How to Potty Train a Husky Puppy

How to Potty Train a Husky Puppy
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon1-4 Weeks
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

He’s everything you hoped he would be, friendly, intelligent, alert, and outgoing. Even your usually somber in-laws can’t help but grin helplessly around your Husky puppy. However, guests only see the positives. There is one negative they’re lucky enough to miss, which is coming downstairs to the unpleasant aroma of an accident, or even worse, standing in an accident. It isn’t his fault, of course, he’s still young. However, you’re keen to tackle this behavior and potty train him properly.

Potty training a Husky will bring with it a number of notable benefits. You will no longer have to clean your nice new floors. Neither will you have to worry about your other pets and young children coming into contact with the potentially harmful bacteria. In addition, you will be able to take him to friends' and families' houses without worrying about him going about his business on their carpets.

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Defining Tasks

Fortunately, potty training a Husky is relatively straightforward. The main task is to get him into a consistent routine. However, you will also need to make the potty as pleasant as possible. That will require an effective motivator. Huskies have a soft spot for anything they can eat. So, some mouth-watering food will play a key part. 

Husky puppies are switched on and fast learners. So, if your husky puppy is receptive, you could see results in just a week or so. However, if he isn’t too interested in following instructions, then you may need a while longer. It could take several weeks before you see consistent results. If this training works, you will never have to worry about him going to the toilet in public spaces or in your vehicle again. Not to mention, you won’t have to go out and buy antibacterial spray every week anymore.

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Getting Started

Before you start training, you will need to get your hands on a few bits. Stock up on some tasty treats. Alternatively, break his favorite food into small chunks. You will also need a potty location in mind that is easily and regularly accessible.

Try and set aside time at several points throughout the day to take him to his new potty. The more consistently you take him out, the sooner you will see results.

Once you have all that, you just need patience and a pro-active attitude, then work can begin!

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The Irresistible Potty Method

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Same potty

Make sure you take him to the same potty spot each day. If he’s been to the toilet there before, he will feel relaxed and more likely to go there again. Also try and find a place that is relatively close to your home, such as your yard or local field.

2

Yesterday’s toilet

If he is struggling to go when you take him to the potty, there is a quick and easy way to encourage him. Wipe down some of the remnants from his last toilet visit. This will put him at ease.

3

Privacy

Make sure your Husky puppy gets some privacy. Staring at him while you wait for him to go may add to the pressure and discourage him. So, turn away and give him the same privacy you would expect.

4

Be vigilant

If you do see him about to do his business inside, you need to quickly take him out to the potty. So, keep an eye out for any intense sniffing around. You may also want to get all members of the house on accident watch.

5

Don’t punish accidents

It is important you do not punish him if he has an accident inside. You may scare him and then he may start submissive peeing. So, calmly remove him and then clean up any accidents up with antibacterial spray. It’s important the smell has completely gone, otherwise he may be more inclined to go there again.

The Routine Method

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Food routine

Make sure he gets his meals at the same time each day. This will get his body clock in a consistent routine, allowing you to predict when he will need taking out to the potty. For the same reason, also keep his water bowl topped up.

2

Breakfast

Once you have given him breakfast, wait a few minutes and then take him to the potty. Quite simply, if he is always outside when he needs to go, he will soon get into the habit of always using the potty.

3

Lunch time

Make sure he goes back out again at lunch time. He is likely to at least need a pee at this time. Because he is a puppy, he will probably also need to go out to the potty once or twice again in the morning before lunch.

4

Dinner time

Once you have given him his dinner, take him back out for a trip to the potty. He will then probably need to go out again before bed. He will soon develop a habit of using your the if you are consistent.

5

Reward

Whenever he successfully uses the potty, it’s important he gets a generous reward. Make sure it is tasty and ensure he gets it within a few seconds of finishing his business. In fact, the greater the reward, the more likely he is to repeat the behavior again.

The Verbal Cue Method

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Regular potty visits

Secure him to his leash and take him out to the potty regularly throughout the day. Try and go at the same times each day. This will help him hold it at night, for example, as he knows he will go out first thing in the morning.

2

‘Potty time’

Just as he is about to go to the potty or does go, issue a ‘potty time’ command. Give this in a high-pitched voice. Use this every time he goes and he will soon associate that instruction with going to the toilet.

3

Reward

Make sure you hand over a tasty reward each time he goes to the toilet as you give the command. You can also shower him in verbal praise.

4

Bring forward the command

After a few days or a week, your ‘potty time’ command will automatically trigger a need to go to the toilet. So, you will be able to use this whenever you need him to go to the potty quickly.

5

Lose the treats

Once he responds to the command regularly and the accidents have stopped, you can slowly phase out the treats. He will no longer need a food incentive, using the potty will have become habit.

By James Barra

Published: 02/12/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Hades

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Husky Pitbull

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4 Months

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Question

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For the life of us we cannot get him to go outside and go potty every time he has to go. He randomly will start to pee inside even though he just spent 15-20 minutes outside. He’s been sleeping in a crate and being put into a crate when we’re gone for awhile and he pees in the crate everytime he’s in it. Me and my family don’t know what to do because he doesn’t even try and tell us that he needs to go out, we haven’t potty trained a dog in at least 10 years because our other dog is a senior and was trained when we were less busy. Another thing that he’s been doing is biting and trying to climb onto our senior dog, we don’t know how to fix that or the biting thing. Any advice would be appreciated

June 18, 2022

Hades's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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Hello Matthew, Check out the Crate Training method from the article linked below. Make sure that the crate doesn't have anything absorbent in it - including a soft bed or towel, otherwise that may be why pup is going potty in there. Check out www.primopads.com if you need a non-absorbent bed for him. Make sure the crate is only big enough for him to turn around, lie down and stand up, and not so big that he can potty in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it. Dogs have a natural desire to keep a confined space clean so it needs to be the right size to encourage that natural desire. Use a cleaner that contains enzymes to clean any previous or current accidents - only enzymes will remove the smell and remaining smells encourage the dog to potty in the same location again later. Pay attention to the frequency of potty trips in the method below. If pup is having to hold it too long between potty trips, pup will be forced to go potty in the crate, and the more that happens the less motivated they will be to hold it in there. A general rule is that the maximum amount of time a puppy can hold it is their age in months plus one. Ideally, to potty train a puppy will be taken out twice that often though. So pup's maximum time is 4-5 hours, and they should be taken outside every 2-2.5 at least. The maximum time only applies when pup is confined and motivated to hold it though, that time decreases while free. Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you are still struggling after applying the above suggestions, then unfortunately pup may have already lost his desire to hold it while in a confined space. This commonly happens when someone accidentally teaches pup to do so by placing something like a puppy pad on one end of a larger crate or confining a puppy in cage where they are forced to pee through wired flooring - like at a pet store and some shelters. There are rare puppies who simply do it anyway, even though nothing happened to teach that. In those cases you can try feeding pup his meals in there to discourage it but most of the time you simply have to switch potty training methods until he is fully potty trained - at which point you might be able to use a crate for travel again later in life. Check out the Tethering method from the article linked below. Whenever you are home, use the Tethering method. Also, set up an exercise pen in a room that you can close off access to later on (pup will learn it's okay to potty in this room so choose accordingly). A guest bathroom, laundry room, or master closet with good ventilation are a few options. Don't set the exercise up in a main area of the house like the den or kitchen if you have other options. Tethering method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Use the Exercise Pen method from the article linked below, and instead of a litter box like the article mentions, use a real grass pad to stay consistent with teaching pup to potty on grass outside - which is far less confusing than pee pads (Don't use pee pads if the end goal is pottying outside!). Since your goal is pottying outside only use the Exercise Pen at night and when you are not home. When pup will hold his bladder while in the rest of the house consistently and can hold it for as long as you are gone for during the day and overnight, then remove the exercise pen and grass pad completely, close off access to the room that the pen was in so he won't go into there looking to pee, and take him potty outside only. Since he may still chew longer even after potty training, when you leave him alone, be sure to leave him in a safe area that's been puppy proofed, like a cordoned off area of the kitchen with chew toys - until he is out of the destructive chewing phases too - which typically happens between 1-2 years for most dogs with the right training. Exercise Pen method: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pad brands - Also found on Amazon www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com You can also make your own out of a piece of grass sod cut up and a large, shallow plastic storage container. For the biting and chewing, check out these articles. Chewing: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ Biting - Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Biting - Out: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

June 20, 2022

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Koda

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Siberian Husky

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7 Weeks

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It seems like she knows not to poop in the house because she never does it but when we attempt to take her out sometimes just her walking to the door with us she’ll just start to pee out of no where.

June 11, 2022

Koda's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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Hello Marcus, You are probably dealing with submissive or excited peeing with the touch, excitement of going outside, and, movement of the potty trip. I would take pup outside every 45 minutes so that pup's bladder isn't so full before they make it outside. Pup should then be able to progress to every hour once they are consistently making it outside. You might also need to keep a drag leash on pup while home (make sure it doesn't get caught on anything and take it off when you aren't supervising pup to prevent that), then when its time for pup to go out, you can calmly pick up the end of the leash without having to touch pup or make a bigger deal of the potty trip. If pup was crated right beforehand, try gently reaching in and clipping the leash on before letting pup out of the crate, so there is less touch while waiting at the door to go out. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

June 13, 2022


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