How to Train Your Dog to Sleep on His Bed

Medium
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Having your dog pace all night looking for a place to sleep isn’t very fun. You could lose sleep trying to get your dog to lie down and relax if he doesn't know exactly where he should go each night. Most family dogs will attach themselves to at least one member of the family. Your dog may want to sleep with your or with this chosen family member. But that doesn’t mean the dog has to be in your bed. Just in your bedroom. Or even in the hallway just outside your bedroom. 

Wherever you place his bed is where he should stay each night. You can teach him where his bed is and to go to bed when it is time to settle down for the night. Once your dog understands where his bed is and that he is supposed to stay in at all night, you both should be getting a full night's sleep.

Defining Tasks

Training your dog to go to bed--in his bed--is a matter of repetition and comfort. There is a fine balance between finding the correct bed for your dog's needs and putting it in the correct spot to ease any fears or separation anxieties he may have. It may take a few weeks to train your dog to sleep in his own bed, but if it does, it's probably because you need to find a different spot for the bed. Many dog owners don't want their dog in bed with them but don't mind a dog bed in their bedroom. If your dog's bed is already in your bedroom, consider placing it closer to your bed so your dog can look up and see you at night and hear you breathing. He's going to feel safe knowing you or at least another family member is nearby.

Getting Started

Make sure before you get started training your dog to sleep in his bed you know how your dog sleeps. If you have a small dog who sleeps in a little round ball, he may be more comfortable in a small bed with raised sides he can snuggle into. If you have a larger dog who spreads out once he's in a deep sleep or lies on his back with his feet straight up in the air, you may need a larger bed. If your dog is older, memory foam mattresses provide great support for achy bones. Be sure you have the proper bed for your dog's size, breed, and needs. You will also want some extra treats on hand, possibly even in the sleeping space, to reward your dog for a job well done. Have some patience with this and be open to change. Your dog may not be happy sleeping in the dining room if you're upstairs on the opposite side of the house.

The Perfect Place Method

Most Recommended
2 Votes
Step
1
Show bed
Choose a bed your dog will want to sleep in. If your dog is a puppy, he may want a small bed with raised sides for comfort. If he is a larger dog who sleeps stretched out, he may like a large bed without raised sides. To keep your dog in his bed, it will need to be comfortable for him.
Step
2
Pick a spot
Choose the perfect place for your dog’s bed. This should be a place he will want to sleep. If he is very close to you, he may want to sleep in your room or he may prefer the living room to keep an eye on the house while he sleeps. Some dogs may prefer, or you may prefer, sleeping in a child’s room. Make sure the spot you pick for his bed is a place you can keep his bed permanently.
Step
3
Command
Use a command you will use each night with your dog to signify bedtime. Use the command and encourage him to get onto his bed. Once he does, give him a treat.
Step
4
Practice
Continue to practice the 'go to bed' command each time you want your dog to lie on his bed. Giving the command during the day will help him remember the command at night as well.
Step
5
Bedtime
When it is time for bed, use the command. If your dog does not automatically get into his bed, walk him to it. Be sure to give him a treat. It will take several nights for him to be able to go on his own, but over time he will put himself to bed.
Step
6
Redirection
If your dog leaves his bed during the night, redirect him by taking him back. You can offer him a treat for going back to bed but only do so once. If he wakes again, he does not get a treat. If you continue to treat him, he’ll continue to wake you for that midnight snack. If he goes potty in the middle of the night, a treat is a good idea once he’s back in bed. Once your dog is about a year old, he should make it through the night without going potty.
Recommend training method?

The Clicker Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Introduce bed
Show your dog his bed and where he is expected to sleep. Be sure this is a place and a bed where he will be comfortable and most likely to stay.
Step
2
Pat bed
With your dog, pat the bed and encourage your dog to get on it. Click and give him a treat and lots of verbal praise and excitement over the bed. He will feel your enthusiasm and begin to feel the same about his bed.
Step
3
Command
Talk up his bed with a command. “This is where you will go to bed.’” Say the key phrase often so your dog associates the phrase ‘go to bed,’ or whichever phrase you choose, with the bed.
Step
4
Nap time
During the day, encourage your dog to sleep on his bed by using the command and taking him to his bed. You may need to wake him from a nap and walk with him to his bed. If he’s sleepy, he may stay longer. Be sure to click and reward him with a treat and use the command even for daytime naps.
Step
5
Bedtime
Use the command again and walk your dog to his bed. Give him a treat and tell him good night.
Step
6
Redirect
If your dog leaves the bed, you can use the command and walk him back to his bed. Be sure to use the same command every time. If your dog does not stay, you may need to reconsider the placement of the bed. For instance, does he want his bed in your bedroom at night?
Recommend training method?

The Bedtime Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Command
Pick a command you will use at night for bedtime. You could say ‘go to bed’ or ‘it’s bedtime.’
Step
2
Place bed
Pick the perfect place for your dog’s bed. Think about where your dog usually sleeps or would like to sleep. Would you both be more comfortable in your bedroom, or do you want him away from your room at night?
Step
3
Walk to the bed
Take your dog to his bed by walking him to it. Avoid carrying him to bed as he will grow expecting that treatment each time he needs to sleep in his bed.
Step
4
Treat
Once your dog steps onto his bed, give him a treat.
Step
5
Sleep
Anytime your dog is sleepy, walk with him to his bed and give him a treat once he’s on the bed. Use your command to 'go to bed'.
Step
6
Bedtime
Repeat the steps above at bedtime. It may take a couple of weeks using his bed each night to get him to stay in his bed all night. If he leaves the bed at night and you’d like him to stay, simply redirect him by walking him back and giving him the command to go to bed. Keep practicing, he’ll get it with time and practice.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 11/07/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Mitch
Beagle
8 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Mitch
Beagle
8 Years

He was used to sleeping in bed with previous owner. So we let him fall asleep on couch with us. Then when we went to our bed, he'd cry all night if we didn't let him in our bed. Now my husband sleeps on couch with dog! How do we get him to sleep in his own dog bed???

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michele, First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As he improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating him during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. If you are home during the day, have lots of 30 minute - 1 hour long sessions with breaks between to practice this, to help pup learn sooner. Whenever he cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If he gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if he stays quiet. If he continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at his side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever he cries. Practice for a few days until he is doing well during the day. You can either continue what you are currently doing at night during this process or go ahead and jump into what I explain below for night time training - waiting until the day is good before starting the night or starting the night and day both at the same time. When he cries at night (in the crate - where he needs to be sleeping for now) before it has been 8 hours (so you know it's not a potty issue), tell him Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if he doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. If you go straight to nights and days like this you will probably have about 3 rough nights, with lots of correcting before he gets quiet - don't give in and let him out or this will take much longer! But the overall process will go faster if you can stay strong. If you practice the daytime routine first while your husband sleeps on the couch for a few more days, then start the nighttime routine once pup understands the new rules, the night should go easier when you do make the transition. Either way you need to stay very consistent for this to work - expect pup to protest and for you to have to correct a lot. You may want to pretend like you are all going to bed two hours early and read in bed with the lights off - anticipating having to get up a lot the first couple of hours to correct - so that you don't loose as much sleep. Choose whichever option seems less stressful for you ultimately and is something you can stick to. Don't worry about feeling bad for pup. I know it's hard but your husbands sleep and your relationship is most important. If this continues indefinitely a lot of people would re-home the dog - when the issue could have been resolved with a some fair but firm training for a few days. Ultimately, every ones relationships being healthy and rested is better for pup too. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Alvin
Chorkie
10 Months
0 found helpful
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Alvin
Chorkie
10 Months

Everything I try to get him off my bed or the sofa, he growl, then I try to pick him up he goes to bite me, I need him to stop as my adult daughter is nervous around dogs

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Diane, You probably already know this but you are dealing with an underlying aggression and lack of respect issue. The bed is just the symptom. I would hire a professional trainer who specializes in aggression to help you safely build his respect for you and add structure to his life. He has learned that he can get his way by biting and using aggression. I would make pup work for everything they get in life for a while, by requiring him to do a command first, such as Sit before being petted, Down being feeding, ect...I would drill pup on some obedience that builds impulse control and calmness, such as the commands linked below. I would keep a drag leash on pup so that when you tell pup to do something you can follow through calmly by picking up the leash and leading him. Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Once pup is being more respectful you can add in giving him treats for obeying the first time, but at first your attitude should be calm and firm, less rewards, and more matter-of-fact. He is in doggie bootcamp for a bit. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Farley
Corgi Schip
14 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Farley
Corgi Schip
14 Years

Farley is a rescue who has only been with us a short while. He needs to be close to us, but our bed is too high for him to get up or down. I would like him to sleep in his bed, beside ours. Also, Farley is deaf. Any advice on how to train him to sleep in his bed? I’ve been trying the treat method, but because he can’t hear the command it isn’t going very well.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Caryn, Because Farley is deaf you will need to modify the method a bit. Instead of giving a command, get his attention by getting in his line of sight and waving your arms in the bedroom, a few feet from his dog bed. As soon as he is looking at you, toss a large treat onto the dog bed while at the same time pointing to the bed with the same hand, so that when you toss the treat your finger is pointed when you do it. Practice this until he will eagerly start toward the bed when you start to motion toward it - before the treat has left your hand. Use large enough treats for him to easily find the treat on the dog bed. When he starts to move toward the bed when you motion toward it - even before he sees the treat leave your hand, then put the treat in your other hand, behind you back, pretend like you are still holding the treat in the hand you will point with, and simply point toward the bed with your empty hand-making the same type of throwing motion that you did before with the treat. As soon as Farley takes a couple of steps toward the bed, then toss the treat on the bed in front of him. Practice this until he will go all the way to the bed when you point and not just a couple of steps toward it. When he will go all the way to the bed when you point to it, then toss the treat to him once he is on the bed and make your pointing gesture calmer and calmer over time, until you can simply point to the bed without pretending to throw anything also. Practice the training regularly during the day at non-sleeping times also so that he will learn to look to you when you enter the bedroom and then follow your point to his bed. If he forgets at any point, then after you point, remind him by walking him over to the bed. You can also sprinkle a bit of his dog food onto the bed randomly during the day for him to stumble across. The randomness of his bed producing dog food will help him want to go to it on his own after a while also. If he tries to get off the bed when you want him to stay on it, calmly but a bit firmly walk toward him so that he backs back up onto the dog bed. When he gets back on it and stays on it while you take a few steps away again, then give him a treat. Use a hand signal that means you can get off, like clapping, to let him know he can leave if you choose to practice him staying on the bed. You can also teach him to look at you whenever you buzz a soft vibration collar. You can do a similar method as clicker training: buzz the collar - give a treat, buzz the collar - give a treat. Practicing rewarding right after buzzing it over and over again during training sessions. Once he understands to anticipate a treat after a buzz, then randomly buzz the collar throughout the day and when he looks at you, toss him a treat, and if he comes over to you, give him three. Vibration collars in combination with hand signals can help you communicate with a deaf dog a lot better. Deaf dogs can be taught most commands using hand signals instead of words. You just need a way to get the dog to look at you first in real life, and having a dog wear a vibration collar that has been paired with positive reinforcement in the form of rewards can accomplish that. Look for a vibration collar that has different levels of vibration since some dogs are very sensitive to the sensation and some don't notice it on lighter levels and need stronger vibration to feel it. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Isla
Labrador Retriever
14 Months
0 found helpful
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Isla
Labrador Retriever
14 Months

Trying to get her to sleep in her own bed.

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Mila
Dachshund
7 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Mila
Dachshund
7 Years

Hello!
Our dog is older and used to sleeping with my mom who sleeps by herself. We now have her and would prefer she sleep in her own bed vs with us. I am not sure how to begin training her to do so because it has been several years of her in bed with a person. I don’t want to feel like a bad dog mom because I tried to put her on a blanket (her bed arrives in 2 days) and she cried until I let her in. No one is getting sleep with her in bed. We really would like this to change! Help!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alyse, First of all, know that you are not being a bad dog mom by being firm about her sleeping in her own bed, both you and her will actually get more restful sleep according to studies, and anything that is better for your family is better for her also - being tired makes it harder to be patient and a good trainer during the day after all. Start by making the dog bed a desirable place for her to be. During the day sprinkle her dog food or small treats on and around the dog bed. Let her discover the treats on her own after showing her them the first couple of times. Periodically replace the treats after they get eaten when she is not looking - so that she begins to associate the bed with the "magically" appearing treats and chooses to visit that area on her own frequently to check for food. Next or at the same time, work on teaching a long Place command. Check out the video linked below for this. Start with shorter periods of time and progress to her staying on Place for at least an hour a day to get her used to being on there. https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-place-command-the-good-dog-training-tips/ At bedtime tell her to go to Place (her bed) and anytime she tries to get off of it, calmly but firmly bring her back to the dog bed. When she whines you can either discipline the crying or ignore it. Disciplining will work much faster but ignoring normally works also with time if you stay consistent and don't give into it! - Remind yourself that sleeping on her own soft bed will not hurt her, she is either crying because she is adjusting (with means she just needs time to adjust) or because she is being demanding (which you don't want to give into because that's a respect issue) - either way she is totally fine sleeping on her own bed and enforcing the new rule from the beginning in your house will be much easier than trying to change it later when you are even more sleep deprived - the environment is new and you are semi-new to her so now is a good time to teach her your house rules. The above way typically equals the least amount of crying but there is another way you can also teach this that tends to work a lot faster but involves being a bit firmer. Sprinkle treats on the dog bed when she is not around and practice sending her to the bed and rewarding her when she gets on it during the day. Make the bed fun during the day. At night once she has the pleasant association with the bed either send her to the bed and enforce her staying on it whenever she tries to get off of it OR crate her with the bed. When she cries either ignore the crying (typically this takes about 5 days to work doing it this way), OR tell her "Ah Ah" and use a Pet Convincer to spray a small puff of air at her side (through the crate's wires if crated) - avoiding her face and only using unscented air - NOT citronella. The second method above can be used without a lot of prior training and tends to work quickly but there will be more crying typically and it can feel harsh for the owner - but it is still fairly gentle. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Deuce
Australian Shepherd
14 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Deuce
Australian Shepherd
14 Years

Deuce has been a part of my family for 14 years, and is beginning to have a lot of trouble getting up and down. He use to sleep with us on the bed, but now cannot get up on his own or even using a ramp we bought. He likes to sleep next to the bed, but will not sleep on the dog bed we bought him or on blankets that we put out. Should we be worried that the temperature is too hot for him?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ryan, Are you saying you feel like he may be avoiding the dog bed because the fabric is making him hot? If so, that is very possible. I wouldn't be worried necessarily but he may be more comfortable if the room was a bit cooler. It's common for dogs to want to sleep on cool, hard surfaces when it's hotter and sleep on things like dog beds more so in the winter when the house is cooler. You way want to check out something like www.primopads.com for hotter days and a bed that is a little firmer memory foam instead of super soft, plush bed for cooler weather - to help with sore joints. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Benji
Peekapoo
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Benji
Peekapoo
3 Months

Benji is a new puppy, he’s very small and both he and I enjoy having him sleep in my bed. It was going good at first, but now he pees at the edge of my bed. I was stern with him the first couple times and put him on his own bed as a consequence. However, every time I bring him back on my bed he’ll pee. I know that since he’s a puppy it is difficult for them to hold in their pee. But I let him pee before bed, and he licks my face to wake me up and let me know he needs to be pee, but lately it seems as if he is backtracking.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tatyana, Having a puppy sleep with you is super cute and fun - I remember when my own dog was that little. Unfortunately, allowing a puppy to sleep with you before they are past the destructive chewing phases (which have only started and may still get worse) and fully potty trained and can hold it overnight, can be dangerous and lead to life-long potty training issues that result in puppy never being able to sleep with you! I highly suggest crating puppy at night at this age. It's not fun, I know, but crating pup now until you have laid a solid foundation of training and pup is older, can mean 10+ years of freedom later. Not doing it now, can result in pup never becoming trustworthy inside and your relationship with each other being less enjoyable for years to come because you can't trust pup unsupervised due to bad habits formed as a puppy. Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Gracie
Havanese
Nine Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Gracie
Havanese
Nine Months

Gracie is crate trained and sleeps in our family room at night. However we would like to start transitioning her sleeping in our room in her own bed or crate at night as well as slowly beginning to let her have day time freedom in areas in the house. Mainly this is because we have a second home and when we have guests there it is not easy for her to be sleeping n the main room when people come and go late at night. We think the continuity of "going to bed" with Mom and Dad would be easier when we travel. So essentially beginning to keep the crate door open and she has the option to use it or now. When is the right age to do this and how long should we plane for it to take to make the transition.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Laurie, She is old enough you can begin the transition to your room now or wait until after 1 year. I would not transition to an open crate until 1.5 years old and she has gone 6 months without chewing anything she shouldn't when left alone for short periods, but she can begin being crated in your room with the door closed now - or you can wait until she is older without issue also. The transition to your room shouldn't take longer than 2 weeks if you are consistent. The transition to more freedom will probably not start until 1.5 years old, then once she is ready for it, you can expect about a month of gradually giving her more and more freedon and seeing how she does...such as 10 minutes alone, 15 minutes, 25 minutes, 40 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hours, 2 hours 3 hours, 4 hours, 5 hours, 6 hours, then all day or night...without surpassing her potty needs. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tess
English Springer Spaniel
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Tess
English Springer Spaniel
3 Years

Tess is almost 3 years old and has slept on our bed for the passed year and a half. We have been trying to get her to sleep on her own bed in our room but haven't been successful.
We put her bed on my side as she loves to sleep 'on' me and I pat her and praise her quietly. After a while she then sneaks back up on to our bed,usually anytime between 1pm and 3pm. We're usually unaware of her hopping onto the bed until later on. Not sure what to do.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lisa, Since she is getting onto the bed while you are sleeping so you can't effectively train at that time, you will need to crate pup - putting her bed into the crate in your room, until she gets into the habit of sleeping there on her own. During the day, practice the Surprise method from the article linked below to introduce the crate if she isn't already crate trained. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Hera
Swiss Shepard
2 Years
0 found helpful
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Hera
Swiss Shepard
2 Years

Hi my dog Hera won’t sleep in her new dog house even when it cold plz plz help me out it took long to make and I don’t want her to get sick

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Alyssa, I suggest making the dog house more appealing in general. Place a dog food stuffed rubber chew toy at the back of the dog house and attach it to the dog house using something like a Virchewly leash - which can be wound through the holes if you get a large enough Kong and thin enough leash, and then clipped to the back of the dog house so that pup has to stay in the dog house to eat- check sizes to make sure they will fit together. https://www.amazon.com/VirChewLy-Indestructible-Leash-Medium-Black/dp/B001W8457I Periodically sprinkle treats and right in front of the dog house when pup is out there and is likely to eat them quickly - you don't want the food just left there or it will attract critters though. Consider adding a waterproof bed, like a rubber mat, low lying cot type bed, or vinyl covered crate pad. What is the weather like where you are? Pup may also be avoiding the house simply because they are hot-natured or want more visibility. More ventilation or visibility could help if it won't compromise the house providing enough insulation during really cold times of the year. It might be worth putting an outdoor thermometer inside the house for a bit to see how hot or cold its getting in the house - if its hot in there that may be the issue. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buddy
Chihuahua
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Buddy
Chihuahua
3 Years

When I first got Buddy, I tried to teach him to sleep in his bed which was next to mine. But because he was a puppy and he would cry, I would bring him onto my bed to fall asleep and ever since, he always jumps on my bed to fall asleep. I have tried teaching him to sleep In his own bed already but every time he lays on the bed for a couple minutes and then comes back onto mine. How to I teach him to stay in his own bed when he loved sleeping with me?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Karina, Realistically, you would need to go back to crate training, putting his bed into the crate, and have him sleep there for a few months, until it was a habit, then transition the crate out if you want him to sleep on just the dog bed. During the day, I also suggest randomly sprinkling treats on the dog bed in the crate for him to find also, so that he begins to go into the crate on his own, checking often. This process will mean crying, but staying consistent and not letting him out when you know the crying is just for attention and isn't hurting him, and practicing the Surprise method from the article I have linked below during the day, will help there be less crying in the long run. Know that every time you let him out when he cries for attention, you are teaching him to cry longer the next night - since he will decide that crying is what gets the door open. There will be less crying in the long run if you stay consistent and give him the opportunity to learn to calm down and go to sleep instead. Usually the first 3 nights are the hardest. Surprise method for crate training: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Teach pup to go into the crate on command during that time, so that once you phase out the crate later, at night you can send him to his bed also. You can also simply teach him to go to his bed and stay there without the crate, but right now with the behavior needing to happen at night you won't be able to be consistent enough about enforcing him staying on his own bed and off yours while trying to sleep, so the crate enforces that for you while you sleep - until it becomes the new normal for pup. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Oscar
Lhasa Apso
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Oscar
Lhasa Apso
3 Months

Potty training, taking commands, bed training

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Naisha, I suggest downloading the free PDF e-book AFTER You Get Your Puppy from the link below. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Crate Training method for potty training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Crate introduction - surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Puppy Class videos: Week 1, pt 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnhJGU2NO5k Week 1, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-1-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 1 https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 2, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-2-part-2-home-jasper-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 3, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-3-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 4, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-4-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 5, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-5-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 1: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-1-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1 Week 6, pt 2: https://www.dogstardaily.com/videos/week-6-part-2-sirius-berkeley-puppy-1-0 Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Aurora
Golden Retriever
10 Weeks
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Aurora
Golden Retriever
10 Weeks

Hi, our puppy is very good at night now she knows the routine and is happy to sleep when we go to sleep.

The issue we have is she just will not sleep in a bed at night, she's happy to sleep in her bed during the day or have quiet time in it but night time she squashes herself up against her puppy pen by the gate.

She didn't enjoy being in a crate so I have taken that away and replaced it with a nice large plastic bed and filled it with comfort toys and one of my jumpers but she'd much prefer the floor.

She's still very young so any advice would be great full, all my past dogs loved their crates so this is all new to me :)

Many thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Claire, Is the bed located in the same location as the area she is falling asleep in, or is where she is choosing to sleep at night closer to you guys? If pup is sleeping somewhere closer to you, the issue simply might be that she is wanting to be closer. Moving her bed to that location where she is currently choosing to sleep at night should help in that case. Some dogs are hot natured or like to fully spread out while sleeping. Many dog beds are designed for the dog to curl up or have materials that keep body heat close to pup. Pup might be hot or want more space in those cases. Using a flat pad, where pup can stay cool and spread out better could help in that case. Such as www.primopads.com or a low lying crate type mat. Spy on pup while she is sleeping on the ground and night and see how she sleeps - is she curled up or sprawled out. Is she panting? Perhaps the pen wires feel nice and cold. Look for ways to mimic the things she seems to prefer with sleeping and temperature. Finally, at 10 weeks old, almost all puppies will not like the crate yet. It generally takes at least two weeks for 90% of puppies to adjust to the crate. Most dogs who love the crate love it as they get older and have made the adjustment already. If you wish to crate train still, try putting a cooler pad in there, instead of something soft and hot, and check out the surprise method from the article linked below. Surprise method; https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Marley
austrailian shepherd/catahoula mix
9 Months
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Marley
austrailian shepherd/catahoula mix
9 Months

My family has had Marley for almost a week. She's deaf so we're working on sign language with her for commands. She recently has started laying on my bed at night and I am way over it. I bought a bed for her but am not sure how to get her to use it because she is deaf and can't hear me tell her to go to her bed. Any tips or suggestions to try?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, I recommend teaching deaf dogs to look at you when you vibrate a gentle remote vibration collar, then teaching a hand signal for each command. To teach pup to look at you when you vibrate the collar, you would use the vibration collar similar to a clicker. Have pup wear the collar around for a week, briefly vibrate the collar with pup on a longer leash. Each time you vibrate the collar toss a treat. Keep the sessions short because the collar will seem weird at first. Choose a collar that vibrates at different intensities ideally and use the lowest intensity for training. Higher intensities can be used during times of heavy distraction later. Practice often and when pup is used to the vibration collar and starts looking your direction for the treat, begin holding the treat up to your eye before tossing it. Practice until pup consistently will make eye contact when you vibrate the collar randomly throughout the day - keep kibble or small treats in a ziploc in your pocket ready. Check out the video linked below for how to teach Place. Instead of saying Place, give a hand signal instead - like pointing to or swiping your arm toward place, then lead pup over to the place with the leash, rewarding pup as soon as they step paws onto Place. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Know that teaching hand signals generally isn't harder than teaching most verbal commands. It's just different so requires a bit of a different approach. The hardest part is generally being able to get your dog to look at your first throughout the day so that you can give signals and communicate with pup - which is why I recommend the vibration collar training and keeping the remote in a convenient location or on your person. My personal dogs are taught both hand signals and verbal commands and perform both together or separately because their are times when I need them to perform commands without noise. I hope that encourages you, and congratulations on your dog! Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Coco
Dachshund
9 Months
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Coco
Dachshund
9 Months

Hi there,
Months ago when coco was 3months, we trained her at night to sleep in crate in our bedroom. We then had the crate on the floor of our bedroom and left the door open, then eventually we could get rid of it and just have her bed on the floor of our bedroom and she would sleep in there the whole night.
During covid we were obviously home a lot more with her and then going back to work about 3 weeks ago she has started to cry and try to jump on our bed. She will do in for maybe an hr and we have just given in to her and put her on our bed to sleep.
We got the crate out a couple of nights ago to start from square 1, and coco is fine when she goes to sleep, then after maybe 2hrs will wake and need to go to toilet (so we take her out) then when we go to put her back in the crate, she begins crying, fretting and this has gone on for 2 hrs. We don’t know what to do to get her to sleep in her own bed anymore.
Please help!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Yes, the covid trial will be causing a lot of dogs to have issues with owners going back to work. I would continue what you are doing with the crate training. You will have to put up with the nighttime crying for maybe even a few weeks, retraining Coco to go back to the way the sleeping arrangements were before covid. The Ignore Crying Method may be the answer: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-cry-at-night/. When Coco wakes in the night to go for a pee, make it a boring trip. No talking, just a trip out in the yard on the leash, pee only. Then, straight back to bed. She'll realize it is no big deal to go out and not worth it. You can also try an exercise pen with her bed in it, beside you as opposed to the crate. See here how to set it up: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Be firm but kind - she has a big adjustment being alone all day and naturally wants to be close to you at night. but, with time you can get things back to normal. Good luck!

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Spencer
Dachshund
9 Weeks
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Spencer
Dachshund
9 Weeks

Hi, we have Spencer for over a week now. He sleeps in the living room. In his bed. For the first week we were sleeping in the living room on the couch so he can settle. He got up about 3 times, 2 times for wee and he went back to bed alright. For the third time he settles really hard. We would like to move back to our bedroom but I am not sure if it is too early.
Also, he goes to the puppy pad by himself now for wee and for poo as well, even when we leave the room. I don’t know if we should still get up at the same time when he usually gets up or see how he does? We have a puppy camera installed so we can see what he is up to even if we are not there. Any advice would be great

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Cute picture! Spencer sounds like a super smart pup and is doing amazing for his age! You may find that Spencer is not too keen on you moving in to your room and leaving him in the living room. But you won't know until you try. I would use the Perfect Place Method, which yes, does mean checking the camera now and then to see how he is doing. Because Spencer is using the pad and returning to bed on his own, I would continue as you are doing - and yes try to go back to your own bed. https://wagwalking.com/training/sleep-on-his-bed. The third time settling is a challenge because he may be ready to get up for the day. You'll have to ignore him and get up when you plan, hoping that he will settle eventually on his own. Good luck!

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Nala
Bernedoodle
6 Months
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Nala
Bernedoodle
6 Months

She used to be really good at sleeping all through the night and sleeping in her own bed, but lately she has been falling asleep at about 10:00 and then waking up at midnight ready to play and she’s up until 2 wanting to run and play and I have to constantly tell her it’s time okay time and it’s time for bed and I have to sit right next her till she falls asleep, I’m not sure at this point what to do. I get so exhausted and I have her bed right next to mine.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kadi, First, work on teaching the Quiet command during the day using the Quiet method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Second, during the day practice the Surprise method from the article linked below. Whenever pup stays quiet in the crate for 5 minutes, sprinkle some treats into the crate without opening it, then leave the room again. As she improves, only give the treats every 10 minutes, then 15 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1.5 hour, 2, hour, 3 hour. Practice crating her during the day for 1-3 hours each day that you can. Whenever she cries in the crate, tell him "Quiet". If she gets quiet - Great! Sprinkle treats in after five minutes if she stays quiet. If she continues barking or stops and starts again, spray a quick puff of air from a pet convincer at her side through the crate while calmly saying "Ah Ah", then leave again. Only use unscented air canisters, DON'T use citronella! And avoid spraying in the face. surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Repeat the rewards when quiet and the corrections whenever she cries. Practice for a few days until she is doing well during the day. When she cries at night before it has been 7 hours, tell her Quiet, and correct with the pet convincer if she doesn't become quiet and stay quiet. Don't give treats at night, just when you practice during the day. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Snowbelle
Husky
6 Years
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Snowbelle
Husky
6 Years

I want to train her to start sleeping on her bed i placed her bed next to my bed. She currently sleeps with my husband and i on our bed. Please give me some advice on how to train her i know that she is older and i heard that when they are older its hard to train them but i know that even when they are older we can still do.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. I am going to give you information on how to get your dog out of your bed, and how to introduce her to her own bed. While you can teach her really anything at any age, you are correct in that it will be a little more difficult. So patience with this one is key. The first step to training your dog to sleep in their own bed is to teach them what “settle down” means. “Settle down” is kind of the cousin to “down.” Once your dog knows the “down” command, “settle down” is an easy add-on. With a treat in hand, lead your dog to his bed and say “settle down.” If your dog needs help getting into the down position, help him by holding the treat between your fingers and placing it slightly in front of and between his front legs. Once he lays down to get a better angle at the treat, say “good settle down!” and reward him with the treat. Throughout the day, when you see your dog resting in his/her new bed, whisper “good settle down” so that he/she begins to understand that “settle down” means relax. With repetition and positive reinforcement, your dog should get the hang of “settle down” in no time. Now that your pup knows it makes you happy when he relaxes in his/her bed, place the bed next to your bed. Your dog is far more likely to happily sleep in his/her bed if it’s in a spot that he can hear, see and smell you. Using a treat, give your dog his “settle down” command, reward him and get yourself into bed. Every time your dog jumps on the bed or cries to be let up, step out of bed, get a treat (leave a secure stash of treats on a bedside table), walk your dog back to their bed and repeat the “settle down” command. When he lies down, say “good settle down,” reward him immediately with the treat and get back into your own bed. Repeating this cycle throughout the night, no matter how many times your dog tries to climb in bed with you, will quickly help your dog learn to happily sleep in their own bed, rather than yours. Dogs innately want to please their people so calm, positive repetition – no matter what you’re trying to teach – will help your dog understand exactly what you want. Waking up throughout the night can quickly become frustrating so be patient and remember – if your dog doesn’t do what you say, it’s because he/she simply doesn’t know what you want. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Layla
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years
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Layla
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years

We recently got my dog 7 months ago , w her previous owner she would sleep in a crate. We don’t have a crate so she got used to sleeping with me on my bed. But now she got the fleas and I would prefer for her to sleep on her own bed , she listens at times but not always. What would be the best way to train her?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. I am going to give you information on how to get your dog out of your bed, and how to introduce her to her own bed. The first step to training your dog to sleep in their own bed is to teach them what “settle down” means. “Settle down” is kind of the cousin to “down.” Once your dog knows the “down” command, “settle down” is an easy add-on. With a treat in hand, lead your dog to his bed and say “settle down.” If your dog needs help getting into the down position, help him by holding the treat between your fingers and placing it slightly in front of and between his front legs. Once he lays down to get a better angle at the treat, say “good settle down!” and reward him with the treat. Throughout the day, when you see your dog resting in his/her new bed, whisper “good settle down” so that he/she begins to understand that “settle down” means relax. With repetition and positive reinforcement, your dog should get the hang of “settle down” in no time. Now that your pup knows it makes you happy when he relaxes in his/her bed, place the bed next to your bed. Your dog is far more likely to happily sleep in his/her bed if it’s in a spot that he can hear, see and smell you. Using a treat, give your dog his “settle down” command, reward him and get yourself into bed. Every time your dog jumps on the bed or cries to be let up, step out of bed, get a treat (leave a secure stash of treats on a bedside table), walk your dog back to their bed and repeat the “settle down” command. When he lies down, say “good settle down,” reward him immediately with the treat and get back into your own bed. Repeating this cycle throughout the night, no matter how many times your dog tries to climb in bed with you, will quickly help your dog learn to happily sleep in their own bed, rather than yours. Dogs innately want to please their people so calm, positive repetition – no matter what you’re trying to teach – will help your dog understand exactly what you want. Waking up throughout the night can quickly become frustrating so be patient and remember – if your dog doesn’t do what you say, it’s because he/she simply doesn’t know what you want. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Jax
Pit bull
2 Years
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Jax
Pit bull
2 Years

Won't listen

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I suggest taking Jax to obedience training classes. Dogs really do love to train and it's a great opportunity for socialization as well! I've seen dogs that were out of control become very well behaved. Training with Jax will also cement the bond that you are building into a great relationship. In the meantime, here is a guide to read that has very good tips for helping Jax learn to listen: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you and https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-rottweiler-to-be-obedient. Read these guides through and use the tips for training. Work 10 minutes a day and always end on a positive note with lots of praise. Good luck and happy training!

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Chops
pit bull lab mix
5 Years
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Chops
pit bull lab mix
5 Years

I am wanting to try to teach my dog to sleep in his own bed at night. He is use to sleeping in bed with me, but it has becoming increasingly difficult to allow him to do so. What is my best option in teaching him to sleep in his own bed at night.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! The process for this can be a bit tedious if he isn't liking the idea of his own bed right away. Dogs are creatures of habit. They also enjoy comfort and being close to us. So there is a lot to work with here! Your best bet is to place his bed by yours. Start teaching him a command like "bed time" or "go to bed". Give him a few treats when he goes to his bed. If he jumps up with you, keep redirecting him to his bed until he finally stays. This may take a few weeks, but he WILL get it and start sleeping on his own. You can also try this out of your bedroom if you don't want him in your room at all.

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Oreo
pitbull
1 Month
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Oreo
pitbull
1 Month

How do I train Oreo to poop on the pad?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! I am going to give you some training information on how to work with your dog to use a potty pad. Choose Your Spot Pick a space in your house where you want your dog to go. Obviously, you’ll want this spot to be a low-traffic area. Make sure this spot is easily accessible to your dog, and make sure the floor surface is linoleum or tile, as opposed to carpet. If your dog “misses,” it will be easier to clean up. If the only spot you can put the pee pad is a carpet, you might consider getting a small tarp to put underneath the puppy pee pad to guard against spillage. Choose a spot that is outside of your “smell zone.” An important tip to remember is to make sure not to let your dog decide the spot he likes. Not only might he pick an area you won’t like, but he’ll learn that he is in charge – not you – which can cause a host of problems down the line. Monitor Your Dog When you are potty training your dog, full-time monitoring is an absolute necessity. It’s impossible to correct bad behaviors if you don’t see them happen. Dogs have very short memories. It is important to catch your dog in the act. If your dog goes on the floor, and you try to correct him hours after the fact, he will be confused and upset, not knowing what he did wrong. This can hinder training and your relationship with your dog. Puppies, in particular, must be watched constantly. They have less control over their bowels and will go when they have to go. If you miss these moments, you lose precious training opportunities. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to be with your dog 24 hours a day, but try to spend more time at home during the weeks you are potty training – it will pay off in the long run. Learn Your Dog’s Schedule Dogs, for the most part, are predictable. They will go to the bathroom at predictable times. You should be able to learn when your dog has to go based on timing as much as on his signals. Take some time to study your dog’s bathroom habits. You’ll learn the amount of time after he eats or drinks that he has to go, and you’ll get in rhythm with his daily bathroom schedule. This will help you reduce accidents and speed up the potty training process. Studying your dog’s habits can also help you identify his bathroom “triggers” – like having to go after a certain amount of playtime. Once you learn your dog’s schedule, use it to your advantage in potty training. Bring him to the pee pad a few minutes before he normally goes, and encourage him. This will help him get used to going in the right spot, and help you establish repetition in your training. Choose a Command Word Dogs have keen senses – they respond to sight, smell, and sound. When you begin pee pad training, choose a command word and use it every time you take your dog to the pad. Just about any word will work. The tone of your voice is more important than the actual word. Try phrases like “go on” or “go potty” in a slightly elevated, encouraging tone. Make sure to repeat this same command, in the same tone, every time you take your dog to the pee pad. Avoid Punishment When your dog has an accident, it’s just that – an accident. When you punish your dog during potty training, he will become confused and scared. He doesn’t know what he’s done wrong, and can’t understand why the person he loves most is mad at him. Most importantly, it will not help his potty training. Positive Reinforcement Both human and dog behavior is largely based on incentives. Dogs’ incentives are very simple – they want to eat when they are hungry, play when they are excited, and sleep when they are tired. But the most important thing your dog wants in life is to please you. Use this to your advantage. Whenever your dog goes on his potty training pad, shower him with lots of praise. If he sees that he gets praise for doing his business on the pad, he will be incentivized to keep going on the pad – and he’ll be excited to do it! Potty training – whether it’s a pee pad or going outside – will take time, but if you do it right, can take less time. Many dogs are potty trained in less than two weeks. Just remember that you and your dog are partners. Do everything you can to help him learn the proper etiquette, and you will enjoy a long, quality relationship together. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in.

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Brandy
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
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Brandy
Labrador Retriever
2 Years

Our dog is crate trained and generally sleeps through the night without issue until the early morning. She was sleeping in until about 5:30 or 6, but we recently moved to a new house and now she is whining/barking to get out as early as 4:30. It is not a potty issue. It seems to be wanting to be near us at that time and/or wanting to eat. We don’t let her out of the crate unless she’s quiet (which she will be if we start moving around) and we don’t feed her before 6am. Her crate is currently in the living room outside her door. We’ve tried in the past putting her in our room in the crate but this doesn’t stop her from wanting to be out when it hits a certain time. The sleep deprivation is really challenging! Suggestions?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, there are a few things you can try. Make sure that you exercise Brandy well in the evenings and if you are able to, take her for a long walk in the evening. Make sure that she goes out for a pee break the last thing before bedtime. Sometimes white noise will help a dog to sleep better - this can be in the form of a fan (pointed away from her). Make sure that the room has room-darkening curtains, too. There are a few more tips here: https://wagwalking.com/training/sleep-all-night. I will suggest using an alarm clock to your advantage. This will take a few weeks, but is effective. Set the alarm for approximately the time that she is typically waking, for about a week. The next week, you move the time 15 minutes later, and keep it there for a week. The following week, set it another 15-30 minutes later, and keep doing this until you reach the desired time that you want to get up. By then, Brandy should be conditioned to waking up when the alarm goes off. Good luck!

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Buddy
Mastiff cross rottweiler
10 Weeks
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Buddy
Mastiff cross rottweiler
10 Weeks

Hi I’m back at work tomorrow and trying to crate train my puppy to be used to being alone. He is fine at night time in his crate but cries when I leave him during the day and tips his water bowl all over. I’ve tried the command bed and when he sleepy I put him in his crate to sleep. But he still cries.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Vicki, Check out the Surprise method from the article linked below. Work on that command on weekends and for at least an hour when you are home after work each day. Also know that it is normal for a puppy to cry in the crate for the first two weeks of crate training. Stay consistent and give pup a dog food stuffed chew toy to focus on in the crate during the day. Because you are already back at work and not able to ease into crate training as much, there will be more crying, stay consistent and pup should adjust after a few days though. Follow the Surprise method when home to help pup learn how to calm themselves in the crate. For the water, look for a bowl made for crates that will clip onto the crate door - check Amazon. Instead of giving pup a whole bowl full of water, fill that small bowl up at potty trip times with smaller amounts more frequently. This will also help more with potty training so pup doesn't get too much water at once. Be aware that at this age, pup will still have to be taken potty at least every 3 hours during the day. If you are gone longer than that, I suggest hiring a dog walker to take pup at least that often. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate In general a puppy can hold their bladder for a maximum of the number of months they are in age plus one, meaning 3 hours for a 2 month old puppy, 4 hours for a 3 month old puppy, 5 for a 4 month old puppy, ect... Until the maximum time of 8 hours for an adult dog. Those times are maximums though. When home take pup out at least twice as often as their maximum time -which would be every 1.5 hours for you right now. If pup is still able to spill the door bowl, you can purchase a few door bowls and freeze the water in each on ahead of time - giving pup a small continuous amount of water to drink and not a full bowl to be spilled. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Leia
English Cocker Spaniel
8 Weeks
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Leia
English Cocker Spaniel
8 Weeks

Hi,

We (my girlfriend and I) just got a new puppy (our second one, we also have a yorkie mini toy) and we are struggling a bit with a few situations:

1) we have two weeks since we are potty training but we have, let’s Say, 50% accuracy on the puppy pad (since we didn’t complete the vaccine scheme);

2) other than that, we try also for two weeks now to redirect her whenever she chews somethings she is not supposed to (that happens all the time during the day;

3) also, she haș moments when she plays a little too agresively with the yorkie and we don’t really know how to properly control that;

4) the yorkie sleeps in our bed and for a while, Leia cries cause she also wants in bed with us but she happens to have little accidents during the night - we would like to get her to sleep in her bed near our bed;

5) finally and the most important, we would like to comfort her on being alone(only with our yorkie) in the house since there will come the Time when we will leave for work for around 8 hours and we would like to avoid crate training her - the yorkie always hâd Access in the entire apartament and never distroied anything.

Hope to hear back from you on at least a few of our concerns!

Best regards!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Claudiu, Congratulations on your new puppy. 1. For potty training indoors, I suggest using the exercise pen method from the article linked below. Instead of a pee pad, I suggest switching to a disposable real grass pad if your end goal is outside potty training once pup is older, to avoid the confusion of rugs and carpets which are also made out of fabric and pup may start pottying on once a pee pad is removed. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Disposable real grass pad brands: www.freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Most also on amazon 2. The chewing will take time - it's often something you have to manage until almost a year - but teaching good manners now, preventing uninterrupted chewing episodes, and teaching pup to chew on their own toys can prevent the chewing from turning into a life long problem, instead of something pup will outgrow once teeth and jaws have developed and the urge decreases with age. Check out the article linked below. The exercise pen will also be important here when you can't supervise pup and they are not safe to be left alone yet. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ Check out the Leave It method and teaching the Out command for managing the dog's play. Give breaks when one gets too rough, and let the tired pup go first to see if they still want to play before releasing the other one. Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ 4. Pup definitely needs to sleep on their own bed with potty access or in a crate at this age. There will be crying but you can help pup adjust by practicing the steps from the Surprise method from the article linked below during the day, ahead of time, to help pup adjust to being in that space in general - which should also help with nights. Right now, set up an exercise pen in your room, with a disposable real grass pad on one end and a non-absorbent bed on the other end of the exercise pen. Pup needs to get used to being in that area, have that set up to help with potty training, and prevent dangerous chewing while you are sleeping. The pen is important at this age because you won't be able to enforce pup staying on their bed while you are asleep. Practice rewarding pup for being there during the day, but keep the pen door closed to also ensure pup stays there at night. Pup should develop a habit of sleeping there and you be able to phase out the pen later once pup is fully potty trained and not chewing anymore. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Non-absorbent bed examples: cot type beds, www.primopads.com, https://k9ballistics.com/collections/chew-proof 5. Finally, the Surprise method can help pup get used to being alone too. Giving pup a dog food stuffed durable hollow toy whenever you leave can help. Providing pup with a dog food stuffed durable puzzle toy once older can also help. Know that confinement at appropriate times during the first year of life, combined with teaching things like Leave It and obedience training when home, is what usually leads to a dog who can be trusted unsupervised in the home after a year. The confinement keeps potty training puppies on track - avoiding long term potty issues, prevents dangerous destructive chewing and that chewing from becoming a long term habit, actually helps the dog learn how to self-entertain and be a bit more independent - preventing separation anxiety - especially when durable toys like stuffed kong are given, and helps pup develop appropriate chewing habits - like chewing their own toys. For dogs who are being trained to go potty on an indoor pad - like the grass pad or pee pad, an exercise pen can be used. For outside potty training dogs, it will need to be a crate until pup is potty trained, then an exercise pen or small dog-proofed room can be used. Once pup is fully potty training - with zero accidents in the past three months, and has gone at least 3 months since trying to chew anything other than their own toys, you can test whether pup is ready for more freedom by giving unsupervised freedom while away from home in ten minute increments - 10 minutes, 20, 30, 40 ect...until you have worked up the amount of time you will be away during work. If pup goes potty or chews, wait another 1-2 months before trying again. Most dogs aren't ready until between 1-2 years of age, but some mature sooner. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bruno
chug
10 Months
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Bruno
chug
10 Months

How do we train our dog to not jump on us while we are eating a meal?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Amanda, First, I recommend teaching Place and Out - which means leave the area. Create a new rule that pup lies on their Place bed at the far end of the dinning room (or wherever you eat), or in the next room. Reward pup for staying there until the end of the meal. Practice Place ahead of time proactively so that pup knows how to lie down on Place and Stay when its needed - until pup knows that command I recommend crating pup temporarily at mealtimes with a chew toy. I also recommend teaching out and using the section on How to Use Out to Deal with Pushy Behaviors to enforce that command once pup knows it, whenever they are being pushy in general. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Out - which means leave the area: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ Finally, for jumping in general, check out the Step Toward and Leash method from the article linked below. I recommend the Step Toward method for pup daily with those they know, and you can use the leash method for those who could be knocked off balance or who you don't want to have to be the ones training your dog like guests and kids. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump

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Oreo
Boston Terrier cross Jack Russell
7 Weeks
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Oreo
Boston Terrier cross Jack Russell
7 Weeks

This is Oreo, I am trying to get her to sleep in a open round doggie bed but then she wanders around, she doesn't mess in the house during the day or night when we are awake, I guess I am just afraid when the lights go out and I put her to bed and she starts to walk around she is looking to do her business in the dark? When I put a box in front of her bed and blankets on the sides she goes straight to bed and she already sleeps through the night. My question is, should I leave her a night to explore and see if she messes or how do I go about getting out of bed at night? She does sleep next to my bed at night.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Oreo is adorable! She is doing amazing sleeping in a bed all night. Good for her and for being able to sleep through without a pee break at her young age. I would try her with an exercise pen at night which gives her space but also keeps her in one place: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Take a look as well at this guide; Oreo may be very happy in a crate at night as it is a cozy spot for a young puppy (and will help to train her for potty purposes as well): https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. Good luck and enjoy little Oreo!

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rico
cockapoo
7 Months
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rico
cockapoo
7 Months

we used a crate from day1. it's in the kitchen diner, which is also open to living room. we have ourselves irregular bedtimes, from 11pm to 2am. Rico will eventually sleep in his crate, but gettim him into the crate to settle is difficult. my husband keeps carrying him to the crate when he goes to bed himself. Rico will settle but when u walk away sit up and barks. my husband will sit outside crate until he sleeps. can take an hour and the we have to be totally quiet. he wakes up sometimes and same thing. Rico will eventually sleep until 7.30.
now he also started to feed from his bowl. please help..

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, good for Rico for eventually settling. However, yes, this is a tough way to get him to sleep. You can try a few things. The simplest way (but not the easiest) is to let Rico bark. He'll get the idea, but it may take a few weeks especially since he is used to company while he falls asleep. But you may have to try this and it will be noisy for a few weeks (or days, it is hard to know). The other idea is to move Rico's crate into your room. This may provide him with comfort and security, allowing him to fall asleep sooner. There is a chance he'll bark, but you will have to let him bark until he learns. Another option is to set up a long term exercise pen area where he can sleep in your room as described here: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Once he gets used to settling there every night, you can slowly move it out to the diner area. This means moving it inches a night only which will take time, but does work. For tips on training Rico to like a crate, if you choose to stay with a crate, look here: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate. Good luck!

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Mochi
Pomeranian
1 Month
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Mochi
Pomeranian
1 Month

My dog seems to attached to me and wants to follow me everywhere. The last two night i have been letting him sleep on my bed. I wanna make him on his bed but he never does. Please help me with this problem.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello! You can start by placing his bed next to yours and redirect him to his bed at night whenever he moves from it. You can keep a few treats next to you and give him a treat for going to his bed. This may take about a week or so but he will eventually get it.

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Ninu
Yorkshire Terrier
4 Months
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Ninu
Yorkshire Terrier
4 Months

Hi. We have a 4 month old yorkie and has been with us for 3 and a half weeks. The first 2 days he got through sleeping in his bed,however from the 3rd day forward he got up and comes grabbing the sheets to pick him up in bed with us and so we did. From then on,he sleps with us but gets up several times during the night to play and we end up extremly tired the following day.
Now we're trying to put him sleep in his bed. Any suggestions? He already sleeps in his bed during the day with no problems.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, you just have to persevere and not give in to Ninu's demands at night. You know that he is capable (and quite happy) of sleeping in his bed. Why not set up an exercise pen area around his bed so that Ninu has the freedom to move around but not the ability to bother you in the middle of the night? Here are tips for setting up the pen (if you are training him to pee outside, leave out the pee pads or litter area): https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. Before bedtime at night, take Ninu for a nice walk that will tire him out and set the tone for sleep. Take up his food and water 2 hours before bed so that he does not need a potty break in the night. He is young, though, so if he needs to pee in the night be sure to take him. (Just a pee, on the leash, no talking, peeing and then straight back to bed.) Good luck!

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Jex
Indian Spitz
4 Years
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Jex
Indian Spitz
4 Years

My dog has been loosely trained. He doesn't listen to me at times and keeps barking always. Also runs away from the house when kept open leased.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it is never too late to start training Jex. For listening, read this entire guide for excellent tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you. For barking, teach Jex the Quiet Method which comes in handy in many instances: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark. For running away, work on Jex's recall skills. Practice daily (make it fun and with positivity) and consistently: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-come-back. Work on his obedience: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-whippet. Be sure to use rewards to give Jex incentive. Train after he has been on a walk and always end on a high note (5-10 minutes a day to start). There is a lot of reading here for you to do, but great tips to get Jex back on the right track. Have fun!

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Gussie
coonhound mix
8 Months
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Gussie
coonhound mix
8 Months

I live in GA&my husband lives in CA. My pup lived with me in GA until3months ago, when we drove to CA to be together. As Gussie has grown, I have gotten her a larger crate to sleep in, which she has done okay with. But the cage is too big for the bedroom, so I moved it to the living room, close to the bedroom. Since moving the crate 10 days ago, it is a real chore to get her to bed. It’s a 30 minute chore, ending with me picking her up, all 50lbs, and carrying her to bed. She sleeps thru the night, but really seems to dislike this new location. Advice? I thought of bringing her back to the bedroom, in her fluffy bed instead of the cage, but the one night I tried it, she was upa lot, roaming around, a wanted to go out to potty every time I got up to go to the bathroom. Help!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Gussie is doing well considering her age and the changes. I have 2 suggestions to try. Put her crate back in the bedroom and once she starts going in it willingly again and sleeping well, start inching the crate out each night. This will take weeks as you will move it literally only an inch or two a night. After a few weeks, she should be back in the living room but not upset about the change. The second option is to set up an exercise pen area (although your bedroom is limited in space?): https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/how-to-set-up-puppy-long-term-confinement-area. This keeps Gussie confined but she may accept that better than the crate. You can try this in your room or in the living room. To help Gussie like her crate better, take a look at these tips. The Surprise Method may do the trick: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate (you can also apply it to the exercise pen). Make sure that she gets a good walk and maybe some fetch in the evening to tire her out and encourage her to go to bed more willingly. All the best to Gussie and happy training!

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King
Pit bull
20 Months
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King
Pit bull
20 Months

I can get him to sleep in his own bed. He is a rescue dog who was abandoned. And I can’t leave my house without him freaking out.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. It sounds like there may be some separation anxiety going on. Because this behavior issue is complex, I have a lot of information to send you. With some time and practice, this is something that can be turned around over the next month or so. Treating the separation anxiety will also help him with sleeping on his own. He will start to feel more independent. The first step in treating separation anxiety is to break the cycle of anxiety. Every time a dog with separation anxiety becomes anxious when their owner leaves, the distress they feel is reinforced until they become absolutely frantic any time they are left alone. Owners should give the dog an acceptable item to chew, such as a long lasting food treat when they go out. The goal is to have the dog associate this special treat with the owner’s departure. Treats might include hollow bones stuffed with peanut butter or soft cheese, drilled out nylon bones, or hollow rubber chew toys such as Kong toys with similar enhancements (place these in the freezer before giving them to your dog to make them last longer). Give the bone to your dog about 15 minutes before preparing to depart. The chew toy should be used only as a reward to offset the anxiety triggered by your departure. Hiding a variety of these delectable food treats throughout the house may occupy the dog so that the owner’s departure is less stressful. In an effort to prevent destructive behavior, many owners confine their dog in a crate or behind a gate. For dogs that display “barrier frustration,” the use of a crate in this way is counterproductive. Many dogs will physically injure themselves while attempting to escape such confinement. Careful efforts to desensitize and counter condition the dog to crate confinement before leaving them alone may be helpful in some cases. However, some dogs rebel against any form of restraint, including restricting barriers and, for them, crate training may never be a positive experience. Crate training and utilizing the crate while people are home can be a positive way to make the crate a safe place. If you utilize it when people are around, your dog won’t necessarily associate the crate with departure and being left alone. Creating nap time in the crate throughout the day can also be helpful. Building Independence Independence training can help fight separation anxiety and loneliness. Independence training can help build confidence and instill obedience. “Doggie Daycare” or hiring a pet sitter may be a better alternative for dogs that are initially resistant to treatment. It can be expensive, but prices vary. Independence training is one of the more important aspects of the program. It involves teaching your dog to “stand on their own four feet” when you are present, with the express intention that their newfound confidence will spill over into times when you are away. You need to make your dog more independent by reducing the bond between both of you to a more healthy level of involvement. Decreasing the bond is the hardest thing for owners to accept. Most people acquire dogs because they want a strong relationship with them. However, you have to accept that the anxiety your dog experiences in your absence is destructive. Essential components of the independence training program are as follows: Your dog can be with you, but the amount of interaction time should be reduced, especially where attention-seeking behaviors are concerned. You should initiate all interactions with your dog, and they shouldn’t be permitted to demand attention. If you give your dog attention every time they whine, it helps to foster the dog’s dependence on you and increases its anxiety in your absence. You should ignore your dog completely when they engage in attention-seeking behavior, and avoid catering to them when they appear to feel anxious. This means no eye contact, no pushing away, and no soothing talk or body language, all of which will reward their attention-seeking mission. Attention is encouraged only when your dog is sitting or lying calmly. The goal is not to ignore your dog, but to stop reinforcing attention-seeking behaviors so that your dog develops a sense of independence. Minimize the extent to which your dog follows you by teaching them to remain relaxed in one spot, such as their bed. To accomplish this, it is helpful if you train them to perform a sit-stay or down-stay while gradually increasing the time that they hold the command and remain at a distance from you. Providing a treat or toy and encouraging individual play time can be helpful. Once your dog has learned basic obedience commands, you can train them to hold long down-stays while you move progressively farther away. First, your dog should be trained to perform a “down-stay” on a mat or dog bed using a specific command, such as “lie down.” Your dog may have to be gently escorted to the designated spot the first few times. Initially, they should be rewarded every 10 seconds for remaining there, then every 20 seconds, 30 seconds, and so on. Once they have figured out what is wanted, you should switch to an intermittent schedule of reinforcement [reward], as this will strengthen the learned response. Each time your dog breaks their “stay,” issue a verbal correction, indicating that there will be no reward, and then escort them back to their bed. First, your dog can be made to “down-stay” while you are in the room. Next, they can be asked to stay when you are outside of the room, but nearby. The distance and time you are away from your dog can be increased progressively until your dog can remain in a down-stay for 20 to 30 minutes in your absence. Your dog should be warmly praised for compliance. Of course, they need to accept the praise without breaking the stay. Your dog should become accustomed to being separated from you when you are home for varying lengths of time and at different times of day. You can set up child gates to deny your dog access into the room you’re occupying (i.e. reading, watching television, or cooking). Instruct your dog to lie down and stay on a dog bed outside the room. As previously mentioned, you can provide an extended-release food treat or toy to keep your dog calm and distracted. Once they are able to tolerate being separated from you by a child gate, you can graduate to shutting the door to the room so your dog cannot see you. Allowing a dog to sleep in bed with the family can increase dependence. If you decide to prevent your dog from sleeping in your bed, there are some steps to take to establish this routine. First, you need to train your dog to sleep in their own bed on the floor in your bedroom. They may have to be taken to their bed several times before they get the message that you really want them to sleep in their own bed. Alternatively, you can train your dog to enjoy sleeping in a crate to prevent unwanted excursions. Do not use a crate if it causes more anxiety and distress for your dog. Once they tolerate sleeping in their own bed in your bedroom, you can move their bed outside of the bedroom and use a child gate or barrier to keep them out. Always remember to reward your dog with praise or a food treat for remaining in their bed. Develop Departure Techniques Many owners erroneously feel that if separation is so stressful, then they should spend more time with their dog before leaving. Unfortunately, this only exacerbates the condition. Everyone in the family should ignore your dog for 15 to 20 minutes before leaving the house and for at least 10 to 20 minutes after returning home. Alternatively, your leaving can be made a highlight of your dog’s day by making it a “happy time” and the time at which they are fed. Departures should be quick and quiet. When departures (and returns) generate less anxiety (and excitement), your dog will begin to feel less tension in your absence. Remember to reward calm behavior. Teach your dog that your departure and return are just normal parts of the day and are not times to be stressed. You should attempt to randomize the cues indicating that you are preparing to leave. Changing the cues may take some trial and error. Some cues mean nothing to a dog, while others trigger anxiety. Make a list of the things you normally do before leaving for the day (and anxiety occurs) and the things done before a short time out (and no anxiety occurs).Then mix up the cues. For example, if your dog is fine when you go downstairs to do the laundry, you can try taking the laundry basket with you when you leave for work. If your dog becomes anxious when you pick up your keys or put on a coat, you should practice these things when you are not really leaving. You can, for example, stand up, put on a coat or pick up your car keys during television commercials, and then sit down again. You can also open and shut doors while you are home when you do not intend to leave. Entering and exiting through various doors when leaving and returning can also mix up cues for your dog. When you are actually leaving, you should try not to give any cues to this effect. Leave your coat in the car and put your keys in the ignition well before leaving. It is important to randomize all the cues indicating departure (clothing, physical and vocal signals, interactions with family members, other pets, and so on). The planned departure technique can be very effective for some dogs. This program is recommended only under special circumstances because it requires that you never leave your dog alone during the entire retraining period, which can be weeks or months. Timing is everything when implementing this program. If your dog shows signs of anxiety (pacing, panting, barking excessively) the instant you walk out of the door, you should stand outside the door and wait until your dog is quiet for three seconds. Then go back inside quickly and reward your dog for being calm. If you return WHEN your dog is anxious, this reinforces your dog’s tendency to display the behavior, because it has the desired effect of reuniting the “pack” members. The goal is for your dog to connect being calm and relaxed with your return. Gradually work up to slightly longer departures 5 to 10 minutes as long as your dog remains quiet, and continue in this fashion. Eventually, you should be able to leave for the day without your dog becoming anxious when you depart. When performed correctly, this program can be very helpful in resolving separation anxiety. Other Treatment Options Obedience Training Obedience training helps to instill confidence and independence in your dog. You should spend 5 to 10 minutes daily training your dog to obey one-word commands. It may be helpful to have training sessions occur in the room where your dog will be left when you are gone. All positive experiences (food, toys, sleep, training, and attention) should be associated with this area of the home. Exercise Your dog should receive 15 to 20 minutes of sustained aerobic exercise once, preferably twice, per day. It is often helpful to exercise your dog before you leave for the day. Exercise helps to dissipate anxiety and provides constructive interaction between you and your dog. It is best to allow your dog 15 to 20 minutes to calm down before you depart. Fetching a ball is good exercise, as is going for a brisk walk or run with your dog on a leash. Even if your dog has a large yard to run in all day, the aerobic exercise will be beneficial since most dogs will not tire themselves if left to their own devices. This is incredibly helpful in dogs that are working breeds that need a job to expend energy and work their brains. Supplements Recently, supplements have been released to the public that can help dogs with anxiety. Purina created a probiotic that has been shown to reduce anxiety and provide a calming effect on some dogs. Your veterinarian may recommend this product for treating anxiety, or other products that contain L-Theanine or L-tryptophan.

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Jj
Maltipoo
2 Months
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Jj
Maltipoo
2 Months

How do I get him to sleep in his bed. How do I get him to pee and poop in his pee pad?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Barbara, Check out the Surprise method from the article I have linked below. That method can be used with an exercise pen or crate. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Check out the Exercise Pen method or Crate Training method from the article linked below. Those methods can be used with a pee pad instead of a litter box like it mentions also. You can also use a disposable real grass pad if pup isn't attracted to the pee pads. https://wagwalking.com/training/litter-box-train-a-chihuahua-puppy Grass pads: www.Freshpatch.com www.doggielawn.com www.porchpotty.com Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lady
Cross breed
3 Years
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Lady
Cross breed
3 Years

When we first got lady she slept through the night now she keeps waking up jumps of my bed so I bring her downstairs let her out for toilet then back to bed but then she wants to play and mess around she finally settles but she never used to do this but now its every night how can I break this

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emma, If it's been less than 8 hours since pup went potty and pup is reliable with potty training, I would ignore pup, crating pup or sending them out of the room when they wake you before it's been 8 hours. If it's been 8 hours, I would take pup potty on a leash, keeping the trip as boring as possible, then come back inside and crate pup until time to get up. This allows pup to go potty if they truly need to but takes all the fun out of the wake up so pup isn't so motivated to wake up when they really only want to play. Don't with a lot of attention, any treats, any play, or feed breakfast until it's the time you want pup to begin sleeping until again. Surprise method for crate training - only reward in the crate during the daytime practice, not in the early morning. https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Eloise
Maltese
4 Months
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Eloise
Maltese
4 Months

Eloise has been trained to use pee pads and she has kept to this and because of this I don’t lick her crate at night but getting her to sleep in her bed at night is a problem. I am able to lure her into her bed which is in her crate with treats but after 2 mins she comes back out and eventually sleeps on the floor through the night. I am wondering if I should start locking up her crate once I lead her in to sleep for the night. Will be glad to get an answer. Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
842 Dog owners recommended

Hello David, Most dogs will choose to sleep outside of a crate unless they have developed a long term habit of sleeping in one. Because of the possibility of pup chewing something that could be dangerous at this age, and the potential future need for pup to be confined in a crate with the door closed as an adult, it would be beneficial to get pup to be in there with the door closed. I would either teach pup to stay in the crate with the door closed, by following the Surprise method during the day, skipping to the part where you begin closing the door, and ignoring any protesting to get out of the crate at night, unless it's been at least three hours and pup needs a potty trip, to help pup learn to stay inside. Or, I would at least set up an exercise pen with pup's crate attached so pup has the option of going inside, with a pee pad in the exercise pen area. Pup may still choose not to sleep in the crate, but they also won't be able to chew anything they shouldn't that way and they will be more likely to choose to sleep in there with the pen present. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate If I were you, I would work on the Surprise method during the day right now, have pup sleep in the exercise pen/crate set up at night to prevent chewing, then in another month or two when pup can hold their bladder all night and they are used to being in the crate with the door closed from daytime practice, I would close the door to the crate all night and have pup sleep in there to complete the training. Whatever you do, do not put the pee pad inside the crate though. Doing that will teach pup to pee in crates and make it so that whenever pup is confined somewhere like the vets or in a crate in the car, pup will automatically pee on themselves in one, even if there isn't a pee pad in there. You want the crate itself to be a pee free area where pup attempts to hold their bladder. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bleu
French Bulldog
6 Months
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Bleu
French Bulldog
6 Months

Since having our first dog we have tried to train her as best as we could, and we thought we were doing really well with her.

We trained her to go toilet on her mat in her room, she was great with that until recently she now poo’s and wee’s anywhere she feels like in her bedroom. She is 6 months so may be due to heat, could this be a reason?

More about Bleu:
She eats 3 meals per day, with water left to the side for her to drink throughout the day.
Final feed/water is at 7pm, then we take her outside for a toilet and put her down at 8pm and then she wakes up around 8am.

What can we do to stop her going toilet wherever she likes?

Thank you,
James

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
227 Dog owners recommended

Hello. It sounded like something disrupted her bathroom habits. External as well as internal factors can affect this. Her first heat cycle could be the case here. So essentially you will want to start completely over with potty training as if she were a brand new puppy. Treats for going potty in the appropriate area, not letting her free roam until she goes to the bathroom where you want, and not giving her unlimited access to water. You can also reduce her meal times to twice a day if that is something that works for you. Dogs typically need to eliminate within about 20 minutes of eating, so that will cut down on one more potty break during the day.

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