How to Train Your Rescue Dog to Poop Outside

How to Train Your Rescue Dog to Poop Outside
Easy difficulty iconEasy
Time icon1-3 Weeks
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

You’re not quite sure about his past. You don’t know what’s happened to him in his life or necessarily how he’s ended up here, but you do know the rescue dog you've recently adopted hasn’t been well trained. You come down in the morning, half asleep and you step in dog mess. It’s not how you want to start your day and it definitely doesn’t make the house smell too good either. At least if you step in it you know it will be cleared up properly, but if the kids step in it, you may find dog poop all over the house as they walk around after doing a half-hearted cleanup.

Training him to poop outside will remove this problem entirely. No longer will you have to worry about getting dog poop out of your carpets. No longer will your house smell rather unpleasant. You’ll also stop the spread of potentially harmful bacteria. 

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Defining Tasks

The good news is that even if he’s new to your home after years of being able to go to the toilet wherever he wants, you can still train your dog to go outside. You need to look at his routine and make sure he’s always outside when he needs to go. You’ll also need to find ways of incentivizing him to go outside and making him feel relaxed and comfortable. If he’s younger then he should respond to training quickly and you may see results in just a week. If he’s older, scared and not so keen to learn, you may need up to three weeks.

Succeeding with this training could stop your kids and other pets getting ill from the bacteria. Which in turn could save you from expensive vet and medical bills. You also won’t have to worry about getting up before your guests anymore!

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Getting Started

Before you set to work you’ll need a few things. Make sure you have some tasty treats to motivate and reward him. Make sure you can take him to a familiar spot outside each day too.

The main component though will be time. You need to be able to take him outside several times a day, every day. You can also rope other members of the household into training too.

Once you have all of the above, just bring a can-do attitude and you can get to work!

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The Routine Method

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Every morning

When you wake up in the morning, give him his breakfast, wait 15 minutes and then head out. If you always give him his meal at the same time each morning, his body clock will soon become regular. That way you can always make sure you’re outside when he needs to go.

2

Every evening

Again, 15 minutes or so after his evening meal, take him outside to go to the toilet. If you’re always outside when he needs to go, he’ll have no choice but to go outside. You can also take him out a couple of times in the day to make sure he doesn’t go about his business then.

3

Location

Try and take him to a similar spot each day. He may be scared and nervous as a rescue dog, so you need to make him feel as relaxed as possible. Taking him to the same spot will put him at ease and he’ll be more inclined to go.

4

Reward

When he does go, make sure you give him a tasty treat. You need to really make it clear that he’s done the right thing. The greater the reward, the more likely he’ll be to go outside next time. You could even spend a minute or so playing around with a toy afterwards.

5

Consistency

The key to success is a consistent routine. Once he’s into the habit of going outside he won’t think or want to go inside. Plus, if you’re always outside after meals anyway he won’t be able to go on your clean, new floors.

The At Ease Method

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After meals

Try and take him outside at the same times each day. His bowel movements will probably see to it that he needs to go about 20 minutes after a meal, so try and always be outside then. If he knows he’s about to go outside he’ll start holding it.

2

Privacy

Don’t stare at him when he’s sniffing around and about to go. If he’s timid he needs to feel as relaxed as possible. Instead, turn around until he’s finished. This will all help make him feel comfortable, especially to start with.

3

Previous poo

If he still seems too shy to go outside, you may need to take an extra step to put him at ease. If you wipe some previous excrement in the location you take him to, he’ll be more likely to think of this spot as a toilet. Taking him to the same spot each day will also help with that.

4

Reward

It’s imperative he always gets a tasty reward after he’s been for a poop. The tastier the treat, the quicker he’ll learn. Once he’s got into the hang of going outside, you can slowly cut out the treats.

5

Never punish him

If he does go inside, make sure you don’t shout at him. If he’s terrified, he may start going about his business out of fear. Instead, calmly and quietly clear it up. Make sure you use anti-bacterial spray. Any smell of poop may encourage him to go inside next time.

The Supervision Method

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Always react

If you see him sniffing around or circling, then you know a poop is fast approaching. You need to quickly secure him to a leash and head outside. If you do this every time he’ll soon realise pooping inside is no longer allowed.

2

‘NO’

If you do catch him already going inside, say ‘NO’ in a firm voice, repeatedly. You don’t want to scare him, but he needs to know you’re not happy. Then remove him and put him outside while you thoroughly clean away the mess. Do this every time and he’ll soon get the message.

3

Schedule toilet breaks

To start with try and take him out several times throughout the day. If he knows he’s likely to be taken out soon then he’ll be more able to hold it. It’s particularly important he goes out first thing in the morning and evening, as well as after meals.

4

Slowly increase the time

As he gets into the habit of only pooping outside, you can slowly increase the time between toilet breaks. He knows he’s going out anyway, his bowel muscles will slowly strengthen and you’ll be able to take him out less.

5

Don’t play with him

It’s important that until he’s gone for his poop, you don’t speak to him. His attention needs to be solely on going about his business. If he expects you to talk and play with him then going to the toilet will be at the back of his mind. It’s also motivation for him to go as quickly as possible so he can enjoy spending time with you.

Written by James Barra

Veterinary reviewed by:

Published: 11/30/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Smokie

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big poodle mix

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about a year

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Question

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Okay this young man was dumped at my neighbors we live in the country he's been there for a couple months I finally got him to the vet and got him shot it's yesterday and I have him in the trailer with me now when he was on that man's porch he pees and poops on himself he doesn't move or get up to go do it and he's bless his heart I mean I'm taking him to the groomer Sunday but I have no clue what to do about

Aug. 24, 2023

Smokie's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the small and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. The method I have linked below was written for younger puppies, since your dog is older you can adjust the times and take him potty less frequently. I suggest taking him potty every 3 hours when you are home. After 1.5 hours (or less if he has an accident sooner) or freedom out of the crate, return him to the crate while his bladder is filling back up again until it has been 3 hours since his last potty trip. When you have to go off he should be able to hold his bladder in the crate for 5-7 hours - less at first while he is getting used to it and longer once he is accustomed to the crate. Only have him wait that long when you are not home though, take him out about every 3 hours while home. You want him to get into the habit of holder his bladder between trips and not just eliminating whenever he feels the urge and you want to encourage that desire for cleanliness in your home - which the crate is helpful for. Less freedom now means more freedom later in life. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Aug. 25, 2023

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Lily

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Frenchie

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Two Years 6mths

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Question

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I took on my Frenchie 10 days ago. She does her poo outside twice a day after meals usually. However, if I have to leave her at home, if only for 15 mins, she will poo anywhere she fancies. Did it on my sons bed this a.m.

April 20, 2023

Lily's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I recommend crate training her and crating her when you leave to encourage her to hold it while you are away and get into the habit of keeping the home clean even when you aren't there. If she is not already used to a crate expect crying at first. When she cries and you know she doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. You can give her a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help her adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If she continues protesting for long periods of time past three days, you can use a Pet Convincer. Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell her "Quiet" when she barks and cries. If she gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If she disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at her side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If she stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward her quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

April 24, 2023


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