tabby
1.5
Moderate condition
-1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Irritable
licking genitals
Peeing outside litter box

My cat keeps blatantly walking into my room and peeing in my laundry basket even with a clean litter box. I've also noticed that he keeps licking his privates. He's neutered and I can't tell if he's been peeing in the litter box. I only see little poop pellets. We also got a new puppy in the house. Does this sound serious Do I need to take him to the vet??

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations

You would normally be able to see if he had been urinating in the litter box as the kitty litter would normally clump (depending on the type of litter you use); the reason for the urination outside of the litter box maybe due to a urinary tract infection (which may explain the licking of the genitals), stress (new environment, new person living in the house) or marking territory (possibly smelling something ‘foreign’ in the basket). One of the easiest ways to prevent this is to cover the laundry basket or to get a different laundry basket with a lid; otherwise close the door to your room. But still visit your Veterinarian to check for urinary tract infection. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kaos
Domestic shorthair
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Suddenly not able to go when he wasbeginningto

So my cat is on antibiotics for a UTI and he was peeing a little bit which was great. It's been two days since I started giving him the antibiotics and he can't seem to pee any more. He keeps trying but can't. I don't know what to do.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
If Koas cannot urinate at all you should visit your Veterinarian since urine will continue to fill the bladder and may cause it to rupture or cause other secondary issues; severe inflammation, urinary stones and other issues may be causing a lack of urination and should be addressed as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Mac
Feline
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

I have a male cat around the age or 2-3.
He has been urinating in many different places around the house and it seems to be getting worse. he will pee on my bed mostly or the floor. when i check his litter box it has a minimal pee spot. he goes more frequently now but cant seem to get anything out, unless it is somewhere other than his litter box

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
This may be either a medical problem or a behavioural problem; from a medical point of view infections, urinary stones, tumours among others; since the urination is occurring mainly on your bed it may be a behavioural issue. The next step would be to have urinalysis done which is a relatively inexpensive test to determine if there are any anomalies found in his urine before doing anything else. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Aslan
tabby
2 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating Outside Litterbox

My cat has peed on my comforter, twice, in the last two months. I locked him out of my room now, and all was well until my angry roommate texted me saying he peed somewhere in the living room or on the couch. He does also pee in the litter box, but at the time he did pee on the living room carpet it was a little messy I must admit. Do you think this behavior could be a health issue, or just behavioral? I'm desperate, I do not want my nice apartment smelling like cat pee.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
It is difficult to determine whether the cause is behavioural or medical without examining Aslan or without any other symptoms - signs of blood, straining, loss of appetite etc… You should ensure that the litter box is regularly cleaned and that Aslan has continuous access to it (it sounds obvious but I have had to make this clear to some people). It may be worth visiting your Veterinarian just to check him over to check for any possible medical issues and for urinalysis to look for infections or other issues. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Esme
Long haired Torti
15 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Blood In Urine

Medication Used

Enrofloxacin

My 15 year old female cat was perscribed Enrofloxacin 22.5 mg. once per day for 14 days for UTI 2 days ago. I researched this antibiotic and learned 1)It can cause retinal damage. 2) Is harsh on elderly felines. 3) The usual dosage is 2.5-10 mg. which is much lower than my cat was perscribed.
My cat symptoms where, excessive urination, excess water drinking, strong amonnia smell of urine, and blood in urine. Her blood glucose was good and she is not diabetic. Even with the UTI, she haf been eating and behaving as she normally does. She never stained or yowled when urinating. She never urinated outside her box. Nor has she had chronic repeated UTI. She eats wet food and a good quality dry food. This is my concern: I had another elderly cat (16 yes old) given this same antibiotic years ago, and he got so sick after taking it for 14 days that literally he wasted away with severe vomiting and diarrhea. One of his eyes protruded and both eyes where constantly dialated.The vet said he had developed glaucoma. But I believe after all I read recently about this drug, that was the cause of his demise. He had to be put down. I would appreciate your opinion. What would be a better choice of antibiotic for my cat to treat this currant UTI, because I am afraid to give it to her and plan on requesting something else from the vet.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations
All medications have some type of side effect, normally just vomiting and diarrhoea; the dosage of enrofloxacin given to Esme is the equivalent dose for a 10lb (4.5kg) cat which is reasonable (see attachment below). Ophthalmic issues have been raised in cats given enrofloxacin at doses above 5mg/kg (2.3mg/kg). If you are uncomfortable with the use of enrofloxacin, discuss this with your Veterinarian as I cannot prescribe prescription medicines without examining a patient first. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.dechra-us.com/Admin/Public/DWSDownload.aspx?File=%2fFiles%2fFiles%2fProductDownloads%2fus%2fenrofloxacin-flavored-tablets-pack-insert.pdf

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Cooper
Shorthaired domestic
approx. 2yrs
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Frequent attemps at priducing urine, but with litt

We just adopted a yr old male catfroma rescue org.He has a history of urinary tract problems. He is at the vet now and had symptoms of reoccurring problem. Frequent sitting In his box with very little urine oulput licking. He has been at the vet all dayand they are keeping him overnight bcaue as of late this afternoon he had not produced enough urine to test. We have only had Copper for 2 1/2 days, so there is not a lot I can tell you a out his previous history. Can Cooper be cured or will this continue to be a chronic problem. He is a set gentle kitty and I want him to have the best stable environment we can provide but on the flip side I worry about him being sickly because of this problem. I also know that having to get used to various temporary homes does not help his illness. He is on a urinary tract formula dry and wet food. And has 2 cranberry treats for cats per day. sm hoping to get so good news, but also want to know the bad news also. thank you for our time.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1680 Recommendations

It’s great you want to give Copper a stable home environment; but I understand your concern about long term problems with his urinary tract. It has only been two and a half days, I cannot say if this will be a chronic condition or not. There are many underlying conditions which can lead to a cat getting urinary tract infections. He may just need to be hydrated and treated with antibiotics and he would be fine or there may be regular recurrence, I cannot say either way. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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