How to Crate Train a Dachshund Puppy

Medium
3-6 Weeks
General

Introduction

Even a small dog like a Dachshund would have his own den out in the wild. A place for him to raise his family, get away from predators, get out of the weather, and to feel safe enough with to sleep in. Dachshunds tend to have separation anxiety and training them to see the crate as their den is a very good way to help curb this problem.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that you need to keep everything about the training sessions positive. You should never use his crate as a form of punishment or he might come to view his crate in a negative way, making it all but impossible to train him successfully. Keep the pace slow and steady, but consistent if you want your pup to get used and then enjoy his new "den."

Defining Tasks

You have a somewhat challenging task ahead of you. Your pup wants to spend as much time as he can with you, on your lap, on the couch next to you, even sleeping on the bed with you (if you let him). While in the wild his desire for a den might take precedence, in your home the desire to be with you is going to make crate training him that much harder.

Rather than think about this type of training as teaching your pup to stay in his crate, there is a better option. Why not make the whole exercise one in which you are training him to see his crate as his new den rather than the wire cage that keeps him from you? By approaching the training from this position, you will find it goes more smoothly and successfully. 

Getting Started

Your Dachshund needs a crate that is big enough for him to move around in comfortably. Be sure you don’t buy one that is too big, or he may decide to use one end as his den and the other as his bathroom. Yet at the same time, you don't want one that is too small, or he won't be comfortable in it and will stay out.

To set up your pup's crate and turn it into a den, you need a nice soft piece of carpet that is easy to clean, a doggie bed, a hanging water bottle, and a few chew toys and soft toys for your pup to play with. You may also want to keep a blanket handy to cover the crate and give your pup a nice quiet place to get away from it all and nap. 

The Treat Lure Method

Effective
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Step
1
Place the treat
You can use a treat or a toy, but place it in the center of the crate. Tell your pup "Go crate" or "Go kennel." Let him go inside.
Step
2
Close the door
Close the door to the crate and find somewhere to relax for a few minutes. Hang out quietly, wait for your pup to start fussing and then let him carry on till he finally settles down and relaxes.
Step
3
Give him a treat
Once he settles down and before you let him out of his crate, praise him and give him a treat. Do this before you let him out, this lets him associate being in the crate with a positive reward
Step
4
Release your pup
Release your pup and take him outside to go potty.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat this exercise several times a day, adding an extra five minutes to how long he stays in his crate until he can stay there when you need him to without fussing.
Recommend training method?

The Every Dog Needs a Den Method

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Step
1
Find the perfect spot
Choose the perfect spot for your pup's crate. Dachshunds are very social creatures, so be sure you place the crate out of the flow of traffic, but where your pup will still be able to interact with the rest of his family. Go ahead and cover the crate with a blanket to give it a more "den-like" feel for your pup.
Step
2
Introductions all round
Pick up your Doxy and place him in the middle of his crate, right next to the pile of toys. Go ahead and leave him there while you close the door. Allow him time to get used to being in his crate. Do this in five-minute sessions at first, you will be working your way up later.
Step
3
Please release me, let me go……..
Your dog is going to do everything in his power both verbally and physically to convince you to let him out. That's fine, let him do his best. But, under NO circumstances should you let him out unless he is actually hurting himself.
Step
4
When he finally stops
When your pup finally stops, and he will, give him a moment to settle down then give him a treat and praise him. When he is all done with it, open up and run him straight out to the yard so he can pee.
Step
5
Oh, won't you stay just a little bit longer
Keep repeating this training, adding five minutes to the time between when he stops fussing and when you release him. With practice, your pup will learn to go into his kennel on command and stay there quietly until you release him.
Recommend training method?

The Treat Toss Method

Effective
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Step
1
Locate his crate
Place your pup's crate in a central location where the whole family can interact with him. Either remove the door or tie it back.
Step
2
Show your pup the treats
Show your pup the treats, let him get a good sniff, but do not give it to him.
Step
3
Toss the treats
Sit back and toss a treat or two in the crate and give him the "Crate" or "Kennel" command. When he goes in, let him have the treat and give him a lot of praise. You can even give him another treat if you want to.
Step
4
Give him room
Take a couple steps back and give your pup room to walk out of his crate. As he walks out, use a cue word like "Out" and praise him, but no treat. You want him to see going in the crate as the way he is rewarded with a treat, not coming out.
Step
5
Keep working it
Continue repeating these training methods, adding more time in small increments until your pup has learned to remain quietly in his crate or den for up to several hours a day.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

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