How to Train Your Dog to Sleep All Night

Medium
1-4 Weeks
General

Introduction

You work long hours. You’re up early so you value every minute of precious sleep. You’ve loved having a new dog in your home. He’s got a lovely temperament and the kids love him. However, he disturbs your sleep more than just a little. He seems incapable of sleeping through the night. He wakes up and then he moans and whines until someone comes down to comfort him. You’ve tried letting him sleep in your bed but he still wakes you up periodically throughout the night.

You need to train him to sleep all night before you fall asleep at your desk at work. It will also be good for him. He needs a regular sleeping pattern so he’s not sleeping in the day when everyone wants to play with him and wide awake at night when you’re all asleep.

Defining Tasks

Training your dog to sleep all night will require considerable patience to begin with, but it’s definitely achievable. You need to set a consistent routine and stick to it religiously. That will require resilience on your part, especially to start with. You’ll need to ignore his cries for attention and take a number of steps to ensure he’s tired when night time comes. 

If he’s a puppy he should be growing quickly and needing a lot of sleep anyway. That makes your job easier and you could see results in just a few days. If he’s older and been a restless sleeper for many years then you may need several weeks to cement this new habit. Succeed and you’ll be able to close your eyes at night and not open them until that alarm goes off. You’ll get a delightful, relaxing and undisturbed sleep, finally!

Getting Started

Before training can begin you’ll need to collect a few bits. You’ll need a comfy bed for him in a location where he’ll get plenty of privacy. You’ll also need some treats to motivate him to stay put in the evenings. You may also need his favorite toys.

You’ll need to set aside 15 minutes each day to really tiring him out before bedtime comes. Apart from that, you’ll just need patience and a can-do attitude.

Once you’ve got all that you’re ready to get to work!

The Happy Place Method

Most Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
New bed
If he’s always trying to leave his current bed it may not be very comfy. Try getting him a new bed and filling it with some nice new blankets. You can also put a couple of new toys in there. The more enticing his bed is the more likely he’ll be to stay in it.
Step
2
Treat
Leave a treat in his bed in the evenings. This will encourage him to go in there to start with. Then give him another one in his bed in the morning when you come down. If he starts to associate his bed with food and knows he’ll get a treat in the morning, he’ll have more motivation to stay put.
Step
3
Don’t punish him
If he does come and wake you, it’s important you don’t shout or punish him. You may only scare him and then he’ll be even more keen to get your attention and the problem could worsen. Simply remove him from the room calmly.
Step
4
Toilet before bed
Make sure you take him to the toilet before bed each evening. If you come down to accidents then this could well be the problem. He could be waking you up because he’s desperate for the loo.
Step
5
Water
He could also be waking you because he’s thirsty. Make sure his water bowl is full every evening before you go to bed. Dehydration is not only bad for his health but it could massively disrupt his sleep.
Recommend training method?

The Routine Method

Effective
2 Votes
Step
1
Food & toilet
You need to set a consistent routine for him each day. This is particularly important if he’s a puppy. If he knows when he’s going to eat and go to the toilet each day his body clock will configure around that.
Step
2
Exercise
You must give him enough exercise. Many dogs don’t sleep because they’re restless and full of energy. Give him an extra walk before bed time or a longer walk during the day. Alternatively, take him out and throw a ball for 15 minutes before bed. The short sprinting will quickly tire him out, making it easier for him to sleep through the night.
Step
3
Give him time
If he’s a puppy, you need to give him time to adjust. Most dogs need several weeks to fully feel at home. So, don’t be too worried if he’s not sleeping through the night to start with. Be patient and you’ll see results.
Step
4
Good night & morning
Before you go to bed, take him to his bed and calmly stroke him for a few minutes. Then say "good night" and go to bed. In the morning, spend a couple of minutes stroking him and saying "good morning". This will help build a routine and re-assure him that you’ll be back with him soon.
Step
5
Attention
Set aside at least 15 minutes each day solely for playing with him. The not sleeping may be attention-seeking behavior. If you ensure you give him enough during the day he may be more content sleeping at night.
Recommend training method?

The Environment Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Look for disruptions
Are there any external factors that could be preventing him from sleeping throughout the night? Are neighbors regularly making noise? Do you have guests staying downstairs near his bed? Are there any other loud noises that could be waking him?
Step
2
Move his bed
It could be that the current location of his bed is not conducive to a good night's sleep. Move his bed to somewhere where he has walls around him and a considerable amount of privacy. If he’s secluded he’ll find it easier to sleep undisturbed.
Step
3
Cold shoulder
Don’t pander to his needs throughout the night. You need to make sure you ignore his pleas for attention if he wakes you. If he knows you’ll respond to him he’ll be more likely to pester you again. So, shut the door at night time and leave it shut until the morning.
Step
4
Consider medical problems
If he’s older this is particularly important. If none of the other steps are working it’s worth taking him to a vet. He could have developed joint pain, for example, that’s keeping him up and leaving him in considerable pain and discomfort.
Step
5
Consider other factors
Have you recently moved? Has someone in the home recently moved away? All these factors can cause him to have separation anxiety and may make sleeping a struggle. If this is the case, give him plenty of attention in the day and give him time. He’ll eventually get through it.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Caesar
Chihuahua
1 Year
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Caesar
Chihuahua
1 Year

Will not sleep through the night. He sleeps in kennel (always has) we go to bed at same time every night. But he wakes up at least once a night.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicki, He could be waking up for a few different reasons. The reason why he is waking up will have a lot to do with the solution to the problem. If he is receiving any type of attention when he wakes up at night, then he is probably waking up out of habit, in hopes of receiving attention from you. If that is the case, then you will need to give him some tough love and stop responding to his cries. This might take a couple of hours for the first few nights, and you will have to be patient and possibly buy some earplugs, while he learns that waking up is not fun anymore and that he might as well just go right back to sleep. If he is waking up because he is not tired enough then have a look at his daytime schedule. He might need more exercise, less time sleeping during the day, or more physical contact with people during the day. If you can't meet those needs yourself during the day then you might want to look into hiring a dog walker, like Wag!, or into taking him to a doggie daycare about three times a week to play, if he likes other dogs, and into leaving better toys at home, to entertain him. Great toys for entertainment are Kong's, stuffed with your dog's food that has been soaked in water until mushy and mixed with peanut butter or soft cheese, and frozen overnight, or puzzle toys filled with your dog's kibble, or wobble type toys, that your dog has to push around to make treats fall out. If he is needing to go potty during the night still, then a trip to your vet is probably in order. Your dog might have a urinary incontinence issue or something related, such as a urinary tract infection. Those things would make it hard for him to hold his bladder overnight. The issue also could be his eating and drinking schedule. Try removing all food and water two hours before bedtime, and taking him potty right before time to go to sleep. His bladder will remain active until he is sleeping, so it is important not to take him out to go potty for the last time too early before bed, or he might just need to go again before morning. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Hello we do everything you said I take him for a walk everyday I took him
To the vet everything is good I take him out before bed every night we play with her she is 5 years old she just dose not sleep she wakes up 3 time a night every night I am tiered

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Question
Coco
Mini Australian Shepterrier
2 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Coco
Mini Australian Shepterrier
2 Years

Coco just had puppies 3 weeks ago. Prior to giving birth, we moved from a large 7 bdrm house to a cute 3 bdrm condo (with no doggie door). She used to be able to let herself out at night if needed. Now, we have to let her out. During the pregnancy she ate a lot! Now, I'm trying to get her back to just eating in the morning, little at lunch and little at dinner and not at all during the night. She whines to go out nearly every hour - it's driving all of us crazy! Sometimes she actually goes, and maybe poos, but last night, she just wanted out to roam and smell her surroundings. We reward her when she actually goes, but I need sleep!!! She doesn't seem to want to sleep with the puppies, and I'm worries she's not feeding them through the night. Can you help me and my 3 kids get a little sleep tonight?? Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carla, Coco might be starting the process of weaning. This process often begins around three to five weeks for puppies, and lasts until seven to eight weeks of age or longer. It is typically a very gradual process which helps the mother dog avoid nipple infections. If she is feeding them once during the night that might be enough for the puppies so long as they seem well hydrated and their weight gain is good. If she is feeding them less than every six to eight hours at night then try creating an enclosed area for her, connected to the puppies' whelping box that the puppies cannot get into, but low enough for her to go between her area and the puppies'. That way she will be next to them, and can get to them when they cry to eat, but does not have to touch them or be bothered by them while she sleeps. You want for her to be able to go in and out of the whelping box as she pleases, without moving too far away from them. If she seems to be wanting to be with you at night, then her separation from you might be the issue and moving the puppies' whelping box near where you sleep at night might help. If she is starting the process of weaning then around four weeks you can begin to introduce them to gruel, which is a mixture of puppy food, puppy milk formula, and warm water. It is very soupy at first and the puppy food is soaked in hot water to make it mushy. I would highly recommend not decreasing her caloric intake yet. She will actually need as many or more calories while nursing as she did during the pregnancy. Unless your vet suggests otherwise, I would wait until she has weaned the puppies to decrease her food. Although you might be able to consolidate the number of times per day that she eats, she should still be eating more frequently than normal and more calories than she does when not nursing or pregnant. If she does not get enough calories that can effect her milk supply and health while nursing.. When you take her outside to go potty take her on a leash, stay in one boring spot or walk just a few feet and let her sniff the ground. If she does not go within five minutes then take her back inside. If she goes, then praise her and reward her with the treat, but if she does not go, then bring her back inside and place her into a crate for ten minutes, to discourage her from asking to go out more frequently then she needs to go. Because of her prior pregnancy her bladder capacity is probably still diminished, so more frequent potty breaks are normal, even during the night because she is awake and nursing, which wakes up her bladder as well. Every hour seems excessive though, especially at night, so if she is actually peeing that often I would visit your vet to get her evaluated for blood sugar issues, a urinary tract infection, or bladder damage that occurred during her pregnancy or labor. If she is not actually peeing that often though, then you can assume that it is just normal post pregnancy frequency combined with a desire to be outside. Making the trips outside boring, crating her for a few minutes if she does not actually go, and possibly even eliminating the treat reward, so long as she is doing very well with her potty training and does not need that incentive anymore in your new home. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Coco
Mini Australian Shepterrier
2 Years
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Coco
Mini Australian Shepterrier
2 Years

How do I know if her puppies are getting enough milk? Can I supplement with any formula type milk for puppies? Should they be wanting water

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Carla, Typically a puppy should double his weight by the end of the first week of life. After that he should consistently be gaining weight each week. The exact amount that the puppy should gain will depend on his own genetics from his parentage and your vet's recommendations. Generally expect regular weight gain every week and watch for signs of dehydration, such as skin that does not immediately go back to normal after you pinch it, very yellow pee, white gums, and a dry nose. If you are at all concerned contact your veterinarian. You can also contact your veterinarian for general guidelines on how much your specific puppies should be taking in. If a mother dog has enough milk and is feeding her puppies correctly, then they should not need supplementation with milk. If they are not getting enough from her, then they will need to be bottle fed puppy replacement formula. Do not give them water until they begin the weaning process though. Water on it's own can effect their electrolyte balance negatively when they are not eating solid food also. Here is an article with a bit of information on puppy weight gain: https://www.cuteness.com/blog/content/normal-puppy-weight-gain-for-first-weeks Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Chilli
Miniature Schnauzer
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Chilli
Miniature Schnauzer
9 Months

Hi, my miniature schnauzer Chilli is 9 months old he goes to bed nicely but wakes up howling at least once or twice in the night he howls for maybe a couple of minutes then settles down again then wakes again between 4am and 5pm. When he wakes then he starts barking and won’t give up and go back to sleep. He sleeps in the kitchen with our other miniature schnauzer Pepper ( she’s a girl of 19 months ). I’ve tried ignoring him but it doesn’t work he won’t settle down or shut up. We’ve tried having him in our bedroom, he doesn’t howl or bark when he’s in our room but he doesn’t wake up and get out of bed every now and then and sometimes tries to get on our bed. I really need some help, I’ve tried the adaptil plug in but that didn’t help either. Any advise would be great. Also everything he does is at a fast pace, he gets so excited when he sees us in the morning and when you come in from being out.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diane, There are a couple of reasons why Chili might be howling at night. The first reason is that he might be hearing noises at night. If there are other dogs or coyotes outside that howl during the night, that can cause him to howl. If he is hearing sirens from fire trucks, police cars, or ambulances, those noises can cause him to howl. If there is a high pitched electronic noise that he notices at night, that could also cause him to howl. If noise is the cause, then finding a way to block out that noise, possibly by moving him into another safe room, or by adding something like a sound machine, might help. The second reason why he might be howling is separation anxiety. Because he does not howl in your room while he is with you and because he tends to have a more excitable and anxious temperament, this might be his reason for howling. The fact that your room might not contain the same sounds as the kitchen and the fact that many puppies at nine months old are excitable anyways, means that this is not definitely the cause though. You will have to evaluate how he does while separated from you during the day also. You will also need to evaluate his body language for signs of stress. These signs can include heavy panting, constant whining, lifting one paw up, licking his lips, and general tenseness. If it is separation anxiety, then he will need to learn more independence and will need more structure in general. Most dogs with separation anxiety need for their owners to interact with them in a calm and structured manner. They also need boundaries and consistency to help them feel secure and to build trust and respect toward their owners. They also need to regularly practice alone time in places like the crate for a couple of hours every day, as well as practice distance obedience commands, and calming commands that require self-control, such as the "Place" or "Bed" command. The goal is to build an anxious dog's confidence by teaching him respect for you so that he does not feel the need to be in charge himself, which can cause anxiety. The goal is also to teach him coping skills while he is alone by doing things like crating him with a food stuffed chew-toy and practicing structured obedience where he has to remain in place away from you. "Down Stays" at a distance are good for this. If you end up crating him some to encourage independence during the day, then when you crate him, stuff a Kong chew toy with dog food and treats and give it to him in the crate, so that he will have something to focus his energy on and so that the crate will be more rewarding. When he is quiet in the crate, then go over to the crate and drop treats inside without saying anything, then walk away again. Do not let him out of the crate or kitchen until he has been quiet for at least one second. Solid K-9 Training has a YouTube channel with good crate training instructions for separation anxiety. The last reason that he might he howling is that he is simply being demanding. Adding structure, working on his general respect for you, and correcting the howling behavior, if it truly is just him being demanding, should help. Make sure that you rule out noises and anxiety first though. For the early morning wake ups I suggest that you evaluate his daytime routine and make sure that he is getting adequate mental and physical stimulation during the day and is not sleeping too much during the day. Do this to make sure that he is actually tired still when he wakes up at night and in the early morning, and is not simply bored because he is finished sleeping, which is a different issue entirely, and one that should not be occurring at night. I also suggest you deal with any separation anxiety going on if you feel like that is the issue, because that could be causing the morning barking too. Once those things are taken care of, if it's still an issue, then I suggest that you purchase a crate, spend time getting him used to being in the crate during the day by crate training him, and then when he is used to the crate, utilize it for the early morning wake ups. To utilize the crate in the morning, first, when he cries, silently go to him and take him outside to go potty on a leash without saying anything to him and without letting him play or stay out there for more than five to seven minutes. It is very important that you take him out on a leash so that he cannot play. After he goes potty, quietly praise him, and then take him back inside and place him directly into the crate until it is time for him to get up for the day. Do not feed him. Do not play with him. Do not talk to him. Simply put him back to bed in an area where he has nothing else to do but lay down, which is the crate. If you believe that he really is not tired anymore because he has already slept a long amount of time, then do the above but give him a stuffed Kong to chew on in the crate also. If he ought to still be tired and asleep, then simply place him into the crate without any treats or food. One rubber chew toy without food is fine if you want to give him something, but do not make the crate rewarding. The goal is boring. Expect him to pitch a fit the first week that you do this for, but hopefully by the end of the week he will realize that barking will get him taken outside to go potty but will not get him anything else, and he will choose to be quiet rather than be crated. If all else fails, then crate train him and have him sleep in the crate at night in a quiet and semi-dark location so that he is less likely to be woken up during the night and morning. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Malachi
Alaskan Husky
5 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Malachi
Alaskan Husky
5 Months

We have kennel trained our first husky with no issues. But Malachi has been a completely different story. He has never not cried, I should say screamed, all night in the kennel. We have tried to show that the kennel is a good place, we have ignored him, all the tricks online and he still screams all night. We did try to let him sleep in our room with our other husky but he just wasn’t ready and fully potty trained to sleep through the night yet so we couldn’t continue to do that. But he didn’t cry. The kennel is falling apart from constant battle of him trying to escape. It’s to the point now where I’m wondering if this could be separation anxiety. Any help would be a life saving!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kimberly, If you have already tried making the crate a very pleasant place by dropping treats inside for Malachi to find, dropping treats into the crate while he is being quiet inside it for a second, and placing a food stuffed Kong in the crate with him when you place him inside, then the issue might be a need for more structure in order for him to feel more secure in general and to learn how to calm himself down and develop coping abilities. I suggest adding more structure to his daily routine. Have him work for his meals, walks, affection, and toys a little more by asking him to do a command before you give him something. Teach him to stay in his crate while the door is open with you standing there and do not let him out until he is being calm. Generally reward calm behavior throughout the day and make your interactions with him pleasant but calm and peaceful right now. Do not baby talk to him or get him super excited. You can play and have fun with him but keep him more focused and his mental energy level moderate to calm. To teach him to stay in the crate with the door open, first, during the day lead him into his crate while he is on a leash without stopping at the entrance of the crate. Close the door behind him and if he protests, then let him pitch a fit while you sit in the same room and ignore him. Bring a book and possibly some head phones to decrease the noise for your own sanity, but make sure that can still tell when he quiets down, so don't cancel out the noise completely. This might take a while the first time. As soon as he becomes calm for even a second, then walk over to him and start to open the door. When he tries to rush out, like he probably will, then quickly close the door again. Do not slam it into him but don't worry if it hits his nose a little bit. When he calms back down, then repeat opening, and if needed, closing the door again. Do this until you can open the door and leave it open and he will stay inside. As soon as he is calm enough to put a leash on him do so and drop the other end of the leash on the floor where you can step on it quickly if he gets out. Just because you put the leash on him though that does not mean that he can come out yet. Close the door it he tries to exit after you put the leash on him. When you can stand next to the crate, instead of in front of it, with the door open, and he will stay inside, then he may come out when you tell him "Okay" or "Free". Your attitude while you are doing this should be as cool as a cucumber. Firm, calm, and deliberate. Practice this during the day twice a day. As he improves, then gradually make the leash attached to him longer by clipping another leash or two to the handle, and move away from the crate one foot at a time while the door is open and he is inside. Be ready to step on the long leash though in case he tries to bolt, so that you can place him directly back inside the crate using the leash and he will not learn that rushing the crate gets him out. Whenever you let him out of the crate he must be calm and he must wait until you release him with an "Okay" or "Free" command. If adding more structure to his routine and crate time does not increase his calm behavior within a month, then check out Jeff Gelhman's separation anxiety protocol from Solid K9 Training. He has a video channel on YouTube where he teaches people how to work on separation anxiety, crate training, implementing structure, nervous behaviors, rude behavior, and aggression (which it does not sound like you have an issue with). His training in all areas is not for ever dog but his advise on separation anxiety and crate training tends to work very well. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Purdie
Sprocker Spaniel
16 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Purdie
Sprocker Spaniel
16 Months

Hi there,
Purdie is perfect apart from night time.....
We have two other dogs and generally they all cuddle up together at bed time, the two other dogs don’t make a sound, but Purdie generally after 2-3 hours wakes up barking.....
We have a toddler,
So think we may have made a rod for our back, as we didn’t want her to wake him we’d jump out of bed to let her out......
we could do this 2-4
Times every night ,
Like having a newborn baby ....!!
My sister said about a crate, so we got one, we put a towel over it to made it hard homely and she is such a good girl with it, she will go in on her own accord when it’s bedtime, she knows and goes straight in.
But she just won’t sleep through the night..??
She does follow
Me around, and lies by the kitchen gate waiting for me
Most of the time , she is very loving and does
Play a lot
With the other dogs, but has to check in where I am..... she watches me.
She gets plenty of excercise, we’ve tried ncreasing it and all
Sorts
But she still does the same waking up....??
I’m not sure weather to try and have her in with me....?? She never has and has always been with the other 2 dogs since we got her at 8 weeks old, and would feel bad on the other two dogs.....
but we are so tired....
I’m not sure if it’s seperation anxiety, but she is fine in the day and if we go out..... no problem at all,
No mess
Nothing...??
It’s just at night..??
I’ve have got an adaption plug in that’s in there room, just in case to see if that helps....??
Or weather it’s attention seeking...??
Please help we are shattered .

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katrina, Purdie likely needs some tough love. She is old enough not to need attention, bathroom breaks, or anything else during the night. If she has been in the habit of waking up and receiving attention as a puppy, then she probably does not know how to sleep through the night for sheer lack of practice and opportunity to learn. Commit two solid weeks to ignoring her barking during the night. I would suggest crating her in a room by herself away from your toddlers' room and letting her bark until she goes back to sleep. Crating her in your room is fine also, but she will be fine in another room and you may be more likely to follow through on the training if you do not have to listen to the barking so close. It sounds harsh but she needs the opportunity to learn how to self-sooth and develop independent coping skills. She may or may not have Separation Anxiety. She most likely has a tendency toward anxiety but is mostly doing the behavior out of habit because it gets her what she wants. Dogs with Separation Anxiety do incredibly well with structure, boundaries, and clear leadership. Dogs with Separation Anxiety tend to be insecure and lack leadership. They need opportunities to learn self-control and management skills. If you do not see progress in two weeks, then check out Jeff Gelhman from solidK9training's separation anxiety protocol on YouTube. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Pippa
Cocker Spaniel
14 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Pippa
Cocker Spaniel
14 Weeks

My pup was sleeping to 6am at the beginning, she is now waking at 4am the last week and a half and I don't know how to stop this from happening? I normally get up and let her outside as she scrapes at the doors. Please help

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lisa, If she is not crated at night, then I highly suggest crating her at night at this age. Doing that, taking her potty on a leash, keeping the early morning potty trip very boring, and then putting her back into her crate after she goes potty, until 6-8am when you want to get up for the day, without feeding her breakfast early, should help. She might also be going through a growth spurt where she is eating and drinking more during the day. If that is the case, then sticking to my suggestions above and wait a couple of weeks, and it should resolve on it's own. If she is not in a crate, then she probably has more energy than she used to have as a young puppy, and so even though she may still be tired at 4am she is choosing to wake up to play rather than sleep. Crating her and only letting her out for boring, on leash potty trips, and then putting her right back into the crate after without feeding her early, until it is the time that you want her to normally get up, should help her stop waking up just to play. When you put her back into the crate at 4am after the potty trip, if she protests do not let her out and feed her. Since you know that her bladder is now empty, she will be fine to wait. Her body need to adjust to eating when you choose to feed her and not before or her body will wake her up early to eat every morning and she will learn that making a fuss gets her out of the crate and will continue doing it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Bella
Schnoodle
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Bella
Schnoodle
4 Months

My puppy used to sleep through the night and wake up around 5:30 am. However, recently she has been waking up around 2:00am and 4:00am and then at 7:00am for the remainder of the day. We go to bed around 10:00 pm and stop water/food around 8:00pm. We take her out at 10:00pm before she goes into her crate for the evening. She goes into the crate pretty easily and when she wakes up in the middle of the night we take her out and she does pee/poop every time. I am not sure if she is waking up just because she needs to go to the bathroom and is still fairly young to hold it. I am just confused because she used to be able to hold it all night and now she is waking us up to go to the bathroom. Should we try to ignore her so she will hold it or still get up with her and take her out. Will she start sleeping through the night with time?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Robin, Bella might be going through a growth spurt if the extra wakings have not gone past two weeks. I would keep things the way they are, give it two weeks to see if she will go back to sleeping through on her own. If she is still waking up two weeks after this started, then I would let her cry it out at 2 am, but take her out one time between 3 am-5 am if she wakes up to go out again. At four months of age she probably needs to go out at least once if she is sleeping longer overall now, from 10 pm-7 am. By five to six months of age you should start to see zero wake ups more often. It sounds like you are doing a good job with her overall routine though. When you take her to go potty, keep the trip simple boring, keep her on a leash and focused, and don't give her a treat when she goes potty, only a quiet "Good Girl", and then straight back inside and into the crate. The middle of the night wake ups are the one time I discourage treats, excitable praise, and other rewards after going potty, once your dog is starting to understand the concept of going potty when you take them outside. You do not want your dog to look forward to middle of the night wake-ups. Middle of the night wake-ups are all business and calmness. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zeke
Labradoodle
5 Months
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Zeke
Labradoodle
5 Months

Hi! We have a 5 month old Labradoodle. He sleeps a lot during day since we are all at work, when we get home in the afternoons, we will play fetch, take him for walks. Come night time, he's REALLY ready to play. We tried crating him the first two weeks we had him (at 3-1/2 months) and he barked, cried and would soil himself and roll all in it - night after night of this behavior, we tried putting him in the bed with our teenager (her dog)....He was doing okay sleeping and maybe waking once or twice - all of a sudden he's waking every hour or every two hours, will go outside and pee a little, then come in wanting to play....We don't show any excitement/playfulness towards him when he wakes up like this but he is determined to play....I read below about not rewarding with a treat during middle of night bathroom trips which we have always done but will put a stop to tonight!! Please help!!!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ann, Definitely stop the treats at night, like you mentioned. When you take him potty during the night, take him on a leash, give him five minutes to use the bathroom, then take him inside and put him back into the crate. Potty trips should be extremely boring at night. First, he needs more stimulation during the day. I suggest feeding him his breakfast out of hollow chew toys so that he has to work for his food during the day and will stay awake for longer. If you are able to hiring a dog walker at least some of the days would probably help too. When you play with him in the evening he needs mental stimulation in addition to physical exercise. Work on teaching him things that tire him out. Things that are new, require a lot of concentration or self-control. If you can combine the mental stimulation with the physical exercise even better. When you play fetch incorporate obedience commands into it. During walks have him heel, focus on you, stop and practice commands like sit and down. Generally make the walk a training session also so that he has to work during the walk - which will tire him out more. His breed is typically intelligent and needs to be stimulated mentally. Once you have dealt with making potty trips more boring and stimulating him during the day, I suggest disciplining his nighttime antics. First, teach him what "Quiet" means during the day using the "Quiet" method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, take him potty if it has been more than five hours since he last went potty, then put him back into the crate after. If he tries to get out of the crate or pitches a fit when you put him back in, or if it has been less than five hours, use a Pet Convincer, which is a small canister of pressurized air. Tell him "Quiet" when he cries. If he does not get quiet, spray a small puff of air at his side through the crate, then leave (Do NOT spray his face). Repeat this every time that he cries. The first three nights or so will probably be rough, stay consistent, even if he has an accident. Once night time becomes boring he should learn to settle down and sleep as long as you are stimulating him enough during the day - do not skip adding more stimulation to his day, otherwise the training may not work. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tory
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
11 Months
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Tory
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
11 Months

Tory has just moved to an apartment where she has no yard (up until now she had a yard) and she doesn’t like to go potty on a leash. She also scratches on the door during the night to go outside and will not go potty. She will go on a long walk and then come inside and go potty. Maybe once or twice a day she will go potty on a leash, mostly tinkle, not poop.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Debbie, Tory needs to be crate trained and crated to limit her freedom in your home to only when her bladder is empty after going potty outside. Also, try taking her potty on a long, 20-30' leash (not retractable but one that can drag and be slack). Tell her to "Go Potty" and when she does go, praise her enthusiastically and give her five treats, one at a time. If she doesn't go potty, put her in the crate for an hour inside to avoid accidents, then take her potty again after an hour has gone by. Repeat this whenever she doesn't go potty until she goes, then you can give her 2-3 hours of freedom (if she consistently won't have accidents during that amount of time, otherwise do less freedom). After 2-3 hours, place her back in the crate for 1-2 hours, then take her potty again, and repeat the trips every hour until she goes. When you need to be gone she should be able to hold her bladder in the crate for the amount of time she was able to hold it for in the old house (the confined space of the crate should naturally encourage her to hold it). Make sure the crate is only large enough for her to stand up, turn around, and lay down and not so big that she can pee in one end and stand in the opposite end to avoid it - otherwise the crate won't utilize her instinct to keep things clean. Also, do not put anything absorbent in the crate. Use something like a Primopad from primopads.com if you want to give a bit of comfort. Reference the following articles for how to introduce the crate: Small dog crate introduction - Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate Training method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lola
Mini Dachshund
8 Months
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Lola
Mini Dachshund
8 Months

Hello, Lola has had no problems with command trainings, but for sleeping at night she has issues. She wines still every 2 hours, i take her out and sometimes she goes, sometimes she just wants to sniff. We’ve tried having her bed in the living room, and in the bedroom but nothing works. She knows she supposed to be in bed because the second i get up she usually gets into beg again. She also still whines in her crate and it seems it’ll never stop. We’ve tried tough love but she’ll whine and bark for 6 hrs straight. Anything we can do to crate and night train? Anything helps we don’t sleep anymore

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Pantaleo, It sounds like its time to correct using an interrupter. First, during the day work on teaching the word "Quiet" using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Once she learns quiet, also practice the command whenever you catch her whining during the day and reward her when she gets quiet for even a second when you tell her Quiet or she stays quiet for 3-5 minutes after being told- to help her understand that Quiet also means stop whining, as well as stop barking. Follow the Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark At night, when she knows the Quiet command, when she whines before it has been at least six hours since she last went potty, tell her "Quiet". If she gets quiet, great! If she doesn't or starts whining again within five minutes, use a Pet Convincer - which is a small canister of unscented, pressurized air. Go to her calmly and spray a small puff of air at her side near her ribs through the crate (NOT at her face), then leave again. If it has been more than 5 minutes since she was told Quiet AND you genuinely think she forgot that you said it you can tell her Quiet again, but whenever she disobeys your Quiet command, or starts whining again a few minutes after getting quiet, then repeat the corrections - Correcting calmly. During the day when she is in the crate, go to her and sprinkle treats into the crate when she gets quiet or is staying quiet, and use the pet Convincer to correct when she whines. Rewarding the quietness during the day is important also. You can also give a food stuffed chew toy during the day to help with boredom and any anxiety. At night don't give food though or she may stay awake or need to go potty more - she should be tired enough at night to settle down after a while and sleep. Unless there is a medical condition she should be able to hold her bladder between 8-12 hours at night (depending on her own bladder control and whether she stays asleep). Some small dogs can hold it less if they keep waking up, but unless something is wrong she should be able to hold it AT LEAST 6 hours in the crate at night. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Texas
Pit bull mix
2 Years
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Texas
Pit bull mix
2 Years

Texas will sleep a majority of the night but she gets up at 4 am to play and again at 6am. She sleeps with me and I always walk her for a good 10 minutes before bed. We play all day and I take her for hikes once a day. She is still a fairly new rescues dog so I’m not sure if she is still adjusting or not? I recently just broke my hand as well but that hasn’t changed much between me and her.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Samantha, I suggest crating her at night so she learns to settle down and sleep. Don't let her out when she barks, wait until she is quiet, and you be the one to pick the wake up time. It's possible that her previous home woke up that early or simply never laid down boundaries. When she has learned the routine and will settle better, you can let her sleep with you again at night if that is what you prefer. Keep any early morning or night potty trips boring, taking her out on the leash, no talking, no playing, no food, and straight back to bed so she will learn that it's not worth waking up early - nothing fun happens until you get her up. Surprise method for crate training; https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zahara
Corgi
6 Months
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Zahara
Corgi
6 Months

Our dog goes to bed in her crate a the foot of our bed. However, she has anxiety when in the crate or a room alone. So when i get up for work to get ready, and leave the room she can hear me fumbling around. She whines and scratches and keeps my wife up, who normally sleeps in as she works later. What would the best routine be? Should we move the dogs crate from our bedroom?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tyler, A couple of things are probably happening here. First, when she wakes up because you are up she probably truly has to go potty because she is awake at that point. If she stayed asleep she could hold it longer because the bladder acts differently during sleep, but once awake she needs to pee. Moving her somewhere where you wouldn't wake her up in the morning would probably help her sleep in a bit more, but don't expect more than 10 hours without pottying. You can also take her potty when she wakes, but return her back to the crate without feeding her, and deal with the barking that happens then to let her stay in your room - correcting the barking and whining knowing that she doesn't truly need anything but just wants to eat or play - to help her learn to go back to sleep until your wife wants to get up. I will touch on how to deal with that in a second. Second, she may be rested enough at that time that she simply doesn't feel like going back to sleep at that point - the solution to that is the same for needing to go potty, take her potty, then put back into the crate and correct the following whining and barking so she gets into the habit of settling back down after being taken potty, or have her sleep in another room. Third, if you are feeding her when she protests in the morning, then her internal clock will cause her to be hungry at that time every morning...You will need to postpone breakfast until later and deal with the barking in the crate the same as with pottying and not being tired until her body resets to eating later. If you want to keep her in your room but deal with the barking and whining, then when she wakes up take her potty calmly on a leash (no play or food here), return her to the crate, then when she barks have your wife tell her Quiet, (teach Quiet using the Quiet method from the article linked below during the day so she understands the word). Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark If she gets quiet, great, no treats and no correction - that was her warning so she understands what to do. Only give treats for Quiet during waking hours not the morning sleepy time. If she continues to bark or stops whining/barking but starts again, use a Pet convincer (which is a small canister of unscented pressurized air - Don't use citronella) to blow a quick puff of air through the crate at her side (NOT face), then get back in bed (even though your wife won't get to sleep much the first few days you do this - she should pretend like she is or read in bed until her usual preferred wake up time). Repeat the correction with the pet convincer every time she barks. When you are ready to get up, wait until she is quiet, then let her out using the method from the video linked below - so she doesn't bolt out but learns calmness in the crate. This is also a great protocol to practice during the day to help with anxiety and calmness with the crate: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ If you move to another room, ignore any crying for the first three nights to let her learn to self-sooth unless you know she truly needs to go potty. You can practice crating her by herself in a room during the day using the Surprise method from the article linked below to make the transition easier. If you are using the Surprise method during the day and ignoring any crying at night (no treats at night), and the crying persists, tell her quiet calmly, and use the pet convincer to correct any barking that follows if needed, then leave the room again - keep things calm and low key while doing all of this. Corrections shouldn't be angry or loud - but calm and consistent. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Monty and Lola
Jack Russell
10 Months
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Monty and Lola
Jack Russell
10 Months

We have 2 pups now 10 months old ,both from same litter. One male and one female. They have been brought up during the lockdown so separation has been an issue and sleeping all night has never been good but is now really bad. They started in kitchen but not in crate and started barking and scratching at door off and on all night . We tried putting them in crate together in our room but they have starting waking earlier and earlier each night. After going out to pee around 4am going into crate briefly but then whining and whining. Now waking at 2am and continuing all night unless we let on our bed, then we can't sleep!! So tried in another room but not locked in crate as girl dog bangs and bangs on it. Now scratching at door from 2am and whining intermittently all night .... really don’t want them in our room at night what do you suggest ... we do the food and drink early but girl dog still has accidents if don’t let her out. Well exercised in day with long walks and ball play. Also should they be in separate crates? Girl dog has been spayed but boy still waiting for castration because of lockdown.
Girl dog very excitable and needy and neither used to being left on their own as we are both retired and at home and in lockdown !! Please help need to get our sleep and have some structure and agree on training plan to get them settled and happy.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bobbie, First, both pups need to be sleeping in separate crates. I suggest crating in kitchen or den, instead of your room based on what you have said. During the day, work on teaching the Quiet command using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark At the same time, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pups stays quiet in his or her crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As they improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating them during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pups learn sooner. Whenever they cries in the crate, tell each "Quiet". If that dog gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he/she stays quiet. If she/he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his/her side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever they cry. Practice daytime crating like this until both do well for up to three hours quietly in the crate during the day. At night, when pup cries before it has been at least 6 hours since they last went potty, tell that dog Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he/she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Don't give food at that time though. If it's been more than 6 hours since the last pee, take pup potty on a leash at that time - keeping the trip as boring as possible and not giving play or food at that time, then return to crate right after, and correct with pet convincer if pup cries after being returned to the crate. Check out the Crate Training method linked below for tips to get pups to go potty efficiently when you take them and how to set up the crates properly - the potty times won't apply as much since pups are older and can hold it for longer though, but pay attention to the rest of that article. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Finally, I suggest working on building independence and structure with the dogs in general, especially in light of covid and likely needing to go back into work or start traveling more in the future again. Check out the articles and commands linked below for some good general things to be practicing once nights are improving, to help with overall behavior. Working, Consistency, and Obedience methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Come - Reel in method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rider
Pit bull
3 Years
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Rider
Pit bull
3 Years

Rider has been waking us up every 1-2 hours every single night. Usually only one of those times is to go pee. I’ve tried moving his bed next to me which helped a little but he is still running around at night and crying for attention. I spend a good amount of time with him during the day and he goes for walks usually 30 min to an hour before bed time. What can I do to get him to sleep through the night?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amanda, I highly suggest crating him at night. Practice the following during the day first to introduce the crate: Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Gradually work up to him being calm in the crate for 3 hours during the day. At that point crate him at night also. Remove all food and water 2 hours before bed. If you do that he should be able to hold it for 8-10 hours at night. If he wakes up before then and doesn't have a medical condition he is likely doing it for attention. It's unhealthy for him and you. When he cries in the crate before 8 hours, once you have crate trained him during the day and so you know he is simply demanding attention, then you can either ignore the crying and within a week of being consistent he will learn to go back to sleep in most cases, or you can correct the crying using a Pet Convincer - which is a small canister or unscented, pressurized air. Tell him "Ah Ah" calmly, then spray a small puff of air at his side through the crate wires, then leave again. Repeat the correction each time he cries until he goes back to sleep. Using a Pet Convincer usually works a lot quicker than ignoring the crying, so you can decide which route you prefer. Don't use citronella air though - only unscented air. The citronella is too harsh for a dog's nose. You can speed up the entire crate training process and most dogs adjust just fine. Working pup up to crate time during the day at the same time as the nighttime crating, but the above approach where you introduce it during the day gradually first is gentler. Decide what's best for you guys based on your needs. Either way you don't need to feel bad for crating pup. He is harming you by interrupting your sleep and harming himself. You are doing what is best for your relationship and both of your health in the long run. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Yuzu
Yorkshire Terrier
13 Weeks
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Yuzu
Yorkshire Terrier
13 Weeks

Hi,Me and my husband decided to get a puppy. He comes from a breeder in queensland where he lives with two 80 years old couple. He has brother, mum,dad, other relatives dogs that he lives together with. Day time there were outdoor playing and night time all dogs sleep together. First night home, of course it didnt work to leave him in the hall Way to sleep. So we brought his bed and put him in the same bed room and he slept. Our intention is to let him stay in bed room during weekday when i go to work. My husband is a shift worker. So yesterday, he was alone in the bed room, i ensure there are toys, tendon, jerky, kong . Problem is he doesnt play with toy. I try to entice him several times to no avail, it makes it difficult. Anyway, i came home of course found him to had pee n poo on his blanket beside his bed. Brought him out To pee, train him basic command, come, sit, leave it say at least 5 to 10mins. Twice. Let him walk around the back yard. When we came in and I started washing his dog bowl or do stuff around the house. He barks at me over and over. Terrible. Night time came. He didnt want to sleep. He was barking in the bed room, we ignored him, then he started trying to jump to out bed. He succeded twice i put him down to his bed. Basically he barks tried to jump for long time until he slept. Please help. This puppy is giving me a lot of stress. I am so anxious that i can eat or sleep.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ria, Check out the link I have included below. At that link you can download two free PDF e-books: "BEFORE You Get Your Puppy" and "AFTER You Get Your Puppy". Read both, especially the AFTER You Get Your Puppy book. Pay special attention to the potty training section, crate training section, how to stuff a Kong toy with puppy food to make it interesting, and finding a good puppy class. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Understand that protesting sleeping alone is normal. The key is not to give into the attention seeking barking but help puppy learn how to self-sooth and self-entertain. Barking won't hurt puppy. Pup also needs to be crate trained. When you do this pup will bark - it doesn't hurt them though and most puppies improve within 3-5 days if you wait until they are quiet to let them out (unless you know they truly have to use the potty). The books from the link above will tackle many of these issues though and help with what to do. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rroy
Irish Doodle
8 Months
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Rroy
Irish Doodle
8 Months

We've had Rory for 4.5 months and have yet to get him to sleep through the night. His crate is in our living room and while he has no issue going in at bedtime, he will wake up every night between 12-1 and 2-3. We live in an apartment so letting him cry it out isn't an option (although on some weekends we have tried and he will cry for 30+ minutes).

Usually after the 2nd wake up one of us will sleep with him on the couch at which point he will stay quiet and asleep for 5+ hours. It's clear he's waking up and crying for attention -what do we do!?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Brittany, During the day practice crating him. When he stays quiet for at least five minutes, return, sprinkle a few pieces of dog food or treats through the crate's wires, then leave again. When he barks, tell him "Ah Ah" calmly, and spray a small puff of air with a Pet Convincer at his side through the crate wires (Avoid his face and don't use citronella spray - only unscented air canisters -citronella lingers and is much harder). Practice this during the day every day for at least an hour or for several smaller sessions during the day. At night crate pup like usual. Stop all food and water 2 hours before bedtime and take pup outside to go potty right before you put them into the crate (not too much beforehand). When pup cries before it has been 8 hours (he should be able to hold his bladder 8-10 hours overnight even if he wakes up), then go to pup, say "Ah Ah" and spray a puff of air at his side with the pet convincer, then leave again. Repeat going to him and correcting each time he cries until he goes back to sleep. Don't give treats at night - only during the day. If you practice this during the day beforehand, pup should understand why he is being corrected and that the goal is quietness (treats during the day help with that part - even though you don't want to encourage being awake during the night with food). Keep your attitude calm and quiet during all of this. In most cases the corrections will work way quicker than waiting for him to become quiet on his own. Practicing during the day helps him learn the bulk of the skills necessary to stay quiet at night - which minimizes him barking at a time when it's more likely to disturb neighbors - i.e. at night. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Millie
mixture
14 Months
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Millie
mixture
14 Months

We rescued this girl from Romania , we have a resident dog who likes to lye in in the morning. Tried a crate for her but she gets anxious then sick if Door shut. Our dog has always slept with us therefore she has had the choice too. We’ve had her 2 weeks now.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello June, First, I wouldn't give up on crate training just yet. What you are experiencing isn't uncommon, especially during the first three days of crate training. Ease into the crate training process and work pup through it. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below and the crate manners protocol: Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate Manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ As hard as it is, working pup through her anxiety now may prevent future separation anxiety later. At this age pup can likely still adjust if given the opportunity and help. Later, leaving her could become a lot harder if she doesn't learn how to self-sooth, self-entertain, and handle being away from you now. Once pup is older, past all the chewing phases and fully potty trained, if you want to allow her to sleep with you out of the crate you can work on the following to make that transition. I suggest teaching Place and putting a dog bed in your room for her. https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ Teach Quiet - quiet method. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Teach off. https://resources.bestfriends.org/article/teaching-dog-training-plan Teach Out https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Once pup knows those commands, practice them a lot during the day - sit in bed and read, enforcing the commands if pup breaks one (such as getting off her Place when not given permission to (Place should be taught as an automatic stay on Place) - or jumping back onto the bed when told off, or barking at you). Keep a drag leash on pup during these sessions and use it to lead pup back to Place, and move pup off the bed if they don't get off when told to. If pup continues barking after being told Quiet, use a pet convincer - which is a small canister of unscented air (Don't use citronella - it's too harsh). Spray a small puff of air at pup's side with the pet convincer while calmly saying "Ah Ah" (Avoid spraying in the face). Repeat each time pup continues barking after telling her Quiet. For now, I would teaching pup to sleep on her own bed (Place) at night instead of on your bed until she learns to sleep through the night - it will be a lot easier to enforce than her waking you while on your bed. If potty training is an issue at night and the crate doesn't work, use the exercise pen method from the article linked below and a real grass pad at night time - take her potty during the day outside though: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Real grass pads: www.doggielawn.com www.freshpatch.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Duke
English Springer Spaniel
17 Weeks
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Question
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Duke
English Springer Spaniel
17 Weeks

I can’t get him to sleep through the night he whine and barks a lot I play with him before bed a lot and I have sometimes let him sleep with me just because I needed the rest myself , he may be sleeping slot durhing the day because I work 10-7 , any suggestions ?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Valerie, Unfortunately that is a common problem at his age. Consistency is probably the number one thing that Duke needs. If he cries do not let him out until he is quiet for at least a couple of minutes. He is probably making noise because he wants to be with you instead of in his crate where it is boring, especially because his breed tends to be very dependent on people and on affection. Give it time and do not reward his cries with freedom and affection unless he becomes quiet and remains quiet for five minutes or more. Also give him a stuffed Kong in his crate at night, so that he will have something to do when he wakes up randomly. To stuff the Kong, place some of his dry dog food into a bowl, cover the food with water, so that the water is a little higher in the bowl than the food is, let the food soak until it becomes marshmallow looking mush. This will probably take at least three hours, so it is best done ahead of time. Next, add a little peanut butter, or squeeze cheese if you can't have peanut butter, and mix the peanut butter or cheese with the food. The food should turn into a soggy mush when you do this, and not look like solid pieces of food anymore. Stuff the Kong loosely with clumps of this mush and freeze the Kong overnight or until frozen. If he has a hard time getting food out of the Kong then simply drop the clumps of mush into the Kong. Do not stuff them down, and use a larger sized Kong. It is easiest to purchase several Kongs and prepare them all at the same time ahead of time, so that you can just grab one when needed. You can also give your pup these Kongs during the day, for while you are gone, to keep him more alert and entertained. I recommend feeding your puppy as much of his daily dog food as possible in the form of stuffed Kongs and training rewards, so that you hardly even need a food bowl. Doing that will stimulate him more and encourage him to work for his food and be less bored and frustrated. If that does not work, and time and consistency do not fix it, he might need to spend around three days a week somewhere like a doggie daycare, where he will be active, interacting with the staff and other dogs, and then come home tired. You can also hire a great dog walker, like a walker from Wag!, to not only take him out to go potty during the day but also to take him on a good walk in the middle of the day or play a high energy but focused game with him in your yard. The stuffed Kongs with his meals inside and some more interaction during the day from a walker or doggie daycare should hep with the daytime sleep, so that he is more tired at night. The Kong in his bed at night should give him something other than barking, and consistency should teach him that barking and whining never get him freedom, so learn that he learns crate plus nighttime equals sleep. If you choose to take him to a doggie daycare look for one that has staff that have been trained to properly supervise dog play, so that dogs are not bullying other dogs or getting bullied by other dogs, and so that the interactions are supervised in order to keep dogs safe from potential fights. My favorite types of daycares are ones that requires a pet interview during the first visit, so that the staff there can evaluate temperament and choose an appropriate group for your pup to be in. This keeps all the dogs safer and less stressed. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rosie
Great Dane
1 Year
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Rosie
Great Dane
1 Year

In the last couple of months all of our dogs have been sleeping in their own beds. Rosie will not sleep at night, she is always trying to play even if we play before bedtime. We have been using A Kong toy with peanut butter inside and it’s frozen but nothing helps. No matter what we do she will not sleep. Any suggestions? It’s gotten bad that she chews the wires under our bed that go to our bed frame.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Selina, Pup really needs to be crated at night. She is still at an age where she is prone to destructive chewing - which is related a lot to maturity and needs time. Not crating pup will be dangerous for her until she gets past that age. 1-2 years is when I first recommend trying pups out of the crate. My own dog wasn't ready until 1.5. When you first test whether pup is ready, pup should only be left alone for 10 minutes. If when you return pup does well, try 20 minutes, then 30, then 45, then 1 hour, then 1.5 hours, then 2 hours, then 3 hours. If pup can do well for 3 hours, pup is probably ready for overnight. Right now, pup needs a minimum of 3 more months being crated before you try more freedom. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Harley
havapoo
1 Year
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Harley
havapoo
1 Year

the older my dog got the better he got at sleeping through the night, but lately he's been waking up at 4am everyday. my mom leaves the house around that time most mornings because of work and we seem to think that's why he's been getting up. But I can't interrupt me sleep every morning because there's no way he needs to use the bathroom at that same time everyday. Its become a bad habit and I need help on how to stop it!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maiya, I suggest crate training him and having him sleep in the crate for about a month until he learns to sleep through the night again. If it has been less than 8 hours since he last went potty, ignore any crying until he goes back to sleep. If it has been longer than 8 hours, he will really have to go potty once awake (but could have held it longer if he stayed asleep because of how the bladder works). If he wakes up after 8 hours, take him potty on a leash - keep the trip as boring as possible, then return him to the crate without feeding him and correct or ignore any subsequent crying - if potty trips at 4 are super boring and he is always put back to bed after without fun or food, he will likely start going back to sleep on his own when he first wakes up at four. Crating him for a while will prevent him from doing things other than barking to wake you up and protest - so that you can correct or ignore the barking, and he is bored enough he will eventually go back to sleep in the crate. To introduce the crate if he isn't crate trained, first, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. You can either continue what you are currently doing at night during this process or go ahead and jump into what I explain below for night time training - waiting until the day is good before starting the night or starting the night and day both at the same time. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If you go straight to nights and days like this you will probably have about 3 rough nights, with lots of correcting before he gets quiet - don't give in and let him out or this will take much longer! But the overall process will go faster if you can stay strong. If you practice the daytime routine first for a few more days, then start the nighttime routine once pup understands the new rules, the night should go easier when you do make the transition. Either way you need to stay very consistent for this to work - expect pup to protest and for you to have to correct a lot. You may want to pretend like you are all going to bed two hours early and read in bed with the lights off - anticipating having to get up a lot the first couple of hours to correct - so that you don't loose as much sleep. Choose whichever option seems less stressful for you ultimately and is something you can stick to. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Quinn
Lab mix
11 Weeks
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Quinn
Lab mix
11 Weeks

So we were fostering Quinn and her sister we decided to keep Quinn. Quinn was the one sleeping through the night and the other was waking up. We talked to the other dogs new owners and they say she is sleeping through the night now, and our puppy Quinn is screaming every hour.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shannon, Likely what has happened is that pup wasn't actually used to sleeping alone because of the presence of the other puppy. Now that she is alone, you are hitting pup needing to learn more independence. As pup gets older, they may also be more awake and able to protest due to less sleepiness. Either way, treat this like she just came home and you are beginning crate training - since she is essentially learning it again on her own this time. At 2 months of age, pup will need to go potty 1-2 times due to a small bladder until they are a bit older. All puppies do, but you can minimize the amount of times pup needs to go out by: 1. Crate training 2. Keeping potty trips at night boring 3. Removing all food and water 2 hours before bedtime though. 4. Take pup potty right before crating at night 5. Ignore any crying in the crate if it's been sooner than 2-3 hours since they last went potty and they are otherwise safe (most puppies will adjust to the crate in 3 days - 2 weeks if you are consistent). 6. When you do take pup potty at night, take pup on a leash, don't feed or play, and return pup to the crate right after they go - you want the trip to be boring so pup isn't motivated to wake up extra times for attention in the middle of the night. 7. During the day practice pup learning independence proactively. Follow the Surprise method from the article linked below. Only give treats and rewards during daytime practice - not at night. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate By doing all the above, pup should begin to sleep longer stretches (but expect 1-2 trips at night to be needed for a few more weeks still with a small bladder), but it can take up to 2 weeks (the first 3 days tend to be the worst though). As pup's bladder capacity increases, if they are in the habit of only waking to pee, then they should naturally begin to sleep longer stretches as they get older, until they can finally make it through the whole night consistently on their own. To help pup go potty quicker when you do take them at night, work on the Crate Training method from the article linked below during the day also for potty training - especially teaching the Go Potty command: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Herb
French Bulldog
6 Months
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Herb
French Bulldog
6 Months

My puppy no longer sleeps through the night. He used to sleep well but over the past week he has been waking throughout the night constantly and won’t settle until around 5am. He refuses to go in his crate, sleep on one of his beds or in our bed but constantly walks around the bedroom or try’s to get in to the living room.

I usually take him for a walk around 7pm and then he has dinner around 8pm. Recently he is sleeping from 5pm until after 8 pm.

I am struggling to get him back into a routine and unsure what to do so he sleeps through the night. Do you have any suggestions on how to get back into a routine so he can sleep through the night fully? Thanks.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Claire, First, limit his evening naps to one hour if you can - keep him busy in the evening so that he doesn't have a long evening sleep stretch before bed - if he does, his body will count that as part of his night sleep and he will sleep less at night. Once he is sleeping through the night keeping him awake should become easier but it will take some vigilance for a few nights to keep him awake in the evening. Second, if he was physically able to hold his bladder through the night before this point and nothing new or traumatic has happened recently, he may be testing boundaries at this age (which is common around 6-7 months). Teach pup the Quiet command from the Quiet method linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark When you are home, spend some time crating him for an hour or so during the day. When he stays quiet in the crate, sprinkle treats into the crate without opening the door, then after an hour let him back out. When he barks while in there, tell him Quiet once. If he keeps barking or gets quiet and starts again, calmly tell him "Ah Ah" while spraying a small puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate (only use unscented air and NOT citronella and only spray his side and NOT his face). Each time you reward or correct with the air, leave again. If he stays quiet for several minutes after a correction or reward, return and sprinkle more treats. During the day, also practice the crate manners protocol from the article linked below. He doesn't have to love going into the crate but he does need to learn how to be calm and okay in it. Loving the crate usually comes after 1 year of age. https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Since the above training is done during the day only, you will do something a bit different at night. Practice the above training proactively during the day so that pup will learn how to be calm in the crate, go in when told, and stay quiet. At night, pup should begin to understand those things because of daytime practice so when pup barks at night, say "Quiet" and if pup doesn't get quiet and stay quiet, use the Pet Convincer to spray the small puff of air at his side, then go back to bed. Repeat this each time he barks if it has been less than 7 hours since he last went potty. At night, remove all food and water 2 hours before bedtime, take pup potty on a leash last thing right before bed (go with him with the leash even if you have a fenced in yard to make sure he actually goes right before bed and isn't playing), then when pup barks you can feel confident that it's just for attention and not a potty need if it's been less than 7 hours since his last potty trip. Example of Pet Convincer - Don't use citronella one - the smell lingers too long and they are too harsh. https://www.amazon.com/Pet-Convincer-Dog-Training-Device/dp/B000QWPWDM/ref=asc_df_B000QWPWDM/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=241919365438&hvpos=1o4&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4334165146951943395&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010791&hvtargid=aud-801381245258:pla-456521603647&psc=1 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rupert
Cocker Spaniel
18 Months
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Rupert
Cocker Spaniel
18 Months

He keeps getting up in the night he sleeps in our beds and has done ever since the first night we got him as he didn’t like a crate. He starts scratching the door and we let him out then he goes downstairs and wants to be let out then he comes in and has some food, he has his food down all day. He is getting up my dad 2-3 times in the night he is left with the house all to himself all day until someone gets home he sleeps a lot but it is hard to keep him awake. Please help he has been doing this for so long and it isn’t fair on my dad he has got in a routine of getting up and we can’t snap it out of him. He doesn’t have the same time of walks maybe a morning one we are trying to be able to get up and walk him in the morning but everyone with work and school, he has one at the evening around 4 or some time around now. What can we do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lottie, You either need to make him sleep outside the bedroom, in another location where he can't wake someone and ignore any barking before it has been 8 hours for the next couple of weeks until he learns to go back to sleep quietly. OR You need to crate train. He probably won't need to sleep in the crate forever. But needs to be crated for at least a couple of nights to learn to sleep through the night. To do the crate training and address his barking in the crate: First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. Continue what you are currently doing at night during this process. Once he is doing well during the day, crate him at night too. When he cries at night before it has been 8 hours, tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Or Allow pup to continue to sleep in the bedroom, teach pup the Quiet command during the day and reward him when he gets quiet during practice. Teach pup a Place command and work on sending them to their bed during the day. At night when pup wakes him before it has been 8 hours, tell pup Quiet and Place. If pup obeys - great! Go back to bed but don't give treats at night. If pup continues barking, pestering and trying to make, tell pup "Ah Ah" and spray a small puff of air from the pet convincer at pup's side, then remind pup to go lie down on Place. Repeat the corrections each time pup wakes you before 8 hours. If pup has accidents during the 8 hours while out of the crate, you will have to crate train pup to teach him to hold it overnight. If pup is left out of the crate in the bedroom I suggest having pup sleep with whoever will be most likely to enforce the training consistently during the middle of the night. Don't use that method if you will give in or the training won't work. It will probably take 1-2 weeks of consistent training with one of these methods for pup to learn to sleep through the night. Stay firm and consistent or it will take MUCH longer. Keep the health of pup and all of the family members in mind - it is extremely important for every one's health that pup learn, even if pup protests a lot. Your sleep matters more than pup wanting attention during the night so be firm. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bailee
Cavapoo
12 Weeks
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Bailee
Cavapoo
12 Weeks

Bailee plays hard during the day and at night is always tired before we actually goto bed. She sleep in her kennel at like 10 after going outside. She doesn’t mind going in at all she lays right down with all her toys and sleeps the night away! Well til 4-4:30 when she wakes up to go outside. She does go potty and poo each time. We come back in and go right back in the crate but she only sleep for maybe an hour and half after that we are usually up at 5:45 to start the day:( not fun she used to sleep all night when she was a couple weeks younger :( I miss those night!! Anything I need to do to change this waking up?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Callie, Unfortunately, it is normal for pups to become less sleepy around this age and to want to play more at less convenient times for us. Since that is a long stretch of sleep, one she wakes up at 4 am her bladder will also wake up, meaning that she will truly have to go potty and if you ignore it at this age, will probably have an accident. Getting rid of that wake up again will simply take a bit more maturity. What you can do is keep the potty trip as boring as possible. No sweet talk, no play, no treats, no breakfast yet. Take her on a leash and then bring her straight back inside and back into the crate. When do you want to wake for the day? That second 5:45 wake-up isn't one you have to heed if you wouldn't get up normally at that time. If you want her to get into the habit of sleeping later - like 7am or so, you need to ignore the crying at 5:45am and not feed breakfast then. If you are feeding breakfast when she cries at that time, her internal clock will continue to tell her to keep waking up then hungry. If you don't want to get up at 5:45 am, the new schedule should look like: take her potty at 4 am if she wakes on her own (don't wake her though because eventually she should start sleeping through that time again). Keep the potty trip super boring without food, then back into crate. If she wakes up at 5:45 am - ignore the crying until you decide it's the time you want to start you day most days - only free her and feed her at that time so that her internal clock will readjust to that new time in a few days. This will require a strong will on your part for a few days. If she is crated in your room, you may want to move the crate to somewhere that makes the crying less loud - such as a walk in closet or bathroom. At 5:45 am she shouldn't have to truly go potty yet so you can safely ignore the crying for 3-4 hours after her previous potty trip at 4/4:30am. If she wakes at 4am to go potty, you will need to take her potty again no later than about 7:30 am though because by then the crying will not be attention seeking - but an actual potty need. With all of that said, make sure you are also removing all food and water two hours before bedtime and there isn't a new noise waking her up in the early morning - like a garage door opening downstairs, door slamming from others in the house, ect..Trying moving the crate to a quieter location if that's the case. Sometimes putting blankets or trashbags over the windows to keep the windows dark at 5:45am can also help at this age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hari
Dachshund
3 Years
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Hari
Dachshund
3 Years

4 weeks ago Hari lost his companion Mylo age 6 they were a bonded pair ate slept played together
We bought Mylo home for burial so Hari spent time with him nuzzling him etc
Since then May 22nd we have not had a night go by without him barking
Crying has stopped and door scratching
Have bought plug in spray and Nutracalm tablets from vets
Any help would be appreciated
Kind Regards
Ingrid

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ingrid, There are two routes you can take. I suggest trying the first one first because it will be gentler. First, practice confining pup in their sleeping area and you going to the bedroom without them a few times a day. Place a door protector over your door to save it from scratching, and ignore the scratching and noise. When pup gets quiet and stops scratching for a few seconds, open the door slightly and sprinkle treats out to pup, then close the door again and leave pup outside it. As pup starts staying quiet and scratching less often as they connect not scratching to the rewards, wait longer and longer gradually before rewarding pup for staying calm and not scratching. Do this until pup has worked up to be able to stay outside the door without barking or scratching for up to three hours. At night, simply ignore the scratching with the door protector on the door to prevent damage. Don't give treats at night or pup may learn to stay up in hopes of food - proactively practice during the day to help nights improve more quickly. Stay consistent about not letting pup in your room or that will set you back. The second option, which is often quicker but involves gentle correction is to use a Pet convincer. Practice confining pup to their sleeping area during the day also. With you in the bedroom, when pup scratches or barks, open the door a bit, calmly tell pup "Ah Ah" and spray a small puff of unscented air from a pet convincer at pup's side briefly - do NOT use citronella because it's too harsh, and avoid their face. After the correction, close the door again. Wait until pup is quiet and not scratching, then open the door briefly and sprinkle out treats. Repeat the corrections for scratching and barking and treats when pup stays quiet. Gradually have pup wait longer and longer not scratching or barking before you sprinkle out treats. At night, correct with the pet convincer but don't give treats. Again, proactively practice during the day with treats to help training at night go more smoothly. Pup is not only adjusting to loosing their buddy but since they were so bonded, pup is probably also having to relearn how to be alone period - since the other dog likely slept with them. At this point, pup may not even be thinking about the loss of the friend, it could simply be that pup isn't used to time alone, and needs to adjust with that and learn how to cope and calm back down. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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bonnie
Jack Russell Terrier
8 Weeks
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bonnie
Jack Russell Terrier
8 Weeks

she won’t sleep in a cage and gets very hyper active before bedtime

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Kona
German Shepherd
9 Weeks
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Kona
German Shepherd
9 Weeks

I've had my puppy for two weeks and he is on a very regular schedule when it comes to food and water. He still wakes up in the night, every two hours and wines to be let out to pee. I'm wondering how I can start to lengthen that time because the sleep deprivation is really kicking my butt.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Maranda, First, know that in the first two weeks of crate training, combined with a small puppy bladder, what you are describing is normal. First, when you take pup potty, take pup on a leash, keep the trip as sleepy and boring as you can - no treats, no play, minimal talk or affection, then put pup straight back into the crate after, go back to bed, and ignore any crying in the crate - knowing that they don't have to potty since they just went and simply want attention. Ignoring the crying will help pup learn after a few nights that they should just go right back to sleep and not expect to get up yet. Once awake a puppy can generally hold their bladder for the number of months they are in age plus one - which is 2-3 hours for a 9 week old puppy. If pup cries and it has been at least 2 hours you will need to respond by taking them on a boring potty trip for right now; however, if pup cries sooner, like every 1-1.5 hours, ignore the crying until time for a potty trip. I know that doesn't mean much sleep, but after about three nights of that, pup will likely begin to go back to sleep for another hour when they wake too soon until they actually have to potty, and should begin waking up less for attention and just for pottying if you are only responding to what could be potty needs and not attention seeking alone - pup is probably waking extra for both right now. To help pup wake less for attention, also practice the Surprise method from the article linked below during the day - but don't give treats at night, only during day practice. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate The first two weeks with crate training and night potty trips is typically the hardest. Pup is adjusting and making a lot, and once awake, with a small bladder, they have to pee a lot. Some amount of crying in the crate is normal for up to 4 weeks - but should be getting better gradually each week. As pup gets more accustomed to the crate and settling down in there, pup should start sleeping longer stretches with time, if you stay firm about keeping trips boring and ignoring crying that happens before 2-3 hours. Stay consistent with crate training, even though it feels easier to give in and let them out sooner, it will be worth it in the long run! Not sticking with it makes life with pup much more difficult later on, and typically leads to having to go back and crate train later anyways - and crate training is more difficult the older a dog is. My first two weeks with my own dog was exactly what you described as well when she was that age. She did learn how to sleep better with a bit of time and consistency though. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Shoon
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
5 Weeks
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Shoon
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
5 Weeks

We just got a new puupy, shoon, and she wakes up every two hours at night, and we dont know what should we do, should we let her cry?
Should we wake up every two hours to take her out for half an hour to potty and waste energy?
(another thing is should we start a scedule with her?
She beraly eats anything during the day, should we leave it abs its becuase shes still very small or should we try and make her eat?)
Sorry for the long message and i will be thankfull go get an answer, thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Beri, At five weeks old pup is too young to begin certain things and will still need additional feedings and LOTS of potty trips. I don't know the situation and why you brought pup home that young - perhaps mother dog couldn't take care of pups or they came from a rescue and were orphaned. If from a breeder - sending a pup home that early is actually illegal in many places because pups are often not developmentally ready and will need the human to act as a surrogate dog mom until pups are more capable at 8 weeks of age. Either way this will mean some extra care from you than what an 8 week old pup would need. A 5 week old puppy will need to eat at least 4 times a day. Because 5 weeks is the age most puppies are just weaning, pup may not be able to chew hard food yet. If that seems to be the case, then you can add a bit of puppy milk-replacer to the hard food and let it get mushy for pup - this is called gruel and is how most puppies are transitioned to hard food. You can also tempt pup with a little meat pureed baby food if they are loosing weight. I would certainly check in with your vet as soon as you can. A pup that age may not be wormed yet - which puppies need several times between birth and 12 weeks of age, and will need to go through that process, even if it's not time for shots. Untreated parasites can be dangerous for young puppies and all puppies are born with a certain amount of them, then wormed by the breeder before being sent home at 8-12 weeks. Don't set pup down on the floor at the vet's because their immune system is so fragile still - carry them in to avoid contacting the ground where other dogs have walked and there could be Parvo germs. It will be a couple of months before pup will be able to make it through the night. Pup literally doesn't have the bladder capacity to make it more than a couple of hours at this age - even at night. That won't come until 3-4 months old. You can either wait until pup cries and take them potty each time, or set up an exercise pen with a disposable real grass pad, teach pup to go potty on the grass pad, and let them sleep on a non-absorbent bed in the pen, like www.primopadss, near the potty pad, for the next few weeks, then starts formal potty training with the crate in 3-5 weeks. Pup will still have to go potty every couple of hours during the day even at 8-12 weeks old,, but they will be old enough to understand the training better and only need 1-2 potty trips during the night, so that's a generally recommended age to begin that. Exercise pen method to pottying on the grass pads: https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable real grass pad brands -also on amazon: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Crate Training method - for when you are ready to begin formal potty training - which you can begin to ease pup into now, even if you also need the exercise pen too for a bit. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Finally, you may find it helpful to check out this article written for those who are doggie surrogates or breeders raising really young pups. https://www.austintexas.gov/sites/default/files/files/Animal_Services/Foster_Care_Manual/Nursing_Mother_Dogs_and_Their_Puppies.pdf Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Frannie
French Bulldog
8 Weeks
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Frannie
French Bulldog
8 Weeks

We are crate training at night. She has been with us for 1 full week. She’s never been in the crate during the day because we are home. She just had 4 decent nights in a row. Last night was bad again with lots of crying and screaming from her every time she went in the crate. She only slept for about 30 min to an hour in between the cries and screams. When she woke up I took her outside for potty because she is so young she can’t hold it longer than 2 hours etc. Why did we go backwards with the exact same routine? Is it just because she’s so young? I don’t mind potty breaks as I know she needs them but the crying and screaming preventing sleep for me is hard. Any advice?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nicole, Puppies will have growth spurts and days where they are more tired than other days, especially when making a transition from a new place - that can be exhausting. As puppies get older, their ability to keep themselves awake also increases. It's normal to have some harder nights during the process. Stay consistent. Most puppies take two weeks to crate train if you are consistent, so it's normal for pup to still be adjusting. Letting pup out at non-potty times when they cry will make the overall process take longer. Something you can do to speed up the crate training process and to shift more of the crying to the daytime instead of nighttime - when you are so tired, is to intentionally practice crating pup for an hour at a time each day a few times a day - with potty and play breaks between. Pup will still cry whiel learning but this process helps pup learn how to handle being alone and calm themselves down at a time other than during the night while you are trying to sleep - so that pup gets used to being alone at night sooner also. Practicing intentionally in the crate some during the day can actually prevent future separation anxiety when done right - because it accustoms pup to being comfortable with some time alone while pup is still open to learning that more easily while young (although not easy at any time - but definitely way easier than going back later to teach an adult dog with separation anxiety). Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below for how to work on this during the day with pup: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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lyra
Labrador Retriever
11 Weeks
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lyra
Labrador Retriever
11 Weeks

Hello, we got out puppy 11 days ago and for the first 3 nights she stayed in the front room with me with a puppy pad and her crate - After 3 days we put the crate in the kitchen and ivr been sleeping on the sofa which was all fine until last night - for some reason she cried for 3 HOURS straight - i went into her at around 30 mins in took her to toilet and settled back into crate by sitting next to her crate and then as soon as i am about to close my eyes when i go back to the sofa she starts crying and yelping and whining again.. i don’t understand why she’s doing this now as the first 10 days she was fine!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

If you are sleeping on the sofa anyway, why not have the crate in there with you. That way, Lyra can see you and may settle better. Once she has been with you for a while and sleeps well in her crate every night, slowly inch the crate (inch by inch only) every evening until the crate is in the kitchen. This will take a few weeks to master as you can only move the crate an inch per night. Other than that, you have to listen to the crying every night until she learns to stop (which is difficult to do). However, always take her out to the bathroom if you think she needs it! As well, take a look at this guide for excellent suggestions: https://wagwalking.com/training/crate-train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-at-night. Good luck and enjoy your puppy!

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Chloe
Golden Retreiver
8 Months
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Chloe
Golden Retreiver
8 Months

Chloe sleeps in the laundry and had generally been sleeping well, from late evening to sun up.
But recently she has been waking at 2 and 4am to go out side, she urinates most times but not always.

How can we help her return to a habit of sleeping through the night?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Stephen, I would start by looking at her evening schedule. Remove all food and water at least 2 hours before bed. When you take her potty before bed, take her on a leash so that you can watch to make sure she goes and walk her around and insist on it if she isn't. If pup is being let out into a fence without you to go potty in the evenings, that could be the issue. She might be getting distracted and not really going potty. She also might be drinking more in the evenings, in which case water needs to be taken up earlier, but you also need to make sure she is being given enough opportunities to get water earlier in the day throughout the day. When pup wakes up, if it has been less than 8 hours since she last went potty, take pup potty on a leash, keeping the trip as boring as possible - no treats, no play, no feeding, and little talk, then put her straight back to bed and go back to bed. Any time she wakes up after less than 8 hours asking to go out - like the 4am time, you can either ignore or correct the barking. I suggest ignoring the barking for one week. If pup isn't giving up, it's time to correct. If she is waking young kids or disturbing neighbors, you can also go straight to correcting. To correct at night, follow the below steps. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method in the laundry room from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the laundry room for 5 minutes, crack the door without letting pup out (or use a baby gate at the door for this, and sprinkle some treats into the laundry room, then leave the room again (with pup still in the laundry room). As she improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2 hour. Practice alone time in the laundry room during the day for 1-2 hours each day that you can. During the longer stretches, you can also give a dog food stuffed chew toy while she is in there. Whenever she cries in the laundry room, tell her "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side or chest after slightly opening the laundry room door while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries. Practice for a few days until she is doing well during the day. During this time, you can either ignore the barking at night before 8 hours, and once she is doing well during the day with the laundry room, then use the Pet Convincer to correct any barking after one Quiet warning (but don't give treats at night). Or starting right away (while also practicing this during the day to help her understand via the use of treats during the day too - since it's not recommended to give treats at night), when she cries at night before it has been 8 hours, tell her Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Correct each time she barks until she finally stays quiet or it's the time you want her to wake up at in the morning - at which point wait until she is quiet for at least a couple seconds before releasing her. With all of that said, pay attention to how often pup is going potty during the day? If pup seems to be going potty during the day often and is having accidents if you don't take her after just two hours of having already gone at night, then I do highly suggest a trip to your vet. The issue may be medical, such as an infection causing incontinence. I am not a vet so consult your vet about anything medical. Also, pay attention to whether there is a noise at 2am or 4am that is actually waking her up. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Teddy
Sheltie
10 Weeks
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Teddy
Sheltie
10 Weeks

How do I get my puppy to learn how to walk on the leash? When I even try to put the collar on him he flips out. He does not like the collar or leash at all. Help!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Here is an excellent article to get you started. It has steps for getting the collar on and advice on choosing the right collar. Once your pup has the collar on, maybe leave it on and soon he'll be used to it. Then, you can take it on and off. Once you have the collar problem solved, the leash comes next! The Treat Lure Method may work because every dog loves a reward for doing well. Always praise Teddy when you have a successful walk, even though they may be short at first: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-boxer-puppy-to-walk-on-a-leash The Start In, Go Out Method may be the ideal solution, too: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-walk-on-leash Good luck and have fun training!

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Rudy
Goldendoodle
9 Months
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Rudy
Goldendoodle
9 Months

Hello,

My pup Rudy started sleeping though the night when he was about 6 months old but it only lasted a few weeks and now he wakes up consistently two times every night. We walk about 3-5 miles/day (some off leash) and usually also play fetch or soccer in the backyard. We have quiet time before bed and one last bathroom break about 20 minutes before we go to bed. But he typically wakes up about 3 hours later and then again about 2-3 hours later. He is not to have water after 7:30pm with a 9:30 bed time, but I do sometimes give him a frozen cube with dog treats inside as a bedtime soothing treat. He uses the bathroom within 2-3 minutes of going outside, but is often reluctant to go back inside. If he doesn't want to go back inside then he starts jumping up and grabbing my arm. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, At this age pup should be able to hold it longer unless there is something medical going on. I would expect pup to be able to hold it for 8 hours during the night - possibly a bit longer if he stayed asleep. I suspect the wake ups are habit and attention seeking, and he is able to pee but could also hold it too if he had too. I suggest crate training pup and having them sleep in the crate until he is sleeping through the night consistently for at least 3 months. Since many pups will nudge and pester until you wake up and respond, the crate makes it so that all pup can do is bark, and I discuss how to address the barking below. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. You can either continue what you are currently doing at night during this process or go ahead and jump into what I explain below for night time training - waiting until the day is good before starting the night or starting the night and day both at the same time. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 5-6 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If you go straight to nights and days like this you will probably have about 3 rough nights, with lots of correcting before he gets quiet - don't give in and let him out or this will take much longer! But the overall process will go faster if you can stay strong. If you practice the daytime routine first while you continue to take him outside at night, then start the nighttime routine once pup understands the new rules, the night should go easier when you do make the transition, but the overall process just take longer. It pup has an accident in the crate when you don't take them potty before it's been 5 hours, then you probably need to eliminate the dog food stuffed chew toy before bed and take pup potty right before crating, opposed to 20 minutes. If pup still has an accident, I would consult your vet to rule out any medical reasons why pup isn't able to hold it through the night. The crating will also ensure pup doesn't want to have an accident when you refuse to take them potty sooner. Either way you need to stay very consistent for this to work - expect pup to protest and for you to have to correct a lot the first three nights. What will likely happen is that pup will wake up, bark, get corrected several times for persisting, then go back to sleep for 3 or so hours, then wake up again when it's been closer to 8 hours since they last went potty. At that point you will take them potty, not give any food, play, or much talk, and as soon as pup goes potty, return them to the crate to go back to sleep, correcting any protesting in the crate, knowing it's just attention seeking. After pup goes back to sleep, then you will let pup out when it's the time you want to wake up at. After doing this routine for up to two weeks, pup will probably stop waking altogether before 8 hours, because they have gotten used to going back to sleep when they wake too soon and waking it's a fun game anymore. Once pup is doing well with the training, and used to holding it for at least 6 hours, you can expect pup to hold it for 8 in the crate, but start out expecting 5-6 since pup needs to adjust to the longer time and staying asleep first. If pup doesn't wake at all at night, they may make it all the way to morning without waking, up to 10 hours. A dog's bladder capacity increases while asleep. If pup does have an accident in the crate, remove anything absorbent from the crate - that can be to blame. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Alba
Boston Terrier
4 Years
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Alba
Boston Terrier
4 Years

Hello! We adopted Alba a week ago. She is a very anxious dog and we don’t know her full history, she’s been used as a breeding dog and slept with 12 other dogs in a dog shed (but crated outdoors during the summer). Since getting her, we’ve set up new routine and she’s been settling well, with occasional anxious moments. She is sleeping in a dog bed in the kitchen, we take her out before bed and then tuck her in with a snack, extra strokes and a goodbye. She gets out to follow us a few times, but is now able to fall asleep and not get up when we leave and close the door (probably because she gets absolutely pupshausted by the end of the day). The problem is we find her in the morning looking super anxious and accidentally letting little wee drops out on the floor.
She’s been taught not to make a noise by the previous owner, so she never whines but i’m worried that she’s not sleeping through the night and stays awake waiting very anxiously until we come down in the morning. Is there anything we can do better? We are reluctant to crate train as it may be triggering - should we try a kids tent? Thanks so much for any advice!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Alba is very lucky to have come to your home - a much nicer situation; thank you for rescuing her. I would suggest a nice pen area for her at night. She may feel safer and less anxious there as it is somewhat cozy and not a big space like the kitchen where she may feel stressed. It's a long night alone when you are used to being with other dogs. You are setting a nice tone before bed, so that is good. Take a look at the exercise pen area described here. It does have a crate; however, if Alba is not forced into the crate and can use it at will for a cozy den when she sleeps (on her terms), why not? https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. As well, here are tips for her to maybe like a crate (again as a place to rest, not be confined - I agree with you on that hesitancy). I think it may work. Good luck and keep reassuring her with lots of love.

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Sammy
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
1 Year
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Sammy
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
1 Year

Sammy does not sleep through the night. We never crate trained him - he loves to be with a person at all times. He get two hours of exercise in the morning with the dog walker from 8-10 and another hour in the afternoon from 3-4. He then is awake in the afternoon when the kids come home from school. We let him out before we go to bed at 8 pm. He gets up at least twice every night to go outside. He typically goes right back to sleep afterwards. He does not eat 2 hours before bed either. He is capable of sleeping through the night as he has done so a handful of times, but typically every night he wakes up to go outside. Any advice? Thank you.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Megan, Even during the day Sammy should be able to hold his bladder for 7+ hours, and at night when asleep for at least 10 hours. 1. You either need to crate train him and let him cry in the crate during the wake-ups (which are simply a bad habit - likely to get attention at this point) to teach him to go back to sleep and then stop waking up at all once the wake-ups are no longer fun for him. You can crate him in your room or in another room (which will allow you to sleep better while he is still learning - then you can move him back into your room later, once he is in the habit of sleeping through the night). 2. Put him in another dog-proof room away from where you sleep (so that you can sleep through his protests until he gets into the habit of sleeping through the night - at which time you can transition him back to your room but still ignore him if he tries to wake you again. 3. Simply ignore the wake-ups or discipline them every time he wakes up while loose in your room (this will be the hardest to not give into). The truth is he can do this, it's better for his health if he does, it will not harm him (he won't like it - but not liking it doesn't mean it hurts him), and it is VERY important for your own health and life that he learns - so stay strong. Personally, I recommend crating him in another room overnight until he learns because this will give everyone the most sleep, he is more likely to give up and go back to sleep sooner, and it will be easier to stick with and stay consistent. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kimchi
Pomeranian
7 Weeks
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Kimchi
Pomeranian
7 Weeks

My puppy sleeps on his bed next to my bed which is on the floor. He is very needy. He wakes me up at 6 or 7am every morning barking because e he wants to come onto my bed and bite my face until I have to hide under the blanket. Once I do, he barks continuously to get my attention. He has so much energy so early in the morning when I'm still half asleep. He barks constantly for me to play with him and can't handle it. Love him but need the barking to stop. Another issue is, he has plenty of toys but will choose to attack myself and my family's feet all day long. He has super sharp teeth and can't get him to stop, if he does, he'll bark for ages and attack after 😂 please help!

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Kyro
Pyrenees
2 Months
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Kyro
Pyrenees
2 Months

He just cries and barks through the whole night and we have work in mornings but he sleeps the whole day, we try to tire him out and everything but it doesn’t work

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
220 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Kyro is still pretty young. He has not adjusted to your schedule, or any sort of schedule yet. Continue doing what you are doing as far as stimulation and exercise as much as you can during the day time hours. I know this is tricky because you are working and can't be around him all the time during the day. He is also probably excited that you are home, and is stimulated. While when you're at work, he doesn't have as much stimulation. So during the weekends, or days off, practice keeping him as busy as possible during the day time hours. This will slowly start to correct itself over the next 3 weeks or so. And you will finally have a pup on your hours! Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Ruby
Cocker Spaniel
10 Months
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Ruby
Cocker Spaniel
10 Months

Ruby will not sleep through the night unless she is in bed with me. i put her in her crate at bed time and she may sleep for 2 hours and then howl, bark, cry and whine until I have to get up to shut her up! It is driving me mad as well as my neighbours and my other two dogs! I don't know what to do.....

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
220 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Some dogs have a really hard time at night. She is definitely old enough to be over this seemingly "puppy" behavior by now. A few things to try might be, getting a fan to place next to her crate to block out any noise. Dogs can hear EVERYTHING. And some dogs just aren't as desensitized to it as others for various reasons. Another idea is covering her crate at night with a blanket. Cover 3 sides and leave one open for airflow. Anything to make her kennel more sleep inducing. Also, adequate amounts of exercise before bed time helps with this. Sometimes moving the crate to different locations and doing trial and error may help. Either with you, or away from everyone, etc. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Charlie
Sprocker Spaniel
1 Year
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Charlie
Sprocker Spaniel
1 Year

Charlie struggles to sleep al the way through the night and becomes very stressed and worked up anytime we try to leave the house without him. He had started to settle before when we left him but would still be stressed and panting (often having had an accident) when we came home. Since the start of COVID and me and my partner both being at home his stress levels and sleeping have got worse and worse. We know he suffers from separation anxiety but are struggling to separate ourselves from him
As we are both at home all day at the moment. What can we do to ease his stress when we leave and get him to sleep through the night??

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
220 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Separation anxiety is a multi-fold issue that usually involves many areas of a dogs life. So I am going to be sending you quite a bit of information. You can read through it and apply what you think works best for your dynamic. The first step in treating separation anxiety is to break the cycle of anxiety. Every time a dog with separation anxiety becomes anxious when their owner leaves, the distress they feel is reinforced until they become absolutely frantic any time they are left alone. Owners should give the dog an acceptable item to chew, such as a long lasting food treat when they go out. The goal is to have the dog associate this special treat with the owner’s departure. Treats might include hollow bones stuffed with peanut butter or soft cheese, drilled out nylon bones, or hollow rubber chew toys such as Kong toys with similar enhancements (place these in the freezer before giving them to your dog to make them last longer). Give the bone to your dog about 15 minutes before preparing to depart. The chew toy should be used only as a reward to offset the anxiety triggered by your departure. Hiding a variety of these delectable food treats throughout the house may occupy the dog so that the owner’s departure is less stressful. In an effort to prevent destructive behavior, many owners confine their dog in a crate or behind a gate. For dogs that display “barrier frustration,” the use of a crate in this way is counterproductive. Many dogs will physically injure themselves while attempting to escape such confinement. Careful efforts to desensitize and counter condition the dog to crate confinement before leaving them alone may be helpful in some cases. However, some dogs rebel against any form of restraint, including restricting barriers and, for them, crate training may never be a positive experience. Crate training and utilizing the crate while people are home can be a positive way to make the crate a safe place. If you utilize it when people are around, your dog won’t necessarily associate the crate with departure and being left alone. Creating nap time in the crate throughout the day can also be helpful. Building Independence Independence training is one of the more important aspects of the program. It involves teaching your dog to “stand on their own four feet” when you are present, with the express intention that their newfound confidence will spill over into times when you are away. You need to make your dog more independent by reducing the bond between both of you to a more healthy level of involvement. Decreasing the bond is the hardest thing for owners to accept. Most people acquire dogs because they want a strong relationship with them. However, you have to accept that the anxiety your dog experiences in your absence is destructive. Essential components of the independence training program are as follows: Your dog can be with you, but the amount of interaction time should be reduced, especially where attention-seeking behaviors are concerned. You should initiate all interactions with your dog, and they shouldn’t be permitted to demand attention. If you give your dog attention every time they whine, it helps to foster the dog’s dependence on you and increases its anxiety in your absence. You should ignore your dog completely when they engage in attention-seeking behavior, and avoid catering to them when they appear to feel anxious. This means no eye contact, no pushing away, and no soothing talk or body language, all of which will reward their attention-seeking mission. Attention is encouraged only when your dog is sitting or lying calmly. The goal is not to ignore your dog, but to stop reinforcing attention-seeking behaviors so that your dog develops a sense of independence. Minimize the extent to which your dog follows you by teaching them to remain relaxed in one spot, such as their bed. To accomplish this, it is helpful if you train them to perform a sit-stay or down-stay while gradually increasing the time that they hold the command and remain at a distance from you. Providing a treat or toy and encouraging individual play time can be helpful. Once your dog has learned basic obedience commands, you can train them to hold long down-stays while you move progressively farther away. First, your dog should be trained to perform a “down-stay” on a mat or dog bed using a specific command, such as “lie down.” Your dog may have to be gently escorted to the designated spot the first few times. Initially, they should be rewarded every 10 seconds for remaining there, then every 20 seconds, 30 seconds, and so on. Once they have figured out what is wanted, you should switch to an intermittent schedule of reinforcement [reward], as this will strengthen the learned response. Each time your dog breaks their “stay,” issue a verbal correction, indicating that there will be no reward, and then escort them back to their bed. First, your dog can be made to “down-stay” while you are in the room. Next, they can be asked to stay when you are outside of the room, but nearby. The distance and time you are away from your dog can be increased progressively until your dog can remain in a down-stay for 20 to 30 minutes in your absence. Your dog should be warmly praised for compliance. Of course, they need to accept the praise without breaking the stay. Your dog should become accustomed to being separated from you when you are home for varying lengths of time and at different times of day. You can set up child gates to deny your dog access into the room you’re occupying (i.e. reading, watching television, or cooking). Instruct your dog to lie down and stay on a dog bed outside the room. As previously mentioned, you can provide an extended-release food treat or toy to keep your dog calm and distracted. Once they are able to tolerate being separated from you by a child gate, you can graduate to shutting the door to the room so your dog cannot see you. Allowing a dog to sleep in bed with the family can increase dependence. If you decide to prevent your dog from sleeping in your bed, there are some steps to take to establish this routine. First, you need to train your dog to sleep in their own bed on the floor in your bedroom. They may have to be taken to their bed several times before they get the message that you really want them to sleep in their own bed. Alternatively, you can train your dog to enjoy sleeping in a crate to prevent unwanted excursions. Do not use a crate if it causes more anxiety and distress for your dog. Once they tolerate sleeping in their own bed in your bedroom, you can move their bed outside of the bedroom and use a child gate or barrier to keep them out. Always remember to reward your dog with praise or a food treat for remaining in their bed. Develop Departure Techniques Many owners erroneously feel that if separation is so stressful, then they should spend more time with their dog before leaving. Unfortunately, this only exacerbates the condition. Everyone in the family should ignore your dog for 15 to 20 minutes before leaving the house and for at least 10 to 20 minutes after returning home. Alternatively, your leaving can be made a highlight of your dog’s day by making it a “happy time” and the time at which they are fed. Departures should be quick and quiet. When departures (and returns) generate less anxiety (and excitement), your dog will begin to feel less tension in your absence. Remember to reward calm behavior. Teach your dog that your departure and return are just normal parts of the day and are not times to be stressed. You should attempt to randomize the cues indicating that you are preparing to leave. Changing the cues may take some trial and error. Some cues mean nothing to a dog, while others trigger anxiety. Make a list of the things you normally do before leaving for the day (and anxiety occurs) and the things done before a short time out (and no anxiety occurs).Then mix up the cues. For example, if your dog is fine when you go downstairs to do the laundry, you can try taking the laundry basket with you when you leave for work. If your dog becomes anxious when you pick up your keys or put on a coat, you should practice these things when you are not really leaving. You can, for example, stand up, put on a coat or pick up your car keys during television commercials, and then sit down again. You can also open and shut doors while you are home when you do not intend to leave. Entering and exiting through various doors when leaving and returning can also mix up cues for your dog. When you are actually leaving, you should try not to give any cues to this effect. Leave your coat in the car and put your keys in the ignition well before leaving. It is important to randomize all the cues indicating departure (clothing, physical and vocal signals, interactions with family members, other pets, and so on). The planned departure technique can be very effective for some dogs. This program is recommended only under special circumstances because it requires that you never leave your dog alone during the entire retraining period, which can be weeks or months. Timing is everything when implementing this program. If your dog shows signs of anxiety (pacing, panting, barking excessively) the instant you walk out of the door, you should stand outside the door and wait until your dog is quiet for three seconds. Then go back inside quickly and reward your dog for being calm. If you return WHEN your dog is anxious, this reinforces your dog’s tendency to display the behavior, because it has the desired effect of reuniting the “pack” members. The goal is for your dog to connect being calm and relaxed with your return. Gradually work up to slightly longer departures 5 to 10 minutes as long as your dog remains quiet, and continue in this fashion. Eventually, you should be able to leave for the day without your dog becoming anxious when you depart. When performed correctly, this program can be very helpful in resolving separation anxiety. Other Treatment Options Obedience Training Obedience training helps to instill confidence and independence in your dog. You should spend 5 to 10 minutes daily training your dog to obey one-word commands. It may be helpful to have training sessions occur in the room where your dog will be left when you are gone. All positive experiences (food, toys, sleep, training, and attention) should be associated with this area of the home. Exercise Your dog should receive 15 to 20 minutes of sustained aerobic exercise once, preferably twice, per day. It is often helpful to exercise your dog before you leave for the day. Exercise helps to dissipate anxiety and provides constructive interaction between you and your dog. It is best to allow your dog 15 to 20 minutes to calm down before you depart. Fetching a ball is good exercise, as is going for a brisk walk or run with your dog on a leash. Even if your dog has a large yard to run in all day, the aerobic exercise will be beneficial since most dogs will not tire themselves if left to their own devices. This is incredibly helpful in dogs that are working breeds that need a job to expend energy and work their brains. Supplements Recently, supplements have been released to the public that can help dogs with anxiety. Purina created a probiotic that has been shown to reduce anxiety and provide a calming effect on some dogs. Your veterinarian may recommend this product for treating anxiety, or other products that contain L-Theanine or L-tryptophan.

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June and Cash
German Shorthaired Pointer
3 Years
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June and Cash
German Shorthaired Pointer
3 Years

My dogs keep waking me up during the night sometimes 1 time sometimes twice. If I feed them they go back to bed but getting up at 2 in the morning is a pain. I am trying to break this cycle just dont know how. They will just keep barking at me till i get up

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, is this a new habit? If it were just one dog, I would suggest a vet visit, but since it is the two of them, I feel they are working together to try and get fed. They get what they want and that settles them down. However, for you to wake up once or twice a night is quite inconvenient. I think the only way to end the problem is a tough solution - let them bark and do not respond in any way. Do not respond by telling them to be quiet, do not go and feed them, and don't give in. This just lets them know barking will give them what they want. Eventually, they will learn that barking does not produce a result. It will be tough for you, for days and maybe even weeks. You may have to resort to white noise in your room to block out the sound. You can also use white noise in the dogs' sleeping area. Try a fan, but have it directed away from them - never blowing on them. Put a diffuser with dog appeasing pheromones in the room as a way to maybe quiet them down for the night. The diffuser emits a natural, calming scent. Lastly, do the dogs sleep in your room? If they do not, you could try setting up an exercise pen (or two pens) in the room with cozy beds. They'll be confined but in a large space and can still have the security of knowing that you are there. That may keep them quiet. I would use the fan for white noise in this case, too. Also have room darkening curtains so that light from the outside, such as a street lamp, does not disturb them. Keep them up as late as you can and take them out for a pee break the last thing before bed. A simple good night and put them in the crate, turn on the fan, close the curtains and hope all goes well. All the best and I hope this helps!

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Arian
Labrador Retriever
5 Months
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Arian
Labrador Retriever
5 Months

Our dog wakes between 3.30 and 4am every night. She needs the toilet so we take her out with no fuss. But she will not settle after this. We have tried letting her bark but after 3 hours of continuous barking we have to go to her for her and our neighbours sake. We have tried her in a crate and more recently tried the freedom of the room where her crate is. We take her for a walk at 10pm to try tire her a little more and have tried giving her a kong which she loves during the day but ignores in the early hours of the morning.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you are doing everything right! Chances are she is full of energy at this point; it is not unusual. But yes, you definitely have to take Arian out for the pee break at 3:30 or 4. I assume 10 pm is bedtime for everyone, otherwise I would suggest keeping her up a little later - do not let her nap in the evenings - keep her busy with mentally stimulating toys and even a game of tug of war. Make sure you still take her out for a quick pee before bed, even if it is later than the 10 pm walk. I believe that Arian's crate is not in your room? You could try her in your room in the crate, and once she starts to sleep through the night, you can gradually move her crate back to the other room. This is done by moving it just inches a night; it takes a while but after a few weeks, the crate has been inched out of the bedroom. Have you tried giving her a kong stuffed with moistened kibble topped with a smear of dog-safe peanut butter (no xylitol as it is toxic to dogs!)? She may go for that in the wee hours of the morning, but ideally, to not get her used to that is best. Try white noise like a fan (not pointed at her) as a way to try and get her to sleep or at least settle down again. Good luck!

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Leo
American Bulldog
7 Years
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Leo
American Bulldog
7 Years

We have recently moved and our neighbors have two large German shepherds. Everyday when we let Leo out to go to the restroom the dogs bark at him and get his attention. He then wants to start attacking the fence to get to them and not in a playful manner. Is there anyway that problem could be corrected?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Zoey, I suggest teaching pup the quiet command, then having pup on a long leash and each time the other dogs bark while you are out there, call up to you before he gets excited about their barking - timing is important here, and reward pup for moving away from the other dogs. You will need to practice this often for pup to develop a habit of moving away from the fence when the other dogs appear and to help pup associate their presence with rewards from you, instead of a fight. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tootsie
French Bulldog
7 Months
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Tootsie
French Bulldog
7 Months

Pulls when walked, when I say command come, runs the other way, afraid of balloons and trash bags, needy

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Niki, Check out the Turns method from the article linked below for the pulling: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Reel In method for coming: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall More come: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ For the fear of objects: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5BjvNScFPs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlZmJlllP7Y&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Texas Pete
Beagle
2 Years
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Texas Pete
Beagle
2 Years

We rescued Texas Pete a couple of months ago and he’s been great in the crate. Then out of now where starts whining and crying all night and we don’t know what to do. We try melatonin calming chews and I threw an old tshirt in his crate but he still cries every night. He’s been like this the past two weeks.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Reece, First, how is pup's pottying? Are poops normal and going no more than 3 times a day, can pup hold their pee for as long as normal? If you suspect an issue there, I recommend checking with your vet - I am not a vet. Second, is there anything making a noise at night that could be bothering him? If there doesn't seem to be a medical issue or something bothering pup at night, pup simply may have discovered that they can get attention by barking at night. If that's the case I recommend doing the following. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Quinn
Terrier / Corgi
20 Months
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Quinn
Terrier / Corgi
20 Months

Quinn wakes up one - two times a night to go out. She sleeps in her own bed, but in our bedroom. We walk her for a good amount of time almost every night before bed, but she still wakes to use the bathroom. I have created a schedule that should prevent this: early dinner time, long walk and a last go-out right before bed, but to no avail. We have tried changing her food and having her sleep somewhere else in the house. My mental health is really taking a toll as I am the only one to get up with her each night. She also has accidents in the house still. Sometimes it is within 5-10 minutes of coming back in from outside. She was recently on an antibiotic for another reason, so it is not caused by infection.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
220 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. She should definitely be able to hold it through the night by now. Have you thought about getting a crate for her? Dogs will often not go to the bathroom in their "den" space, and a crate gives them that den feeling. It sounds like you are doing everything else correctly, and that is my only other suggestion other than having her checked out by a veterinarian. I spent time working in an animal hospital and often females can have incontinence issues from scar tissue left over by being spayed. If she has been spayed, I would look into this. There are a few supplements that help build bladder strength. I would talk to your vet first, but this is something that many people don't realize is an issue.

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Milly
Pug
4 Years
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Milly
Pug
4 Years

Hello, we recently rescued Milly, a four year old pug. We already have a 7 year old cockapoo called Archie. For the first couple of weeks Milly was in her own bed in the same room as Archie, and slept through the night. However she has since then been barking at various hours of the morning, every morning for the last month. We contacted her foster family and they suggested allowing her to sleep in Archies crate, which worked for 2 nights and then she was back to barking. We are trying to stick to going down at 7am and giving them breakfast, then if she wakes before then we try and ignore, then go in and say back to bed Milly until she is quiet. The main problem really is our older dog Archie because he is being disrupted every night and consequently his behaviour in the day is very subdued. We are not sure what to do to balance the needs of both dogs and us!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Olivia, Was Milly already crate trained or is the crate new to them? I recommend returning Milly to her own crate. Work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As she improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating her during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever she cries in the crate, tell her "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And no not spray in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries. If pup doesn't bark when crated during the day, only at night, then just work on the Quiet method and skip the Surprise method practice during the day, then address nights the way I outline below either way. When she cries at night (in the crate by herself - where she needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell her Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If you go straight to nights and days like this you will probably have about 3 rough nights, with lots of correcting before she gets quiet. If pup is protesting the crate during the day too, don't skip practicing the Surprise method when you are home, but don't give food at night. It may also be worth listening out for any noises that are happening in the middle of the night - like an appliance beeping or making a high pitched hum, or neighbor coming and going/dogs barking or howling, ect... that could be bothering pup. If you find that's the case, practice Quiet around that noise often with treats during the day to help desensitize pup to the noise and condition being quiet when they hear it, if it's not something you can simply turn off . Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Jaxs
Pit bull
7 Weeks
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Jaxs
Pit bull
7 Weeks

My puppy is 7 weeks old I got him three days ago I want to potty train him to go outside but there is snow on the ground and 20 degrees some days he is so little I don’t want him to get sick. I do have training pads and he is starting to go on those some but I don’t want him to just use those I also would like to train him to go outside.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
220 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Dogs don't typically get sick from the cold weather. It doesn't compromise their immune systems like it does ours. As long as he isn't out for more than about 10 minutes right now at his age, he will be fine. I am sending you quite a bit of information on potty and crate training just in case you want to use a crate to help with potty training Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Griff and Lachie
Poodle
13 Years
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Griff and Lachie
Poodle
13 Years

I have adopted two older poodles who both lived together all their lives. They are doing really well however they will not sleep in their beds at night. They go into my bed and take over my sleep space. I have tried to leave them on that bed and sleep in the spare bed but am followed. I have had them two months and now they are settling in really need to get them to sleep in their own space. During the day they will sleep in the bed or on the lounge chair no problem. How can I solve this so we all get good nights rest?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
220 Dog owners recommended

Hello! If possible, you may want to have them sleep in a different room for about a week so they break the habit of sleeping with you. Put their beds in a different location and close your door so they don't have access to your bed. Then after some time, bring their beds back into your room. Give the command to go to bed and give them treats for going on their beds. If they try to jump on your bed (which they may try quite a bit the first night) just keep re-directing them to their beds.

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Elsa
terrier
3 Years
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Elsa
terrier
3 Years

Not sleeping all night

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Angie, What is pup's routine at bedtime? Where are they sleeping at night (i.e. in a crate, in your bed, same room, another room, outside...)? What is pup doing when they wake up (i.e. barking at you, pacing, jumping on you, ect...)? What do you do when they wake up (i.e. take them outside, sniggle with them, feed them, ect...)? How many times are they waking up roughly? Does pup have any medical issues or other symptoms or are there reasons to believe this could be medical, like pup sleeping past in the fine and now suddenly waking to pee more? I would love to help you. Could you please give a bit more information about your night routine, how you are responding to pup, and anything else you feel could apply. Thank you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Frankie
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
15 Months
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Frankie
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
15 Months

Frankie has been sleeping through the night in her crate since about 3 months. However, starting 3 or 4 nights ago, she has been waking up around 3, and then midnight yesterday. I thought she had to go out, so I let her out and out her right back in her crate. However, she barks incessantly and won't go back to sleep. The first 2 nites, I let her sleep on my bed which I know she wants to do and she went straight to sleep. When she woke at midnight last nite, I let her out, she didn't pee and when I put her in the crate, again she barked for 25 mins. I was determined not to give in to her but put the vibration collar on her. She stopped barking and finally fell asleep until 3am, and then woke up again crying. I tried to let her out again but she didn't want/need to go. She was trying to hide under the table from me at 3am because of the collar! I ended up taking off the collar and letting her on my bed. My kids have school and my husband has to work. I can't let the dog bark all night. I know Frankie wants to sleep in my bed but I don't want her to. How do I train her to sleep in her crate again???

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it's strange that Frankie all of a sudden does not like the crate. If she keeps waking up and needing to pee (and this is something new) a vet checkup may be in order to rule out an infection in the bladder or kidneys. I don't have a lot of experience with vibration collars (or any training collar - it's just something I choose not to use) but I think that it may be confusing Frankie at this point and if she associates it with the crate, it could be counterintuitive. I would work on helping Frankie to associate the crate with good things. This guide has excellent tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. The Surprise Method may work. If you can get Frankie to go in and out of the crate during the day on her own, nights may not seem so bad to her. You can also consider an exercise pen area for her (use the Surprise Method here as well): https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Buy her a comfy new bed and she may grow to like this den space. Encouraage her to go there during the day on her own by placing new toys there and praising her for going in, even if it is just for a few minutes. If she continues to bark or cry at night, you may have to persevere for a few days (or weeks). Good luck!

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niko
Husky
1 Year
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niko
Husky
1 Year

just adopted a dog, wants to go outside multiple times a night, then will not come back in, wants to play

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kelly, At this age, pup shouldn't need to go potty at night if it's been less than 8 hours; however, pup will probably not be motivated to hold it if still potty training if they are not being supervised (which you can't do and sleep also) so I recommend crating pup at night, then ignore or correct the crying when pup asks to go outside but it's been less than 7-8 hours. When you do take pup outside before bed, during the night, and first thing in the morning, take pup on a leash, tell pup to Go Potty, walk pup around slowly on leash, then reward pup right after they go - to help them learn the Go Potty command. I would stop potty rewards once pup is consistently going potty quickly when you say Go Potty though. After pup goes potty during those bedtime, middle of the night, and early morning times, immediately bring pup back inside and crate pup if it's not time to get up for the day yet - you want all night potty trips to be super boring and focused just on peeing, without the option to play, so pup will stop asking to go out when they don't truly need to go potty. If pup isn't already crate trained, and protests a long time when you ignore the barking before it's time to go potty, you can also teach the following. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. You can either continue what you are currently doing at night during this process or go ahead and jump into what I explain below for night time training - waiting until the day is good before starting the night or starting the night and day both at the same time. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zues
pitbull
3 Years
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Zues
pitbull
3 Years

Even when we as family play with Zues, each night, he will start jumping up the glass door, waking everybody up. What can we do, we tried tiring him out before bed but he still does this. Help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Biance, During the day I recommend mimicking what you are doing at night, leaving pup on the other side of the glass door. Whenever they lie down, sit, or generally wait patiently for several minutes, calmly go to the door, open it just enough to drop a treat at pup's paws then close it again without letting them in. Whenever they jump at the door, open the door just slightly, tell pup "Ah Ah" calmly and briefly correct pup with something like a quick puff of air from an unscented pet convincer at their chest or side (Not at their face and don't use citronella). Practice proactively during the day to help pup learn to simply lie down at the door instead of jumping. At night either ignore the jumping or calmly correct, but don't give the food at night, and don't act too excited or angry at night - calm and boring instead. Don't skip on the daytime practice. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rocco
Shih-Tzu
3 Years
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Rocco
Shih-Tzu
3 Years

Hi i hope you can help me, i have taken on a rescue Shih-tzu 3 years old, after having two Shih-tzus over a 26 year period, the only problem i have is, he sleeps in his own bed in my bedroom but wakes me a couple of times through the night and wants to go out in the garden and he does poop each time, he does go back to bed as good as gold, and he will do one poop through he day, i have tried different dried foods which he took to anyway but it has made no difference, i have also tried various feeding times, he is an absolutely brilliant dog and friend, but me being 82 it is not doing me much good regarding sleep,
i really hope you can give me some advice, i await your kind reply with many thanks
Jim

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jim, I would start by speaking with your vet if you have not already done so. It sounds like pup is either used to a pee pad and in the habit of going at night due to that from their previous home, has a GI issue that needs addressing with your vet - even the need for a good probiotic (I am not a vet though so consult them), or is too distracted to poop as often as pup needs to go during the day so is holding it until things are calm at night. Make sure that you are removing all food and water at least 2 hours before bed. To help pup go potty better during the daytime so they will hopefully not need to go as often during the day, make sure pup is moving a lot while outside too. You can either walk pup around slowly for 15 minutes again after they pee, or if that amount of moving isn't an option, I recommend teaching pup to fetch if your yard is fenced to get pup running in your yard a few times a day before leashing pup back up and telling them to Go Potty - the running will help pup feel the need to poop right after. Movement in general helps stimulate the need to poop. I also recommend teaching pup the Go Potty command. Take pup potty and tell them to "Go Potty." If they pee, give one treat. After pup pees, walk pup around for another 15 minutes, telling pup to Go Potty again, and praise and giving five treats (you can also use pieces of dog food if pup enjoys their food) if pup poops. Do this until pup will go quickly on command; at that point, reserve the treats for only when pup poops outside during the day. Don't give treats during middle of the night potty trips. Expect pup to likely need to poop morning, afternoon and evening, or morning and evening. If pup already pooped 2 hours ago, you can go back inside instead of walking around for another 15 minutes if you feel pup doesn't need to go, but if it's been a while since pup pooped, he just ate, or he ran around a lot, encourage pooping after peeing. If you absolutely cannot get pup to hold it overnight, crating pup at night can sometimes help pup try to hold it until morning if pup physically is able to and there is not a medical condition causing the pooping at night. You can also teach pup to go potty on a disposable grass pad in a closed room, like in a bathroom and have pup sleep in there at night to keep you from having to get up with him. I would only do this if an alternative won't work, and I would keep the grass pad just in that room where you can confine pup at night and not give pup access during the day, because you don't want pup to get used to going in other parts of the house at other times. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lola
Mini Groodle
9 Months
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Lola
Mini Groodle
9 Months

We have moved house 2 weeks ago, and she is no longer sleeping through the night, she has always slept in her crate, and has slept through the night in there no problem for months. Do we persevere with her sleeping in the crate? She wakes up at 3am every morning and cries til we come and get her

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Miri, I suspect the crying may have started at first because she was anxious about being left in a new location without you, not knowing that that was the family's new home. Once you responded to the crying a couple times by letting her out, she has now learned that crying gets her out of the crate so she is continuing it. Start by ruling out other causes. Is she still able to hold her pee for as long as she had in the past during the day? Is she pooping more than 3 times per 24 hours, or is her poop runny? Are there any other signs of illness, or noises or blinking lights that could be waking her at 3am? If you suspect a medical issue, start by seeing your vet to get that resolved. I am not a vet. If there seems to be something waking her, try moving her crate or fixing the issue there first. If pup doesn't seem to have a medical issue or something external waking her. I recommend either ignoring the barking for five nights straight before trying the below to see if ignoring it will resolve it, or correcting the barking as follows. First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As she improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating her during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. Whenever she cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries. Practice for a few days until she is doing well during the day. When she cries at night before it has been 8 hours, tell her Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If you believe she truly needs to go potty at 3am when she wakes, take her potty on a leash before returning her to the crate right after and correcting or ignoring any crying after she is returned to the crate. Keep the potty trip as boring as possible - on leash, no treats or food, no petting or praise, and little talk or interaction. This trip is all business, and she is returned to the crate quietly right after and not given freedom to sleep somewhere else. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Archie
Cocker Spaniel
14 Weeks
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Archie
Cocker Spaniel
14 Weeks

We have done everything by the book from an evening walk to a comfy quiet location for his crate. He happily goes off to sleep and in the first few weeks we were getting up in the night to take him for a toilet break. He had always done a pee in his crate by then but we would took him out anyway. We would put him straight back and he would normally be quiet for another half hour.
Lately, he doesnt want to go for a pee as he has already been, he just wants our company and will yelp and howl roughly around 4.30 am indefinitely. We left him to cry as we didnt want to be at his beck and call for attention.
He cried for 2 hours.
This has happened for at least 3 nights and doesnt seem to be getting any better. Hve you got any ideas to help us, please?
Thanks you!
Jerry and Debs

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
220 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Right now is probably a time to transition him off of that night time potty break. He is just borderline with his age/being able to hold it physically all night. Physically he is just about mature enough, so now we have to break the habit. This can take about 2 weeks which I know will be super unpleasant. You may want to restrict water a few hours before bed time, and then add more stimulation to his evening routine. In addition to walking, maybe some games or working on training commands. People have a lot of success with partially covering the crate and adding a fan or white noise machine to block out any sounds that may wake up your dog. The noise also creates a more sleep inducing environment. So with all of that, when he does wake up, it is best to continue ignoring him like you have. It takes time to break the habit, and I know it may seem impossible, but dogs are very "cause and effect" learners. His barks get your attention, so he will continue barking. Once he realizes he will not get that attention, he will stop.

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Lotti
Vizsla
2 Months
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Lotti
Vizsla
2 Months

Waking up once a night which is not the problem. The problem is that she won't settle after and needs me to shush her sleep and cries as soon as I then put her down and go out of sight. We've had her 2 weeks now.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
819 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alexis, Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. At night you will need to ignore the crying if it's been less than 2 hours since pup last went potty - some puppies cry for a very long time at first, but the more consistent you can be the sooner they tend to learn how to put themselves to sleep. Practicing the surprise method during the day will help them have the skills to calm themselves though. Surprise method - only give treats during daytime practice, not at night though: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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