How to Train Your Dog to Pee in a Specific Area

Medium
1-6 Weeks
General

Introduction

When you first got him, your dog relieved himself all over your shiny, clean floors. Eventually, you managed to train him to start going for a pee outside in the yard. This was great to start with, but now summer is fast approaching and you’re trying to turn your yard into something special. That means growing plants, flowers, and grass that you don’t want trodden on and ruined by your heavy dog, or peed on, for that matter. So, you need to train him to pee in a specific area. 

You’ve already found the right spot that’s going to be all his. But the next hurdle is the training. Fortunately, this guide will give you several effective methods to choose from. Succeed with this training and you’ll be able to instruct him to pee in a location of your choice, hassle-free.

Defining Tasks

Most owners are surprised at how straightforward it is to train your dog to pee in a specific place. You’ll need to take steps to make the location as dog-friendly as possible. The more relaxed and comfortable he feels there, the more likely he’ll be to consistently use it. You’ll also need to use some delicious treats to motivate him to use that specific spot. You’ll need to establish a routine and be vigilant for the first few weeks, but it will all be worth it. 

If he’s a puppy, he should be a quick learner and you could see results in just a week. If he’s older and not quite the receptive student he once was, you may need up to six weeks. Succeed with this training and you’ll have a quick and easy spot you can take him to pee at each day. Saving you time spent in the cold and rain during winter months.

Getting Started

Before your work can begin you’ll need to gather a few things. Firstly, you’ll need to find a new location that will be his dedicated toilet. You’ll also need to stock up on treats or break his favorite food into small chunks.

The other main component is time. You need to be there to take him for a pee at the same times each day, at least for the first few weeks.

Apart from that, you’ll just need patience and an optimistic attitude, then you’re ready to get to work!

The Routine Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Water bowl
It’s important he’s always got enough water in his bowl. This will get his body in a steady routine and then you’ll be able to predict when he needs to go out. If he’s dehydrated half the time, you’ll struggle to establish a consistent routine.
Step
2
Morning
Each morning, secure him to his leash and head for the new toilet spot. Be jolly and upbeat as you go, you want to make him feel comfortable and relaxed. If you’re always at the spot when he needs to go, he’ll have no choice but to go there.
Step
3
Lunch time
When lunch time comes, take him back to the toilet again. After a few weeks, he may not need to go quite so often, but to start with you want to get him as used to the new toilet as possible. Again, remain upbeat and happy when you go.
Step
4
Evening
After dinner you can take him back to the spot again. He’ll probably also need to go for a poop at this point, so if you want him to poop elsewhere, you’ll need to take that into account. After a couple of weeks you can adjust the routine slightly to go at times that are more convenient for you. But make sure you at least go in the morning and evening.
Step
5
Reward
Whenever he does go for a pee in his new spot, make sure you give him a tasty treat. You can also give him some verbal praise and play with him. The happier he feels after, the more inclined he’ll be to go there again.
Recommend training method?

The Environment Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Make it his own
Try and make sure the location you choose can be his as much as possible. If you’re using a yard, try and opt for a place that is slightly separated from the rest of the yard or in a corner. The more comfortable he feels there the quicker he’ll start using it.
Step
2
Privacy
When you take him there each day, make sure you give him as much privacy as possible. Don’t stare at him, turn around and look away. You probably don’t like it when people watch you go to the toilet and he likely feels the same!
Step
3
Yesterday’s pee
If you’re struggling to get him to go the first few days, try wiping some of yesterday’s pee on the new spot. If he can smell that he’s already been to the toilet there before he’ll be much more likely to go there again.
Step
4
Reward
Make sure you give him a reward each time he uses the new spot. The greater the reward the more likely he’ll be to use it again. You can use tasty food, or alternatively, you can spend a minute or so playing around with a toy.
Step
5
Never punish him
If he does go for a pee inside or somewhere else, make sure you don’t punish him. If you shout and scare him, he may start peeing out of fear, and then you’ll have an even bigger hurdle to overcome. Simply clean up the mess thoroughly and make sure you get him outside next time.
Recommend training method?

The Verbal Cue Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Routine
Secure him to a leash and take him to the new spot several times a day, every day. If he’s always there when he needs to go then that’s half the battle won. If you don’t have time to take him yourself every day, have someone else help too.
Step
2
‘Toilet time’
When he starts peeing, give a ‘toilet time’ command. Give it in a clear and happy voice. You want him to think you’re playing a big game. If you do this every time it will eventually work as a trigger.
Step
3
Reward
Once he’s gone for his pee, give him a delicious treat. You can also shower him in praise and attention. The happier he feels, the quicker you’ll see results. He’ll also be more likely to respond to your command in the future.
Step
4
Early cue
After a few days of giving the command while he’s peeing, start giving the command before he needs to go. When you want to take him there, just give the command in the house and he’ll naturally jump up. Simply hearing that command will make his body feel like he needs to pee. Then after he’s gone for a pee, give him a treat again.
Step
5
Lose the treats
After a couple of weeks of consistent results you can start to cut out the treats. By this point it will now be a habit and he’ll no longer need the promise of food. You can sit back and relax, your work is done!
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd