How to Train Your Dog to Sleep in a Certain Room

Medium
1-4 Weeks
General

Introduction

You’ve always loved cuddling up with your dog when you sleep at night. You wanted the company and he gladly obliged. Now you have a new partner though, and a dog sleeping between you isn’t quite what your partner envisaged on moving in. Your dog is also quite defensive and protective about who sleeps in his bedroom, so you know it’s time to make a change. He’s not a puppy anymore either, so maybe some independence will do him good.

Training him to sleep in a certain room is good for both of you. He needs to be able to survive without you, at day and at night. It will make leaving him in kennels or at a friend's when you go on vacation easier, too.

Defining Tasks

The training itself isn’t always a walk in the park. It depends largely on how long your dog has been used to sleeping wherever he likes. If he’s mature and you’re breaking a 10-year-old habit, then it may take a few weeks to get him truly settled into his new bedroom. If he’s just a puppy and new to having sleeping freedom, then taking it away could take just several days or a week. The biggest struggle comes with making his new sleeping area a comfy and desirable bedroom for him. Also, if you’ve spent years with him sleeping in your bed, then letting go of your cuddle buddy may prove challenging for you as well.

Succeed with this training and you’ll have a dog you can control and who won’t cause you any trouble at night time. 

Getting Started

Before you start your new training regime you’ll need a few things. You’ll need a comfy bed and toys, plus treats to make your dog's new sleeping area nice and appealing. You’ll also need to set aside a few minutes each day for getting him familiar and excited for his new bedroom.

You’ll have to find all your patience and resilience to stick with the training campaign, so bring the right attitude. Once you’ve collected all of that, you can get to work!

The ‘Bed’ Method

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2 Votes
Step
1
Stand by his bed
Be right next to the bed in the room you want your dog to sleep in and then call him over. Make sure you’ve got a pocket full of treats with you.
Step
2
‘Bed’
Issue the verbal command, then point at his bed and encourage him to head there. Once your dog has looked at you puzzled for a while, he’ll finally clock on and take a step onto the bed. As soon as he does that, give him a treat and shower him with praise.
Step
3
Increase the distance
Repeat this again and again over the next few days. As you practice, slowly increase the distance you are from the bed when you send him there. The trick is to increase the distance gradually. Keep practicing until you can send your pooch to his bed when you aren’t even in the room. At this point, you can cut out the treats, he’ll no longer need them to follow your command.
Step
4
Apply it at night
When the evening comes, send him to his new room/bed with the command. Be firm and clear so he knows you mean business. If he trots back out, send him straight back. If he comes into your room or another room at night again, give the command in a louder, clearer voice. You will need to be persistent. It will take him several days to a week before he finally realizes that he needs to stay in that room all night.
Step
5
Water spray for the persistent ones
If he consistently comes back after you send him to bed, you may need to use a deterrent. A simple spray of water near his face will give him a little fright and help reinforce the point. Use this each time he comes back or into your bed, give him the ‘bed’ command. Once he gets the message, you can go back to drinking water instead of spraying it.
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The Routine Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Follow a timeline
Each evening, try and be consistent. Give your dog his food, take him to go potty, and then put him to bed at the same time. It should never be a surprise when you want him to go to bed. Routine brings with it comfort, so take him to his new room at the same time each evening.
Step
2
Leave a treat on the bed
An easy way to get him to go in there in the first place is to put a treat on his bed. Simply having something in there to look forward to will encourage him to head in there each evening.
Step
3
Say ‘good night’
Spend a couple of minutes gently playing with him and stroking him. Get him comfortable and happy, then say good night and leave him. It’s important you follow this routine each day and then he won’t be surprised when you leave.
Step
4
Go and get him in the morning
Having a routine in the morning is also important. If he’s not already up, go and say 'good morning' and stroke him. Doing this in the morning and evening will teach him that going to bed and where he goes to bed is on your terms. It will also comfort him to know you’ll be there when he goes to sleep and you’ll still be there first thing in the morning.
Step
5
Be consistent
If you slip up every couple of evenings your dog won’t stick to his new room. You need to stick to your routine every evening or the process will take considerably longer. But be patient, be rigorous, and it will pay off.
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The Gentle Cold Shoulder Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
Make the new room all his
If you want your dog to sleep somewhere else, you need to make it feel like his own. Play with him there in the day. Allow him to have some space in there that is totally his. It will then start to feel like his territory, a safe place where he can escape to.
Step
2
Add some home comforts
To start with, you may want to put some old clothes of yours into his new room and bed. The smell of you will help put him at ease. It will also help to leave his toys in there. All of this will make him feel more comfortable.
Step
3
Leave the door open wide
To start with, you need to keep the door open so he can escape if he wants. This may not make sense now, but the idea is you show your dog gradually that he’s not missing out on anything. It also stops you cutting all ties in one go, which won’t be easy for him.
Step
4
Gradually close the door
Each night, close the door a little bit more, until it is only just ajar and then finally completely shut it. This will allow your dog to slowly get used to not having his own freedom anymore.
Step
5
Put him to bed
Each night, take him to his new room and slowly stroke him for a few minutes until he gets sleepy. Think of it like taking a child to bed at night and reading them a bed time story. Keep doing this and all of the above steps until he’s comfortable in there. Then you can slowly stop taking him to bed each night.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Olly
Maltese/Poodle cross?
3 Years
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Question
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Olly
Maltese/Poodle cross?
3 Years

Olly is a rescue dog that has continually barked from Day one and showed some aggression issues, last few months he has actually attacked me when I am trying to do something for him, he slept on bed from day one but now when we move he again attacks and acts like a German Shepard really nasty looking and barring teeth, same thing when he is on floor and we need to get around or over him, if we tell him to move he just ignores us completely then we when go near him he is in attack mode. I have tried isolating him in another room but he continually cries barks, whinges and makes a noise my husband is suffering from cancer so getting optimum sleep for me is a necessity but atm no sleep very tired do I continue to persist with dog in another room and will he eventually learn that he is not to sleep in bed, saying no does not seem to compute with him

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Yvonne, It sounds like Olly needs an entire shift in the way he views you and your husband. By increasing his respect for you, you should have more success with the nighttime training, but unfortunately ignoring his cries will still be needed. I would advise getting him used to wearing a basket muzzle first. Introduce the muzzle with lots of treats, giving him treats for sniffing the muzzle, touching it, letting you put it on, and letting you take it off. Practice that until he can tolerate wearing the muzzle. After he is used to wearing the muzzle then you can use a straw dipped in peanut butter or spray food, like the ones sold to stuff Kongs with from your local pet store. You can poke the straw dipped in food through the muzzle to let him lick it off when he is behaving well. Once he is used to wearing the muzzle, then it is time to implement a lot of new rules around the house. He should no longer be allowed on the bed or furniture, so long as he is acting aggressively when told to get off and not obeying your commands. He needs to work for everything he gets by doing a command for you first. Things that he should work for can include: attention, meals, walks, games, and anything else that he asks for. This process is called "No Free Lunch". Do not pet him unless you have called him over or have had him do something first. The idea is for him to learn that he can no longer get his way by acting aggressively and that you own everything in the home, and he does not. This might sound harsh but right now his behavior is dangerous and causing stress for you and your husband, and this process is a safe way to teach him differently. Have him wear the muzzle when you are home as a normal part of his life until is attitude completely changes, like wearing a collar, so that when he tries to control the situation by acting aggressively, he will not be able to, and will learn that aggression does not work. While doing this, work on crate training with him during the day, leave him in the crate during the day for gradually longer and longer periods of time, rewarding him with treats when he is quiet. Start with only a few minutes in the crate and work up to one hour as he improves. Only let him out when he is quiet. You can give him a Kong stuffed with food in the crate with him, or another favorite, safe toy. This should help him get used to being alone, without having to practice just at night when you are tired. It is vital when you lock him out of your room at night, that you do not give in by letting him back in. Every time that you give him, he will just learn that if he persists long enough he gets what he wants. He is being demanding and insecure, and needs to learn how to be independent and respectful. You can help him learn by working on the crate training during the day and the respect training all the time. Those should help not only his nighttime behavior but his general behavior as well hopefully. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hugo
American Akita
8 Months
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Question
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Hugo
American Akita
8 Months

We made a kennel outside how do I make him sleep he keeps barking and crying

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Ideally, pup would sleep inside in a crate at night until he is in the habit of sleeping through the night. This would allow you to teach quietness in the crate and how to handle time alone. If that is not an option, you will need to use a bark collar for the nighttime barking. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Rex
French Bulldog
18 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
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Rex
French Bulldog
18 Weeks

Been sleeping with me and my partner since we got Him but it’s coming beetween us dosent like it when we kiss and he is getting bigger so not enough room

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Laura, I suggest crate training pup and choosing another room for pup to sleep in in the crate. Once pup has developed a habit of sleeping there quietly, if they are otherwise potty trained and non-destructive in the house, you can transition the crate out for a dog bed in that same location at night. Using the crate will make enforcing sleeping, quiet, and not scratching on doors at night much easier during the training process though. Practice crate training during the day too. If he is not already used to a crate, expect crying at first. When he cries and you know he doesn't need to go potty yet, ignore the crying. Most dogs will adjust if you are consistent. During daytime practice, you can give him a food stuffed hollow chew toy to help him adjust and sprinkle treats into the crate during times of quietness to further encourage quietness. If he continues protesting for long periods of time past three days, you can use a Pet Convincer to correct. Work on teaching "Quiet" during the day but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when she barks and cries. If he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If he disobeys your command and keeps crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at his side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If he stays quiet after you leave, you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward his quietness. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark At night, simply say "Ah Ah", correct with a puff of air through the crate, then return to bed. Correct each time pup barks. You may want to go to bed 1-2 hours early that night, knowing that you will likely be correcting a lot at first those first three nights. Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Archie
French Bulldog
2 Years
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Question
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Archie
French Bulldog
2 Years

I recently rescued Archie, a brindle two year old french Bulldog. We have a two story house where upstairs is much warmer than our tiled lower level. At first I slept with him downstairs and for a few nights have had him in my room upstairs but come nighttime and he’s upstairs he paces, he chews, he’s destructive and pants excessively. Sometimes I can have the air conditioning on and he’s not so bad but cost wise that isn’t a option for every night so most of the time we end up back downstairs where in minutes he’s relaxed, not panting and asleep. This works for him but me, not so much. I haven’t had a decent night sleep since we got him. If he’s alone downstairs he’ll bark and cry but I don’t like risking having him upstairs where I know it’s harder for him and potentially cause him harm. How am I best to train him so he can sleep by himself downstairs and I can sleep upstairs without being anxious or upset that we are separated?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Anneliese, First, I suggest creating an area where Archie has to stay put and can't wander around at night or try to come upstairs. If he is crate trained, the crate is a good place to start out in. If not, an exercise pen with his dog bed and a couple of durable chew toys will work. During the day get him used to spending time in that area while you are out of sight. Purchase some hollow chew toys, such as Kongs, if he likes food. Stuff a couple of the toys with his own dog food and a bit of peanut butter (Avoid xylitol sweetener - It's TOXIC). You can soak the food in water ahead of time to make it soft before mixing it with peanut butter also. If you soak the food you can also freeze the Kongs if he gets the food out too quickly. Confine him in the area for an hour during the day with the food stuffed chew toys. Ignore any crying. When he has been quiet for at least five minutes or stayed quiet for at least five minutes, return to him and sprinkle a few treats into the pen or crate, then leave again. You want to ignore crying and reward quiet and give him time to work through being alone and learn to relax. At first he may not chew on the food stuffed toys. Once he gets used to the area he will become more likely to eat the food and enjoy the toys - which will help him learn to enjoy being in the area and relax more. After he is used to being in the area during the day, start putting him in there at night for bed. Ignore any crying. You have spent time getting him used to the area so he should be able to adjust at night to being alone..Give him the opportunity to work through it and accept the new arrangement. The crying is probably just protesting something new and not anxiety at that point - since he is already used to being alone in that area and it isn't that new. If you cannot let him cry for some reason, like neighbors, you can also correct the barking and teach him faster. This way can feel harsher but it also helps the dog adjust more quickly. You can purchase a small pressurized canister of air called a Pet Convincer. Practice the confinement in the area during the day, but when he cries return to him and spray a small puff of air at his side while telling him "Ah Ah", then leave again. Also, reward him with the treats for staying quiet for five minutes. You want to reinforce being quiet also. Once he has learned to be quiet during the day in the area, then transition him to the area at night. If he cries at night, go to him and correct the crying, then return to bed. Don't give treats during the night though because you don't want him to learn to cry then get quiet just to get treats at night. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

I have a similar situation :( I am super attached to my little 4 yr old maltese and he is really attached to me. We used to always sleep together before my husband and i got married. i got him used to sleeping right next to me by the bed and he is fine with that as long as hes next to me. we recently moved to a two story townhome and we have carpet in the second floor. Hes had a few accidents and now my husband doesnt want him going upstairs at all :(. i gave him his little area in the kitchen with his crate and blanket and toys and i leave the crate open with a few pads on the floor in case he needs to use them. its very cozy and he loves his little area but theres still one problem, im not there at night. he wakes up to call for me at all hours of the night and isnt letting us sleep. hes a confident dog and does very well with goodbyes during the day, hes knows im coming back after work and wont even bark. but at night its a different story. it breaks my heart to see him stressed out over this and wish he would be happy sleeping away from me :(. PLEASE HELP

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Sadie
Kelpie
10 Weeks
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Question
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Sadie
Kelpie
10 Weeks

We have our 10 week old kelpie Sadie sleeping in our laundry in a kennel. She is too young to be outside and we do not wish her to be able to have access to our lounge in which she could potentially urinate and chew it. We have our a baby gate in to stop her from sneaking out. We have had her for 3 weeks. The first week she cried for 10-30 minutes, the second week she walked in with little to no crying and sleeping until 6. The third week she has been crying a lot longer and waking up earlier. She escaped twice in back to back nights due to me not locking the baby gate properly and we didn’t realise until the morning. Right now she has been crying and wailing consistently for 2 hours. We have tried to consistently put her to bed around 8.30-9 every night. Why has she gone crazy and how can we get her to stop? I want to cave and allow her into the lounge room as when she escaped she made no sounds. My partner wants to stay strong but it is ruining her sleeping and we are both exhausted. We can’t walk her for another 6 weeks either. What can we do to help her want to sleep?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Sadie is pretty young. Are you sure she does not need to go outside for a pee break and that is why she is waking so early? Putting her to bed at 8:30 is potentially too early, unless of course, that is your bedtime, too. I would let her stay up and play with mentally stimulating toys in the evenings. Play games with her (roll a ball, fetch outside with you if your yard is safe). Kelpies have the lineage of working dogs and Sadie will need lots of exercise every day. I think if you check with the vet you may be able to play with her in the back yard. I cannot see you (or her) lasting another 6 weeks without Sadie having lots of physical exercise and a mental work out, too. So, to get her to sleep at night, keep her very busy! And do not put her in bed until you go, and take her for a potty break the last minute before bed. Remove food and water 2 hours before bed. Take a look here for tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/sleep-all-night. Good luck!

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Lucky
Labrador Retriever
9 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Lucky
Labrador Retriever
9 Months

My dog recently started jumping into my room around 6 to 7am, while I'm still sleeping. He does this when he is playing or when he is energetic, not when he is tired or willing to rest with me.

I want him to sleep with me, but since he always comes to my bed energetic and hyper, he usually will lick me a whole lot, and sometimes bite my fingers when I try to push him off.

How do I train him to sleep with me but not play in my bed? I don't want him to jump in my bed, just hop up and lay down and rest.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kien, You will need to teach Lucky a Down-Stay and practice that command on your bed during the day. Work on him Staying for up to two-hours. Once he understands what the Down-Stay means, then you can practice long Down-Stays while you are doing something sitting down, like watching TV or doing homework. Your goal should be a one-to-two-hour Down-Stay for him to be able to be still in your bed with you during the morning for that long. After he has learned the command and you have practiced it on your bed and he can do it for long periods of time, then you can simply tell him to Down-Stay when he gets in your bed and is too excited. You will probably need to tell him to Down-Stay on the far end of your bed and not right by your face (to remove the temptation to lick you), until he develops a habit of being calm on your bed. Doing this sets an expectation for being calm while in your bed, helping him transition to sleeping with you without bothering you later on. Be patient with him. He is still an energetic puppy and this will take him time to learn, but it is also a very good exercise to practice with him because it helps him develop self-control and learn how to calm himself down. It is also alright to give him a rubber chew toy to chew on while he is in your bed -- as long as he has been been possessive or aggressive about toys, giving him a chew toy might keep him from chewing your blankets -- which you need to be aware of at his age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Millie
Pit bull
5 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Millie
Pit bull
5 Years

Millie is a 5 year old used to sleeping in the bed with my girlfriend and I. We really would like for her to sleep in the bed in the guest room but are having trouble getting her to do this. I’ve been working on teaching her that bed is the command “bed” with treats and she is learning that, but she will not stay in the bed. What can I do to get her to stay in the bed?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michael, I suggest teaching a Place command - which includes automatically staying on the Place. You can use the word "Bed" instead and make the bed the place. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s I also suggest closing the door or using a baby gate, and practicing getting pup used to staying in there - like you would a crate, some during the day, so that you can reward pup for calm responses while alone in there during the day when you are awake. That will help prepare pup for sleeping in there at night, and it's important to use the door or gate at first because you won't be able to enforce pup staying in there at night while you are sleeping at the beginning of training. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below, and reward pup similarly for being calm and quiet in the guest bedroom. Keep the bed near the doorway to encourage pup to choose to lie on the bed, and periodically sprinkle treats on the bed also, when pup chooses to stay on it on her own, even when not practicing Place. surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mabel
American Eskimo
8 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Mabel
American Eskimo
8 Months

We rescued Mabel when she was about 4mo old. She is a Corgi/Eskimo mix. She was very difficult to potty train because she does not let us know when she has to go out. We crate trained her for up to 8-9 hrs either for work or at night. She has terrible separation anxiety with mainly me who is her primary caretaker. She would do ok in her crate at night and then after a few weeks she would bark uncontrollably, all night long. We moved her crate around to numerous different places the last one being in our 11 y/o room. She does ok but as soon as anyone makes any sort of peep, she is barking like crazy. We have treats that she only gets in her crate but just never has become accustomed to it. As soon as we let her out she grabs all her toys out and runs away. I was at a loss so I made the "mistake" of letting her sleep with us and she sleeps all night long without a peep. This is great except for the fact that my husband is not thrilled it is every night. I would like to get her to sleep in one of my boys beds and she will lay down with them but as soon as I am out of sight she comes to find me. I have also tried crating her at night again and she wants no part in it. Any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, There are a couple of routes you can take with the separation anxiety. The first is to initially start by simply working on building her independence. Generally build her confidence by adding a lot of structure and predictability into her routine. Things such as making her work for rewards like meals, walks, and pets. Working on "Stay" and "Place," commands while you move away or leave the room, and teaching her to remain inside a crate when the door is open too. Changing the routines so that she does not anticipate alone time and build up her anxiety before you leave - which is hard for her to deescalate from. Being sure to give her something to do in the crate during the day (such as a food stuffed Kong to chew on), and ignoring her crying at night until she eventually learns to go back to sleep. This is the general protocol for separation anxiety. It is gentle but can take a very long time. Another protocol involves teaching the dog to cope with their own anxiety by making their current anxious go-to behaviors unpleasant, giving them an opportunity to stop those behaviors long enough to learn something new, then rewarding the correct, calmer behavior instead. This protocol can feel harsh because it involves careful correction, but it tends to work much quicker for many dogs. If you go this route, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using both positive reinforcement and fair correction. Who is extremely knowledgeable in e-collar training, and can follow the protocol listed below, to help you implement the training. Building her independence and structure in her life will still be an important part of this protocol. First, check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating crate anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Make sure you are implementing what he teaches there in other areas of her life too. Second, purchase a remote electronic collar, e-collar, with a wide range of levels. I recommend purchasing E-Collar Technologies Mini Educator for this. If you are not comfortable with an e-collar then you can use a vibration collar (the Mini Educator is also a vibration collar) or unscented air remote controlled air spray collar. DO NOT use a citronella collar, buy the additional unscented air canister if the collar comes with the citronella and make sure that you use the unscented air. (Citronella collars are actually very harsh). Because of your dog's strong reaction, it is unlikely that the vibration or spray collars will work though, so you may end up spending more money by not purchasing an e-collar at first. The Mini Educator has very low levels of stimulation, that can be tailored specifically to your dog. It also has vibration and beep tones that you can try using first, without having to buy additional tools. Next, set up a camera to spy on her. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with her end on mute, so that you can see and hear her but she will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on Mabel while she is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on her, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if she responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning her head, moving her ears, biting her fur, moving away from where she was, or changing her expression. If she does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when she is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing her reaction at that level until she indicates a little bit that she can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Once you have found the right stimulation level for her and have it correctly fitted on her, have her wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours. Next, set up your camera to spy on her while she is in the crate. Put her into the crate while she is wearing the collar and leave the room. Spy on her from the other room or outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear her barking or see her start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time she barks or tries to get out of the crate, stimulate her again. If she does not decrease her barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. She may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. Do not go higher than three more levels on the mini-educator or one level on another collar with less levels right now though because she has not learned what she is supposed to be doing yet. The level you end up using on her on the mini educator collar should be low to medium, within the first forty levels of the one-hundred to one-hundred-and-twenty-five levels, depending on the model you purchase. If it is not, then have a professional evaluate whether you have the correct "working level" for her. If she continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog. Do not speak to her or pay attention to her for ten minutes while you walk around inside. When she is being calm, then you can let her out of the crate. When you let her out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want her to be calm when she comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore her when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Continue to put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with her. Once she is less anxious she will likely enjoy it and that will help her to enjoy the crate more. First, she needs her anxious state of mind interrupted so that she is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give her a food stuffed Kong in the crate for her to relieve her boredom instead, since she will need something other than barking to do at that point. Don't give her the food at night though - just an empty chew toy, or she might have to use the bathroom in the middle of the night. Practice all of this during the day at first. Once she has learned that e-collar corrections are for barking and is able to calm herself back down during the day, then you can transition the training to night time when she tries to bark then - if you are certain that she does not need to pee at that time. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bo
Labrador Retriever
6 Years
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Bo
Labrador Retriever
6 Years

Bo is house trained, however, we have experienced some changes in our family (both parents working full time and son leaving for college), that I feel are upsetting him. He is peeing in the house now, and barking non stop if we try to put him in a room by himself. So to get any sleep at all, he rotates sleeping with different people. He has never been crate trained and allowed to roam freely, but he has destroyed our floors and furniture. Should we put him in a room by himself now during the day, and keep him there when we go to sleep at night? We are at our wits end with him, please help us!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ashley, I suggest crate training him and hiring a balanced trainer to help you work through his separation anxiety. He would probably benefit from extra structure and boundaries to help him feel more secure so working on things like Place, distance Stay, working for pets and food and other things he loves by doing a command first, having to heel by your side during walks, learning to stay in a crate while the door is open while you are home, and other things that develope self-control, independence, and help him learn to cope with anxiety and pent up energy and learn to be calm instead. Separation Anxiety is easier and safer to tackle through crate training - it gives the dog a safe place to be when he is destructive and forces him to have to calm down when you use an interrupter (like a vibration collar) to stop the franticness in the crate, then reward his calmness by returning to him and dropping treats into the crate - to show him that being relaxed equals your return and not him trying to escape. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Clark
Pug
3 Months
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Clark
Pug
3 Months

my son took the puppy to bed with him the first couple of weeks and we now want to switch him to sleeping in a small play pen area. how do we start this process. he is a very winey and needy little baby lol

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Shari, First have him spend time in the pen during the day for at least an hour each day. Give him a food stuffed Kong for him to focus on. Ignore any barking or crying while he is in there (take him potty beforehand so that you know he doesn't need to go potty). When he gets quiet, return to him, calmly sprinkle a few small treats or pieces of his puppy food in the pen, then leave again. As he improves, wait until he has been quiet for a bit longer than before before you return to sprinkle treats - so that you are rewarding him staying quiet. Stay firm and consistent and don't let him out when he cries. If you do this will take much longer to teach. Practice this until he can stay quiet in the pen. If you are willing to deal with some crying at night you can start putting him in the pen at night 3-5 days into the daytime training. Ignore any crying at night. Since he is young he should wear himself out within an hour in most cases and fall asleep. Plan your bedtime schedule accordingly. The pen area should be dark and quiet when you put him in there. Be sure to take him potty right before you put him to bed. Don't give any food at night - practice with the food only during the day. Simply ignore the barking at night. Working on this during the day at the same time should help him learn how to cope with nighttime. It is normal for the transition to take up to two weeks if you are consistent. Some puppies adjust with three nights, but don't give up if it takes a bit longer - just remember that you are trading a few nights of evening barking for 10+ years of good sleep habits. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bruce
Weimaraner
14 Weeks
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Bruce
Weimaraner
14 Weeks

Daytime crate training help Bruce barks in his crate and doesn't settle unless someone is in the room and even if he looks like he's in a deep sleep wakes up and barks if anyone dares to leave. I've tried all the stuff like making it a fun place. Feeding him in there. Not letting him out unless he's calm. Taking him out to pee then putting him right back in etc.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Caroline, How long have you been working on crate training with him? Many puppies take up to two weeks to adjust if you are consistent about not letting them out when they cry while they are crying. If you let them out while crying it can take longer. Check out the surprise method from the article linked below. I also suggest giving him a food stuffed chew toy in the crate whenever you put him in there so that it takes him longer to get to eat and gives him something to do in the crate. To stuff a hollow chew toy, you can put his food into a bowl, cover it with water, let it sit out until it turns to mush, mix a bit of peanut butter (avoid Xylitol sweetener - it's toxic) or liver paste or cheese into it, place the whole thing into a zip-lock bag, and freeze overnight. To make it easier, purchase several Kongs and stuff them all at once so that you can just grab one out of the freezer as needed. He can even eat all of his entire meals this way, and as treats, without using a food bowl. Stuff the Kongs very loosely so that he can get the food out after it freezes. There are some quicker methods you can use also; pups just tend to like the cold while teething and the frozen acts like a time released treat so it lasts longer. surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Crate Training method, steps on introducing the crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside If the barking continues after working on the Surprise method and past the two week point, you can correct it if needed. I typically recommend waiting things out with puppies because most do adjust if given time and consistency, but there are exceptions to that. If he doesn't adjust, purchase a Pet Convincer and teach the Quiet command from the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Once you have taught Bruce the Quiet command, when Bruce barks, tell him "Quiet" in a calm tone of voice. If he gets quiet and stays quiet for 2 minutes, give him a treat. As he improves wait until he is quiet for longer before you give the treat, working up to 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes. If he doesn't get quiet or starts barking again before the 2 minutes, then spray a small puff of air at his side through the crate using the Pet Convincer while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then go back to ignoring him. When you do this do NOT spray it near his face. If he is pretty sensitive, then hold it further away from him when you do this so that he feels it less. You want to interrupt the barking but you don't want to punish him too harshly. Only use unscented air canisters. Do NOT use citronella. Even if you find that you need to use the Pet Convincer for the barking, continue to reward him when he stays quiet for longer periods of time and give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate so that he will learn what NOT to do and what TO do instead. It is important for him to understand what he should be doing in the crate besides barking to prevent separation anxiety - i.e. being quiet, chewing a chew toy, and resting. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nellie Mae
Mixed breed
6 Years
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Nellie Mae
Mixed breed
6 Years

I adopted Nellie Mae about 2 years ago from a rescue. She always slept with me, in my bed. When I said bedtime, she happily ran into my room and hopped up. A few months ago, she got very sick (liver failure). While she was sick, she was up and down all night, and got into the habit of sleeping in a different room. I let her because it was far more important that she sleep and heal than sleep with me. But now, she's better, and refuses to sleep with me. I tried closing her out of the room she likes to sleep in, but she then slept in the kitchen instead. I don't know why she has decided she doesn't want to sleep with me, but is this normal or is something wrong?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Natalie, Because of her history of sickness she might associate your room with that experience. If so you can work on creating positive and relaxing experiences for her in that room to deal with any anxiety related to it. Work on this during the day, so that night is simply a time for sleeping. If she gets over her fears, then she may choose to sleep in your room again on her own. It might also simply be preferential. Dogs like people do have sleep preferences. She may have realized while sleeping elsewhere that she sleeps better in a room by herself, or she might like the cool floor of the kitchen or a certain rug. Pay attention to what is different about your room versus those rooms- if those rooms are cooler or there are rugs or other surfaces she might prefer. If you can figure out the difference and adjust those things in your room, she might want to sleep in your room again. You might also wake her when you sleep if you tend to toss and turn, snore, or sleep talk - if so she may simply sleep better by herself. If the issue seems anxiety related, then work on making that room pleasant again. If not, there is nothing wrong with her sleeping in another room - she might just sleep better by herself and have a preference, this is even more common for older dogs because sleep can be more difficult for some dogs as they age. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lala, Lobo, and Landee
Pit bull
10 Years
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Lala, Lobo, and Landee
Pit bull
10 Years

Hi,

My three babies have always slept with me. I recently moved to the state of Florida from Indiana. I am staying with family and the dogs are not aloud anywhere in the house but a room in the back that leads to the yard. I feel guilty that they no longer get to sleep with me but somewhat relieved at having a bed to myself. I also feel bad that they no longer to to roam the house as they did before the move. Should I be concern?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ludivina, Sleeping by themselves should not harm them in anyway. I actually teach my own dogs to sleep in a separate room as puppies just so they will do better while I am away as adults, even if I let them sleep in the bedroom later in life. The main thing is just how much mental stimulation, physical exercise, and human interaction are they getting. Being in one room shouldn't be an issue as long as you are being intentional about meeting their needs for those things I mentioned by spending time with them in there, taking them on walks, training, or doing other fun things with them in life. Many dogs spend time in a crate all day and do fine, but their owners need to make sure they are meeting their needs when they are home, since they are social, intelligent, active creatures. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Olaf
Maltese
4 Years
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Olaf
Maltese
4 Years

I am super attached to my little 4 yr old maltese and he is really attached to me. We used to always sleep together before my husband and i got married. i got him used to sleeping right next to me by the bed and he is fine with that as long as hes next to me. we recently moved to a two story townhome and we have carpet in the second floor. Hes had a few accidents and now my husband doesnt want him going upstairs at all :(. i gave him his little area in the kitchen with his crate and blanket and toys and i leave the crate open with a few pads on the floor in case he needs to use them. its very cozy and he loves his little area but theres still one problem, im not there at night. he wakes up to call for me at all hours of the night and isnt letting us sleep. hes a confident dog and does very well with goodbyes during the day, hes knows im coming back after work and wont even bark. but at night its a different story. it breaks my heart to see him stressed out over this and wish he would be happy sleeping away from me :(. PLEASE HELP

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Ayme, This is going to be hard to hear but the crying needs to be disciplined. It doesn't sound like separation anxiety, it actually sounds like an adjustment, demanding attention, possible respect issue. I suggest teaching the Quiet command during the day. When pup cries, tell pup "Quiet", and if he doesn't get quiet or gets quiet but starts crying again soon, use a Pet Convincer to spray a small puff of unscented air at his side, then leave the room again so he can go back to bed. This might sound harsh but the air won't harm him, because you have taught the Quiet command he will know why he is being corrected and how to avoid the correction by being obedient instead, and the puff of air will actually interrupt any arousal or adrenaline that could be going on if it is related to anxiety - helping him calm himself back down and avoid the unpleasant experience of being worked up - in the end he will feel calmer and more relaxed and able to sleep with boundaries...Plus your spouse should always be priority over your dog as much as we super love our dogs. Quiet method for teaching the Quiet command - only give treats while practicing this during the day and not at night when he should be calming down to sleep - you don't want to encourage him to stay awake hoping for food: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bree
Labrador Retriever
5 Months
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Bree
Labrador Retriever
5 Months

When I come home, my puppy will jump on me and bark at me whilst biting my wrists, any advice?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jack, Check out the article linked below and the Step Toward and Leash methods. When you first let pup out of their crate, I suggest clipping a leash on pup, so that you can step on and pick up the leash handle to direct pup when they get too excited. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump Check out the Leave It method from the article linked below and begin teaching Leave It - which can be used to help with the biting. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Reward calm responses when pup sits, doesn't jump and waits for instruction - anything calm. To reward, praise calmly (no heavy excitement while pup is so excited), and toss the treats at pups paws - so pup looks down instead of jumping up for them. Give pup a toy they can chase and hold in their mouth, or play a structured game so that pup can focus their pent up energy on something like fetching a ball. When you let pup out of the crate, make pup wait until they are coming out calmly so that their energy coming out of the crate initially is calmer - unless you know they will have an accident waiting the extra five minutes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn5HTiryZN8 Overall, keep your attitude happy, confident and calm. Angry, excited, or loud in any way will only get pup more wound up. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Savannah
Labrador Retriever
8 Months
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Savannah
Labrador Retriever
8 Months

She has Been sleeping on our bed since about 4months of age...now that she is bigger obviously she takes up more room .my husband has been patient in that he is sleeping in other bed but I know we need to train her to sleep in the other room on couch like our 4 yr old lab!
She is a very loving dog and follows me everywhere.she is attached to me and loves me much as I love her..I enjoy having her in bed with me. How do I go about changing this?? She has a stubborn streak in her though 😬

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Have you tried putting Savannah in the room with the couch to see how she makes out? Put an old shirt or bedsheet you slept on (it may be worth the expense) of yours in the room, too for the scent. There may just be a few nights of fuss and then she'll settle right in. You could also get her a new dog bed for the room and have her try that. Put an infuser with dog appeasing pheromone to calm her as she sleeps. Alternatively, put the new dog bed in your room and insist she sleep there (at least that gets her used to not being in the bed but still in the same room with you) - and then you gradually inch the bed toward the door (only a few inches and night and only after she is settled well in the bed a few weeks) until she is no longer in the room. Then move it toward the other room. Take a look at these, too: https://wagwalking.com/training/accept-a-new-bed and https://wagwalking.com/training/sleep-in-a-dog-bed. Good luck!

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Olive
Yorkie
10 Weeks
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Olive
Yorkie
10 Weeks

My partner and I just got a 10 week old Yorkie 5 days ago. My partner insists that she has to sleep in our room because she’s a puppy. We have her sleep in a playpen and she does not like it. Every 2-3 hours, she wakes up, whines, and attempts to get out of the playpen. It really disturbs my sleep and I have to get up early for work everyday. I’m now cranky or falling asleep at work because I’m not sleeping. How can we effectively teach her to essentially be quiet while we’re asleep and that she is not getting out of her playpen on her call? Also, does she HAVE to sleep in our room or can we teach her to sleep in a separate room? I just want to sleep! Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessie, You will need to hear pup when they wake needing to go potty at this age, which means pup either sleeping in your room OR sleeping in another room but setting up an audio baby monitor to listen out for pup. Training wise both options are completely fine. It just comes down to preference. She will need to practice being crated in a room alone some at some point to get her used to alone time to prevent separation anxiety, but that can be done either during the day or night. I suggest crate training and taking her potty when she wakes to go - but ignore the crying if it has been less than 2-3 hours since the last potty trip, unless you plan to teach her to go potty on a pad inside, in which case you can use the exercise pen, with a crate attached to it for sleeping. If not using a pad for potting, the crate will encourage sleeping through the night sooner and be better for potty training at this age. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below for ways to help her adjust to confinement sooner. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate When you do take her potty, take her on a leash, don't give treats or play, keep it as boring as possibly, then return her to the crate or pen immediately after - you will need to take her potty at night still but you don't want to encourage waking for attention. Once a puppy is awake they can only hold their bladder for the number of months they are in age plus one - which is 3 hours right now. If pup stays asleep they will be able to make it a couple hours longer, but only if they stay asleep. To encourage them to stay asleep, keep trips boring, ignore crying that takes place outside of truly needing to potty, and follow the tips from the surprise method from the article I linked above during the day - so pup learns how to relax in the crate or pen in general. Even with all of the above, expect crying for 2 weeks while pup is learning. I know that's hard to hear when you are sleep deprived, but if you can both stay consistent it will improve. Usually the first 3 nights are the hardest. Pup will probably wake up at least one time during the night for pottying for the next couple of months though, but it shouldn't be every 2 hours soon. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Toffee
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
1 Year
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Toffee
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
1 Year

Bad seperation issues but will not sleep unless with us upstairs , during the day we now have to take him upstairs to bed just so he will sleep otherwise he will be awake downstairs no matter how tired and start having a tantrum eg excessive barking. it feels more like having child than a dog at the moment. we want him to just sleep when he is tired! he has a bed , access to the sofas etc but will not sleep on them , and if he does on the odd time its for a minute or two!

Just dont know what to do anymore

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Toffee is an energetic breed that needs a lot of exercise and mental stimulation. Take him for an extra-long walk in the morning. Provide him with interactive feeder toys that take a bit of work to get the food out. You can even feed him his meals this way. To be clear, is he is on his own all day downstairs while you are upstairs? This may be the problem. Allow him to be with you but provide him with his own activities (like the feeder toy). Also, try a Kong. Fill the Kong with moistened kibble and a smear of dog-safe peanut butter (no xylitol as it is toxic). Freeze the Kong for a long lasting treat. Take Toffee to obedience classes to give him socialization and also to work his brain. You may find him easier to deal with - as he gets older, it will ease up, too. Puppies and dogs do take a lot of work but if Toffee seems to have extra issues, consult a behaviorist. Lastly, you could try doggy daycare a few days a week. He'll have a ball and be tired out. Good luck!

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Kingsley
King Charles Spaniel
3 Years
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Kingsley
King Charles Spaniel
3 Years

Kingsley is always sleeping in my mom and dads room but he snores a lot and that keeps him up. We’re trying to make him stay in my room but his head is always up staring at the door. So how do I get my dog to sleep in my room throughout the night while attached to them?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. It usually takes dogs a few weeks to adjust to any change you make to their routine. Also remember, his sleeping schedule is probably a little messed up because he was use to being somewhat awake at night. For now, you can help him get on a better schedule by making sure he gets extra exercise during the day. This can come in the form of walking, games of fetch, or any other interactive game. You can also practice any training commands he might know for about 10 minutes. If possible, you may want to use a fan or white noise machine at night to help drown out any noises. You may not be able to hear your dad snore, but dogs have excellent hearing and it's likely that he can still hear it. And it will keep him up just like before. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Puppy
Cavapoochon
14 Weeks
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Puppy
Cavapoochon
14 Weeks

Hi
We got our puppy at 10 weeks and Originally he slept in his crate then started crying to I put him on the foot of my bed.
Lately as I’ve had to leave him home alone he’s become more bitey and wants to Sleep right next to me. I tell him no and send him to he bed but he just barks and bites at me until he gets his own way. I’m not sure what to do anymore.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I suggest that you start working on obedience now, as Puppy is not allowed to bite in that manner. Start training here: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-great-dane. Work on these skills to train Puppy not to bite: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite. The guide is quite extensive and has great suggestions for you, so please read it through entirely. Consider starting with the Bite Inhibition Method and the Leave It Method - both are good. I can understand that Puppy wants to sleep with you; he's most likely quite lonely with the changes. Implement the following: Take Puppy to dog training as soon as the vet gives the okay that vaccines are up to date. Walk Puppy morning and night for 15 to 30 minutes each time. Invest in mentally stimulating toys for him to play with when you are gone. Buy an interactive feeder and give Puppy a half portion of breakfast in the morning, with the other half in the feeder to occupy him when you are gone. Try him in a crate at night. He may feel safer and cozier there, as opposed to an open bed area on the ground. Here are tips to help Puppy like a crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. As stated in the Surpise Method, hide treats throughout the day as you train so that he gets used to going in there. Make the crate a welcoming place. You may have to tolerate barking at night for a few days (or weeks) until he gives in. But, the main thing is that he learns to not bite you to get his way. That is the first step. Good luck!

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Mis
Shih Tzu
4 Months
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Mis
Shih Tzu
4 Months

Hi I have a 4 month old shih tzu when we first brought her home she slept in my room in her bed but now we transitioned her to the family room in a play pen the play pen has toys and her bed I also put a blanket over it at night. She likes sleeping In the pen and she got used to going into it when i would say “in your bed” she sleeps through the night as long as I am in the room but if she sees me leave she cries all night I ignored her crying once the entire night and the next day she woudknt go into her play pen when I commanded her to now I’m back to sleeping on the couch while she sleeps in her play pen she also didn’t seem to want to eat the next day when I left her to cry all night she. Any idea on how to get her to be okay with being alone I always make sure to walk her and play and train before bed so that she’s tired. The same goes for staying home alone she’ll cry and bark the entire time even tho I leave a stuffed kong.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you seem to be taking all of the right steps so far. Sometimes dogs are extra clingy and take time to become independent. I can understand that Mis is whining at night - she is pretty young yet and probably feels quite vulnerable left alone, especially when she was used to your comfort at night, being in the same room. Rather than sleep on the couch, you could bring her back into your room. (By the way, you are very lucky that she sleeps through the night without needing a pee break at such a young age). Once she starts sleeping through the night again in your room, gradually move the play pen out of the room a little each night. This is done by moving it only INCHES per night - it will take weeks - until the play pen is back where you want it. If you don't want to try that, you can try dog appeasing pheromones emitted via a diffuser; they often work to calm a dog. You can try white noise in the room to soothe her to sleep and maybe keep her that way. As for the separation anxiety, there are a few tips here: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-separation-anxiety. Practice leaving Mis in her crate and leave for 5 minutes, taking her out of the crate when you get back for a pee break or walk. Then extend it to 10 minutes, after a few days, taking her on a walk again afterward. Then 20 minutes, and so on. She should learn that you will be back and a fun walk will take place when you do - and keep giving her the stuffed kong. Try a smear of dog safe peanut butter on it (no xylitol as it is toxic to dogs!). That may make it more appealing and she may give into it eventually. Good luck!

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Abbott
Black Lab
2 Years
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Abbott
Black Lab
2 Years

How do I make my dog be comfortable in my room and make him like my room

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your best bet is to provide a bed or space large enough for him to turn around and lay down on. Also, plenty of toys or other items that he likes. Sometimes dogs do well when there is a fan or white noise machine on. They can hear everything and sometimes our movements keep them up at night. The sound of the fan or machine will block a lot of that out.

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Hachiko
Indian pariah
3 Months
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Hachiko
Indian pariah
3 Months

He bites people by literally sinking his teeth and when i go to get him off then he bites me. I have tried everything starting from bite inhibition to distracting him with treats and toys but to no results. People are scared in my house and he knows that and goes about chasing and biting them. I am losing it. Pls help

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you really have no choice but to call in a trainer. Because he is biting so often, I am concerned that it may escalate to problematic levels if you don't. The older and bigger he gets, the harder it will be to handle him. A few sessions with a trainer who works with aggressive dogs will give you the tools and knowledge to be able to enjoy Hachiko and for him to be the best he can. It is worth the investment! You can also try group training lessons - they are helpful, too. But customized lessons for his problem is the answer. Right away, have Hachiko "sit" for everything. Make him sit before meals, before getting his leash on to go for a walk, before a treat, before a toy, etc. Work on his obedience commands every day for 20 minutes. Take a look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-german-shepherd-puppy. When you are walking him, work on the Heel command so that he learns to listen and focus:wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Look here as well: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-rottweiler-puppy-to-not-be-aggressive. If you are not able to make excellent headway, call a private trainer right away. Good luck!

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Ace
Labrador and indian pariah mix
5 Months
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Ace
Labrador and indian pariah mix
5 Months

Ace is habitual of sleeping in the same room as me. H
I have been following the Routine method for 5 days to get him used to sleeping outside my room, it has been unsuccessful so far. He sleeps for about 2 hours, then he howls and cries again, for half an hour, then he'll be quite again for an hour or so before howling yet again.
It is difficult for me to ignore this because of the noises so I end up taking him inside my room after a couple of hours. This has left me exhausted! He does not like confined spaces so instead of crate training, he has been room trained and he sleeps through the night without any accidents when sleeping in the same room as me.
Please help! I want to train him to sleep outside my room.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! That does sound exhausting. Unfortunately it can sometimes take dogs up to about 30 days to fully adjust to a routine change. They are just so hard wired by habit, that changing things up really disrupts them. One that has helped many pet parents is getting a fan or white noise machine. Dogs can hear us moving around in our sleep, and this often wakes them if they are a little anxious. The sound of the fan or machine will help to block out the noise.

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Leo
BoShih
4 Months
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Leo
BoShih
4 Months

He refused to sleep where I want him to
Even though it's right by my bed in a baby-gated area where he has his bed and everything he needs

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Dania, Puppies have to learn independence like any skill. Check out the article linked below. Practice pup staying in the gated area while you leave the room at times and while you stay in the room at times, to get pup used to being in there by themselves quietly. Know that it's normal for pup to cry while learning to be by themselves, whether that's in a crate or just their own bed. It takes most puppies two weeks to adjust fully. The article linked below mentions the crate, but you can use the same steps for the gated area. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Barney
Cockerpoo
2 Years
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Barney
Cockerpoo
2 Years

Barney is our daughter's dog, however she has just gone to university for 3 years. Barney has always slept with her on the bed.
Our dilemma is 3 fold..just before she left Barney was attacked by a greyhound, thankfully no major injuries, however it has made him more nervous. He is obviously missing our daughter and my husband is sleeping in her bed with him, to try not to distrupt him too much. Where should I start with teaching him to sleep alone?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jane, First, I would intentionally get him around a lot of other dogs in a structured and fun way - like a canine sport class, dog walking group or hiking group, frequent visits to the park where there are other dogs around - giving pup a treat every time they are acting happy or relaxed or ignoring the other dogs. Avoid places like the dog park that can lead to fights, but do pursue a whole lot of doggie social interactions that you can control and make fun - you want pup to learn that the attack was the exception and not the normal thing. For the bed, first, I would test how pup does sleeping alone one night. Some dogs if given enough mental and physical exercise during the day will simply go to sleep in the familiar location without the person there and adjust easily if you keep things calm and don't make too big of a fuss about the change - so they don't pick up on your anxiety. If you does well, great! I would simply let them sleep in the room by themselves if they are safe to do so, if not, I recommend practicing pup being in there by themselves during the day. I suggest applying the principles of the Surprise method especially to that room - with the room as the confined space, with a baby gate across the doorway or the door closed. Reward pup for being calm and quiet in that room. Also, practice the other methods of tossing toys into that room and generally making it fun. Since the room it's new though, the main goal will just be to get pup used to being in that room on their own - the easiest time to help pup adjust to the alone time is during the day for 1 hour periods often. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Oreo
Shih Tzu
9 Weeks
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Oreo
Shih Tzu
9 Weeks

How can I train my puppy to sleep in a crate.? we tried putting him into crate and he stays there for an hour or two but as soon as he doesn’t see us, he comes out of the crate and looks for us.

Then we take him on the bed with us

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hi there! Here is some information on crate training. Some of it you probably already know, so just skip over those parts. But the rest of this should really help you fine tune what you are already doing. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Dex
labrodoodle
3 Years
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Dex
labrodoodle
3 Years

Hi. So my dog Dex has slept in my room for 1 year. After the course of a week he now always wants to go to my parents bedroom.I know it doesn't seem like a huge problem, but he scares our other dog out? How can I get him back so night time isn't so crazy?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Is it possible for you to confine him until he breaks this habit? With a baby gate or something similar. Dogs are creatures of habit. He likely heard a sound one night and went in there, and then it quickly became a routine for him. Breaking that memory by not allowing him out for a few nights in a row should solve this problem.

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Jaxx
French Bulldog
4 Years
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Jaxx
French Bulldog
4 Years

We have recently just bought jaxx from another home. He used to sleep with them but due to us having a new born we wanted jaxx to have his own space. He’s began settling down a little and getting use to being away But he is still crying for us, he will sleep for a little while tben will wake up and cry for us again, sometimes occasionally howl. He isn’t damaging anything or scratching at doors etc just has a little moan. What can we do to help settle him down more

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katie, I recommend practicing with Jaxx in that area where he sleeps, away from you, during the day some also, and practicing the Surprise method from the article I have linked below during the day. Don't give treats at night though, just during daytime practice. At night continue to ignore the crying until he falls asleep. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Peanut
Border Collie
10 Months
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Peanut
Border Collie
10 Months

Hi! I really want peanut to sleep in my room at night and not my moms. Every night, I keep her in my room, but she just gets up and scratches at the door you too I open it. Then she goes downstairs to where nobody is. She then goes between my moms room and my room throughout the night

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lily, Border Collie's are a herding breed and have a natural desire to keep track of the whole flock...Pup is likely trying to do the same thing with your family - checking on various members throughout the night to make sure everyone is safe and where pup thinks they should be. If you don't want pup doing that, I would crate pup in your room at night to help pup develop a habit of sleeping in there and to prevent the door scratching - until pup is used to the new arrangement, then begin the night with pup not in the crate and crate pup only if they start to pester you to be let out of the room. Surprise method for introducing a crate: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Coco
Yorkshire Terrier
5 Months
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Coco
Yorkshire Terrier
5 Months

she is also part maltese, but it wouldn’t let me add that. anyways, how can i stop coco from barking at night? also she sleeps in her crate at night and i usually cuddle her before i put her in her crate, but the past 2 nights, she hasn’t wanted to cuddle with me. also one day when she is fully potty trained i want her to sleep in my bed. do you think she will ever sleep in my bed? and if so how can i make her want to stay in my bed and not her crate?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hailey, First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating her during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever she cries in the crate during the day, tell her "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries. Practice for a few days until she is doing well during the day. At night pup will probably still need to go potty one time at some point many nights. If it has been at least 5 hours since pup last went potty, take pup potty on a leash outside and keep the trip as boring as possible - no treats, no play, and little talking at night. Return pup to the crate right after the potty trip. When they cry when you first crate them, return them to the crate, or its been less than 5 hours, then either ignore the crying or correct calmly. The one potty trip pup truly does need they should grow out of in another month or two when its only a trip for pottying and not for (depending on how long you crating pup at night - how old they have to be able to hold it for that long). At this age pup will need to. For the snuggling, I recommend desensitizing pup to touch so touch is fun for pup. Use puppy's daily meal kibble to do this. Gently touch an area of puppy's body while feeding a piece of food. Touch an ear and give a treat. Touch a paw and give a treat. Hold her collar and give a treat. Touch her tail gently and give a treat. Touch her belly, her other paws, her chest, shoulder, muzzle and every other area very gently and give a treat each time. Keep these times calm and fun for pup. Many dogs become more snuggly once they calm down as adult, especially if you make touch really fun for pup and don't create avoidances of being touched through pestering. As far as sleeping on your bed, that has a lot to do with pup's personality as an adult. Many dogs are crate trained as puppies and love sleeping on beds as adults once they are old enough to be trusted out of the crate (my own dogs included, who were crated until 18 months then allowed on the bed with permission after that). If pup isn't a dog who likes to share a sleeping space, you can also place small treats on the bed during the day for pup to find, to encourage pup to want to go to that space on their own often. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Penny
Labrador Retriever
6 Years
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Penny
Labrador Retriever
6 Years

We are fostering a dog who’s owner is in hospital. She was passed from pillar to post before being put in an animal rescue centre where I volunteer. She was there for a month before I took her home to foster. She is lovely and has overcome her fear of men whilst here (been with us for 4 days). Her main problem is that she has separation anxiety and barks when left alone. Night time is the main problem, but she is fine if someone sleeps in the same room as her (she is quite happy to sleep in her bed with her soft toys). What else can we do? She gets lots of exercise and fresh air over the days and does not require constant attention.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jane, Check out the article linked below. I recommend confining pup somewhere away from while you are home and rewarding pup whenever they get quiet like the article instructs. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate I also recommend practicing commands that build independence, like a 1 hour Place command, where you work up to pup being able to stay on Place while you walk in and out of the room and go about your business, a distance down stay, and structured heeling. Heel: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Down stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Cookie
cockapoo
3 Months
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Cookie
cockapoo
3 Months

He arrived 2 months ago and since day 1 we let him sleep in our bed. It was easier and then my whole family got ill and we couldn't do anything about it. We now would like him to sleep in his own bed but we don't know how.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! The process for this can be a bit tedious if he isn't liking the idea of his own bed right away. Dogs are creatures of habit. They also enjoy comfort and being close to us. So there is a lot to work with here! Your best bet is to place his bed by yours. Start teaching him a command like "bed time" or "go to bed". Give him a few treats when he goes to his bed. If he jumps up with you, keep redirecting him to his bed until he finally stays. This may take a few weeks, but he WILL get it and start sleeping on his own. And then after this, put his bed in the location you want him to sleep in. By then he will be out of the habit of sleeping in your bed.

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Milo
Pit bull
10 Weeks
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Milo
Pit bull
10 Weeks

How can I get him to stay in his crate without climbing out or crying

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, is this problem a nighttime thing for Milo, or is he in the crate sometimes during the day? If he is climbing out, I assume the door is open, as well? Milo is pretty young and may be missing his siblings and mom. I suggest setting up an exercise pen area for Milo; it is described in great detail here: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area.This gives your puppy the freedom to move and play but still keeps him confined and safe while you are busy doing housework or at night when everyone is asleep. If you would like to stay with the crate, take a look at this guide: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. The Feeding Method or the Surprise Method may be ideal. Good luck and happy training!

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Teddy
toy poodle
16 Weeks
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Teddy
toy poodle
16 Weeks

My toy poodle was sleeping I. The laundry quite comfortably for the last 8 weeks and then suddenly after his 3 month immunisation he has been crying and not sleeping at night by himself. He scratched so hard his claws bleed. We have had to put him in our bed to sleep. Would like him back in the laundry but not sure what happened and why he has changed. Please help me. Gladys

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Gladys, If pup seems to be feeling poorly in general I recommend a trip to your vet to make sure everything is alright. I am not a vet. At 12 weeks a lot of puppies tend to "wake up" more and the new persistence wanting out may be related to that. I recommend crate training pup and practicing the Surprise method from the article I have linked below during the day and ignoring pup's escape attempts until pup pauses the attempts and you can reward with treats, and when it's time - letting pup out of the crate. At night, ignore pup's crying, except when it's been long enough they may truly need to go potty. I would practice the crate training during the day for a while. At night, you may want to move the crate into your room temporarily, then move the crate to the laundry room once pup has adjusted to the crate. Expect a couple weeks of crying during this process with pup getting gradually better after 3-5 days of consistency. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Penny the pug
Pug
2 Years
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Penny the pug
Pug
2 Years

My pug won’t leave my bed at all she won’t sleep on her beds she has 3 beds around the house wich she pees on and not sleep on what do I do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lupe, First, it sounds like pup may be pee pad trained and confuses the fabric of her dog bed with pee pads. If so, I recommend switching to cot type beds, or something like one of the k9ballistics.com beds, that aren't so absorbent. Next, if you don't want pup on your bed, I recommend teaching pup Off and using some of the steps from the article I have linked below about keeping dogs off of couches to also keep pup off of your bed. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-train-dog-stay-off-couch/ Third, I recommend teaching pup a Place command so that you can send pup to their bed (which can be Place), and work up to pup staying on there for an hour at a time. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Finally, I recommend sprinkling treats or kibble onto the dog bed(s) and leading pup to the kibble the first few times. After pup begins to expect kibble on the bed, then sprinkle the kibble there when pup isn't around and allow pup to find it on their own. Replace the kibble a couple of times per day, so that pup starts to go over to the beds on their own - helping them associate the bed with good things and somewhere they want to be. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chewy
Shih Tzu
9 Months
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Chewy
Shih Tzu
9 Months

He’s been sleeping in the sunroom since he was brought home. In the crate and then with a little extra space with a puppy pen. He’s always been in there but started barking in the morning. I transferred his bed, create and puppy pen into our room. It’s dark in the room but sunroom/living room always has some light. He’s been walking me up to go to the living room where another bed of his is. He’s done this often but not every night. I usually just pick him up and take him back into my room. He sleeps on the floor in the closet with no door on it. I think he doesn’t like the crate but not sure? We let him try to not be caged in but then he pooped in our room. So I had to put him in his crate again. He has been in there now for a few weeks. Now he’s not letting me sleep the last 3 nights. He always wakes up and wants out to go outside or sleep in living room. I have my husband’s nephew and his wife here so I don’t want him out there by himself. My nephew leaves for work and I’m afraid he’ll try to follow him outside. I’m not really sure if he’s old enough to sleep without being created? How old does he need to be to know? He’s potty trained in the living room he rings his bell to go outside but the bedroom doesn’t have a bell and it’s pretty dark in there. Maybe he’s afraid of dark? He doesn’t want to go to bed in his crate are he does everything to get out of it but my Husband lays with him by the crate and visits him before bed to calm him down. What do I do? Don’t want to leave my door open for fear of him getting out when my nephew leaves. He sprays runs to the door to go outside.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marcie, First, if it's been longer than 8 hours since pup last went potty, once awake pup may really have to go potty. If it's been at least that long, I suggest taking pup potty on leash when they wake then until pup learns to sleep in again. Keep the trip calm and boring - no play or treats, then right back to the crate after they go. You don't want to start the day that early or pup will continue waking, just take potty, keep it boring and return to the crate - not feeding breakfast or playing with pup at all yet. When you return them to the crate, you have a couple of options. 1. You can either ignore pup barking until 7/8/9 (whenever you normally want to get up) - which will probably mean an hour of barking for a few days until pup learns to just go back to sleep until breakfast, and gradually begins to sleep longer and not need that early morning potty trip as their internal clock resets again. 2. The second option is to correct the crying once you return pup to the crate after the potty trip. To correct pup, first, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate in your room for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. When he cries at night or early morning, after you take pup potty and return them to the crate, or pup cries before 7/8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Don't give treats at night/morning though - practice during the day proactively to help pup learn that quiet is good, since you don't want to encourage pup to stay awake in the early morning, but to go back to sleep instead. I generally recommend waiting until a dog is 1-1.5 years old before I stop crating, and has gone at least three months without an accident or chewing anything they shouldn't. When I do so, give shorter periods of freedom first with you out of the house - like 10 minutes, 20, 30, 45, 1 hour, 2 hours, then 3 hours. Each time you come back, check or accidents or chewing, and wait another month or two before trying freedom again if you discover an issue. If pup does well, give the next amount of freedom and see how pup does - like 10 minutes the first time, 20 minutes the next time, ect...Since your dog is still having occasional accidents in your room when not crated, I recommend crating for longer. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Beau
Cocker Spaniel
12 Weeks
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Question
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Beau
Cocker Spaniel
12 Weeks

Beau is with us for 3 weeks . He is absolutely gorgeous. He is my first pet .
He is sleeping well in a crate downstairs in the living room . I have gated most of the living room for him . The crate (his bed) food and toilet pads ( that he uses well ) are all in there . My husband and I take turns to sleep on the sofa at night so that he can see us and sleeps well . He just started his outdoor walks so not toilet trained outdoors yet .
I want to take Beau to our room at night , into his own bed , but I’m unsure how to coordinate that and his toilet habits . He will usually wake up between 1am and 5 for two poos .
1- So if I take him up to the room , do I bring him back to his toilet pads between those times ??
2- will he be confused as to where his bed is ?

I would like to keep his crate downstairs, as I work from home and I’d like his to sleep downstairs in the day .

Any advise will be much appreciated.

Thank you ,

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! He is adorable! So you can take him to his potty space when he wakes up at night. That should really be the only thing you do when he wakes up. Keep it unexciting and it's just potty time. The same goes for if you ever potty train him to go outside versus the pads. Outside for potty then back to bed. It may take him a few days to adjust but he will get the routine down pretty quickly. The kennel is his safe space, but his bed is with you.

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Bruno
Cane Corso
26 Months
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Bruno
Cane Corso
26 Months

Bruno has slept in my bedroom since day one. My GF can't sleep because he snores pretty loud. I've been trying to transition him to the crate in n the family room. Problem is, he won't stop barking at night. He has no problem being in there during the day but barks constantly thru the night. I've tried being more stubborn than him but hour after hour of barking..... I can't take getting no sleep. Ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Bruce, First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. When he cries at night (in the crate) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. The goal is to practice with treats and corrections during the day simply to teach pup the needed skills and new rules at a time when the food keeping him awake won't be an issue. At night, ideally pup would then understand the new rules and you would just ignore the barking or correct, and not be giving treats. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bailey
Mixed
5 Years
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Bailey
Mixed
5 Years

My dog was crate trained when I got him I never really had any issues if he a whined a quick shout of be quiet and he would go to sleep. Recently he cries and barks at night. I've tried a few different things. He is fine if I'm in the room with him, he even goes in on his own when I say crate and I can get him to stay in there when the door is open and sleep . The problem is when I leave the room. He will happily sleep in the living room not in his crate at night.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, I would make sure the crate is big enough and a good temperature - depending on what bed or if you are using a bed in the crate, you may need to use one or choose a different type - like softer or firmer cushioning, vinyl cool type cover or warmer cover - pay attention to where pup tends to choose to sleep and what that surface is like. If the issue simply seems to be pup protesting the door being closed, first, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. If pup doesn't bark when crated during the day, only at night, then just work on the Quiet method and skip the Surprise method practice during the day, then address nights the way I outline below either way. When he cries at night (in the crate) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If you are alright with pup sleeping out of the crate at night and he isn't disturbing anyone, destroying anything, or having accidents, you can also allow him to sleep in the living room without the crate - that choice is purely a matter of personal preference and what your life style and routine requires. I would probably get him used to sleeping in there again for the times when you travel, before allowing more freedom again though - to make sure pup can sleep in the crate when required, or have pup sleep in the crate every night. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chip
Standard wirehaired daschund
3 Years
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Chip
Standard wirehaired daschund
3 Years

Chip was well behaved and crate trained. He was neutered at a year old. From 2 years onwards he developed separation anxiety that has become increasingly worse especially at night. He has eaten his way out of two crates, opens doors and gets very distressed , with classic signs such as whining, panting, shaking. As soon as he sees us, he stops. He is now keeping us awake at night and hurting himself and damaging the house. Please help ! Thank you

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Becky, There are a couple of routes you can take with the separation anxiety. The first step is to work on building his independence and his confidence by adding a lot of structure and predictability into his routine. Things such as making him work for rewards like meals, walks, and pets. Working on "Stay" and "Place," commands while you move away or leave the room, and teaching him to remain inside a crate when the door is open. Change your routine surrounding leaving so that he does not anticipate alone time and build up his anxiety before you leave - which is hard for him to deescalate from, and be sure to continue to give him something to do in the crate during the day (such as a dog food stuffed Kong to chew on); this is the general protocol for separation anxiety. It is gentle but can take a very long time on its own for some dogs. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Down-Stay: https://www.thelabradorsite.com/train-your-labrador-to-lie-down-and-stay/ Another protocol involves teaching the dog to cope with their own anxiety by making their current anxious go-to behaviors unpleasant, giving them an opportunity to stop those behaviors long enough to learn something new, then rewarding the correct, calmer behavior instead. This protocol can feel harsh because it involves careful correction, but it tends to work much quicker for many dogs. If you go this route, I suggest hiring a trainer who is very experienced using both positive reinforcement and fair correction. Who is extremely knowledgeable about e-collar training, and can follow the protocol listed below, to help you implement the training. Building his independence and structure in his life will still be an important part of this protocol too. First, check out this video from SolidK9Training on treating anxiety. It will give a brief over-view of treating separation anxiety more firmly. This trainer can be a bit abrupt with his teaching style with people but is very experienced working with highly aggressive, anxious, and reactive dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk www.solidk9training.com Make sure you are implementing what he teaches there in other areas of his life too. Second, purchase a remote electronic collar, e-collar, with a wide range of levels. I recommend purchasing E-Collar Technologies Mini Educator or Garmin Delta Sport or Dogtra for this. If you are not comfortable with an e-collar then you can use a vibration collar (the Mini Educator and Garmin should also have a vibration mode) or unscented air remote controlled air spray collar. DO NOT use a citronella collar, buy the additional unscented air canister if the collar comes with the citronella and make sure that you use the unscented air. (Citronella collars are actually very harsh and the smell - punisher lingers a long time so the dog continues to be corrected even after they stop the behavior). The vibration or spray collars are less likely to work than stimulation e-collars though, so you may end up spending more money by not purchasing an e-collar first. The Mini Educator has very low levels of stimulation, that can be tailored specifically to your dog. It also has vibration and beep tones that you can try using first, without having to buy additional tools. Next, set up a camera to spy on him. If you have two smart devices, like tablets or smartphones, you can Skype or Facetime them to one another with your pup’s end on mute, so that you can see and hear him but he will not hear you. Video baby monitors, video security monitors with portable ways to view the video, GoPros with the phone Live App, or any other camera that will record and transmit the video to something portable that you can watch outside live will work. Next, put the e-collar on him while he is outside of the crate, standing, and relaxed. To learn how to put the collar on him, check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Turn it to it's lowest level and push the stimulation button twice. See if he responds to the collar at all. Look for subtle signs such as turning his head, moving his ears, biting his fur, moving away from where he was, or changing his expression. If he does not respond at all, then go up one level on the collar and when he is standing and relaxed, push the stimulation button again twice. Look for a reaction again. Repeat going up one level at a time and then testing his reaction at that level until he indicates a little bit that he can feel the collar. Here is a video showing how to do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM A modern, high quality collar will have so many levels that each level should be really subtle and he will likely respond to a low level stimulation. It's uncomfortable but not the harsh shock many people associate with such collars if done right. Once you have found the right stimulation level for him and have it correctly fitted on him, have him wear the collar around with it turned off or not being stimulated for several hours or days if you can (take it off at night to sleep though). Next, set up your camera to spy on him while he is in the crate. Put him into the crate while he is wearing the collar and leave. Spy on him from outside. Leave however you normally would. As soon as you hear him barking or see him start to try to escape or destroy the crate from the camera, push the stimulation button once. Every time he barks or tries to get out of the crate, stimulate him again. If he does not decrease his barking or escape attempts at least a little bit after being stimulated seven times in a row, then increase the stimulation level by one level. He may not feel the stimulation while excited so might need it just slightly higher. Do not go higher than three more levels on the mini-educator or two more levels on another collar with less levels right now though because he has not learned what he is supposed to be doing yet. For example, if his level is 13 out of 100 levels on the Mini Educator, don't go past level 16 right now. The level you end up using on him on the mini educator collar will probably be low to medium, within the first forty levels of the one-hundred to one-hundred-and-twenty-five levels, depending on the model you purchase. If it is not, then have a professional evaluate whether you have the correct "working level" for him. If he continues to ignore the collar, then go up one more stimulation level and if that does not work, make sure that the collar is turned on, fitted correctly, and working. After five minutes to ten minutes, as soon as your dog stays quiet and is not trying to escape for five seconds straight, go back inside to the dog, sprinkle several treats into the crate without saying anything, then leave again. Practice correcting him from outside when he barks or tries to escape, going back inside and sprinkling treats when he stays quiet, for up to 30 minutes at first. After 30 minutes -1 hour of practicing this, when he is quiet, go back inside and sprinkle more treats. This time stay inside. Do not speak to him or pay attention to him for ten minutes while you walk around and get stuff done inside. When he is being calm, then you can let him out of the crate. When you let him out, do it the way Jeff does is in this video below. Opening and closing the door until your dog is not rushing out. You want him to be calm when he comes out of the crate and to stay calm when you get home. That is why you need to ignore him when you get home right away. Also, keep your good byes extremely boring and calm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5GqzeLzysk Continue to put a food stuffed Kong into the crate with him. Once he is less anxious he will likely enjoy it and that will help him to enjoy the crate more. First, he probably needs his anxious state of mind interrupted so that he is open to learning other ways to behave. Once it's interrupted, give him a food stuffed Kong in the crate for him to relieve his boredom instead of barking, since he will need something other than barking to do at that point. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Kylo
Shih Tzu
3 Months
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Kylo
Shih Tzu
3 Months

He is used to sleep with me, but now my parents don't want him to sleep in my room.
I've been sleeping with him in the new room but if I let him alone he'd cry for more than an hour and I investigated and it said that could bring anxiety issues in the future. I don't know what to do and my parents won't take me seriously

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello! While it is somewhat normal for young puppies to be lonely, it is important to teach them to be independent. Correcting this behavior is a bit of a process, so I am sending you a very informative article to read. https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/leaving-puppy-alone/

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Doxie
Wire Fox Terrier
6 Years
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Doxie
Wire Fox Terrier
6 Years

Doxie on the right is our latest addition to our family. She’s a rescue, 6 this year, very timid and has a few issues we are working on.
My issue with her is sleep. She doesn’t sleep unless she’s touching me. I can’t do this she makes me itch at night and I’m not sleeping well because of it. Marty on the left sleeps wherever in the house he chooses to but he yo has stopped jumping up with mum and dad because Doxie is now there and will not move.
How do I get her to sleep ok the floor or in a bed of her own, if I got her a sleeping bag would that help?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tara, You can certainly try a sleeping bag, but the issue is probably proximity to you and not what surface she is on. I would work on building independence. If she is fully potty trained, I would set up an exercise pen in your room and place a comfortable, supportive dog bed in the exercise pen. I would then practice the Surprise method from the article I have linked below during the day, to get her used to being in that pen alone, at a time when you are awake enough to train. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate You can either practice during the day for a few days while allowing her to sleep in the bed at night, then transition nights too, or start the daytime practice and night practice at the same time, expecting pup to cry a lot more in the pen at night for probably a week. Expect some crying either way. The more consistent you can be, the sooner she should adjust, and the daytime practice should help her gain the confidence needed to learn how to settle in the pen. If ignoring the crying is too hard or she isn't learning to settle after a few days, you can also adjust the training to interrupt the barking sooner. Work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the pen for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the pen without opening it, then leave the room again. As she improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice penning her during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. Whenever she cries in the crate, tell her "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, with this method, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side through the pen while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries during daytime practice. When she cries at night before it has been 8 hours, tell her Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Don't give food at night. I would have her sleep in the pen for a few months to create a habit of sleeping by herself. Once she is used to that, then you can start leaving the pen door open if she is okay unsupervised, and simply tell her Off or send her to her bed is she attempts to jump on the bed and her be able to settle on her own then. Once she does well with the door open, then you can remove the pen completely. You can also choose to keep the pen there with the door closed if you prefer that long term for any reason. If she isn't fully potty trained, I would do the above, but use a crate instead of a pen. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buster
English Bulldog
11 Months
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Buster
English Bulldog
11 Months

Buster was brought to my home, a month ago. My eldest child could not take care of him and was given to me as a gift. We have two other dogs (Chinese Shitzu) they sleep inside a big pantry always have. Buster has his own kennel that he has used since my daughter brought him to her house. At first he was okay with the sleeping arrangements, he sleeps in my man cave away from the other dogs, but now is hesitant on sleeping by himself inside his kennel in another room? I feel that he knows he belongs and does not want to sleep by himself?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
821 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ramon, How is pup's potty training? Is he completely trustworthy in the home without supervision and won't have an accident or chew anything besides his dog toys? If so, and if the dogs are at the point where they are completely fine together unattended without the potential for a fight or bullying at this stage in their relationship, then you can allow him to sleep with the others if you wish. If he isn't trustworthy alone, isn't fully potty trained, or isn't completely safe with the other dogs unsupervised, then I would continue with the crate, or if you wish for him to stay in the crate for your own reason, I would continue with the crate. Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. You can practice rewarding pup for quietness and giving a dog food stuffed chew toy in the crate during the day to reinforce pup staying in the crate alone happily. At night, I would ignore any protesting in the crate - many dogs this age will go through a period of protesting being in the crate when they think it's more fun outside of it. If pup isn't ready for more freedom yet, I would maintain the crate and stay consistent about not letting pup out when they protest unless there is a true need like pottying. Most dogs will adjust again. If they don't go back to being quiet after a couple of weeks, you can correct the behavior too. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Work on teaching "Quiet" but using the Quiet method from the article linked below. Tell him "Quiet" when he barks and cries. During daytime practice, if he gets quiet and stays quiet, you can sprinkle a few pieces of dog food into the crate through the wires calmly, then leave again. If he disobeys your command and keep crying or stops but starts again, spray a small puff of air from the Pet convincer at his side through the crate while saying "Ah Ah" calmly, then leave again. If he stays quiet after you leave you can periodically sprinkle treats into the crate to reward quietness. At night you would only correct as calmly and quietly as you can, and not give treats too. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Only use the unscented air from the Pet Convincers - don't use citronella, it's too harsh and lingers for too long so can be confusing. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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