How to Potty Train a Scottish Terrier

Medium
3-6 Weeks
General

Introduction

Are you tired of coming home to puddles at the end of the workday? Worse yet, you follow your nose to the fresh pile of poop sitting on the living room rug. Accidents are a fact of life when you have puppies, but with proper potty training, you will soon be able to come home to dry floors and no more landmines on the rugs. Scotties are tough little dogs that tend to be more on the feisty side. They have a stubborn streak and tend to be fearlessly independent. This can make potty training a little more challenging than with many other breeds, but with time, effort, and patience, it will happen. 

Defining Tasks

The task, hmm, let's see, the task. Ah yes, the task is to teach your Scottish Terrier to train your pup to do his business outside in a designated area of your yard instead of in the middle of your living room carpet. While this doesn't sound like it ought to be too hard, when you are dealing with a stubborn Scottie, it could easily become a battle of wills, if you let it. Your job is to remain patient and to keep working with your pup, going at his pace until he masters this very important skill.

Getting Started

You can start potty training your Scottie as soon as you bring him home. Most breeders will not allow new owners to pick up their pups until they are between 8 and 12 weeks of age. This is the perfect age to start working with them on potty training as well as other basic behaviors. To get started, you'll need a few things.

  • Crate – For training and a place to safely keep your pup if you have to go out
  • Treats – For rewards
  • Leash – To take him outside on
  • Potty pads –For training purposes

Along with these items, you need plenty of time to work with your pup and the ability to be patient and remain calm. No matter which method you decide to use, stick to it. Be consistent and your pup will master the fine art of peeing outside. 

The Puppy Pad Method

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Step
1
Shopping time
Go out to your local pet store and pick up a large pack of puppy potty pads, a pack of treats, and if you don't already have some, a spray bottle of pet deodorizer.
Step
2
Place the pad
Start by putting a pee pad in a spot where it will be easy for him to get at when he has to go. Do not move it during the first phases of training.
Step
3
Keep tripping
While you have your puppy out of his crate and everyone is playing with him, just make sure you take him to the pad frequently. If your pup is very young, you should do this every 15 minutes. Use a timer if you need to.
Step
4
Cue word
Each time you take your pup to the pad, introduce your pup to the cue word, "Go Potty" works well. This helps not only to teach the pup that he needs to go pee, but it helps him learn to do so on command. When he goes, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
5
What if he won't go?
If after about 5 minutes your pup still hasn't gone, put him back in his crate for 10 to 15 minutes.
Step
6
Moving outside
Start slowly moving the pad over several weeks from its original spot to the door and then outside to the spot in the yard you want your pup to use. Chances are good that once his paws are on the grass, natural instinct will kick in and he will start going potty on the grass.
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The What's That Smell Method

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Step
1
Start at the store
Like many training methods, this one starts with a trip to the store. This one is for a bottle of puppy potty spray and a bag of treats.
Step
2
Mark his territory
Pick a spot on your lawn that is to become your pup's territory. In time, he will do more than his fair share of marking all by himself. For now, use the spray to mark the spot, this will encourage him to start marking it by himself and keep him in the area.
Step
3
Bring out the pup
Hook your pup on his leash and take him out to the marked spot. Let him explore it, sniff at it, run around in it, and most of all give him plenty of time to go potty in it. If after a reasonable amount of time your pup doesn't go, take him back inside for a little while and try again.
Step
4
Don't forget the special potty breaks
There are certain times of the day when you need to take your pup out, even if he has gone out recently. These are: after meals, after he drinks a lot of water, first thing in the morning after he has been playing for a while, and just before bedtime.
Step
5
Make it stick
Continue working with your pup until he comes to you when he needs to go potty so that you can take him out. Remember to praise him and give him treats whenever he gets it right.
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The 20-Minute Method

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Step
1
Check your schedule
Before you start this training method, you need to check your schedule and make sure you can get away from what you are doing every 20 minutes for the first stages of potty training your pup. When you take him out, be sure to praise him and reward him with a treat when he goes potty. If he doesn't, that's okay, go back inside and be patient. At the first sign he is making moves towards going potty, take him straight outside.
Step
2
Individual potty breaks
No matter where you are on your schedule, there are going to be times when you need to take him out. These are when you first get up in the morning, before you go to bed, and after any one of the following: meals, drinking a lot of water, or playing for an extended period of time.
Step
3
Pick your cue
You need a cue word that can be used when you are taking him out. Use it each time you take him out during the training process so that he learns to associate it with what is expected of him.
Step
4
Build stamina
Slowly start increasing the time between journeys outside. This will help him build stamina or his ability to hold it for longer periods of time.
Step
5
The road goes ever on
Every journey starts with a first step, now that you have the first step mastered, keep working with your pup until he masters this very important skill.
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Success Stories and Training Questions

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