How to Train Your Bull Terrier Dog to Not Bite

Medium
2-8 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

To you. he’s the cuddliest and cutest thing you’ve ever seen. He doesn’t argue back and he loves you unconditionally. He’d also never cause you any harm intentionally. However, your Bull Terrier's nature can be extremely protective. Recently, he’s tried to bite at your new partner when he’s come too close. He also occasionally displays signs of aggression and biting behavior at other dogs when they get too close to you. This behavior could be seriously problematic. If he gets into a habit of biting, he could cause someone serious harm. Not only could this result in expensive medical bills, but worst-case scenario, he could have to be put down.

Getting a handle on this behavior is essential. Fortunately, Bull Terrier dogs are, on the whole, well-tempered and easy to train. So, all is not lost. Getting this training right could even save him from serious injury if he gets into a fight with another dog.

Defining Tasks

Because Bull Terriers are so receptive, you can definitely train this biting behavior out of him. To do so though, you’ll need to take a number of steps to deter him from biting altogether. You’ll also have to react quickly and firmly when you do see any worrying signs. Part of training will also require you to direct his energy elsewhere. With the right incentive, you’ll soon see results.

Bull Terrier puppies are particularly energetic and responsive. This means you could see results in just a couple of weeks. If he’s older and this habit has developed over many years, then you may need a couple of months to fully break the habit. Succeed with this training though, and you won’t have to be on edge when you meet new people and pets. You also won’t have to worry about leaving him with the kids.

Getting Started

Before you start training, you’ll need to get your hands on a few things. You’ll need some treats or your pooch's favorite food broken into small pieces. Some toys and food puzzles will also be needed for one of the methods. The main component though, will be time. You need to be on hand to monitor and react to your Bull Terrier's behavior as much as possible. 

Bring a positive mindset and a willingness to work alongside your independent pooch. Once you have all of those things, you just need patience and an optimistic attitude. Then, work can begin!

The Time Out Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
React
When your Bull Terrier bites or displays any signs of aggression, you need to react quickly. Take him by the collar and lead him out of the room. Shut him in a room for 30 seconds. Make sure there are no toys in there for him to play with. Say nothing as you take him out.
Step
2
Release him
Once the 30 seconds are up you can release your dog from the room and allow him to rejoin you. Try not to get him worked up and keep him calm when he’s back with you. Just make sure you keep a close eye on him in case the behavior resurfaces.
Step
3
Increase the sentence
If he bites again, then repeat exactly the same procedure. However, this time leave him in his time out room for an extra 30 seconds. Once the time is up you can bring him back in again. Add 30 seconds onto his sentence each time he bites until he gets the message. He’ll soon catch on.
Step
4
Boundaries
If the biting usually happens around certain individuals or kids, then you need to address how they’re behaving around him. Don’t let them play around his mouth, for example, and make sure they’re giving him enough space.
Step
5
Encouragement
Make sure you show him how happy you are when he plays calmly. You can talk in an upbeat voice and give him the occasional treat. This combination of positive and negative reinforcement will swiftly show him what is and isn’t acceptable.
Recommend training method?

The Positive Encouragement Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Exercise
Bull Terriers need lots of exercise. Those that don’t get enough can act out in any number of ways, such as biting. So, make sure he gets a good, long walk each day. You can also throw a tennis ball as you go. The short sprinting will tire him out. This could help release that pent-up energy.
Step
2
Tug of war
Spend a few minutes each day playing tug of war with him. This is an effective, controlled environment for him to release any aggression. Make sure to end each session on a positive note, otherwise, he’ll soon give up playing.
Step
3
Give him space
Make sure he has his own space he can escape to. Bull Terrier puppies can often feel overwhelmed, especially if kids are always trying to play with them. So, if he retreats to his crate or bed, let him have some alone time.
Step
4
Reward
Make sure you reward gentle play. That means giving him the odd treat when you're stroking him and he remains calm. If he associates gentle play with food he’ll have a serious motivation to remain relaxed.
Step
5
Attention
Make sure he gets enough attention each day. If he spends long periods of time on his own then he may get agitated and frustrated. The biting could be attention-seeking behavior. So, dedicate a few minutes each day to giving him the love he needs.
Recommend training method?

The Do's and Don'ts Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Do: seek help if your dog is at all aggressive
Trying to train your Bull Terrier if you really aren't aware of triggers and how to react isn't wise. Seek the help of a professional trainer if needed. Don't make the situation worse.
Step
2
Don't: ignore the problem
Your feisty Bull Terrier likes to be included in all things. If he is becoming a biter, don't ignore the issue. Don't let him bite without you letting him know it hurts. Give a vocal "ouch!" to deter him from thinking it is all in play.
Step
3
Don't: lose patience
Never strike your pooch. Your dog will begin to fear you and the added anxiety may bring on more biting.
Step
4
Do: provide toys and outlets for play
Rather than roughhouse with your dog with your hands and feet, throw a frisbee for fun or teach your dog agility skills. This is a good outlet for extra energy.
Step
5
Don't: make quick movements
Moving your hand or arm away quickly may indicate game-on. Instead, fold your hands to let your dog know you are not interested in being bitten.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Ivory
Bull Terrier
5 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ivory
Bull Terrier
5 Weeks

Ik shes still small but around what age do they start listening to no biting?Is it cause she's teething?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bonine, The biting is partially related to teething, it is also how puppies learn to control the pressure of their mouths so that they are safer during play or a fight. It is also a way they communicate with other dogs. It varies how soon it improves, some puppies aren't very mouthy, some stop around 4-5 months of age when they are finished teething, some get worse again for a while around 7-9 months when their jaws start to develop and are sore (this is also a heavy destructive chewing age). Puppies need help learning how to use their mouths appropriately. I usually aim to have puppies stop by the time they reach 5 months - because their jaws get stronger then. Check out the article linked below and the Bite Inhibition method and leave It method. I typically recommend the Bite Inhibition method for puppies younger than three months and the Leave It method for puppies 3 months and up or in general. You can use both also. Bite Inhibition method and Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Ivory's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Noser
Mini bull terrier
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Noser
Mini bull terrier
10 Weeks

We had him for two days, we can't play with him due to his biting us hand arms legs ankle. It's not nibble or chewing but bites. He also bites his cage. He isn't interest in chew toys etc. I've tried holding him done until he relaxes but as soon as I let go he kninda goes into a biting frenzy lunging out at any part of my body and clothes. His health history, he was born with Clif palent and has 2 surgeries that weren't successful. He has been by his self since he stopped nursing.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hi, It sounds like the behavior might be meant as puppy mouthing but because of his oral stuff and lack of interaction with other puppies he doesn't have bite inhibition - which is where a puppy learns to control the pressure of his bite to make it gentler during play. If he seems aggressive - intending to harm on purpose, and not just wound up and too rough, then I would definitely hire a trainer because aggression at that age is very unusual and needs to be addressed ASAP by someone who has a ton of experience with aggression, great client reviews from those who have had that issue, and uses both positive reinforcement and fair correction - with a lot of emphasis on addressing underlying issues too. Puppy biting that looks more like tantrums, overly excited play, rough housing, and curiosity is 100% normal even if it hurts and still needs to be addressed. A dog that is lunging for your face, coming at you with a definite intent to harm you, and acting out of rage is not normal at this age. Some dogs have a strong defense drive and part of what that means is that when you apply physical pressure, like penning down, their natural response is to fight back and resist the pressure, instead of run away, give into it, or calm down. Dogs with strong defense drives do better with gaining their respect through consistency and things that stimulate their minds to think. There are certain commands you can teach to help earn a dog's respect through mental stimulation instead of a lot of physical stimulation - these methods still may involve correction but the correction is less physical and also combined with positive reinforcement once the dog does a correct behavior instead. Check out the articles linked below for some good commands to teach him to help with the rowdiness and lack of impulse control: Out - which means leave the area - great for biting. Be sure to read the entire article for different ways to use it in certain scenarios, and how to teach it: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It command - Leave It method to build impulse control: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Place command - work up to him being able to stay on place for an hour: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners - staying in an open crate to build impulse control and calmness while you are home: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds - building his respect for your space: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method - also helps build spacial awareness, respect and calmness: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Try placing his dog food into a container and covering it with water, letting it sit out until the food turns into mush, mixing a little peanut butter, cheese or liver paste into it (avoid Xylitol in peanut butter - it's toxic to dogs), then loosely stuffing a hollow chew toy with it. You can also freeze the toy if it's too easy for him to get the food out, and make several ahead of time if you plan to freeze. Many puppies need to be taught to chew on chew toys - this is done by using hollow chew toys and feeding your pup his meals in them, making them extra enticing with a bit of liver, cheese, or peanut butter if extra incentive is needed. It takes time to chew toy train. A good time to do it is in the crate or while he is on Place and can't leave - while he is bored and that's his only entertainment option. If he still won't take interest in chew toys, then check out something like Pet Tutor or Auto Trainer - a treat dispensing device that rewards certain calm behaviors by occasionally dispensing a piece of dog food. Puzzle toys are also good. If he isn't already, crate train him! This is extremely important for him especially. It sounds like he needs to practice things that give him an opportunity to learn to self-sooth, self-entertain, be calm, and relax. Place, crate training, and staying in the crate with the door open too are good ways to help him learn those skills. When many puppies get really tired they will actually bite a lot more - when he has an especially hard time listening, then he may need some rest-time in a crate or exercise pen. Check out the Surprise method linked below for introducing a crate. Expect a couple weeks of protesting. Many dogs adjust in 3 days, but up to 2 weeks of adjusting it normal - STAY CONSISTENT. Don't let him out unless he needs to go potty or is quiet for just a second (doesn't have to be long but catch him when he's quiet so that he is being rewarded with freedom for quietness and not noise). Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Finally, because of his past there is a chance that he has a really bad association with being touched or handled. If you find this is the case, then work on desensitizing him to touch and handling - it's a great thing for all dogs to practice as an aggression preventative too. Use his daily meal kibble for this. For example, touch an ear- give a treat. Touch a paw - give a treat. Touch a tail - give a treat. Touch his shoulder - give a treat. Hold his collar and give a treat. Start by giving the treat at the same time you touch him, then as he improves touch first, then give the treat. Start by touching areas he is most comfortable with first, like his shoulder, and gradually work toward areas that he is less comfortable with - like his tail, being especially gentle and focusing a lot of your efforts on touching those areas he struggles with to help him relax. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Noser's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Oakley
Bull Terrier
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Oakley
Bull Terrier
9 Weeks

my Bull terrier is 9 weeks old and his biting is out of control he latches on and tugs as hard as possible I have tried no getting up walking away yelping and even time out but nothing seems to be working help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Angela, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method (which you are already essentially doing). BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Oakley's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Obie
Miniature Bull Terrier
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Obie
Miniature Bull Terrier
8 Weeks

Obie is showing signs of aggression one minute he’s playing the next he’s jumping biting and locked onto fingers, hands socks whatever he can get at. He growls and is relentless on his attack. I put him away and ignore as per advice but it seems to be getting worse than better?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mel, What you are describing does not sound like true aggression (although I am not there to witness), what is most likely going on is that pup is trying to rough house with you like he would with another puppy and lacks impulse control and bite inhibition - which is what he needs to learn. Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Yelp" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method - found in the same article linked below. As soon as pup is good at the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the "Pressure" method from the article below to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the yelp method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to look for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Obie's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Coco
English Bulldog
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Coco
English Bulldog
1 Year

How can I stop my dog from bitting? She's starting to be a bit aggressive to the family at home. She sees them everyday, and while i'm at work they feed her, but she's tried attacking them.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maria, It sounds like it's time to hire a professional trainer. During this time, many trainers offer Skype and remote training. Check out Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training. You need someone who is very experienced with aggression, who can ask more detailed questions about pup and the bites, then tailor a training plan to you, based on what they learn during your sessions. The issue could be resource guarding, a lack of respect, fear or trauma, or a number of other things. How you train will depend on when and why the bites are happening. Certain precautions will also need to be taken during training, depending on the details of pup's aggression. Things such as back tie leashes to provide safe distance while working on things like desensitization or resource guarding, a basket muzzle pup is desensitized to using treats ahead of time - to keep you safe while working on exercises that build respect, like a structured heel, Off, Out, Leave It, ect... Or a crate while desensitizing pup to the movement of kids if that's the issue. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Coco's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Chapo
English bullterrier
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Chapo
English bullterrier
9 Months

I have a aggressive bull terrier which started towards my husband but is now my other female bull terrier and myself. It’s usually indoors when we are on the sofa and now anywhere near food.
He paces up and down, pants and drinks a lot. The growl is scary and he had bitten my husband and last night he bit me. Something just takes over him. I love him so much but I don’t know what else to do. We have children and I can’t let them near him inside the house and my 3 year old bitch avoids him at any cost!
We had him neutered a week ago and he’s gotten worse since. Outside, he is great on the lead, great recall and good with other people and dogs. My husband wants to re home him and we can’t live like this anymore.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Helen, I would have pup evaluated by a professional trainer who specializes in aggression. This could be chemical, genetic, or behavioral. There may be resource guarding or something else that can be addressed, or it might be genetic or something else. I highly suggest having someone who specializes in aggression evaluate pup in person to get a better idea of what's going on and to what extent this can be addressed and what would be involved, to better help you decide how to proceed. I certainly agree with keeping pup away from children right now. I would also have a trainer work with you on introducing a basket muzzle. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Chapo's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Leeroy
Bull Terrier
8 Months
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Leeroy
Bull Terrier
8 Months

My bull terrier is reacting to people and other dogs by screaming growling and barking. We thought it was excitement but it’s more aggression we feel.

He’s attacked a couple smaller dogs but hasn’t done any damage thankfully.

He’s 8 months old, we took him to training and the trainer said he has the desire to fight like no other.

He also broke his leg quite young and wasn’t properly socialized.

Any tips?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brady, Not all trainers are experienced with aggression and reactivity, or have the resources to safely work on the issue. First, I suggest finding a trainer who comes well recommended, who is very experienced in this area. Ideally, look for a trainer or group that has access to a lot of well-socialized dogs and possibly a second trainer, so that training sessions can be set up where you can control the variables - like distance between dogs and having the other dog pass back and forth over and over again, while your dog is worked with. Check out Sean O' Shea from the Good Dog, Thomas from the Canine Educator, and others who specialize in aggression to learn more about the issue. They both have free Youtube videos and websites. Part of the training will involve building pup's trust and respect for you - often that's a contributor or at least can improve aggression and reactivity. Teaching commands like Place, Heel, Down, creating rules and boundaries in the home and calmly enforcing them, and having pup work for life rewards can help to build trust and respect. Check out the article linked below, and especially the "Working method" for instructions on how to have pup work for life rewards. The other two methods, the consistency method and obedience method are also great to follow, so check out those. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Add a comment to Leeroy's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Raymond
English bull terrier
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Raymond
English bull terrier
2 Years

We just got him from a rescue and he bites a lot and jumps up, what is the best way to break him of these habits? Thank you Shannon

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! This will be a 2 part answer and will be a little long. But you will get all of the information you need for a more peaceful environment. Dogs may nip/bite/mouth for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or a form of aggression. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Now onto jumping. When good behavior is consistently rewarded and jumping is ignored, dogs can quickly learn that keeping four feet on the ground is a preferable posture. No Rewards Allowed Training books and videos offer a number of creative methods for teaching a jumping dog to stop. Why, then, do so many dog owners continue to be subjected to this often unwelcome advance. The most important reason lies in the way that dogs learn. Any behavior that results in a reward is likely to be repeated. Rewards may be obvious or may be quite subtle. When dogs are excited, they naturally jump up onto their “target.” Over the course of time they are met with hands petting them or pushing them away – with voices sometimes warm, at other times stern or surprised. All of these responses can be rewarding – and, therefore, all of them may reinforce jumping up behavior. When such rewards are scarce and intermittent – they are even more powerful reinforcers. So even if the family is working hard to ignore jumping up, the occasional reward supplied by a long-lost, third cousin can undo all the good work. Take Action What can be done to plant those four feet firmly on the ground? First, inform all family members and visitors that, from this day forward, jumping of any kind is banned. Peoples’ only reaction to jumping should be no reaction. Everyone should remain utterly silent, averting their gaze and adopting an indifferent posture. Enlist the help of a neighbor or friend who can knock and enter repeatedly. Leash your dog and arm yourself with small food treats (perhaps placing a jar of treats near the door for visitors to dispense) Tell your dog to sit before he jumps up, while he’s still calm enough to comply. Reward non-jumping behavior with food treats. Persistent attempts to jump can be corrected by saying, “OFF,” walking your dog briskly in a circle, then telling him to sit (followed by a reward). Repeat the exercise as needed. Unlike pushing, petting or begging your dog to “get down,” this exercise is unambiguous and rewards an alternative behavior – sitting. Your chances of success will be far greater if you work with others who can “provoke” your dog by entering the house or passing you on the street, time and time again. You should set up the training. At each pass, tell your dog to sit and reward this preferred behavior. In time, shift the control from yourself to the “visitor,” who supplies attention only when your dog sits. Before you know it your dog will earn your heartfelt praise by sitting calmly instead of jumping up. A properly fitted head halter, such as the Gentle Leader, can be an invaluable tool for facilitating this type of retraining. All that is required is to pull forward and up to position the dog in a “sit” position. Then immediately release tension on the lead and praise the dog lavishly for sitting. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

Add a comment to Raymond's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Butch
Bull Terrier
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Butch
Bull Terrier
3 Years

He Bites / pinch my son's girlfriend. She is very small built. Butch jumps up on her and grab her arm. Always a struggle to let him go. He only listen to me. Zenobia.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this is unacceptable and it is good that you are looking for help. Work on the methods in the guide where you submitted your question, which is here: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-bite. Try all of the methods as they are good. As well, https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shiba-inu-to-not-bite and https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-to-not-bite. However, if you are not able to stop the behavior, you will have to call in a trainer used to dealing with dogs that bite. Is he well socialized? Work on that as well. Take him to obedience classes so that he listens and understands direction. But don't delay - call in a private trainer to help if you cannot see a change right away. This could escalate into a dangerous situation. All the best.

Add a comment to Butch's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Mia
Bull Terrier
2 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Mia
Bull Terrier
2 Months

very aggressive and dominant already!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

Add a comment to Mia's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Blanca
Bull Terrier
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Blanca
Bull Terrier
3 Months

I can’t be around her without her trying to bite. I carry her and she even snaps at my face.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Blanca's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Tessa
Bull Terrier
6 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Tessa
Bull Terrier
6 Months

She nips and bites without warning! Its getting to a point where we cant even sit down without a bite

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

Add a comment to Tessa's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Question
Ja
Bull Terrier
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ja
Bull Terrier
3 Years

Attacks when I comes to feeding and gets real stubborn and won’t come out of his outside pen no matter the weather and will attack you if you try to make him

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. Dog aggression is a very complex issue, and can have any number of causes. Because of this, I am including a link to a wonderful article for you to read that will give you insight and solutions. It is way too much to include in this box for the answer. So I hope you find the article helpful. https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-behavior-training/ask-dr-debra-canine-aggression/

Add a comment to Ja's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd