How to Train Your Boston Terrier Dog to Not Bark

Medium
1-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Nothing beats the first few weeks of having a new dog in your home. If they’re a puppy, you just want to cuddle them all day long. Boston Terriers, in particular, are small, sharp and lively. They make the ideal addition to a home. However, despite him being less than a couple of feet from the ground he may well have a surprisingly loud bark. To start with, it was entertaining but now it’s getting to be a bit much. It’s also putting a strain on your relationship with the neighbors. A dog that barks makes bringing new people to the house uncomfortable, too.

Training your vocal companion not to bark will solve a world of problems. You’ll be able to relax and get an undisturbed night's sleep and you won’t need to worry when you introduce him to new pets and friends. 

Defining Tasks

Training a dog not to bark can be challenging, especially if you’re unsure what the cause is. Boston Terriers are usually very friendly, so putting your finger on the problem can be even more confusing. Once you have identified the problem, you can set to work remedying it. You’ll need to use a number of measures to teach your pooch the ropes. You can also train him to be ‘quiet’ on command. This can be a very effective way to silence the barking habit. To do that, you’ll need the right incentive. Most Boston Terriers will do pretty much anything for food, so that will be essential.

If he’s a puppy, he should be a fast learner and you could see results in just a week. If he’s old and a tad stubborn, be prepared to invest several weeks into training. Get this right and you’ll have your peaceful and relaxing evenings back.

Getting Started

Before you can start work you’ll need to collect a few items for training. You will need a stockpile of treats or your dog's favorite food broken into small chunks. A safe dental stick will come in handy, too. The more your pooch loves the food, the quicker you may see results.

Then, you’ll need to set aside 10 minutes each day for training. Try and find a time where you won’t be distracted by noisy kids charging around, or other dogs waiting to play.

Remember to praise often, and wear a smile. Once you have all of that, you just need to bring patience and perhaps some earplugs, then you’re all set!

The Environment Method

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Step
1
Exercise and fun
Your Boston Terrier may be barking because he’s full of energy. Take him for a long walk each day, or throw a ball for him while you walk. The short sprints will quickly tire him out. If he’s blown off all his steam, he will spend the evenings napping rather than making a racket.
Step
2
Bathroom breaks
Make sure your Boston Terrier gets to go out for a pee break regularly. Some dogs bark because they are trying to draw your attention to a problem. So, take him out first thing in the morning and last thing before bed. Also, make sure he goes out promptly after meals.
Step
3
Water & food
Make sure your dog's water bowl is full and he’s getting the correct amount of food. You can also check he hasn’t got any visible signs of illness. The barking could be a cry for help because he’s in pain. If you do find something, swiftly take him to the vet.
Step
4
Cold shoulder
If he keeps barking and all his needs are met then you shouldn’t pander to his barking. If you respond to him then you’re telling him barking is the way to get what he wants. Instead, turn around and don’t say a word to him.
Step
5
Reward
When your Boston Terrier stops barking you can turn back around and give him a treat. You’re now giving him an incentive to stop barking. Over time this will help him kick his own habit without him even realizing what he’s doing.
Recommend training method?

The Do's and Don'ts Method

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Step
1
Do: have a good attitude
Training any dog to change a behavior is a challenge. So, come with the right mindset and work with your pup in a positive way.
Step
2
Don't: reward at the wrong time
Remember, you never give a barking dog a treat as a way to quiet him down. Doing so will register as, "when I bark, I get a treat."
Step
3
Do: earn the reward
Plan to give a high-value reward, such as a chew stick. When you think you are in a situation that will end up with a bark fest, be proactive and give your pup the reward, but only after having him earn it by obeying the "sit" or "down" command.
Step
4
Don't: use training aids that are inappropriate
You've chosen to get a dog, and dogs do bark. If you are trying to lessen the barking, work with patience, not with methods or aids that scare your pup into worse behavior.
Step
5
Do: allow play time
Make sure your dog gets enough attention from you each day. Some Boston Terriers bark for attention, so make sure you set aside 5 minutes a couple of times a day for playing with him. You can play tug of war, or you can just sit and stroke him.
Recommend training method?

The Quiet Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Monitor your pooch
Spend a couple of days watching your dog to see what it is that causes him to bark. Most Boston Terriers bark at the same things. While you’re preparing his meals or when you’re getting ready to take him out for a walk are likely occasions.
Step
2
Quiet is the way
Now, put him in one of those situations and wait for him to stop barking. As soon as he stops barking, issue a ‘quiet’ command. Really try and give the command as quickly as you can when your dog falls silent. Over time he’ll learn to associate the command with being quiet. You can use any word or phrase you like for the instruction.
Step
3
Reward time
Once you’ve given the command and your little companion has stopped barking, you can hand over a tasty treat. The better the treat, the more likely he’ll be to respond to your instruction next time. You can shower him in verbal praise, too.
Step
4
Bring the command forward
Practice this for a few days. Now the word will mean something to your dog, so you can start giving it to him when he’s still barking. He will know the command and falling silent brings food, and that will be motivation enough.
Step
5
Consistency is key
Issue the ‘quiet’ command whenever your Boston Terrier barks over the next few weeks. You must be as consistent as possible and react every time. If you always silence him, he will break his own habit over time. Your work will be done and you can finally remove those earplugs.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Badger
Boston Terrier
8 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Badger
Boston Terrier
8 Years

Every time I take him out he starts whining and making almost a screaming sound. The other day we took him to the pet store and when he saw another dog he started doing a high pitched bark, when I pulled him away and kept telling him no he wouldn’t stop. I even tried taking him to a different isle and he would still whine a little bit. I don’t know how to get him to stop!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
92 Dog owners recommended

Hello, is Badger new to your family? Or is this a newly acquired behavior? You may want to take Badger to dog training to help him get exposed to being around other dogs (let the trainer know beforehand so they know that Badger will need help in class). Also, this excellent article is extensive and will give you many tips on how to make your dog feel more comfortable on outings. There is a section "How do you Socialize a Dog With Another Dog?". Please read the entire article and look for the tips on interacting with other dogs. I am sure the information will help! https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-socialize-a-shy-dog/. Walk Badger often, and try the Passing Approach Method as described here to help him feel more at ease: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs. Keep trying; it will be the best thing for Badger - constant exposure even though it may be hard at first. If you have friends with dogs, ask them to meet you often for walks as that will help, too. All the best to you and Badger!

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Question
Lucy
Boston Terrier
3 Years
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Question
0 found helpful
Lucy
Boston Terrier
3 Years

When my dog meets a new dog, one that is older she will bark and sounds very aggressive but she isnt at all. Other dog owners usually get scared because she sounds aggressive but i know she is just being playful. If the other dog is much larger/ bigger then sometimes she does it as a way to get them to back off because she knows that she is smaller and that they could hurt her, but she would never actually hurt anyone. How can i get her to stop doing this? Ive heard boston terriers are just very vocal dogs, is that just something i need to let her do? Is this an okay thing?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
706 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nikki, If Lucy is simply barking because she is exciting and is not being rude toward you by pulling, jumping, or ignoring commands, then it is not a harmful behavior if she is otherwise very friendly. It's is a mark of her excitement and personality. Because it scares other dog owners away I would suggest working on it though. I suggest teaching her a "Quiet" command and after she has learned that command, take some treats, go to a park with other dogs around - at a distance at first, and practice "Quiet" with her. If she stops barking when you say to - give her a treat. If she looks at another dog and stays quiet - give her a treat. If she in some other way behaves calmly or focuses on you instead of the dogs - give her a treat. You want to reward her for being quiet, for paying attention to you, and for being calm. This will take practice for her to build the amount of self-control she needs to have to stay quiet during an actual interaction so you will have to practice this regularly where there are other dogs around. Just like teaching your dog to "come", you have to work up to your dog being able to do it around distractions too. If she doesn't stop barking, then practice a heel with her to get her attention back on you. Make the heel like a drill-sergent exercise - with lots of turns and changes in pace so that she really has to focus on you. Check out the "Heel" article that I have linked below and follow the "Turns" method for that. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Check out the article that I have linked below and follow the "Quiet" method to teach her what "Quiet" means. Once she knows "Quiet", then practice around distractions, starting with easy distractions like far dogs or people and working up to harder ones like other dogs as she improves. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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