How to Potty Train an American Eskimo Dog

Medium
1-6 Months
General

Introduction

One of the many good things about training your American Eskimo is that he is a very intelligent dog who learns very quickly. Potty training him is less about struggle than it is about time. You may need to wait until he is at least 10 to 12 weeks of age or you will be wasting your time. Prior to this, you may need to lay papers down and be vigilant about cleaning up any accidents he has. This may be the most important part of the training process as leaving a "smelly" spot on your floors will lead him to believe it’s a perfectly good place to go potty.

Defining Tasks

The most important thing to remember is that your pup only knows one thing, he needs to find a spot to go potty and when he finds it, he is going to go. In the wild, dogs have no concept of not being able to go potty anywhere they want. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to train your pup that the only place he can go potty is outside. 

Getting Started

Eskies do not respond well to being chastised or punished. The fastest way to successful potty training is not through punishing your pup for his indiscretions, it is through positive reinforcement and rewards. Your pup will not only respond better to this type of training, but will learn much faster. You will need a few things to help you along the way.

  • Crate – For training and a safe place
  • Treats – For rewarding good behavior 
  • Leash – To take your pup outside

While these supplies are necessary, you also need to make sure you have plenty of time to work with your pup and the patience to see the training to a successful end. 

The Start With a Crate Method

Most Recommended
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Step
1
Set up
Set up your pup's crate with a bed, a few toys, and a water bowl. Pop your pup in the crate and close the door. Set a timer and take him out every 60 minutes so he can go potty. When you take him outside, introduce your pup to your chosen cue, such as "Time to go potty!"
Step
2
5 minutes, no more
Give your pup five minutes to go potty and not a minute more. If he doesn't go, take him back inside and put him in his crate. Set a time for 60 minutes and then try again.
Step
3
Relief at last
By this time, if your pup didn't go before, he should have no problem taking care of business now. When he does, be sure to praise and reward him with a treat.
Step
4
Back to the crate
Take him back inside and put him in his crate. Repeat this every hour until he starts to figure out that he is only supposed to go outside in his designated area. This may take several weeks.
Step
5
More time
Start working on adding more time in between excursions outside. In time, your pup will finally come to understand where he is allowed to go potty and that going in the house is a big no-no.
Recommend training method?

The I'm Watching You Method

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0 Votes
Step
1
Grab those treats
If you want to successfully train your Eskie to do his business outside, you will need a healthy supply of his favorite treats.
Step
2
Never let him out of your sight
You should never let your pup out of your sight unless he is in his crate. The moment you see him acting in any way like he is trying to find a spot to go potty, you need to say "NO!" in a firm but not angry voice. Chances are good the shock will stop him dead in his tracks.
Step
3
The pick up
Immediately pick your pup up or put his leash and take him out to his spot out in the yard using your cue words, "Let's go potty."
Step
4
Confusion
Chances are good that he might be a bit confused at first. But, give him a few minutes and he should take care of business. When he is finished, praise him and give him a treat.
Step
5
The rest
The rest is all about working with your pup on a regular basis, extending the time between outings until he starts letting you know when he needs to go potty. Then you know you have succeeded.
Recommend training method?

The Pee Spray Method

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Step
1
Start at the store
It all starts at the store with purchasing at least one spray bottle of potty training spray. The spray is actually designed to attract your pup to the spot and instill in him the desire to go potty.
Step
2
Mark the zone
Use the spray to mark a spot on your lawn that will become your pup's potty place.
Step
3
Introductions
Put your Eskie on his leash and take him out to the spot. Let him wander around for a few minutes to get his bearings and take note of the spot. If he hasn't gone after 15 minutes, go ahead and take him back inside. Watch him closely, in case he should decide he needs to go potty. If he does, take him right outside. If not, try again in 15 minutes.
Step
4
Good job
When your pup finally decides to go potty, be sure to praise him and give him a treat.
Step
5
The onus is on you
The rest is all about being dedicated to continuing his training, including extending the time between trips outside. Give him time and your Esky will stop messing in the house and will be asking you to take him out.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers and Success Stories

Question
Axle
AnimalBreed object
1 Year
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Axle
AnimalBreed object
1 Year

Hi! Axle was potty trained for a few months and then we moved, I figured he would have a few accidents in the house and it would be normal, he eventually was doing really well not having any incidents in the house. Recently he has been peeing again in the house and last night he pooped. I don’t know what has changed, he goes outside and is out side for about fifteen minutes when let out and goes for about half hour walks every week. If you can help me figure out a cause or maybe some tips to help retrain him it would be very helpful!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
674 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kaitlyn, First, when you let him outside, he likely needs you to go out with him and keep him focused. There is a good chance that he is simply playing when you let him out and is distracted by something in your yard like a mole, neighbor's dog, or digging. Take him outside to go potty on a leash, walk him over to where you would like him to go or he tends to go, tell him to "Go Potty", and then give him one or more treats when he goes. If he gets distracted, keep him slowly moving around so that he will sniff and find a spot. Do this for about a month, then if he is going quickly when you take him potty and tell him to "Go Potty", start sending him off-leash into the yard from somewhere that you can see him from and he can hear you, like your porch. Tell him to "Go Potty" when you let him out and watch him to make sure that he does so. As soon as he goes, praise him loudly enough for him to hear you from where he is, and when he comes back over to you, give him a treat for going potty. If he never comes back over, then go to him to give him the treat. He should start coming over to you if he realizes that you always have one typically. Doing all of this should motivate him to go potty when you tell him to, even when you are not present. After he gets his treat, you can either let him back inside or let him stay outside to play in the fenced-in yard for a bit, whichever he wants and is convenient. You want him to get into the habit of peeing before he plays or goes for a walk though. If you think he needs to poop also and he has not yet, then remind him to "Go Potty" again and wait for him to do that also, then give him a second treat when he does. Most dogs need extra encouragement to remember to poop when they are outside. I suspect distraction is the main issue, but there also might be pet smells inside that are causing confusion. Make sure that you clean up all of his accidents with a cleaner that contains enzymes, to break down the poop and pee at a molecular level, which will fully remove the smell for even his sensitive nose. Other sprays do not remove the smell well enough for a dog not to smell it still. Also, avoid cleaners that contain ammonia, because Ammonia smells like urine to a dog. If the house smells like pee or poop from his own or other animals' accidents, then that can lead to potty accidents. If you know that the previous owners had pets, then I suggest renting a carpet cleaner and cleaning the carpet with a carpet safe cleaner that contains enzymes, like Nature's Miracle and similar brands. Look on the cleaner bottle for the word enzyme. Clean any rugs or carpets that may have had pee or poop on them before. If you have hardwoods or tile, then mop the floor with an enzymatic odor removing cleaner also. Third, if Axle is peeing more often than every four hours, take him to your vet to check for a urinary tract infection or similar issue. Finally, go back to the basics for a while. Crate him at night and whenever you cannot watch him, and when you are home, clip him to yourself with a six or eight-foot leash, so that he cannot sneak off to pee. Take him out every three to four hours if he is not in the crate. Since you will already be going outside with him to take him potty on leash, teaching him the "Go Potty" command, and rewarding him with treats when he pees or poops, then the extra supervision to prevent accidents should help to ensure that he has lots of opportunities to be rewarding for peeing in the right spot while he gets used to the new location, and does not create a long-term bad habit of soiling the new home. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Lola
AnimalBreed object
7 Weeks
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Question
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Lola
AnimalBreed object
7 Weeks

My pup is just under 7 weeks old and has not had her parvo shots yet so therefore we cannot take her outside to potty train as we were told parvo can live on the sidewalks and grass for 2-3 years. So my question is, how do we potty train when we can't take her outside? She seems to be using my entire house as a puppy pee pad! I'm afraid we may have a problem potty training now.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
674 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kelli, First, understand that Parvo lives on the ground where other dogs have been - via their bodily fluids like poop or saliva. If you have a fenced in yard where other dogs can't come in you should be fine to take her outside. (I am not a vet though) https://avsab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Puppy_Socialization_Position_Statement_Download_-_10-3-14.pdf If you are in an area where there are few other dogs or you can carry puppy to a spot that was likely not visited by other dogs - the risk is very low. If you are in a house, generally, your own yard is low risk even if not fenced, if you don't have many off-leash dogs in the area, since most dogs will be walked on the sidewalk. If you are in an apartment, you will either need to carry pup to a safe location away from where the general population of other dogs go, or teach pup to go potty on a real grass pad until 12 weeks of age. If you have a balcony area or small fenced in terrace, I suggest putting the real grass pad out there - clean it frequently like you would an indoor pee pad - to avoid complaints, and follow crate training in the house - taking pup to the grass pad instead other grassy areas outside. www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com www.porchpotty.com Crate training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If you have no other option but to use an indoor potty, I suggest putting a real grass pad into a room you can close off, like a bathroom, and teaching pup to use the grass pad in there only. You don't want pup to associate the rest of the house with pottying and I highly suggest avoiding all pee pads since you plan to outside potty train later - pee pads often lead to accidents on rugs and carpet when you remove them later if you use them for too long. Exercise pen method for indoor potty training -if needed: (The difference is that you won't phase pup away from the exercise pen or bathroom. You will transition pup to pottying outside and crate training at 12 weeks instead. Only use indoor potty until 12 weeks to make the transition to outside potty training easier. The method talks about litter box training but you can use a real grass pad instead since you will be transitioning to outside). https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy https://avsab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Puppy_Socialization_Position_Statement_Download_-_10-3-14.pdf Also, you can go ahead and socialize pup. Just carry pup places and take pup to safe places like friends home - where the risk of disease is low. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Invicta
AnimalBreed object
6 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Invicta
AnimalBreed object
6 Months

My 6 month old puppy,Invicta, refuses to go outside. He will hold it for hours until we get back inside. We will be outside for hours and he will hold to the point it'll leak out of him but he still will not go outside. As soon as we walk in the house he will relieve himself. We have tried the spray and he just licks it. We've tried crate training and he will wait to go potty in his crate and we try watching him. Just as he is about to go we will bring him outside and he will not go he will hold it. I am lost on what to do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
674 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jayda, First, is he fearful while outside? Often a dog won't want to go potty - especially poop, if they don't feel safe. If so, I suggest spending time with pup outside on a long leash - play games like scattering treats for pup to find, fetch or tug, practicing training with rewards, and simply sitting out there and reading for long periods of time calmly - just to expose pup and help them relax while outside. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Sasha
AnimalBreed object
2 Years
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Question
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Sasha
AnimalBreed object
2 Years

She doesn't listen
She keeps on messing the whole house
I don't want her to "go potty" outdoor but indoor
Can help me out

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
93 Dog owners recommended

Hi! Your best bet is to train her to go on a potty pad or another designated potty space. I am going to give you some training information on how to work with her to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Question
Oscar
AnimalBreed object
3 Weeks
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Question
0 found helpful
Oscar
AnimalBreed object
3 Weeks

He poo 💩 almost everywhere and mess up himself in the poo, how do i stop him, i have tried stopping him few times and take him outside to do his business but won't until he's back in his cage and mess himself up again. Now i have to bath him everyday because of this

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
93 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is some detailed information on potty training. 3 weeks is still very young. Dogs typically struggle with potty training until about 12 weeks of age. Sometimes longer. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior.

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Training Success Stories

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Tace
AnimalBreed object
1 Month

I want to train her how to listen to me

3 months, 1 week ago
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