How to Obedience Train a Shih Tzu Puppy

Medium
2-4 Weeks
General

Introduction

The Shih Tzu is a friendly, little house dog that loves people and is usually good with other pets. They love attention, and this can be used to help obedience train your loving Shih Tzu pup. 

Because they are small and can be picked up and handled easily, some owners, unfortunately, neglect obedience training their Shih Tzu pups. Don't make the same mistake--not only is obedience training important for your dog's safety, as he may not always be in reach when you need to direct him, obedience training is good for keeping his mind active, focused on you, and developing your role as his pack leader. You don’t want to be that dog owner at the dog park or doggy playground repeatedly yelling commands at your Shih Tzu with no response! Even house dogs should have a good grasp on obedience command, as they are a stepping stone to other behaviors and tricks and can give you important control when you need it.

Defining Tasks

To train your Shih Tzu puppy obedience commands, you need to find the right motivation for him. What will he work for? Treats, a toy, attention? Spend some time figuring out what your Shih Tzu really loves the most and incorporate it as positive reinforcement into obedience training. Also, avoid overusing an obedience command without getting a response; never “spoil” the command by yelling it repeatedly and allowing your Shih Tzu to ignore it, as this develops a bad habit. You can incorporate hand signals or use another verbal command, if a verbal command has become “spoiled”, and start over, ensuring that commands are adhered to in the future. Consistency and patience will be key to teach your Shih Tzu the basic obedience commands, 'come', 'sit', 'down', 'stay', and 'heel'.

Getting Started

Remember to work at your Shih Tzu puppy’s pace and work in multiple short sessions rather than a few long ones. A puppy can easily become bored, frustrated or confused. Take breaks and end on a positive note. A good general rule is that once your Shih Tzu has repeated a command successfully 8-10 times in a row,  he understands it and is ready to move on. If your dog is only performing the command correctly a few times in a row, do not push him, keep working at this level until your Shih Tzu has grasped the concept and is ready to move on. Try not to overwhelm your pup.  

You will need treats, toys, patience, and consistency to motivate and guide your Shih Tzu to perform obedience commands. Remember that your attention-loving Shih Tzu may be happy to work for affection. Teach your Shih Tzu “good boy”  or “good girl” and associate this with a reward so that your Shih Tzu recognizes when he or she has pleased you. You can use these verbal rewards during obedience training.

The Shape Basic Obedience Method

Most Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Shape 'come'
Use a clicker and treats. Start with the command 'come'. Place your Shih Tzu on the floor, and walk away a few steps and wait. When your Shih Tzu comes over to you, click and treat, say “come”. Repeat frequently until your Shih Tzu responds to the command “come”. Gradually remove clicker and treat.
Step
2
Shape 'sit'
Wait with a clicker in your hand and your dog standing in front of you. When your dog eventually sits down, say “sit”, click and treat. Practice frequently.
Step
3
Shape 'down'
Once your Shih Tzu understands the 'sit' command, ask him to sit. While he is in the sitting position, wait for him to lie down, click and treat. Add the “down” command and practice.
Step
4
Shape 'stay'
Teach the 'stay' command by saying “stay”. Wait a few seconds while your Shih Tzu is in place, then click and treat. If your dog moves, do not click and treat but position your dog again, and repeat the 'stay' command until your dog is successful at staying in place. Gradually increase the length of time required for your dog to stay in place before clicking and treating is provided.
Step
5
Shape 'heel'
Hold a clicker and treats while you walk your Shih Tzu. When your pup trots along at your left leg, click and treat. Do not reinforce if he lags behind or pulls in front.
Recommend training method?

The Lure Basic Obedience Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Lure to 'come'
Hold a treat out and call your dog by commanding “come”. When your Shih Tzu runs over to you, provide the treat, praise and affection. Repeat often.
Step
2
Lure to 'sit'
Stand in front of your Shih Tzu and hold a treat slightly above and behind his head. Your dog will usually sit in order to continue focusing on the treat. When he sits on his bottom, say “sit” and provide the treat. Practice frequently.
Step
3
Lure 'down'
Ask your dog to sit, then hold a treat down on the ground in front of your Shih Tzu. When your dog lies down on the floor to reach the treat, say “down” and provide the treat.
Step
4
Reward 'stay'
While lying down or sitting ask your dog to 'stay'. Hold a treat but do not provide it yet. Wait a few seconds, if your Shih Tzu remains in place then reward with the treat. If your dog moves, re-position and repeat until he is successful. Gradually increase the time your dog needs to stay in place to get his treat.
Step
5
Lure to 'heel'
Hold a treat or a toy in a closed hand at your side and walk with your Shih Tzu on your left side. Lure your pup to stay at your left side by letting him smell the treat in your closed hand. Periodically provide the treat or play with the toy as your Shih Tzu walks beside you. Replace with another treat as needed, hold and continue.
Recommend training method?

The Pair Hand Signals Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Pair hand signal for 'sit'
Hold a treat in your hand, palm up, with your Shih Tzu in front of you. Move your palm up to your chest, and as your dog tracks your movement his bottom will go down to the floor. Say “sit” and provide the treat when he is successful. Eventually you can stop using the treat and just say “sit” and use the hand signal.
Step
2
Pair 'down' hand signal
Hold a treat between your fingers with your palm facing down and your Shih Tzu in front of you. Move your palm down to the floor and say “down”. Your Shih Tzu will follow your hand and lie down on the floor, provide the treat. Repeat, alternating verbal and hand signals until established.
Step
3
Motion to 'come'
Place your Shih Tzu a few feet away from you. Hold your hands out parallel to the ground, straight out from your sides with a treat in one hand. Call your pup to 'come' and bring both your hands together at your chest. When your dog runs over, provide the treat. Practice increasing distance as the hand signal and verbal commands become well established.
Step
4
Hand signal 'stay'
To teach your Shih Tzu the hand signal for stay, hold your palm out toward your dog while he is sitting and say “stay”. Provide a treat when your dog stays for a few seconds, gradually increase time, continue pairing hand signal and verbal command.
Step
5
Tap hip for 'heel'
Tap your hip with your hand while asking your Shih Tzu to heel. Reinforce heeling with treats, praise and affection.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Laurie Haggart

Published: 02/13/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Bella
Shz tzu
9 Months
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Bella
Shz tzu
9 Months

To listen to my commands like Sit Stay in like make what you know when you have to let me have to go outside.

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Sultan
Shih Tzu
11 Weeks
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Sultan
Shih Tzu
11 Weeks

First week how should I train my newly dog

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Dilshad, The most important things to work on with a young puppy are socialization, potty training, crate training, and getting puppy used to being handled. Check out the free PDF e-book download AFTER You GET Your Puppy from the website linked below for more details on how to start all of that. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads An especially good way to work on socialization as well as obedience, is to find a good puppy class in your area. No puppy class will be perfect but check out the article linked below for details on the type of class to look for. The most important part is finding a class that have time for moderated off-leash puppy play. As a trainer I took my dog through someone else's puppy class just for the socialization, even though she already new all of the obedience commands taught in class. The socialization is the super important part. If you can't do a class, see if you have any friends with puppies under 6 months of age and have play dates together to gain socialization. You can also practice getting each others puppies used to being touched by people by trading puppies and giving each others puppies treats each time you gently touch an area of their body, like paws, ear, tail, and mouth. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ As far as obedience commands go, obedience commands can still be taught to an older puppy, so timing is a bit more flexible on that, whereas socialization is dependent on a puppy being young still. If you have the time to start some obedience commands too, I suggest teaching the following commands: Sit https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-sit Down and Stay: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-to-lay-down https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Come: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Leave It - Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Drop It - section Part 4. Teaching Your Dog to Drop It: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-to-fetch/ Quiet- Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Place (or bed) - with a young puppy you don't need a prong collar though just a buckle collar, leash, Place or dog bed, and some treats. https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leo
Shih Tzu
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
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Leo
Shih Tzu
9 Weeks

My puppy refuses to train. I can get about 30 seconds to 2 minutes of training in before he just walks away with his tail between his legs. I am patient, use treats, say good boy and pet him. My kids and husband have been holding him and hugging him since he came home about 1.5 weeks ago. I am thinking that he does not feel like he has to listen to me. I have had a Shih tzu before and I do not remember him being this stubborn. What can I do? I will never train a dog with 30-60 seconds to train and then him acting afraid of me at the end. And it is only me since as soon as another family member walks in he is suddenly happy and full of energy.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cynthia, You may want to change which method of training you are using. Most things can be taught multiple ways. For example, check out the article linked below on teaching Sit. Notice that Sit can be taught in three different ways. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-yorkshire-terrier-to-sit Many puppies do well with lure training, where you use a treat or toy to show them how to move into a certain position. Some stubborn or unmotivated puppies need the Pressure method to physically show them how to do a behavior (most 9 week old puppies are not actually stubborn though - especially if acting afraid). Many dogs need the Capture method, where you simply train throughout the day in little bits. If you are uncertain how to train, find a trainer you feel you can trust and watch their videos that demonstrate how to train a certain thing. Your dog might need different handling than past dogs to motivate him. Zach George and Ian Dunbar on YouTube both have several good puppy videos. I suggest trying lure training first. If you are not successful with that or have already tried that, then I suggest trying the Capture method next. At this age, I suggest incorporating the training into your day in little bits also. For example, before you feed him, use a piece of his food to lure him into a sit, then reward him with the piece of food when his bottom touches the floor, then tell him "Okay!" to let him eat. If you are home during the day, you can also feed him his entire meal this way - as little rewards for dozens of 1 minute commands. Before you take him on a walk, work on Watch Me, where he has to look at you for a second before exiting the door. When you are watching TV at night, practice down by rewarding him for automatically laying down and staying down for longer. At nine weeks he is really still learning how to learn so keep working on it but also recognize that he might just need a little time to mature, but the more you practice in little bits, the better his capacity for learning in general should get, so that you can then have longer, full training sessions. Dogs are different than each other, so his focus might be different at this age then your previous dogs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Otis
Shih Tzu
10 Weeks
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Question
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Otis
Shih Tzu
10 Weeks

Hi there, this is our first time with a puppy and he is very energetic. We provide many chewing options but he eventually only wants to bite our feet and hands (and hard! ). Sometimes he persists until he is really wound up and starts to lunge and even bark or growl. We have tried "time outs" in his crate but as soon as we let him out he goes right back to the behavior. It is exhausting! Is there another discipline method we can use to get him to stop? We've also tried praising him everytime he uses the chew toy but, again, he will go right back to lunging at our hands and fingers. Help! We want a nice dog that can be playful and yet calm!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bradi, Check out the article linked below and use the Leave It method. It will take a bit for him to learn the Leave It command so you can also use the Bite Inhibition method to help the puppy biting while he learns Leave It also - but your end goal is leave it. Once he knows Leave It and is older, you can use the Pressure method if he disobeys your Leave It command, but you need to teach Leave It well first or he will probably only think you are roughhousing when you use the Pressure method - instead of understanding that he should stop biting. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Also, work on teaching the Out command and use Out when he gets too wound up - out means leave the area. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Continue the time outs with food stuffed chew toys - not as a discipline to help him learn (that's what the other methods are for), but because when many puppies this age get really wound up it is actually a sign that they are overstimulated and need to rest (or be exercised if cooped up all day), and they need help calming back down by being put somewhere calm with something relaxing to do - like chew a food stuffed chew toy. Stuffing the hollow toys with his dog food will help peak his interest. I also suggest looking for a puppy kindergarten class in your area that has time for off-leash puppy play that is moderated by the trainer and owners so that puppies are given a break when one starts to get too rough or another overwhelmed. Playing with puppies can help puppies learn to be softer when they bite - this is called learning bite inhibition, and it is very important for puppies to learn it while young to make them safer as adults. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Doxie
Shih Tzu
3 Months
-1 found helpful
Question
-1 found helpful
Doxie
Shih Tzu
3 Months

I have a 13 year old chihuahua also and Doxie is constantly chasing and biting him. I have to put Doxie into a separate room to keep her from annoying him. I use the ‘leave it’ command and provide a treat if Doxie responds properly but many times she is too engaged or leaves it and then resumes after the treat. What do you suggest?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Paula, Continue working on Leave It and sending her somewhere away from your older dog when she gets too excited until she calms down, like you are already doing. Also, work on teaching an "Out" command. In addition to the above, it is also a matter of age. If you are consistent, as she matures things should improve. She will gradually learn the rules if you keep enforcing them as her impulse control, capacity to calm herself, and other maturity factors improve. With puppies it is often a lot of repeating the same things over and over as they grow, until it seems to 'click' eventually when their impulse control is better. The training does pay off but it can take a while to see results in many cases. Stay consistent, knowing that it will be worth it. Check out the article linked below and especially read the sections: "How to Teach a Dog The Out Command" "How to Use Out to Deal with Pushiness" There is also a section with tips on bringing a puppy home that may be useful in your case. "How to Use 'Out' to Help Dogs Get Along" "Out" article: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Daisy
Chi tzu
2 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Daisy
Chi tzu
2 Weeks

She doesn’t pay attention I don’t have a clicker but I have treat she young Nd doesn’t pay attention

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Juliane, Is pup really 2 weeks old, or was that a typo and should have said 2 months. If pup really is only 2 weeks, its too early for training and the main focus should be on pup's basic bodily needs, early neonatal handling, and paper training via a whelping box type setup. If that should have said 2 months, then you probably need to slow training down since pups this age don't have very long attention spans and the main goal is for them to learn to learn, learning how to focus and learn something new is part of what training anything is about at this age, so a lot of patience, short training sessions, rewarding small progresses, and repetition over several days is needed. Start with simple things like teaching pup to look at you when you say their name. To teach pup to respond to her name better, practice saying her name and holding a treat next to your eye. When pup looks toward your eye, praise and give a treat. Practice often until pup consistently looks at your eye when you say her name. Next, pretend to hold the treat by your eye with your hand but actually have it hidden behind your back in your other hand. Say pup's name and praise and reward pup with the treat from behind your back when they look at your eye. Practice until pup looks consistently. Also, practice at random times throughout the day when pup isn't expecting it. Next, simply point to your eye and do the same process until pup is good at looking at your eye then even at random times during the day. Finally, simply say pup's name without pointing at your eye and reward with a treat hidden in your pocket throughout the day at random times of the day - you can also use pup's meal kibble as treats kept in a ziploc baggie in your pocket. You can also use your voice in place of a clicker. Simply say "Yes!" right when pup gets something correct, before giving the treat. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Willow
Imperial shih tzu
9 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Willow
Imperial shih tzu
9 Weeks

Hi, I hope you can help!

We got our little puppy "Willow" a week ago today (Currently 9 weeks old). She is a full Karashishi Imperial Shih Tzu who is very hyper and playful.

Assuming she is just teething but she loves to nibble on absolutely Anything! Clothes, hands, your face, furniture. How do we stop her from doing this? She has many toys to play with including ones specifically made for teething pups but she still just wants to bite everything!?

Most the time is is a gentle bite however this can get rather sharp and hard the more playful she gets.

We do also have a rule she can go onto the sofa, she is also constantly trying her best to jump up there and barks to try to get our attention. Any tips on how we can help this?

Thanks!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Question
zeke
Shih Tzu
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
zeke
Shih Tzu
4 Months

Training advice

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joeanthony, I would be glad to help you. What exactly is your training questions? What part of obedience training are you specifically needing help with? Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Black Pearl Eusebio
Shih Tzu
8 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Black Pearl Eusebio
Shih Tzu
8 Months

how to stop my shih tzu to bite my hands

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marian, When is pup biting your hands? Is pup biting them when touched, when they have an object or food, when they want you to play, ect? How this is addressed depends a lot on whether pup is biting due to fear, puppy mouthing and wanting to play, resource guarding, or touch sensitivity. If pup is biting due to normal puppy mouthing, I would work on teaching the Leave It command to increase self-control. Leave It: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite If pup is biting for another reason, the underlying sensitivity, fear, or aggression also needs to be carefully addressed, possibly taking precautions like a basket muzzle depending on the severity of it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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lola
shitzu/chiuahah
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
lola
shitzu/chiuahah
9 Months

hi, i need some advice on training lola to stop barking and growling all the time.. everytime i walk into a room...leave the room and when people come over all she does is growl and bark at them

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello there. It sounds like you have your hands full. I am going to provide you with information on how to correct this behavior. You won’t be able to solve your dog’s overprotective behavior in one day. In the meantime, you don’t want to put your life on hold. You can still invite guests into your home as long as you prioritize managing your dog’s behavior. You’ll need a short-term strategy to start showing your overprotective dog what behavior is unacceptable while also keeping your guests safe. There are a few ways to do this. Leash: Keeping your dog on a leash while friends are visiting gives you control over your dog’s actions. Leash him up before the doorbell rings and keep him close as you greet your guests. During the visit, you can let the leash drag and only use it if you have to. Muzzle: If you feel his behavior warrants the use of a muzzle for the time being while you work on solving this problem, then it may be a wise choice. Separate Room: Your dog won’t get better without practice, but sometimes you have to weigh the risks versus rewards. If your overprotective dog is in the beginning stages of training, keeping him separated from guests might be best. You don’t want to put a friend’s safety at risk or needlessly stress out your dog. As long as you keep working toward stopping the behavior, separating an overprotective dog from company is a temporary management solution. Start Obedience Training Obedience training is a must for every dog, and it’s especially important for overprotective dogs. Working with your dog on things like “sit-stay,” “down-stay,” and “heel,” will help build his impulse control. He’ll start seeing you as a capable leader and will turn to you for guidance. A mistake many pup parents make is stopping obedience training once their dog masters the basics skills. Being well-trained is about more than knowing how to sit when a person holds a treat in front of their face. It’s a lifetime lesson, and even senior dogs need regular training. Commit to training your dog several times a day for short periods of time. Make Your Dog Work for Affection You can’t help but smother your dog with love every time he’s within petting distance, but that isn’t always what’s best for him. He will start to feel entitled to your attention, and that’s part of the problem. To remedy this, initiate a “work for it” program that allows you to show your dog affection as long as he earns your attention in appropriate ways. Make him sit, stay calm, and do whatever else you ask before doling out whatever it is he wants. If he’s excited for dinner, make him sit and leave it before digging in. If he wants in your lap, ask him to do a trick first. Never give your dog attention if he rudely nudges your hand or barks in your face. He needs to know polite behavior, and polite behavior only, is how he gets what he wants. You ignore everything else. Involve Other People in the Dog’s Life Most overprotective dogs choose to guard only the person they feel closest to. It’s usually the same person who fills their food bowls, takes them on walks, and handles training. They become obsessively attached, and a strong bond gradually mutates into overprotective behavior. Putting some space between you and your dog will help him learn to trust other people. Enlist the entire family’s help and take a step back in your role as primary caregiver. Have someone else feed the dog a few times a week, and encourage other people to engage her in playtime. This will help him be more comfortable with different people. Socialize Socialization is best done during the puppy stages, but even adult and senior dogs benefit from new experiences. Exposing your overprotective dog to new places, experiences, and people, will help him learn that not everyone is out to hurt you. Make sure each new experience is positive, and encourage your dog without forcing him to interact. If your dog is afraid, you don’t want to make things worse. Take socialization at the pace he’s comfortable with. If he seems overwhelmed, back up and try something a little smaller. These are some general ideas and they can be modified to fit your dynamic. These behaviors do take time, I am talking months, to correct. And sometimes the behaviors get worse before they get better. So just push through that time if that starts to happen. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Question
Luigi
Shih Tzu
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Luigi
Shih Tzu
4 Months

To come and stay
Stop barking in the crate
no bitting

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment. Recall: STAGE ONE – 'Catching' or Charging Up the 'Come' Cue Start in a distraction free environment so that your dog can focus only on you. Whenever your puppy or dog is coming to you on his own, wait until he is a couple of feet from you and then say his name and the word 'come.' When he gets to you, make a big fuss. With this exercise, your dog will learn that coming to you is a really good thing. After a while, you can lengthen the distance between you and start using the word when he is coming to you from a greater distance. Coming to you should always be rewarded, whatever the circumstance and no matter how long it took your dog to respond. Motivate your dog to come by being exciting, running away from him, waving a toy, or having delicious food for him when he gets to you. This will show him that coming back to you the best thing he can do. STAGE TWO – Solidifying the Cue Through Play Make sure you play the Back and Forth game with another person that your dog is comfortable with. Start the game in a quiet environment so it is easy for your dog to focus on you. Hold your dog back while the other person calls him excitedly. Try not to use his name or the cue word but talk excitedly to ‘gee’ him up. Do not release him until the person calls his name followed by the cue word “come.” When the cue word is given, release your dog and let him go running to the person calling. As soon as he reaches them they should praise and reward him with a game of tug or a food reward. When your dog has had his reward, have the other person hold him back as you call him and release as you say his name followed by the cue word. When he comes to you reward him with another game of tug or food reward. Repeat this game back and forth but only do a few repetitions so your dog does not get bored or too tired. Keeping it fresh means the game is always fun to play. STAGE THREE – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Inside Now your dog knows what the word “come” means you can use the cue word to call him to you while adding a hand signal to the word. Hand signals are always good to build with vocal cues so that even if your dog cannot hear you he will understand what the hand signal means. This is good if your dog is a distance away from you. Start in a quiet environment. Walk away from your dog and call his name followed by the cue word and a hand signal. Praise and reward him when he comes to you. Start increasing the distance you call him from and praise for his compliance. If he does not respond, go back to the previous distance and repeat. Only practice this cue for a few minutes so your dog does not get bored. The secret to success is to always keep it fun, exciting and fresh. When your dog recognizes the hand signal, try calling his name and using the hand signal by itself without the vocal cue. You will then be able to use a combination of vocal cue only, hand signal only and the two together. Now your dog knows what the cue word means you can start to call him from different rooms or from areas where he cannot see you. This will encourage him to respond even when you are out of sight. STAGE FOUR – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Outside Now your dog is consistently coming to you in a distraction free environment you can proof your recall cue by taking it outside. Practice the recall in your yard and then gradually build up to the point where you can use it in the park or similar environment. The ultimate test is to use the recall when your dog is engaged in a different activity. Wait for a lull in that activity and then call your dog to you. Praise his decision to comply.

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Jake
Shih Tzu
2 Months
0 found helpful
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Jake
Shih Tzu
2 Months

He’s biting all the time nipping your feet n angles when he’s going to bed we put in cage he howls n barks for awhile n wakes up about 4 n 5 every morning

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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