How to Train Your Dog to Go Pee

Medium
2-6 Weeks
General

Introduction

Bringing a new puppy home is exciting. They can also be exhausting. New puppies are awake a lot during the night, need to be trained, need to be socialized, and need to know the best place to use the potty. You may train your dog to eliminate in one spot such as a pee pad within your house or one special area in your yard. Alternatively, your goal may just be to teach your dog to tell you she needs to go outside and let her roam the yard on her own until she is satisfied. In the whirlwind of having a new dog, whether it is a new puppy or an older dog who needs to be retrained, house training tops the list of things your dog must know.

Defining Tasks

House training is about praise, love, and repetition. The level of frustration can be high if you are not patient, are intolerant of accidents, or are not taking the time your puppy needs to learn this important skill. It is important to know if you have a puppy, they can usually hold their bladder for about one hour for every month he is old. So, a four-month-old puppy can typically go about four hours without having to pee. However, smaller dogs may need less time in between visits to the potty. Excited dogs may need to visit outside before the magic hour per month time is up. And as your dog is learning what it feels like to have to eliminate and recognize the actions that go with it, you may find him telling you right away without warning. House training is not a difficult task, but the time you put into it these first few weeks will truly be the determinant of how long it will take you and your puppy to succeed.

Getting Started

You will need a few things depending on how you would like to train your puppy.

  • Treats for rewarding good behavior.
  • If you would like to train your puppy to use a bell to let you know she needs to go outside, you will need that device from the start.
  • Time, patience, and commitment will be required.

Remember to ask your dog often if she needs to go potty before she does so in your house.

Your young puppy will need to go at least once, if not two or three times, in the middle of the night so be prepared to lose a little bit of sleep or increase your coffee intake for a few weeks.

The Bell Communication Method

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Step
1
Hanging bell
Hanging a bell close to the door you wish your dog to use to go outside at a level appropriate for your dog so she can signal you when she needs to go outside. Your dog will want to nudge the bell with her nose or ring the bell with her paws. However, before you hang the bell, introduce it to her first. Introduce the bell to your dog by sitting on the floor near the door with her and showing it to her.
Step
2
Bell does more
Allowing her to sniff the bell, give her a treat every time her nose touches it. Continue showing her the bell, only this time ring the bell so she can hear the noise it makes. As you continue to show her the bell, every time her nose touches it, and she makes the bell ring, give her a treat. Do not treat if she only touches the bell but does not make it ring.
Step
3
Ring the bell
When she is able to ring the bell every time you show it to her, begin to place her treats outside the door where she can see them. Showing her the hanging bell again encourage her to ring it. When she rings the bell, open the door, allowing her to receive her treat.
Step
4
Potty and bell
As you are bell training, watch for signs that she may have to go potty. Each time you take her out to go potty, point to the bell and encourage her to ring it. When she rings the bell, open the door and let her go outside to go potty.
Step
5
Reward
If she goes potty after ringing the bell, reward her.
Step
6
Repeat
Each time she goes to the door to be let outside, point to the bell, encouraging her to ring the bell before you open the door to let her out.
Step
7
Practice
Getting her used to the bell may take several days. Getting her to associate the bell with going outside to use the potty may take several more days. Be patient with her and show her the bell every time.
Step
8
Expectations
Leaving the bell at the door, continue to point to it every time she needs to go outside. Eventually, your dog will ring the bell on her own to let you know she needs to go potty outside.
Recommend training method?

The Same Spot Each Time Method

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Step
1
Introduce idea
You can teach your dog to go potty in the same place. This will protect your yard from urine damage and keep the clean-up responsibilities confined to one area. Choose a space specifically for your dog's potty needs. This area should be free of distractions and kept clean.
Step
2
Puppy's age
Keeping in mind your dog's bladder can only stay full for about an hour for every month of their age, take him to his specific area and use a verbal cue such as "go potty".
Step
3
Stay and treat
Keep your dog in that area until he eliminates. Offer your pup a reward in the form of a treat and praise. If you are trying to train your dog to go in one spot, bear in mind you may only want to offer the reward if he uses that spot.
Step
4
Next time
Carry on with your day, allowing your dog to play and rest. Before the time of one hour per month old passes, take your dog back outside to his special potty area.
Step
5
Command
Using your command words such as “go potty,” leave your dog for a few minutes in his area and wait for him to pee. The more your dog uses this area, the more the area will smell like him and remind him that this is his special potty place. However, be sure to keep it clean because if left with more than one pile of stool, your dog may begin to refuse the area and will want to go elsewhere.
Step
6
Reward
Reward your dog for good behavior and repeat the steps above.
Step
7
Know your dog
Pay attention to your dog during normal activities and watch his body language. Your puppy may spin around, pace, or wag their behind a little more when he has to eliminate. Knowing these signs will help you to get your dog to his potty place within an appropriate time.
Step
8
Accidents happen
If your puppy has an accident, clean it up quickly without punishing the dog. Take your dog to his special potty place and repeat the steps above rewarding him if he eliminates again.
Recommend training method?

The Crate and Potty Method

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Step
1
Using a crate
If your puppy is using a crate for his safe spot and sleeping spot, avoid putting puppy pads inside the crate if you can get him outside frequently. Every hour, take your dog out of the crate and with keywords such as “let's go potty.” Take him outside to sniff around your yard.
Step
2
Reward
When he eliminates, praise him with verbal praise and a treat.
Step
3
When to go out
Remember your puppy will need to go out frequently. Take him out every hour repeating the steps above. After meals, take your dog outside with your keyword phrase, “let's go potty” about 10 minutes after your dog has eaten.
Step
4
Out of the crate
If your dog is out of the crate, keep him close to you, watching for typical signs that he may need to go potty such as pacing, circling, or wagging his tail more than normal. If you are putting your dog back in the crate after he eliminates, offer verbal praises. Be sure to come back often to avoid accidents within the crate.
Step
5
Every time
Each time you take the dog out of the crate, put him outside immediately. As your dog ages, the time spent in the crate between visits outside can lengthen to two hours or more.
Step
6
Maturing pup
Eventually, with age and practice, your dog should be able to stay in your house or his crate without accidents for a full day if you are away from the house. Be sure to reward your dog for positive behavior every time he uses the potty outside as he is training.
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 11/29/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Fiji
pitbull
4 Months
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Fiji
pitbull
4 Months

Just adopted Fiji 4 days ago. I take her out very often, maybe 5 times a day since I’ve got her. She has only pooped and peed outside once, I praised her when she did. But now she only goes in the house. I will walk her for 20-40 minutes and nothing, then as soon as we go inside she will pee, and gives me no warning that she has to go. How can I fix this ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
875 Dog owners recommended

Hello Stella, Fiji needs to be strictly crate trained to prevent opportunities to pee inside. She also needs to be taken out as often as every one and a half hours until she starts to understand that she is supposed to pee only outside. While she is crated she can be expected to hold it for four hours if you are gone, but while you are at home take her outside every one and a half hours. Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Crate Training" method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Shadow
Greyador
8 Months
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Shadow
Greyador
8 Months

What can I do if I startled my dog when he was going potty outside. And now he does not want to potty in front of me, therefore refusing to go potty in a designated yard area?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
875 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ramiro, Take him to the bathroom using a long leash, such as 40 feet (use a training leash that drags on the ground, not a retractable leash for this). Take him to that general area of the yard where the designated spot is but don't expect him to go right on the spot at first, we will get there gradually. Tell him to "Go Potty" and let him wander away from you on the long leash, so that he feels he has some privacy. Pretend like you are not watching him from about 20-40 feet away. When you DO see him go potty (because you really were watching from the corner of your eye), praise him enthusiastically and toss several large treats toward him as a reward. As he gets more comfortable peeing near you - because of the praise and treats, then you can gradually coil up more of the long leash over th next few days and weeks, until you have eventually coiled up all but six feet of it and are taking him directly to his potty spot on a normal 6 foot leash. For this to work you have to be very calm when you take him potty and happy when he goes potty outside. He will be less likely to go if he senses you are angry or frustrated (we all feel that way sometimes but don't show him that). Inside, do not yell at him or act frustrated if you catch him having an accident or after he had an accident. Crate train him and keep a careful potty schedule to prevent accidents in the first place. If he starts to squat to go potty inside, say, 'Ah Ah, let's go!', in a calm tone of voice and hurry him outside, with as much cheerfulness and urgency as you can (remember he is learned and not doing it to be spiteful, so treat him like a little one who simply needs to be shown). Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Since he is older you can take him potty every 3-4 hours when home, and up to 7-8 hours if you have to be at work all day (if he demonstrates he can hold it that long in the crate). After he goes potty outside, give him 2 hours of supervised freedom outside the crate inside, before placing him back in the crate until time to go potty or taking him back outside if Tethering him to yourself. If you are gone during the day, use the crate training method then, and the Tethering method in the evening when you are home to prevent accidents. Potty training article: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside The better you are about preventing accidents the quicker potty training tends to go. Clean up any accidents with a cleaner that contains enzymes because the enzymes break down things at a molecular level. Other cleaners leave scent that can encourage peeing in those spots again. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mia
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
4 Months
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Mia
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
4 Months

I’ve tried everything to get my dog to use the pee pads. The sprays that attract her, catching her midstream and placing her on the pad, pad next to the door, her urine wiped up on a paper towel and put on the pad, the fake grass pad, pads in the places where she goes. She won’t go on the pad. My expectation is for her to go on the pad when I’m at work. I don’t know what to do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
875 Dog owners recommended

Hello Julie, Follow the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Following that method will ensure that her only option is to pee on the pad since anytime she doesn't pee on the pad you will return her to the crate, then try again in thirty to forty-five minutes (or sooner if it's been a long time since she has pottied. Also, switching from a pee pad to a disposable real grass pad is easier for most dogs since it feels and smells like grass outside - since it is real grass. You may want to consider using a real grass pad instead, especially if you plan to train pup to go potty outside primarily when she is older and can hold it for longer. Use the Crate Training method to pee pad train her. Once she is used to going on the pads, then you can switch to the exercise pen method for further training - without you having to be there all the time. Crate Training method and Exercise Pen method - the methods mention a litter box, but you can use real grass pads or pee pads in place of the litter box and follow the same methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - also found on amazon: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com You can also make your own grass pad using a large, shallow plastic storage container and a piece of grass sod, cut to fit into the box. Periodically replace the grass as needed. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sparky
Mini Blue Healer
4 Months
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Sparky
Mini Blue Healer
4 Months

My puppy will not pee unless I or my wife are with him. He will go outside and poop but he will not go outside and pee. He will go outside when we tell him to go outside but he will not pee unless we go outside with him. What can I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
875 Dog owners recommended

Hello David, Honestly, you are expecting far too much of him too soon. It is normal for you to need to go with pup at this age, until almost one year of age. He is actually already doing better than most puppies at this point. Taking him on a leash to keep him focused is even normal still. Some dogs don't need to be accompanied anymore as soon as 7 months but 9 months tends to be the average for when you can simply send pup into the yard on their own and expect them to go potty. Expect to need to go with pup for at least a couple more months. If you don't go with him, he might start having more accidents inside again and slow his progression with potty training. Potty training needs to become a firm, long-term habit first, and that takes time and practice for a dog in most cases. To speed up the process, so that it doesn't take you a year, when you do take puppy potty, tell him to "Go Potty". After he goes, give a treat. If he may need to poop, tell him to "Go Potty" again and give an additional treat after he poops also. After a couple more months of potty training, you can start transition him to not needing you there, taking pup outside without a leash (if you aren't already) if your yard is fenced in. At first, stand near pup and tell him to "Go Potty", then reward him when he goes and comes back over to you afterward. Gradually stop closer and closer to your house - away from where pup goes to pee, a couple of feet at a time. Tell him to "Go Potty", letting him wander out into your yard away from you to go, then come back to you afterward for his treat. As time goes on, you will gradually go less and less far out into the yard with him, so that you are standing closer to the door to your house and he goes out into the yard to go on his own, then comes back afterward. Finally, open the door to let him outside, tell him to "Go Potty" as he is going out the door, watch him from the window, then give him a treat when he returns if he went potty while out there. If he doesn't go potty and returns to the door without going, tell him to "Go Potty" again and walk out there with him a few feet to remind him. Practice this until he no longer needs the reminder but will simply go out, go potty, then return each time he needs to go. Eventually you can phase out the treats completely and the "Go Potty" command will just be something he is expected to do without reward. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rango
Border Collie
12 Weeks
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Rango
Border Collie
12 Weeks

HI,so we are training out dog to pooty outside, but after long walks he resist and until we take him to a garden he does not pee or poo, so how we can change that as of now the garden is closed but will reopen soon and he will not be allowed to access? Can you please assist us?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
875 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brenda, Check out the Crate Training method linked below. In that method you will find tips for teaching the Go Potty command, using rewards, movement, and the crate for encouraging a pup to potty outside. When pup doesn't go potty outside, you will go back home, crate pup for 45 minutes- 1 hour, then try taking pup again, repeating that process until pup finally goes potty outside, and is then rewarded with praise and treats for doing so to help pup learn to go faster in the future. The idea behind this method is to only give pup the option of pottying outside - pup is only given freedom in the house while their bladder is empty. At first, expect to take pup out very often until pup gets comfortable with pottying outside quickly, and is more motivated to go quick by having learned the Go Potty command and being given treats for doing so. If pup seems nervous while in the new potty area, also simply spend time hanging outside relaxing or playing fun games with pup on a 6 foot or long leash, to help pup relax while in that area so they are not hesitant to potty there. Crate Training method for potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If pup isn't crate trained, check out the Surprise method from the article linked below also. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Korra
Bichon Frise
1 Day
0 found helpful
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Korra
Bichon Frise
1 Day

She barks at every little noise

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, congratulations on your new dog. Yes, this breed does like to bark - and as well, if you just got her, she will be nervous and tend to bark more. All of the methods here are good for teaching a pup not to bark.https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark, Try the Desensitize Method as a starting point. Lots of positive reinforcement and reward based training will encourage Korra to do her best. Make sure she has a crate or bed where she can go to rest and as well, give her lots of exercise in the form of a few walks per day. She'll focus her energy elsewhere and have less time to bark. Make sure she has mentally stimulating toys like an interactive feeder to keep her entertained sometimes, resulting in less barking, too. Good luck!

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Korra
Bichon Frise
7 Years
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Korra
Bichon Frise
7 Years

She won't stop scratching surfaces to get us to give her food.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, if Korra is used to getting food when she scratches, it will take patience and consistency to change the habit. You'll have to ignore the behavior and not give in. The other option is to provide her with an interactive feeder that can give her mental stimulation and allow her to have a snack at the same time. The feeder will have her working for the food, and she'll get a reward for a positive activity as opposed to scratching. When she scratches, is it near meal time? Or often at other times during the day? You could also spread her meals out into 3 small meals as opposed to two. If the consistent hunger is a new behavior, get a vet check up to rule out an illness (like diabetes.) All the best!

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Theodore
Siberian Husky
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Theodore
Siberian Husky
1 Year

We got our boy from my bf parents whom raised him. We are having difficulty getting him to potty outside alone. He is used to being on a leash to potty and used to potty inside at my bfs parents. We've only had a few accidents inside but he just refuses to be outside alone.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
229 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use the crate to help with potty training. This information is written for puppies, but the procedure is exactly the same for training an adult dog who doesn't quite know where to go potty. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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