How to Train Your Small Dog to Like a Rabbit

Hard
4-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Traditionally dogs are predators, rabbits are prey, and specifically, rabbits are prey for dogs. They are a natural food source for canines and their wild cousins. What if you have a pet rabbit and a pet dog?  Is there any hope of your dog becoming “friends” with your rabbit? Will you be able to socialize them and let them loose together? 

Many dogs and rabbits share homes together quite amicably. But whether your dog and rabbit will be able to be loose together and enjoy companionship depends on your dog and, to some degree, your rabbit. Dogs that are extremely prey motivated, or from breeds recently crossed with wild canine cousins, such as coyotes or wolves, are not good candidates as bunny buddies! 

However, most dogs can be taught to respect their rabbit housemates. Even a Labrador cross farm dog, Bella, who would happily chase and kill a jackrabbit in her field, has been trained so that she carefully steps over her mistress’s pet bunny, sitting on the living room floor, and quietly goes to her bed in the corner, leaving the family bunny unmolested. Bella may be an exceptional case, as she will chase wild rabbits, but not her family's tame one. Most dogs cohabitating with rabbits are trained not to chase rabbits at all, and this is usually how best success occurs in establishing rabbit and dog roommates!

Defining Tasks

Before training your pet dog to get along with your pet rabbit, who is naturally a prey animal to your dog, it is important that your dog is obedient, that he listens well to your commands and responds to you, and that your dog recognizes you as the pack leader. Dogs perceive the world through their rigid social structure, which is hierarchical and includes a pack leader and pack members of varying ranks. You will want to establish that you're the pack leader and that your rabbit is a member of the pack, along with your dog, in order to be able to let your dog and rabbit safely in contact with each other.  

You can start training your young dog to get along with your rabbit, but a puppy may have limited self-control. Although he may not be intentionally aggressive towards your rabbit, roughhousing and chewing can be difficult to control for a puppy and can injure your rabbit, so use caution with young dogs. An older dog may have more control over behavior. Also, using a confident bunny helps; a rabbit that always shows fear or runs away will not be useful at teaching your dog not to chase or view the rabbit as a prey object.

Getting Started

Be sure to supervise closely at all times when introducing a rabbit and dog together, to protect the rabbit's safety. Using a leash and a cage or barrier is usually necessary to control the situation until success socializing your two pets occurs.  Treats can be used to reward calm non-aggressive behavior in your dog around the bunny. Be sure you have a strong relationship with your dog, that he sees you as his leader, and responds to your commands and direction before attempting to teach your dog to socialize with an animal that he would otherwise see as prey. This strong relationship is necessary to help him establish an alternate way of relating to the rabbit and turn your bunny into a buddy, not an appetizer!

The Introduce Slowly Method

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Step
1
Introduce in cage
Put your rabbit in his cage in the middle of the floor and keep your dog on a leash so you have control of your dog. Slowly approach the cage and allow your dog to investigate. A bunny will usually feel safer in his cage, and if the rabbit is well socialized will probably not show fear of your dog. If he does, finding a bunny to borrow that is less fearful may be useful for training.
Step
2
Reward calm
If your dog stays calm while investigating, talk calmly and praise him, give him treats.
Step
3
Correct aggression
If your dog barks, paws at the cage or reacts aggressively, correct him by tapping him on the side and distracting him. Move your dog further away until he is calm and then approach the cage again. Say “gentle” when your dog is quiet and calm with the rabbit.
Step
4
Hold rabbit
When your dog is quiet around the rabbit in the cage, take the rabbit out of the cage and hold him while your dog investigates. Have an assistant hold the rabbit so you can control your dog on-leash. Reward gentle behavior, correct aggressive behavior. Create space when needed.
Step
5
Let loose supervised
Gradually move to playing with the bunny on the ground, and if your dog reacts calmly, remove leash and allow the rabbit and dog to move around together, supervise closely.
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The Make a Pack Method

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Step
1
Put rabbit in rolling cage
Dogs like to travel in packs. Your dog forms a pack with you, other people, and other animals that walk alongside him. Put your rabbit in a small rolling cage, available at pet stores, or put a small cage with your rabbit in it on an open wagon, so your dog can see the rabbit.
Step
2
Walk with dog
Go out on a walk in a safe location. Be sure other large, aggressive dogs will not be present, that may get out of control and attack your rabbit in the cage. Control the situation. Walk your dog alongside your rabbit in the cage frequently.
Step
3
Carry rabbit
If possible, have a reliable child ride in the wagon holding the rabbit on a leash to increase exposure during walks or carry your rabbit while on a harness and leash. This will help your dog see your rabbit as a pack member part of his traveling group.
Step
4
Introduce after walk
Start introducing your dog to your rabbit after walks in a quiet location with your dog on leash and the rabbit held on a leash. Supervise closely. Tell your dog to lie down at first, until the rabbit becomes accustomed to your dog.
Step
5
Allow to socialize
Eventually let your dog and rabbit move around together, if they are comfortable together you can let them off leash, in an enclosed safe area while supervised, to socialize together.
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The Create Submission Method

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Step
1
Tire and expose
Exercise your dog so that he is tired and ready for quiet time. Expose your dog to your rabbit while your rabbit is in the cage on the floor. Praise calm behavior, correct aggressive or excited behavior.
Step
2
Have dog lie down
Once your dog is calm around your rabbit in the cage, have your dog lie down next to the cage door on his side. This is a submissive position. You are teaching your dog that he is not dominant over the rabbit.
Step
3
Allow rabbit access
Open the cage door and allow the rabbit to come out and investigate your dog at his own pace. Do not force the bunny out.
Step
4
Allow investigation
If your dog is remaining calm, allow your dog to lift his head and sniff or investigate the bunny, but insist he remains lying down, and allow the bunny to move around freely. Give your dog lots of praise and attention for being still and calm. Repeat frequently for several days. This stage will take significant time for your rabbit to become comfortable approaching the dog, and your dog to learn not to react to the rabbit.
Step
5
Increase exposure
Eventually allow your rabbit and dog to move around together. Always supervise and insist your dog lie down if he shows signs of wanting to play aggressively. Reward your dog when lying down in the presence of the rabbit, so your dog recognizes this as a pleasant experience and does not feel frustrated and reprimanded constantly.
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Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Debbie
Parson jack russel cross staffy
4 Years
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Question
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Debbie
Parson jack russel cross staffy
4 Years

I’ve just got Debbie today and I’m trying to settle her in, my rabbits are inside and I don’t think Debbie has seen a rabbit before as soon as I brought her in the house she went straight to the cage trying to get in so I’ve put the rabbits outside while Debbie settles in ...what can I do x

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Abby, I suggest following the "Introduce Slowly" method and keeping the animals separated when you are not able to train - to prevent Debbie from bothering them, breaking into the cage, or increasing her aggression toward them - which would make training a lot harder. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-rabbit Be very careful and get Debbie used to wearing a basket muzzle while also on a leash, if needed. If you are not seeing some progress within two weeks doing the training, I suggest hiring a professional trainer to help you. This type of training can be delicate - especially with older sogs who were not raised with such animals. Be aware that there are some dogs who can never adjust due to a strong prey drive that would be too dangerous for the prey animals to always manage in the same household. A trainer should also be able to evaluate Debbie in that area, once the training begins based on how she is responding to the training and her body language around the rabbits. Do not trust her around the rabbits yet though. Left on her own right now she likely would kill them because they are still just prey to her. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Foxy
Pomeranian
1 Year
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Question
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Foxy
Pomeranian
1 Year

Hello, my Foxy is so sweet, and my rabbit, Yvonnie, likes to follow her around the house, interrupt her naps and play with her whenever I let her out. Sometimes they are nice together and lay together and play, but sometimes Foxy starts to get annoyed and growl, which doesn’t seem to bother the bunny at all! But it bothers my dog occasionally. What’s the best approach when she starts to get aggressive? She nips at Yvonnie but never bites. She paws her sometimes and I don’t want it to potentially go too far

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Quinn, I suggest treating the bunny like a puppy with an older dog. To help an older dog get along with a puppy it's important to advocate for the older dog and manage the interactions, so that the older dog doesn't feel overwhelmed and like they need to be the one to discipline and control the puppy. When you remove some of the stress of being constantly pestered, then many older dogs start to relax around puppies. Essentially, manage the interactions between Foxy and the bunny. When you notice that Foxy wants to be left alone, instead of waiting for her to start growling at your bunny or trying to escape, make the bunny leave the area where Foxy is. You may want to set up a comfortable area for Foxy where the bunny cannot follow or use a baby gate or exercise pen to keep the bunny away from her during these times. You can discipline the aggressive displays firmly but gently, but it sounds like the bunny is really the issue and Foxy simply needs her own space some times. If Foxy feels like she can depend on you to take care of things and protect her when she wants to be left alone, then she will likely feel less stressed about the bunny's presence and can enjoy her more when she feels like playing or spending time with her. Reducing the stress can help keep the aggression from escalating. You can also reward Foxy when the bunny enters the room initially and for being tolerant of the bunny's presence, so that the bunny is associated with good things in her mind. When the bunny leaves, stop the rewards. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Finley
Yorkshire Terrier
9 Weeks
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Question
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Finley
Yorkshire Terrier
9 Weeks

Hello I have a house rabbit and a New puppy he is half the time very calm around the rabbit of ignoring. However when he wants to play he tries to chase the bunny. I call him over and give him a treat every time he ignores the bunny is this the right thing to do? Will he eventually be calm all the time around the bunny

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ruth, Rewarding him for being calm around the bunny is great. That is half the picture. You can also gently correct him for trying to chase the bunny. I would keep a drag leash on him or keep him attached to yourself with a leash while you are home. Whenever he tries to chase the bunny, tell him "Ah Ah" and give a gentle tug of the leash. When he ignores the bunny or is calm while interacting with the bunny, calmly praise him and give a treat. When you reward and correct, remember that he is still learning, you are telling him yes do this, and no don't do that to help him learn the rules of your home while young. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Biha
Mixed breed
1 Month
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Question
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Biha
Mixed breed
1 Month

I've had a free roam house rabbit for two years now and she's very aggressive when new people/animals enter the home. Thinking this behavior was out of loneliness, I got her a baby bunny which ended terribly...I ended up giving away the bunny. Fast forward...I recently adopted a 1 mo. pup who is very calm and who I think would make a great friend for my rabbit, but my rabbit has already exhibited aggressive behavior. What do I do ?! :(

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maria Check out the following articles. I am not a rabbit trainer or behaviorist but the following articles might give some insight. https://rabbit.org/faq-aggression/ http://www.therabbithouse.com/behaviour/problem-aggressive-rabbit.asp https://www.wikihow.com/Address-Biting-and-Aggressive-Behavior-in-a-Rabbit crate train puppy and teach the Leave It command and Out command for puppy to teach puppy to give your rabbit space so he will feel less threatened by your dog. You will likely need to confine puppy and rabbit more, so that your bunny can't charge pup but can still get accustomed to his smell and scent from across the room. Rotate using a baby gate to keep bunny in certain areas, and an exercise pen for puppy while your rabbit is free roaming. Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Leave It method for teaching Leave It command to pup: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I am not experienced with bunnies but most animals can be trained using clicker training and positive reinforcement. You might want to train bunny to associate the clicker or a certain word like "Good!" with a food reward when puppy is not present. Once bunny associates that cue with something good, then click and give a reward whenever puppy is near your bunny and bunny is not acting aggressive yet, or you rabbit gets close to puppy's pen without being territorial and aggressive. Basically reward your rabbit whenever she is calm and tolerant of pup but not while she is acting aggressively - since whatever you click and reward is the behavior you generally get more of. Per the articles linked above's suggestions, you may want to consult your veterinarian about whether your rabbit's behavior could be medical or hormonal and could be addressed in those areas. (I am not a vet) Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Snorkel
Beagle
8 Years
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Question
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Snorkel
Beagle
8 Years

We rescued our dog almost two years ago. My rabbits had been staying at my parents while my husband and I built an indoor enclosure for them. When I go in to feed them, my dog barks outside the plexiglass doors and sometimes jumps on the doors, scratching. She is ok when they are in their cages but the goal is to allow them to have full access to the enclosure out of their cages. I know beagles were bred for rabbit hunting, is there hope for us? I don’t necessarily want them to meet close up, I just want to be able to spend time with them and for my dog to be calm while I’m doing it.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Renee, There is hope. I wouldn't expect her to be able to be close off leash around them and safe but expecting her to be calm around them from a distance is possible in most cases. With dogs that have a high prey drive it can involve low level remote collar training though - to teach the dog to avoid the rabbits and simply walk away when she is too tempted by them. The prey drive can't be removed but by teaching avoidance you can often teach a dog to keep themselves from becoming overly aroused (where it's hard to control themselves) by managing themselves better...I.e. avoiding looking or walking away or giving more distance - the dog learns to manage how they behave to keep themselves calmer. Check out the videos linked below for several examples of how this is done. Because it involves remote collar training I do suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced with e-collar (remote training collar) training and teaching things like avoidance on a dog's "Working level" - which is the lowest level a dog will respond to the collar at - making the training gentler. Also, only use a high quality collar for this. A good collar generally has at least 20-60 levels (not 3) so that you can find the lowest level your dog responds to, to make the training gentler and more effective. Check out the following videos below: Fitting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Finding the Working level: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Good remote collar brands: Garmin Dogtra SportDog E-Collar technologies - the mini educator model Teaching avoidance information and examples: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MLJV5PBh7Y More e-collar work with the same dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8lkbX0dhT0 More in-depth on avoidance: Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Dexter
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
3 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Dexter
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
3 Years

Hello, we are currently in the process of adopting a dog from the shelter who has been abused. He's very loving and a little nervous. I have 2 house rabbits a home, who are used to ruling the roost! My girl is very nervous and my boy is very chilled. We are so worried that they may never be able to live in the same house and I am asking for your opinion before I go through with this because the bunny's were here first so if I am going to be putting them in major danger I won't be able to adopt this doggy. I just wish in some world they would all be friends but however I am willing to put the work in. I have hard some horror stories. Are staffy's capable of loving bunny's? and are bunny's capable of loving them back?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
416 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rachael, There are two main things I would consider when making this decision. First, is either bunny territorial toward other people or animals? Second, what is pup's prey drive like? If the bunnies are territorial and/or pup has a high prey drive either or those things can be a big problem. Ask the rescue a lot of questions about how pup is around other animals like squirrels and cats. If pup has high prey drive, then if it was me I personally wouldn't adopt that particular dog with free-roaming bunnies in the home. You can management prey drive and territorial aggression but you can't remove them completely. Some dogs are very laid back, regardless of breed norms. This dog could be a dog with very little prey drive, who is submissive and laid back and things would be fine with the right management and training. If the rescue can't offer insight into pup's prey drive and temperament, then I suggest asking to do a two-week trial period with pup - to evaluate his prey drive and see if during two weeks the animals can make progress together, and especially how fixated he is on the bunnies and whether the bunnies are territorial and aggressive toward him. Even making pup for the day to place like pet stores and parks and watching his reaction around small animals may offer some insight - although this definitely not a definitive test. If the two weeks go really well, then with lots of training and careful management they may learn to coexist peacefully together. If things don't go well and you have the time, you may want to consider adopting a puppy instead, who can be raised with the bunnies; choosing a breed that typically has lower prey drive would also be important - although there are exceptions to standards within individual dogs. With a puppy you can't assume you have the exception while they are still little and you don't know yet though. Whatever you end up doing, make sure pup is on a leash and a harness or collar he can't slip out of or pull away from you from to keep everyone safe if you bring him home where the bunnies are. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Thank you for this information. We have decided not to take the risk, because the rescue are not 100% of his background, and he has been known to chase cats. We do not want to take the chance. Very unfortunate as he is a lovely boy, but it's not fair on anyone really - buns and dog included. We are now waiting for a dog who has lived with small animals. I believe the right one will come along :) Thanks again.

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