How to Train Your Dog to Not Jump the Fence

Hard
2-4 Months
Behavior

Introduction

So, you put up a fence thinking that giving your dog a fenced in yard to play in would keep him at home. To your surprise, all he wants to do is jump the fence and go find a few friends to hang out with. This is nothing unusual in that it is only natural for a dog to want to roam and to hang out with his friends. But allowing him to roam loose can, at best, end up with a fine that has to be paid, but he could just as easily become injured or lost.

Part of the problem with trying to teach your dog not to jump the fence is that this behavior is "self-rewarding" in that by succeeding in getting over the fence your dog's reward is freedom. More importantly, each time he is successful merely serves to reinforce the behavior.

Defining Tasks

During training, the command you might use could simply be "No" or "Get Down" or even "Stop!". The most important thing to remember is that once you decide on a command, stick to it and use it with authority in your voice. Not only will this help to avoid confusion, it will let your pup know you mean business and expect him to obey immediately.

Remember, keeping your dog from escaping could save him from becoming seriously injured, lost, or killed. You could start this type of training while your pup is too small to actually jump over the fence by teaching him not to even jump on the fence at all. This way, by the time he could clear the top of the fence, he has no interest in even going near it. 

Getting Started

There are a few things you can do before you start training your dog not to jump the fence. These include repairing any holes in the fence and, if you have a chain link fence, consider adding plastic slats to the fence to block him from seeing what's on the other side. Teaching your dog to stay in the back yard requires time, patience, and plenty of treats.

Try to choose a time of day when there aren't a lot of distractions like cars going by or kids out in the streets playing. You need your pup to remain fully focused on you and your training, which in turn will make the training go faster and help both of you reach the end goal much more quickly. Remember, teaching him to stop jumping the fence could save his life. 

The Long Leash Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
On the leash
Attach your dog to the long leash and let it lay loose on the ground.
Step
2
Follow that dog
Follow your dog around the yard, close enough to grab the leash but not so close he will not attempt to jump the fence.
Step
3
Grab the leash
When he gets too close to the fence and looks like he is ready to jump, grab the leash.
Step
4
Use the command
Give your chosen command and, using the leash, gently stop him from carrying out his plans.
Step
5
Lots of praise
If he obeys, give him a treat and plenty of praise.
Step
6
Repeat the process
If he doesn't, make him sit, back off and repeat the process until he gets the clue. It may take a few sessions before he understands he is not allowed to jump over the fence. Once he understands this, try watching him from out of sight and without the leash attached. If you happen to see him contemplating jumping, step out and use your command. Reward him if he obeys, if not bring out the leash and start training again.
Recommend training method?

The Water Gun Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Let your pup run loose
Let your dog run loose in the backyard and keep a close eye on him.
Step
2
Give the command
When he approaches the fence, give your command.
Step
3
Praise and treats
If he obeys, be sure to use lots of praise and give him a treat.
Step
4
Spray him
If he keeps going, spray him with water and repeat the command.
Step
5
Treats instead
Each time he behaves, give him a treat and when he doesn't, spray him again. It won't take your dog long to associate his desire to escape by going out over the top with getting doused with ice cold water. It also won't take him long to associate staying home with plenty of praise and treats.
Recommend training method?

The Paws on the Ground Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Let your dog roam
Let your dog roam around the yard under your supervision.
Step
2
Use the 'down' command
Each time he starts to climb or look like he is getting ready to jump, give the 'down' command.
Step
3
If he obeys
If he obeys, he gets a treat, if not, start all over again. Remember not to punish him for not getting it right.
Step
4
Praise him
Always remember to praise him for getting it right. Positive reinforcement will help to speed the training process.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat this process several times a day until he looks at the fence and walks away on his own.
Step
6
Deterrents
Along with training your dog not to jump the fence, you can increase the height of the fence or place PVC pipe along the top rail of the fence. PVC pipe is very slippery, making it impossible for your dog to gain any kind of grip he could use to help him clear the fence. You might also consider planting shrubs so that he doesn't have enough room to get the running start he needs to jump the fence.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Siyra
Labador
6 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Siyra
Labador
6 Years

My dog keeps jumping the fence are you able to train her not to?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Gloria, You can either teach pup to stay away from the fence using e-collar training OR you can bury an electric fence two feet in front of the physical fence, on the inside of the fence where your yard is. Having an electric fence in front of your normal fence will teach pup not to go all the way up to your physical fence so that pup can't jump or climb the fence. I do NOT suggest electric fences without the physical fence for dogs that try to escape, but when the two are combined it can work well for most dogs. The electric fence will enforce not going near the fence when you are and are not present - the e-collar training can do that, but some dogs will figure out that they only have to avoid the fence when you are present to enforce the training and may still try to escape occasionally; whereas the electric fence is always enforced while pup has the collar on. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Ash and Flint
Muts
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
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Ash and Flint
Muts
1 Year

My dogs listen very well and won't jump the fence as long as we are there, but the second we try to leave they go to jump the fence and follow us. We work long enough hours that I don't want to leave them inside, that's not fair to them. We've tried a few different things but their drive to be with us seems stronger than the methods we've tried.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
621 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mickayla, For their own safety, I suggest using an electric fence in addition to your regular wooded fence. Bury the electric fence 2 foot inside your wooden fence, so that the dogs are corrected if they try to go up to the fence at all. It's important to bury it a little further in than your normal fence, because you want to prevent the dogs from even being able to go up to the wooden fence to climb, dig, or get traction to jump. Don't use an electric fence on its own though of course! That will be far less effective than the wooden fence. Just add the electric fence to the current yard setup. Be sure to have the dogs always wear the electric fence collars while in the yard. If you don't always put the collars on them, they will probably figure out after a bit that they are not corrected near the fence so long as the collars are off, and will get out again, plus be less deterred in the future. Keep things consistent with the setup and electric fence collars on the dogs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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