Xylitol Poisoning Average Cost

From 30 quotes ranging from $300 - 6,000

Average Cost

$2,500

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What is Xylitol Poisoning?

Xylitol is found in many products that may be within the reach of our canine family members. Vitamins and sugar-free gum are just two of the products that contain this sugar substitute which is growing in popularity. The antibacterial benefits  (making it an attractive addition to dental products) and the use as a sweetener (fewer calories than regular sugars) have increased the household use, and therefore, increased the cases of toxicity in dogs. With xylitol, absorption by dogs is rapid and complete; symptoms of poisoning can be seen in as little as 30 minutes after ingestion. Symptoms can escalate to life-threatening, with complications as serious as liver failure a result. In some cases though, symptoms do not appear for a few days but are nonetheless just as dangerous. A veterinary visit for detoxification is absolutely necessary for pets who ingest products containing xylitol.

Xylitol is classified as a five-carbon sugar alcohol which has many uses. An additive in dental care products, baked goods, nicotine gum, vitamins and more, xylitol is extremely toxic to dogs with symptoms ranging from lethargy to hypoglycemia. A dog who consumes xylitol must be seen by the veterinarian as effects can evolve to life-threatening proportions.

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Symptoms of Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs

Symptoms of xylitol poisoning can be evident in as little as 30 minutes.

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Blood in stool
  • Drowsiness
  • Restlessness
  • Weakness
  • Tremors
  • Convulsions
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Low blood pressure
  • Loss of control of bodily movements

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a very real danger with xylitol consumption. Symptoms of this effect can appear within 15 to 30 minutes but may be delayed up to 12 hours. Seizures and collapse are common. Recent studies have shown that liver damage is also a secondary complication that can occur; jaundice is a sign of liver issues as is the development of small purple and red spots on the skin (petechia). Other symptoms that may not be easily seen but can be life threatening include gastrointestinal hemorrhage and prolonged blood clotting time. The higher the amount of xylitol consumed per your dog’s body weight, the more toxicity will occur.

Types

Products containing xylitol include:

  • Nicotine gum
  • Sugar-free gum
  • Toothpaste
  • Dental rinses
  • Candy
  • Baked goods like cookies and bread
  • Granulated powder for baking
  • Chewable vitamins

Causes of Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs

Xylitol is found naturally in fungi like mushrooms, berries, and lettuce. Though completely safe in humans and considered a good substitute for sugar, it is highly dangerous for canines.

  • Xylitol is absorbed into the bloodstream of dogs very rapidlly
  • Xylitol stimulates insulin release, which causes a drop in blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • Hypokalemia (deficiency of potassium) and hypophosphatemia (low phosphate levels) cause further distress
  • Xylitol causes poisonous effects that lead to liver damage
  • Elevated liver enzymes can be evident 12 to 24 hours after your pet consumes a product containing xylitol

Diagnosis of Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs

As soon as you are aware that your pet may have consumed xylitol, call the veterinarian immediately. In most cases of xylitol poisoning, the symptoms arise very early on. Your veterinarian may diagnose the poisoning right away based on the history you have provided and the clinical appearance of your dog. Because the symptoms can be Very severe within minutes, the course of action may be to stabilize your pet right away based on the signs of poisoning (low blood pressure, rapid heartrate, vomiting, lethargy) at the physical examination. Your pet will most likely be hospitalized right away and further diagnostic blood tests will be done during treatment in order to determine the level of toxicity.

Treatment of Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs

Supportive measures and the monitoring of levels to normal ranges are crucial to your dog’s treatment and recovery. Blood tests will indicate the blood sugar level and state of hypokalemia or hypophosphatemia if present. Treatment will depend on how much xylitol was consumed, the length of time that the xylitol has been in the system, your dog’s state of health before consumption, and the condition of his liver as a result. With liver issues, the veterinarian may see skin color changes in your dog because of bleeding under the skin (ecchymosis). Petechia, which is red and purple spots on the skin, can also indicate liver problems and coagulopathy (the impairment of clotting ability in the blood).

Intravenous fluid therapy will be administered and will help correct glucose, potassium, and phosphorous levels. Liver protectants, along with antioxidants, vitamins C, E, and K1 will be included. Antibiotics may be recommended as well. 

In the case of a severe coagulation complication, blood plasma or whole blood transfusions may be needed. In any case of xylitol poisoning, your dog will remain in the hospital until the veterinary team feels that the liver is functioning normally and all blood markers are at the levels they should be.

Recovery of Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs

A dog who has ingested xylitol in any form will benefit the most from quick and aggressive treatment. Pets who receive fast therapy have the most positive prognosis. If the xylitol poisoning has led to complications like hyperbilirubinemia, which can mean impaired liver function, or coagulopathy, which is a disorder of the blood clotting process, the prognosis is guarded to poor. When your pet returns home from the hospital you will need to provide a quiet resting place, but one where you can keep an eye on him. Call your veterinarian if you have concerns about the progess of his recovery. Store any products and foodstuffs out of the reach of your dog. In addition, spread the word to your friends and family who are pet owners as they may not be aware of the dangers of products such as chewing gum and toothpaste.

Xylitol Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Millie
Beagle mix
8 Months
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Low Blood Sugar

are there any potentially permanent damages resulting from a xylitol overdose in a dog? We acted immediately, but 36 hours later we are still having blood glucose issues. Does this usually correct itself over time? Do most dogs that OD on xylitol have permanent liver damage or does it resolve itself with medication over time? I know all cases are unique but I'm just looking for a generalized answer.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Generally, with hospitalization and therapy, glucose issues resolve. Liver concerns are variable, and can resolve, or not. Blood testing throughout the therapy process helps to guide medical care, and gives an idea as to prognosis. I hope that Millie recovers normally!

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P-Stella, B-Blair
Pit , lab
3 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Shaking

My to dogs ate mints. I'm not sure how much. My 45 lb pit started shaking and was off balance 10 minutes after I got home,she then started throwing up had had diarrhea. I carried her in the house she went to her kennel and hasn't moved. My 50 lab mix started having the same symptoms 15 minutes after my first dog. There isn't a vet close that's open. How do I stabilize them til morning. It's been 9 hrs. They sat up to drink some water with assistance but then lay down and won't move. Their hr and breath in take were fast and hard but have slowed down I think a little slow. Lab is 6 to 9 yrs and pit is 3 yrs

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations

Dogs are 100 times more sensitive to xylitol than humans and causes their blood glucose level to fall through the floor; if you are unable to visit your Veterinarian or any Veterinarian; put a drop of corn syrup or honey on their tongue, but they both require emergency stabilisation as soon as possible. Until a Veterinarian is available, the Pet Poison Helpline may be able to give you more help. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/xylitol/

 

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nala
cotton de tulear
3 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

My dog ate chewing gum 2 hours ago,and she vomited twice,what should i do? Is she in great danger? There is no vet working now,so i must wait until morning. Will she be ok until morning?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. If the chewing gum contained xylitol, she should be seen as soon as possible to have her blood work evaluated. She may need further care, as xylitol can cause a drop in blood sugar, and liver disease. I hope that she is okay.

My dog got into a box of xylitol gum last night. We rushed her to the vet ER and she is now stable. My question is, she has a littler of 2 week old puppies. Can she go back to nursing them or does xylitol cross into the milk?

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Archie
Goldendoodle
2 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

My dog has ingested a very small amount of prechewed gum, barley a nibble no where near the entire thing, we are unsure if it contains artificial sugars or not. He is currently acting fine and it’s about 30-45 since the accident. I was wondering if there’s anything I could be doing or be looking for. It was a gum ball from a machine. He is two years old and about 50-60 lbs. thank you so much for the help

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
It is unlikely that a gumball from a gum machine is sugar free gum, thankfully. If Archie ate that gum, it would be a good idea to monitor him for vomiting or diarrhea, and see your veterinarian if those things occur. Side effects of xylitol toxicity can include a dramatic drop in blood sugar, and liver failure - to be safe, it would be best to have a veterinarian see Archie and run some lab work to monitor his blood levels. I think it is very unlikely that that gum contained xylitol, however.

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Mia
Boarder collie/husky mix
10 Weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

tired

Hi, earlier today sometime between 4:30-6 my dog ate an entire pack of gum containing xylitol, when I found the empty package at 6 I took her to a 24 hr emergency center where they induced vomiting and got a lot of gum back out of her(they are keeping her for 24 hrs. ) She's been in their care since 7:30 and when I called 3 hrs later they said that her blood sugar was normal. ( they have her on a treatment) If her blood sugar is currently normal is that a good sign that she will be ok or is it too early to tell? Could things still go really bad even though she is in treatment right now? (She's 10 weeks old maybe 10 lbs)

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations

It is generally a good sign if glucose levels are normal as xylitol causes the blood sugar to plummet quite quickly after consumption. Given Mia’s age, I think they want to keep an eye on her for a while to be on the safe side; I cannot tell you 100% she will be OK, but xylitol is absorbed into the body very fast and any effects would normally be evident by now. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a golden retriever and he ate a pack of ten chewing gum that contains xylitol at about 12:00am I was so scared and started crying thinking that he was going to die I have never been that upset about anything and I rushed him to the vets and sent him away at 2:00am he wasn't showing any symptoms but I was beyond scared I started crying like a ticking bomb I don't know what was going to happen then the vet came back from making my baby boy vomit and said they couldn't find any gum and hospitalised him for 72 hours and said that they got him on an iv and won't guarantee anything if he'll be okay. The next day I called them asking if he's okay and they said he's happy and calm and said that they will tell the results later but the haven't still it's already been 48 hours and the only thing their saying is he's happy and calm. Eh? So is he going fine? Does he have liver failure? Is he going to make it? All these questions run through my head and I'm going insane hopefully I can go and get him and bring him back home again and not let him out of my sight again because honestly it's like going through hell

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snow
Maltese
8 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Hi my dog maltese 8 year old. Eat milk bone pig ear snack for dogs. And after 3 days she started to drink a lot and pee alot. I took her to the vet. The blood test results her liver function is slightly high and her blood sugar level also a bit above. She is still active, eating normally, no jaundice. Then i saw the gum ear i gave her. It stated xylitol in the ingredient. She is given liver support capsul, antibiotics, and antioxidant. Im case of xylitol poisoning, can the liver flushed the toxin and heal? Im worri3d abour her. Should i get her iv fluid?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations
If the cause was due to xylitol we would expect the blood sugar level to be low not high; dogs are a hundred more times more sensitive to xylitol than humans and consumption can cause a drop in blood glucose to a dangerous level. But xylitol may also cause liver failure and its effects can be delayed if it is present in a gum based product; treatment should be with Denamarin (silybin and SAMe) along with other supportive care. Each case is individual and you should speak with your Veterinarian about the xylitol in the milk bone pig ear. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/xylitol http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/new-findings-effects-xylitol-ingestion-dogs

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Shan
Golden Retriever
11 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

I have a golden retriever and he ate a pack of ten chewing gum that contains xylitol at about 12:00am I was so scared and started crying thinking that he was going to die I have never been that upset about anything and I rushed him to the vets and sent him away at 2:00am he wasn't showing any symptoms but I was beyond scared I started crying like a ticking bomb I don't know what was going to happen then the vet came back from making my baby boy vomit and said they couldn't find any gum and hospitalised him for 72 hours and said that they got him on an iv and won't guarantee anything if he'll be okay. The next day I called them asking if he's okay and they said he's happy and calm and said that they will tell the results later but the haven't still it's already been 48 hours and the only thing their saying is he's happy and calm. Eh? So is he going to be fine? Does he have liver failure? Is he going to make it? All these questions run through my head and I'm going insane hopefully I can go and get him and bring him back home again and not let him out of my sight again because honestly it's like going through hell

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations
Xylitol is highly toxic to dogs and many people do not know; generally within half an hour of ingestion a dog will have a hypoglycemic event which can cause tremors, seizures, lethargy and weakness with larger ingestions causing liver failure. I cannot tell you that Shan is going to be OK, but so far so good; around three days after ingestion, a blood test will show overall liver health. During the period between ingestion and the blood test, some people recommend offering liver support supplements like silybin and SAMe. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/xylitol/

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Willie
Mixed
10 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Excessive drinking

Medication Used

chlorphenirimine
hydroxizine

I just realized that the melatonin we are giving our dog has xylitol in it. He was only on it for 3 1/2 days before I checked the bottle. It is Natrol brand 3 mg. and I didn't realize I got the flavored kind. In that time he consumed 3 tablets (1/2 in a.m. and 1/2 in p.m.) He has shown none of the typical signs of xylitol poisoning although he has been drinking a lot more water during the time he was on it. He didn't eat meals as well, either, but we were out of town and he often eats poorly when in unusual circumstances. We were on a training weekend, and he ate plenty of treats, though. Other than that, he seems fine. Should I be concerned about long term affects? Should I do anything since he seems to be fine?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations
The effects of xylitol toxicity are usually evident within half an hour with long term effects presenting with a day or two; I would keep a close eye on Willie and look out for any symptoms listed on this page. Most cases of xylitol poisoning occur when the blood sugar level crashes due to a dog’s sensitivity to xylitol being 100 times more sensitive than humans. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/xylitol/

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Manny
Shih Tzu
9 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none.

My dog manny , a 12 pound 9 month old shih tzu ate a nibble of mildly chewed gum that contains xylitol. When I say nibble I mean probably less that a fourth of a piece of gum. Naturally I am worried because I googled it and found that gum and xylitol are poisonous to dogs. Although it said that it takes about 3-9 pieces to cause symptoms but I could never be sure. It’s been an hour and a half and he is acting normal, eating and running around. Should I be worried?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations
Normally the onset of symptoms of xylitol poisoning is fast and if you haven’t seen any symptoms present, then you’re probably in the clear; although some gums may have a slow release formula so you should still keep an eye on Manny for the time being and visit your Veterinarian if you have any concerns or any symptoms present. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/xylitol

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Lilah
Standard Poodle
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

will puppies be affected?

My dog got into a box of xylitol gum last night. We rushed her to the vet ER and she is now stable. My question is, she has a littler of 2 week old puppies. Can she go back to nursing them or does xylitol cross into the milk?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Xylitol does not cross into breast milk in people, from what my research has shown me, so the chances are good that it doesn't in dogs either, since we are all mammals. I would probably be very careful, however, in case that information isn't 100% accurate, and it may be a good idea to bottle feed the puppies until she is recovered and over her toxicity. I would think after 48-72 hours, any xylitol would be gone from her bloodstream, but make sure that you check with your veterinarian, as they know more about her individual situation. I hope that Lilah and her pups are all okay.

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Toby
Yorkipoo
5 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea
tired
Not eating
Vomiting

This last friday night we went to a baseball game. Bought some kids some cotton candy. Went home, and they didn't wash their hands before the dog starting licking their hands. They had cotton candy residue and about an hour or two later Toby started throwing up. At the time we didn't know they did this nor did we know about Xylitol. We waited till the next morning to have him seen as he wasn't eating or drinking and had diarrhea. They did testing for Parvo and did bloodwork and determined he had Xylitol in his system. We assume it's from the cotton candy as he was fine when we were out at the game.

They treated him with an IV pouch and with some special food. We took him home that afternoon and monitored him. He was tired and slow moving and we took him back in the next day to be examined. The dr's stated he was much better than the day before and recommended to keep him home and rested. Last night he had diahreah every 2 hours and he's back in the vet on IV fluids and antibiotics. And will be back tomorrow to finish the round.

Question is.... will there be long term damage to any of his organs, or should we expect no issue after/if he recovers?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations

Dogs are hundreds of times more sensitive to xylitol than humans; when a dog ingests xylitol, the body releases insulin causing the blood glucose level to drop through the floor. Treatment in these cases is purely supportive whilst the dog manages to rebalance its glucose levels. With a quick response, prognosis is good; if treatment is delayed, it is less favourable - I haven’t examined Toby so your Veterinarian would be the best to ask about this. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Nitro
Jack Russell
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

Dog ate an already chewed piece of gum with xylitol listed as one of the last ingredients. We immediately induced vomiting and the piece of gum came right up. It was in his stomach less than 10 minutes, do we have anything to worry about?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. You acted very quickly, and getting the gum out of his stomach should resolve any chance of effects from the xylitol. If Nitro shows any signs of weakness, tremors, vomiting, or diarrhea, he should be seen by you veterinarian, and it would be a good idea to have someone with him to monitor him for the next 12 hours.

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Lilli
German Shorthaired Pointer
19 Weeks
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My 19 week old German short hair ingested 2 pieces of Ice Breakers gum containing 1g xylitol. We took her to the emergency vet within 1.5 hours of ingestion. She was showing no signs of hypoglycemia. The vet induced vomiting and said her liver enzymes and glucose levels were good. They are keeping her for 48 hours on IV and continual monitoring. I have been ready a lot on the internet and am concerned that the dog won’t survive. What is the typical prognosis for a dog with the above conditions?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations
It is difficult to give a specific prognosis, it is important to see how liver function is after a few days; even though Lilli didn’t have hypoglycemia, liver damage is still a concern and should be checked for over the next few days. Liver support like silybin and SAMe may be useful and are available over the counter. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/xylitol/ www.msdvetmanual.com/toxicology/food-hazards/xylitol http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/new-findings-effects-xylitol-ingestion-dogs

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Bmo
King Charles Spaniel
7 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No symptoms yet

My dog chewed on 2 pieces of gum but didn’t ingest any, as the gum still maintained it’s shape but showed chew marks, it’s been 4 hours and no symptoms have shown, should I be worried? He’s a 7 month old cavalier King Charles spaniel.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Bmo might have a problem if he ate gum containing Xylitol. If the gum didn't contain Xylitol, and if he didn't actually eat any gum, you should have anything to worry about. It would be best to monitor for vomiting, diarrhea, inappetance, or collapse.

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Suge
Boston Terrier
4 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

no st
no symptoms

I found my puppy playing with some already chewed gum in my back yard. She did not ingest any and I have no idea what was in the gum. It has been 10 Minutes. What should I do?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
If you are sure that Suge did not actually eat any of the gum, you should be okay monitoring her for weakness, lethargy, decreased appetite, vomiting or diarrhea. If there is a possibility that she did eat any of it, it would be best to have her seen as soon as possible by a veterinarian, as the xylitol can cause blood sugar problems and liver failure. I hope that all goes well for her!

My 5 month old puppy ate apx 60 pieces of sugar free gum. We had left it on the counter. She threw up twice and starting falling down so we immediately took her to the vet who started and iv and sent us to urgent care. So we got her to the vet in about an hour. Her liver is back to normal but her phosphurus is now high. I know the vets at the hospital can't give me any answers on chance of survival but can you tell me? The bill is up to $3,000 and though I would pay a million to save this pup I can't. She hasn't started having seizures and she is eating and going to the bathroom. But she is lethargic. Have any dogs ever survived ingesting this much Xylitol? Her gums were pink when we took her in and they are doing all they can to save her.

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Monsetrrat
Yorkshire Terrier
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

Hello, my 7 to 9 pound yorkie ate what seems like at most 1 piece of the Trident gum, which contain Xytolil. I have contacted the Pet Poison Center, and they advised me to keep an eye on her. I tried to induce vomiting twice and she did not vomit. She has been acting as her usual self and it has been about 2 to 3 hours since she ingested the gum. Is there anything I should look out for, should I take her to have her blood work examined? She is a very weird dog, and by that I mean that she has eaten pure dark chocolate and nothing ever happend.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Even a small amount of xylitol can be quite devastating to a dog. She may be fine, but to be safe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian to have her blood sugar and liver values checked. They'll be able to assess her and advise you on any treatment that she may need. I hope that she is okay.

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