How to Train Your Dog to Stay in an Unfenced Yard

Hard
2-4 Months
Behavior

Introduction

Keeping your dog safe while in your unfenced yard is imperative to owning a dog on a large property or having a dog in a home without fencing. Your neighbors may not want your dog on their property and many homes in rural areas have a lot of yard space but no fences to mark these boundaries. There are dangers in having a dog in an unfenced yard as well. Numerous dogs are hit by cars every day because they are allowed to roam freely near roads or driveways. Keep your dog safe and protected by keeping him on your property. 

Respecting your neighbors’ property as well as their pets or livestock is simple with training your dog to stay in your yard, even if it does not have a fence. Teaching your dog his boundaries will keep him home, or at least in your yard and out of harm’s way, as well as out of trouble.

Defining Tasks

Training your dog to stay in an unfenced yard is basic boundary training. You will be showing your dog his boundaries, where he can go, how far away he can be from your or your home, and where he is not allowed to go. Boundary training takes time and repetition. To teach your dog his boundaries, you will need time and patience. Be sure to practice this training every day. You will start by showing him the far boundaries of your unfenced yard and then work up to challenging him not to cross that invisible line as he gets used to your expectations. This might be a difficult task at first, but remember to repeat this training each day, several times a day, in short sessions to get your dog to understand and remember the rules around the border. 

Getting Started

Be sure to use some high-value tasty treats for rewards and to entice your dog when necessary. You will need a leash for early training. Be sure to have the proper collar and/or harness as well, depending on your dog’s size. At least one method uses marker flags. These can be found at your neighborhood hardware store. Temporary flags can mark the border line so your dog can see the visual line and begin to make a connection to your expectations with the border. Have patience and dedicate time for this training. It may take several weeks to be able to leave your dog unattended in your unfenced yard. 

The Perimeter Method

Most Recommended
3 Votes
Step
1
Walk the border
Walk with your dog on a leash along the perimeter of your yard several times a day for a few days. While walking the perimeter, point toward the ground on your way around so your dog can visually see his boundary. You can also mark this area with flags, but it’s not necessary.
Step
2
Boundary
After a few days, stop pointing to the perimeter and begin a sweeping motion with your arm so your dog can see the perimeter of his boundary line. Do this walk with your dog at least four times a day for a few days. Your dog should begin to stop at the boundary line and not cross.
Step
3
Commands
Once you have spent about a week showing your dog his boundary line, begin to go to the line with your dog and start commands. Beginning with sit, have your dog sit in various places at the border line on your property.
Step
4
Stay
After practicing sitting on the line, start using the stay command while at the border of your property. To challenge your pup, you can cross the line yourself while having the dog stay on his side.
Step
5
Leave it
Back on your property, take your dog on the same daily walks and use ‘leave it’ as you get to the line. If your dog is not familiar with the leave it command, it may take another week or so using this command for your dog to connect and understand he is to leave anything on the other side of the line alone.
Step
6
Treat challenge
Once your dog understands the 'leave it' command as it relates to the the property line, begin tossing treats onto the opposite side of the property line and use the leave it command. Your dog should refrain from going after the treats. Once he is successful, you can offer him a different treat. On the other hand, on your way back around your property line walk, you can cross the line using the ‘stay’ command and get the treats for your dog from the other side.
Recommend training method?

The Help from Friends Method

Effective
3 Votes
Step
1
Commands
Train your dog basic commands such as ‘stay,’ ‘come,’ and leave it.’
Step
2
Walk
Once he knows those commands, begin to take him for a leash walk along your property line. If your dog tries to cross over the line, gently tug the leash or stop walking so he is stopped in her tracks.
Step
3
Treat
Once he responds and comes back to you, offer him a treat.
Step
4
Recruit a friend
Ask a friend to run quickly across your yard crossing the property line. If your dog doesn’t chase, offer him a treat. If he does try to follow, stop or shorten the leash to keep him on the correct side. You can also use the ‘leave it’ command.
Step
5
Toys
Continue to use a friend to help you by tossing a ball or toy over the boundary line. Use the ‘leave it’ command to keep your dog on the line, not crossing over. Give him a treat once you realize he is not interested in crossing the line.
Step
6
Play
Once your dog is used to this imaginary line, try having your dog outside off leash. Play with him and toss toys on the other side of the line every so often as you play.
Step
7
Reward
Be sure to reward your dog as he learns where his boundaries are.
Recommend training method?

The Boundary Training Method

Least Recommended
1 Vote
Step
1
Clicker
Using a clicker, teach your dog to recognize flags and then place them along the boundary line.
Step
2
Flag line
Buy utility marking flags from your local hardware store and place them along the invisible boundary line where you would like your dog to stay. Consider placing these inside your property line if possible so if your dog crosses, he has room for safety while staying off someone else’s property.
Step
3
Indoor flags
Using two flags indoors, teach your dog to recognize a flag by exploring and clicking when your dog acknowledges the flags. Show your dog a flag, let her sniff and touch her nose to it. Click and treat when she touches the flag.
Step
4
Separate flags
Put two flags apart from one another a few feet apart. Walk your dog to the flags and let her touch them with her nose. Each time she touches the flags, click and treat.
Step
5
Further
Keep moving the flags further apart and continue to practice getting your dog to recognize and touch her nose to the flags. As you move them further, you may need to walk with her to each flag for her to notice it.
Step
6
Name it
You can give the flags or the border a name such as ‘border’ so she recognizes the flags’ name and will connect that with her boundaries later. Practice inside with the flags in different areas for about a week before moving outside.
Step
7
Border line
Outside, place your flags about ten feet apart along the border you’d like your dog to respect. Walk the property line with your dog using the name you’ve given the flags. Be sure to click and treat each time she touches her nose to the flags. She should recognize and touch each flag as you pass. If she is distracted, you may need to use a leash for the first few weeks.
Step
8
Off-leash
Continue to practice taking your dog off-leash once she’s used to recognizing the flags and touching them. As she does better, spread the flags out more and walk with her off-leash. Click and treat each time she touches the flags.
Step
9
Practice
Continue to practice with your dog taking flags away as she trains. Over time, you will be able to take the border flags away and your dog should know her boundaries.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Stephanie Plummer

Published: 10/26/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Baylee
German Shepherd
1 Year
2 found helpful
Question
2 found helpful
Baylee
German Shepherd
1 Year

Baylee chases other dogs making her leave her yard. She won’t listen

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Beverly, I suggest you work on her "Come" and "Leave It" commands before having her off leash. Practice her "Come" command and "Leave It" command in a public location such as outside a dog park or regular park, where there are lots of other dogs area but enough space to avoid up close interactions. Use a long leash for this and work on enforcing her "Come" by reeling her in with the long leash when she ignores you. Practice this until she can be running toward another dog to say hi and when you tell her to come she will turn around mid-run and run back toward you. In order for her to listen in your yard, she needs to have had opportunities to practice coming and listening around high level distractions at other times when you are able to enforce the command. Generally working toward off leash obedience with her by using a long thirty foot leash, and eventually a lightweight fifty foot leash, will help to ensure obedience when it is most important. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mac
weimeraner
1 Year
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Mac
weimeraner
1 Year

We need him to stop digging and getting out of the fence

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Hayden, I suggest either burying chicken wire at the bottom of your fence, deep enough that pup can't dig under it, or installing an electric fence two feet inside your physical fence, to teach pup to stay away from the boundary lines of the physical fence in general. You can also try other approaches to teach pup to stay away from the fence when you are present, but the two measures I mentioned will enforce the training even when you aren't with pup, if that's when the issue is mostly happening. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Peanut
Blue Heeler
1 Year
0 found helpful
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Peanut
Blue Heeler
1 Year

My in laws have had Peanut since she was a puppy and unfortunately due to her highly active breed, my in-laws, being an older pair, just can't handle her excessive chewing and hyperactive behavior . We have offered to take peanut in and I'm looking to train her to stay in the yard. She was only kept outside in a 12 by 12 fenced in area. She has a sweet temperament but the poor girl is just bored and not exercised like she should be. She also chews on everything. Tips on how to deal with that would be appreciated as well.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Julie, Check out the video below for a demonstration of how to teach boundaries. I also suggest when your dog steps over the boundary line, telling them "Ah Ah" and moving toward them until they back up onto the correct side of the boundary line. Many dogs learn fastest if you reward for correct behavior, tell them when they do something correct (by using a clicker for praising right when the dog does something correctly), and by calmly telling them No or Ah ah when they are not correct. Boundary training video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuTh47i3hOY For the chewing, check out the article linked below: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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N/A
Australian Shepherd
8 Weeks
0 found helpful
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N/A
Australian Shepherd
8 Weeks

Hello, I’m getting an aussie puppy in June & wanted to get a head start on what I’m going to need to do to train her to stay in my yard. we live along an interstate with a decent fence separating & nothing but fields surrounding but still want to be cautious! What is the best method of training to train the pup to stay in the yard?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Cassie, I suggest using the "Help from Friends" method to teach boundaries. Also, be aware that at this age she will probably want to stay pretty close to you and stay inside your boundaries decently well with training. When she reaches adolescence and becomes more independent, curious and less nervous about leaving your side that is when she is likely to start wandering off the most. Do the training with her while she is little to keep her safe, but then repeat the training to remind her and reinforce the rules over the next couple of years as she grows up and wants to test limits even more, also. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Nova
Australian Shepherd
3 Months
0 found helpful
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0 found helpful
Nova
Australian Shepherd
3 Months

We have an unfenced big yard. How do I train my 3 month old puppy to stay in the boundaries? How old should she be before I can let her out alone? Thanks.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question about Nova. My first suggestion is to discuss with Nova's vet, the vaccine schedule and when it will be safe to take her to positive reinforcement obedience training. A dog without strong recall skills and bonding with the owner is not safe in an unfenced yard. I do have hesitation personally, with letting a dog outside on their own at any age, due to the hazards of cars, aggressive dogs in the area, and dog theft. You could look into underground fencing as a precaution. Or, accompany Nova when she goes outside and use that time to play fetch or other stimulating games. Australian Shepherds love to work and are very quick learners - perhaps set up an agility course and use the time outside to do that. Your bond with each other will grow and she'll be safe under your care. This is a guide on teaching boundary training as well: https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-within-boundaries. Good luck and enjoy your dog!

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queenie
Border Collie
2 Years
1 found helpful
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1 found helpful
queenie
Border Collie
2 Years

We have 4 acres all fenced in. But we have a power gate at the driveway and she will not stay inside the gate when we try to leave. We just got her and she is very clingy with people and wants to be with us. We have 4 fenced in areas that we could put her in for the day, but we really want her to be able to roam with the other dog we have.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sarah, I suggest looking into pet barrier devices if the issue is only at the gate. A pet barrier device is a bit like an electric fence for a small area. The device is setup in the area where you don't want pup to go, then the range is set so that the dog is corrected with the corresponding collar if they get within a certain distance of the device. As long as the dog stays away from that area they won't be corrected in the rest of the yard though. Is pup only getting out when the gate opens for your vehicle or is the gate wide enough that pup can get out through the bars even after the gate closes? If pup is just slipping out when your car leaves, I suggest using a pet barrier device setup right at the gate to keep pup back from the gate while your car is going through. If pup can get through the gate after it's closed also, I suggest also modifying the gate so that there are not large gaps she can fit through so that the gate will be less of a temptation in general. One example of a pet barrier device: https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petcostore/product/you-and-me-white-food-storage-bin-small-2541986?cm_mmc=PPC-GG-_-PTC_P_SUP_LIA-GG_FY19_SBU04_Supplies_BOPIS-_-76654999654-_-A&kpid=go_6481492731_76654999654_381033017427_pla-750811487164_c&utm_config=tad0iunwp&utm_campaign=PTC_P_SUP_LIA-GG_FY19_SBU04_Supplies_BOPIS&utm_source=google&gclid=Cj0KCQiAiZPvBRDZARIsAORkq7fVoSe1CLNjQcAiZ8OzQ9hMn0brSMPy0Ckwk8PNqaZo9lVa_PV_zf4aAtBuEALw_wcB Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Harley
German Shepard mixed
2 Years
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Harley
German Shepard mixed
2 Years

Almost every night and early morning Harley barks constantly she barks at thing in are woods. Harley is very protective of us but her barking prevents us from sleeping and we don’t know how to get her to stop barking we’ve tried clicker training but after a while she started to ignore it

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, It sounds like she is outside and barking when you are not present. If pup is with you, there are a lot of options, but if pup is by herself outside and barking, you will need a way to enforce the quietness without having to be present. A stimulation based bark collar is usually the best option for this outside. Teach pup the Quiet command and practice Quiet during the day while you are there. When pup knows Quiet, add the bark collar, then wait until she finds something to bark at when you are around. When she barks, command quiet and the collar should automatically correct her. Tell her "Ah Ah" and interrupt her if she doesn't stop barking when corrected (to show her that she should stop to stop the correction), and reward with treats if she does stop on her own after the correction and Quiet command. Practicing with her and teaching Quiet helps her understand why the bark collar is correcting her and gives an opportunity for her to choose quietness and earn treats. This makes the training more fair and more likely for the collar to be effective when you aren't present too. When she is in situations where she would normally bark and she doesn't due to the training, reward with treats. Once pup understands the training, have pup wear the bark collar at night. Be sure it is fitted according to directions or it will not work. I suggest only using high quality bark collars that have levels you can adjust. For a manual level, start on the lowest setting and see how pup does. Gradually increase the levels until you find a level pup indicates in any way that that she feels, that will be the level to use. Once the collar is set to that level, it should correct at that level each time she barks, instead of starting at the lowest level and gradually rising - starting at the lowest can sound good in theory but often allows dogs to get into the habit of barking several times before becoming quiet, instead of staying quiet. Also, be aware that if she is outside in an area where wild animals could enter the yard, she might need her bark to keep herself safe. If that's the case, the best option would be to take her inside at night to sleep in a crate where she can't watch out the windows to bark - unless pup is guarding livestock - in which case the barking at night might also be necessary and moving the livestock further from your home might be better - so that she can still guard them without disturbing you or others. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Mork and Mindy
Australian shelherd and chocolate lab cross
9 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Mork and Mindy
Australian shelherd and chocolate lab cross
9 Months

Our dogs are a brother and sister. They are neutered and spayed. We live on a farm, unfenced. They have started running to neighbouring farms, several miles away. How do we train them to stay home? We are seniors and my husband can’t walk well, so I will have to do the training.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rachel, I suggest following the "Recruit Help from Friends method" from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-in-an-unfenced-yard Because pups are so motivated to leave by interesting things nextdoor, I would also do some remote collar training in addition to the above method. First, learn how to fit the collars correctly by watching the video below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI figure out pup's "working level" on your e-collar, which is the lowest level that dog responds to at all - indicating they can feel the collar at all. Check out the video linked below on how to find this level and go through this protocol for each dog. Finding their Working Level - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Next, walk pup, one dog at a time around your perimeter. Each time they approach the boundary line (which I would use property flags to mark well so pup's can visually remember and you will be consistent), use your leash to reel them back toward you, back inside the property line while at the same time pushing the stimulation button on the remote collar while pup is on the wrong side of the boundary line - as soon as pup gets back on the correct side of the boundary line, the correct stops and pup is praised. When pup begins to avoid going over the boundary line, you can also give treats for staying on the correct side. This will involve a lot of walking. Pup's will need to do this a lot, each dog separately, one at a time at first around the entire property line. Once pup's have learned the lesson well. You can go for a walk near the boundary line with the dogs off-leash and correct with the remote training collar if they cross the boundary during the walk - showing them that they still can't cross while off leash either. While you are still training the dogs you will need to physically keep them on your property using leashes and such so that they aren't running across the boundary line when you aren't ready - that will ruin your training. They need to be corrected consistently for crossing the boundary lines while you show them what they are supposed to be doing using the long leash (if you just correct and skip the long leash part they will likely run away and not toward you because they won't understand at first why they are being corrected - reeling them in with the leash and stopping the correction as soon as they are on the correct side of the boundary helps them learn to come back over to your side of the line). Another, easier option that will likely be even more effective if it's an option financially will be installing an electric fence around your property. You will still need to walk them around the boundary using a long leash and reel them back to your side of the boundary line when they cross to show them how to stop the correction - but the collars from the electric fence will enforce the correction for you and will be very consistent in correcting pups for crossing the boundary when you aren't around - making the training more effective and probably quicker for you. With electric fences, use flags to mark the boundary also and because your property is large, don't remove the flags later - keep them in place a s a reminder since you don't have a physical fence to remind pups. Don't skip walking the boundary with pups and teaching pup to avoid the electric fence - many people skip that part and it can ruin training for electric fences because dogs cross, then run and don't know how to stop the correction by returning - pups need to learn to return to make the correction stop so that they understand how to avoid the correction by not crossing the boundary. Reward pups with treats for not crossing. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Sky
German Shepherd
4 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Sky
German Shepherd
4 Months

So I am getting my dog tomorrow and we have a neighbor close by that has a dog that constantly stays in our yard and also roams free everywhere else. We previously had a dog that was a rescue and I just couldn’t seem to get him to stay in the yard without wanting to run off with the neighbors dog. Trying to break this trend. What should I do?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, thank you for the question. The most important thing I can say after reading your information is to remember that Sky is only 4 months old and should not be outside alone until much training has taken place and boundaries are set. Firstly, take Sky to dog obedience classes as a fun way to establish a strong and healthy bond between the two of you. Once Sky knows "sit, stay, come" and has the recall commands down pat then you can try being out and about in the yard with Sky off-leash. I would use the "Help From Friends" method and practice over and over. Using the long leash to establish the boundaries is key. Patience is a necessity, and praise and rewards are going to let Sky know that listening brings great benefits. I would provide your pup with plenty of stimulating toys, a source of water, and a place to rest to make home the best place to be. Play with your pup in the yard often so that Sky knows you are there and interested. This may dissuade seeking adventure elsewhere. Good luck!

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Bowie
Rotti mix
6 Years
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Bowie
Rotti mix
6 Years

We live in the country with many open acres of farm and pastureland, some of which we own. We have accumulated 7 rescue dogs of various sizes, ages, breeds.
I am sad to admit that though we should have fenced in a portion of our property, we have not because we did not have close neighbors. Now we have one. Unless we can fence in a large portion of acreage, do you think it is possible to train my dogs, after may years, of running free? Of course you know nothing of my dogs temperments but my real question is:

is it possible with success to retrain a dog to respect boundaries after years of none???

We have investigated the underground fencing but I am just not convinced they are the answer. I realize this would take much time as I would need to work with each dog.

Thank you very much.
Adele

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Adele, I suspect some of the dogs can learn and others may continue to struggle. You touched on it: I don't know your dogs temperaments...Very determined dogs, intact males with stronger urges to roam, and highly prey driven dogs are far more likely to struggle than dogs that naturally tend to stay closer to their person - like a herding breed or retriever opposed to a scent hound or husky. If your dogs are not intact males, very determined/driven dogs, or highly prey driven, then you have a good chance of success with work and a lot of consistency. You will likely need to use a remote electric collar (e-collar) to proof the boundary training after the dogs have learned though. This device is different than an electric fence. A remote training collar only goes stimulates the dog when you push the button and you control the stimulation level. It should be used in combination with tons of practice and teaching the dogs one by one where the boundary line is beforehand, like you mentioned. You can then practice calling the dog away from the line from further and further away while he is wearing the e-collar and correcting with the e-collar if he disobeys. The correction should not be a high-dangerous correction. You want to use the lowest level that each dog responds to, called a working level, and each dog's working level will be unique to him. Using an e-collar this way is simply a way to improve your own consistency - to teach the dog that you will enforce your rule even from a distance or from hiding somewhere nearby. The dog is then corrected for disobedience and understands the correction because you already spent time teaching him the boundary before you used the collar while he was on a leash beforehand. This gives him control of the situation and a choice to obey or disobey, rather than a random correction. I suggest setting up markers around your boundary line, like the ones used for training a dog not to go past an underground fence, and then leave them up since your property is large. For the e-collar training, you may want to hire a professional to teach you how to use the collar correctly, how to find a dog's working level, and train the boundaries with it. You can then teach the other dogs by yourself if you wish. Be careful who you hire and which collar that you buy. Garmin, SportDog, Dogtra, E-collar Technologies are good brands. Avoid lesser known, cheap collars - they can be dangerous. A good collar has a minimum of ten levels. Ideally, a good collar should have sixty or more. E-collar technologies mini educator has 100 levels - letting you use the perfect level for each dog without going too high. Another option is to put up a visual fence, that is less secure or shorter, and put an underground electric fence two feet in front of the visual fence, on your side of the fence. This scenario will ultimately depend on the electric fence to stop the dogs instead of just the small fence, but it will increase the likelihood of the electric fence working and the dog's respecting it because there is a physical barrier - however weak, that the dogs cannot just bolt through. The real fence will serve as a reminder that there is an electric fence - making the electric fence more effective and more fair to the dogs. Of course the final option is to just put up a fence tall enough to contain all the dogs. You will have to decide which of the options I mentioned sound best knowing your dogs and your property and financial goals. I wish you the best! Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Soren
Labrador Retriever
3 Months
0 found helpful
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Soren
Labrador Retriever
3 Months

We have an unfenced yard and are out in the yard leash training him. I had been told before not to take him for a walk in our neighborhood, because it changes the dogs territory and they wander more. Is this true? We have other neighbors who walk their dogs and I don't see them wandering, but I want to do the right thing for him. Thanks!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Erika, Socialization is extremely important for a puppy and exposure to things in your neighborhood is a large part of socialization, so I wouldn't refrain from taking him for a walk; with that said, it will make boundary training harder, but any good boundary trained dog typically leaves their yard often on leash. You simply have to spend additional time teach pup where the boundaries are, not to leave the yard unless they are given permission and with you - which means using a command like "Heel" or "Okay" as you cross that threshold each time, enforcing pup not wandering off while still in the training process - which means using a long leash to enforce training while working up to an off-leash level, and working on teaching pup to stay close to you in general through things like rewarding automatic following and automatic attention while outside with you on a long leash, and practicing commands like Come and Down-Stay with you in the yard while on a long leash. You want pup to learn to stay in the yard because it's your rule and they have learned to listen to you and your leadership. Know that not taking your pup for a walk doesn't necessarily mean that they won't leave the yard any better, if other training with obedience commands and encouraging staying near you isn't also done. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Willow
Golden Retriever
11 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Willow
Golden Retriever
11 Months

My yard has a fence, but my golden retriever puppy can slip under it. My yard is pretty big, but it’s right next to a very busy road. We have practiced recall diligently but she gets distracted outside and runs off. We’d like to use tone/vibration/shock collar training to keep her from running off from us and out of the yard. I’ve Googled and You Tubed several different methods of training with the collar. Which do you you recommend?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Trista, Check out the James Penrith from Take the Lead Dog Training. I suggest training similarly to how he uses e-collars for off-leash obedience. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoxuNKpmUs390K7x_rvgjcg Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Keta
German Shepherd Heeler mix
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Keta
German Shepherd Heeler mix
1 Year

My dog will find a way to escape our 2 acre fenced in property . She wanders and sees a stranger. She acts super friendly and will then go up to them follow them, and go home with them.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it is pretty hard to monitor Keta when she has 2 acres to roam over - that is wonderful for a dog, but the fact that she escapes is not so good. I would check the perimeter inch by inch for escape holes. Ask the neighbors if they have seen her scale a fence or anything like that. The only thing I can recommend training-wise is to work on her recall method - perfect it. Then, call her often so that she expects to have to come home at any given time. The Advanced Skills for a quick recall:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-come-back. If you have not already, license, ID tag and microchip Keta as well. Good luck!

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JJ
cattle dog mix
4 Years
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JJ
cattle dog mix
4 Years

I adopted my dog jj a little over a month ago from a rescue in Georgie. He's a beautiful, loving dog but tends to pull while walking on a leash and has gotten free chasing deer and run off our property. The first time he did it, I was terrified and searched for ~40 minutes but he ended up coming back on his own. He has done it twice since then and always makes his way back but I have a heart attack each time. I was wondering if its possibly to train him to stay in the yard even though it's not fenced in?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katie, You can boundary train a dog, but with a dog with a strong prey drive I wouldn't recommend relying solely on that anytime soon. Check out James Penrith from TakeTheLeadDogTraining. He has a free YouTube channel and works with live stock chasing dogs and off-leash training. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Zeke
Australian Shepherd
12 Weeks
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Zeke
Australian Shepherd
12 Weeks

I want to train Zeke to nit leave our unfenced yard

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sheila, I would start by following the "Recruit Help from Friends method" from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-in-an-unfenced-yard Once pup is older than 6 months, you may also need to do some remote collar training in addition to the above method. First, learn how to fit the collars correctly by watching the video below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Figure out pup's "working level" on your e-collar, which is the lowest level that dog responds to at all - indicating they can feel the collar at all. Check out the video linked below on how to find this level and go through this protocol for each dog. Finding their Working Level - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Next, walk pup around your perimeter. Each time they approach the boundary line (which I would use property flags to mark well so pup's can visually remember and you will be consistent), use your leash to reel them back toward you, back inside the property line while at the same time pushing the stimulation button on the remote collar while pup is on the wrong side of the boundary line - as soon as pup gets back on the correct side of the boundary line, the correct stops and pup is praised. When pup begins to avoid going over the boundary line, you can also give treats for staying on the correct side. This will involve a lot of walking. Pup's will need to do this a lot at first around the entire property line. Once pup has learned the lesson well, you can go for a walk near the boundary line with the dog off-leash and correct with the remote training collar if they cross the boundary during the walk - showing them that they still can't cross while off leash either. While you are still training you will need to physically keep them on your property using leashes and such so that they aren't running across the boundary line when you aren't ready - that will ruin your training. They need to be corrected consistently for crossing the boundary lines while you show them what they are supposed to be doing using the long leash (if you just correct and skip the long leash part they will likely run away and not toward you because they won't understand at first why they are being corrected - reeling them in with the leash and stopping the correction as soon as they are on the correct side of the boundary helps them learn to come back over to your side of the line). I wouldn't recommend any e-collar training until older than 6 months though, and if pup isn't a wanderer you may find you never need it at all and the "Recruit a friend" method and obedience training is enough. Other things that can encourage pup to stay close by are come and rewarding automatic following. Check out the Reel In method from the article linked below. Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall More Come - pay attention to the PreMack Principle and long leash training sections especially once pup has learned what Come initially means. These need to be practiced around all types of distractions like dogs and kids at the park to ensure pup is reliable before attempting true off leash. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Another activity you can practice is walking around places like your yard or a field with pup on the long training leash and changing directions frequently without saying anything. Whenever he takes notice (at first because the leash finally tugs, but later just because you moved), then toss a treat at him for looking your way or coming over to you - without calling him; this encourages him to choose to pay attention to where you are and associate your presence with good things on his own, so he will want to be with you. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Ghost
American Bulldog
2 Years
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Ghost
American Bulldog
2 Years

We have tried putting a fence up and he continually runs off outside the fence. We have tried teaching him borders and he does t seem to care. He learned sit and shake relitively quickly but stay, leave it, and the boundaries of our property are apparently a bit much. We have tried focusing on only one but he still has no interest in further learning. Any advice?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Teaching boundaries is the best route to go with this and it can take months to learn. Without being able to ask follow up questions, I hope I am not giving you information you have already tried. Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary. If you feel you have done all of this, and your dog still isn't staying inside the boundaries, you can look into invisible fence options. Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Ollie
burnese/shepard cross
16 Months
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Ollie
burnese/shepard cross
16 Months

Ollie is male and I need to know when to have him fixed.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Now is a good time. Veterinarians all have different recommendations, but most recommend an age between 4 and 9 months.

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Eevee
unknow
11 Months
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Eevee
unknow
11 Months

Hello, I live in the countryside with really big space, it is fenced but with big spaces and the dog can easily sneak out. My dog arrived on january with 4 months and I also have an older dog that can behave , on march my neighbor (who is my grandma that have her house inside the property) adopted a puppy 2 months who has become friends with Eevee and they roam around the property together but lately they started to go farther to another neighboor who has sheep and lambs. So I am pretty worried i need to start to training the barriers , my house has a fence but the full property has anothers, I think I just will train my dog for the closest fence to the house because it will take forever to teach the actual limits of the property. So my biggest cocern is , if it will work to do the training only with Eevee, the older dog sometimes goes around the property but he knows his boundaries, the little puppy from my grandma can come and play inside the yard. So the other 2 dogs would go out the yard , could Eevee resist not to follow them ?? What would you recommend? Should i trained the 3 dogs? (that need to be separatley?). I really would appreciate an advice, thank you.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. I think it would be best for everyone if you trained boundaries with all 3 of them. Eevee might not be able to resist going along with the other ones. Especially if they are being playful. You don't want to set Eevee up for failure. You can attempt to train all 3 together. You may need to start with the individually, and then move towards doing all 3 at the same time.

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Ginger
Labrador Retriever
3 Years
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Ginger
Labrador Retriever
3 Years

She won’t stay in our yard. She always tries to go down the road and in the taller grass where we don’t cut with the lawnmower. And then when I they to get her in or play with her she will just run off even more.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, to start, I would work on taking her on a leashed walk every day (a lengthy one) . Work on the heel command as described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Use either the Turns Method or the Stop and Go Method. The time spent training to heel will be like a play time for Ginger, all the while you are working on building respect from her. Start obedience training as well. Dogs love a challenge and love to train! This will bring you and Ginger closer together: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-to-be-obedient. Once you have these skills under control, you can work on Ginger's recall. This is an excellent guide - read the entire guide for tips that will teach her to come back when you call: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-come-back. Lastly, you can work to teach Ginger boundaries for the yard: https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-within-boundaries. Happy training!

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Willow
Golden Retriever
1 Year
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Willow
Golden Retriever
1 Year

I live outside of a small town and Willow has been running off (taking neighbor friends every time). We do not have a fenced area to put her in. She goes far enough to reach a street or busy gas station. The problem is that her boundary is very large and not consistent because we take them for rides on the four wheeler outside of what could be a boundary. How can I train her that it is okay to go outside of the boundary when she is with me but not when she is alone.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this is a challenging question! With the four wheeler ventures outside of the boundaries, it may get confusing. But I agree that something must be done. Making her way to a busy gas station or street raises the risk of being hit by a car or of theft of your dog. She is a popular breed, too. Try the Reinforcing Boundaries Method as described here. Read the entire guide to see what method may work for Willow: https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-within-boundaries. You may want to consider an invisible fence if you will be letting her out on her own. Spending time with Willow outside of your home, training and treating her on the property may give her a sense of home, but to prevent her from running off will take work every day on your part. I hope the guide helps - you can also hire a trainer to come and work on your property as well, and you will get the tools needed to work on your specific environment. Good luck!

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Roman
German Shepherd
8 Weeks
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Roman
German Shepherd
8 Weeks

What method is most effective to train pup to learn boundary area of a 1 acre, non-fenced yard. Is the clicker method more effective than a collar with tone, vibration and static/shock?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I am not a fan of deterrent collars but I do have a guide to share that has methods for teaching boundaries: https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-within-boundaries. I especially like the Reinforcing Boundaries Method because it gives the dog a visual that is easily remembered. The Wait Method is another good one and is described in the guide also. Be sure to take Roman to obedience classes to instill the bond with you that will have him coming to you when called. Work on his Recall also: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-come-back. The methods are all fantastic. A stellar recall will make the boundaries training easier, too. Good luck!

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Oscar
Treeing Walker Coonhound
6 Years
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Oscar
Treeing Walker Coonhound
6 Years

He will not go to the bathroom in our backyard he wants to go everywhere else help

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Often when adult dogs have potty training issues, I tell people to just start completely over with potty training as if your dog were a puppy. This usually solves the problem in a few weeks or less. I am going to send you quite a bit of info on potty training. It is geared towards puppies, but the process is the same. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior.

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Windsor
Golden Retriever
1 Year
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Windsor
Golden Retriever
1 Year

He always used to listen when he was called for, and he always used to stay out of the neighboring yard and the upper level in out house, but this past week he won't listen and he's always running over to the neighbors no matter how much we holler for him. Now my folks have told me to tell him no whenever he does something like that and to bat him on the nose but I just don't feel comfortable with doing that. I don't know what to do.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Younger adult dogs often struggle to retain learned behaviors. It is just something that happens until they are completely mature. The best thing to do in this scenario is to refresh his recall. You may have to practice in this setting, so he refreshes quickly. Recall: STAGE ONE – 'Catching' or Charging Up the 'Come' Cue Start in a distraction free environment so that your dog can focus only on you. Whenever your puppy or dog is coming to you on his own, wait until he is a couple of feet from you and then say his name and the word 'come.' When he gets to you, make a big fuss. With this exercise, your dog will learn that coming to you is a really good thing. After a while, you can lengthen the distance between you and start using the word when he is coming to you from a greater distance. Coming to you should always be rewarded, whatever the circumstance and no matter how long it took your dog to respond. Motivate your dog to come by being exciting, running away from him, waving a toy, or having delicious food for him when he gets to you. This will show him that coming back to you the best thing he can do. STAGE TWO – Solidifying the Cue Through Play Make sure you play the Back and Forth game with another person that your dog is comfortable with. Start the game in a quiet environment so it is easy for your dog to focus on you. Hold your dog back while the other person calls him excitedly. Try not to use his name or the cue word but talk excitedly to ‘gee’ him up. Do not release him until the person calls his name followed by the cue word “come.” When the cue word is given, release your dog and let him go running to the person calling. As soon as he reaches them they should praise and reward him with a game of tug or a food reward. When your dog has had his reward, have the other person hold him back as you call him and release as you say his name followed by the cue word. When he comes to you reward him with another game of tug or food reward. Repeat this game back and forth but only do a few repetitions so your dog does not get bored or too tired. Keeping it fresh means the game is always fun to play. STAGE THREE – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Inside Now your dog knows what the word “come” means you can use the cue word to call him to you while adding a hand signal to the word. Hand signals are always good to build with vocal cues so that even if your dog cannot hear you he will understand what the hand signal means. This is good if your dog is a distance away from you. Start in a quiet environment. Walk away from your dog and call his name followed by the cue word and a hand signal. Praise and reward him when he comes to you. Start increasing the distance you call him from and praise for his compliance. If he does not respond, go back to the previous distance and repeat. Only practice this cue for a few minutes so your dog does not get bored. The secret to success is to always keep it fun, exciting and fresh. When your dog recognizes the hand signal, try calling his name and using the hand signal by itself without the vocal cue. You will then be able to use a combination of vocal cue only, hand signal only and the two together. Now your dog knows what the cue word means you can start to call him from different rooms or from areas where he cannot see you. This will encourage him to respond even when you are out of sight. STAGE FOUR – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Outside Now your dog is consistently coming to you in a distraction free environment you can proof your recall cue by taking it outside. Practice the recall in your yard and then gradually build up to the point where you can use it in the park or similar environment. The ultimate test is to use the recall when your dog is engaged in a different activity. Wait for a lull in that activity and then call your dog to you. Praise his decision to comply.

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Judge
German Shepherd
1 Day
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Judge
German Shepherd
1 Day

We are getting a puppy soon and have a large property. I would like to train him to stay in a certain boundary unattended, not the whole property as it is too big for that, but will it confuse him and ruin training when we go hike with him around other parts of the property?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Krystal, It will be harder but you will simply need to teach him a command that means he is allowed to cross. Practice walking and running across the boundary line and him not being allowed to follow you. Clip a leash onto him, tell him "Let's Go", "Free" or whatever command you want him to learn for going across the boundary, then lead him over the line. Practice him being allowed to go across the line when given that word and you tempting him over by crossing the line yourself (after he has learned about the line) and correcting him by herding him back onto the yard where he is supposed to be if he tries to follow you without being released. I suggest only letting him across the line when a leash is clipped to him for now to make it less confusing, even if you simply un-clip the leash again twenty-feet into your walk. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Aspen
Alaskan Malamute
9 Months
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Aspen
Alaskan Malamute
9 Months

Aspen is a big girl weighing 90+ lbs and only 9 months old. How do I cure her from jumping on people? She is fine when petting her but then jumps on us when we quit. She wants us to keep giving her attention.
Any ideas to help with this would be much appreciated.
Its hard to just ignore her cuz she jumps on our backs etc.
Thanks for your help.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Angie, There are three main ways to do this. First, you can use the Leash method from the article linked below, but due to her size, you will probably need to pair that method with a correctly fitted prong collar - don't skip rewarding for sitting right after though. You want to communicate don't jump - uncomfortable, do Sit - rewarding, instead of just correcting. The second way, is the Step Toward method also found in the article below. With a dog her size this will only work if you step toward her as soon as her paws start to leave the ground and not once she has landed on you. I would also only recommend sturdier, stronger family members do that method to avoid being accidently knocked over - I have done with with a Great Dane effectively with good timing though, so timing makes all the difference. Step Toward and Leash Methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-australian-shepherds-to-not-jump The third option is to teach an Off command and enforce that with a remote collar, after the basics of remote collar training have been done, and finding pup's working level has been done - which is the lowest level of stimulation on a high quality collar that pup can feel. A good collar should have at least 60 levels and some dogs will respond well to vibration instead. This type of training should only be done with a professional trainer whoever, since it involves a tool that has to be used very carefully and correctly, to make the training effective, the least uncomfortable as possible, and with good timing. Good e-collar training with a high quality training can be done with very low levels so it's only slightly uncomfortable but still gives you a way to correct remotely in situations where you have less control due to pup's size for example, but used wrong they can do harm. Work a lot on rewarding sitting - since this is an attention seeking behavior, whichever route you go, it will be important to also reward with treats or simply affection, pup sitting nicely - since sitting can be done while pup is jumping. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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dixie
Bloodhound
1 Year
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dixie
Bloodhound
1 Year

I have a one year old bloodhoud, if she see someone or another dog she rans ups to them and wants to play. If they start to walk away from her she will follow them. Everytime i try to tell her come back she refuses to listen.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! So I am going to give you some tips on teaching recall. It is something you will have to practice to ingrain it into her so she is responsive in those settings. Recall: STAGE ONE – 'Catching' or Charging Up the 'Come' Cue Start in a distraction free environment so that your dog can focus only on you. Whenever your puppy or dog is coming to you on his own, wait until he is a couple of feet from you and then say his name and the word 'come.' When he gets to you, make a big fuss. With this exercise, your dog will learn that coming to you is a really good thing. After a while, you can lengthen the distance between you and start using the word when he is coming to you from a greater distance. Coming to you should always be rewarded, whatever the circumstance and no matter how long it took your dog to respond. Motivate your dog to come by being exciting, running away from him, waving a toy, or having delicious food for him when he gets to you. This will show him that coming back to you the best thing he can do. STAGE TWO – Solidifying the Cue Through Play Make sure you play the Back and Forth game with another person that your dog is comfortable with. Start the game in a quiet environment so it is easy for your dog to focus on you. Hold your dog back while the other person calls him excitedly. Try not to use his name or the cue word but talk excitedly to ‘gee’ him up. Do not release him until the person calls his name followed by the cue word “come.” When the cue word is given, release your dog and let him go running to the person calling. As soon as he reaches them they should praise and reward him with a game of tug or a food reward. When your dog has had his reward, have the other person hold him back as you call him and release as you say his name followed by the cue word. When he comes to you reward him with another game of tug or food reward. Repeat this game back and forth but only do a few repetitions so your dog does not get bored or too tired. Keeping it fresh means the game is always fun to play. STAGE THREE – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Inside Now your dog knows what the word “come” means you can use the cue word to call him to you while adding a hand signal to the word. Hand signals are always good to build with vocal cues so that even if your dog cannot hear you he will understand what the hand signal means. This is good if your dog is a distance away from you. Start in a quiet environment. Walk away from your dog and call his name followed by the cue word and a hand signal. Praise and reward him when he comes to you. Start increasing the distance you call him from and praise for his compliance. If he does not respond, go back to the previous distance and repeat. Only practice this cue for a few minutes so your dog does not get bored. The secret to success is to always keep it fun, exciting and fresh. When your dog recognizes the hand signal, try calling his name and using the hand signal by itself without the vocal cue. You will then be able to use a combination of vocal cue only, hand signal only and the two together. Now your dog knows what the cue word means you can start to call him from different rooms or from areas where he cannot see you. This will encourage him to respond even when you are out of sight. STAGE FOUR – Adding Vocal Cue With Hand Signal Outside Now your dog is consistently coming to you in a distraction free environment you can proof your recall cue by taking it outside. Practice the recall in your yard and then gradually build up to the point where you can use it in the park or similar environment. The ultimate test is to use the recall when your dog is engaged in a different activity. Wait for a lull in that activity and then call your dog to you. Praise his decision to comply.

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Bridger
Labrador Retriever
3 Years
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Question
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Bridger
Labrador Retriever
3 Years

We live on 6 acres and have trained our dog to stay on the property for the most part - with some exceptions. Now, however, there has been a new development of houses that can be accessed about 1/2 a mile away. He has discovered how to go over there and be in the neighborhood. We now need to border train him to just our property - and are seeking your advice. Thank you for any suggestions you might have.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Captain
Samoyed German shepherd retriever
8 Months
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Captain
Samoyed German shepherd retriever
8 Months

How can I train my dog to stay near my house? I live in the country with a huge backyard with no fencing.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Zoe, I suggest following the "Recruit Help from Friends method" from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-in-an-unfenced-yard If pup is too motivated to leave, you may also need to do some remote collar training in addition to the above method, but start with just the above method because that's may be sufficient and e-collar training will be on top of that, not in place. First, learn how to fit the collars correctly by watching the video below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLxB6gYsliI Figure out pup's "working level" on your e-collar, which is the lowest level that dog responds to at all - indicating they can feel the collar at all. Check out the video linked below on how to find this level and go through this protocol for each dog. Finding their Working Level - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cl3V8vYobM Next, walk pup around your perimeter. Each time they approach the boundary line (which I would use property flags to mark well so pup's can visually remember and you will be consistent), use your leash to reel them back toward you, back inside the property line while at the same time pushing the stimulation button on the remote collar while pup is on the wrong side of the boundary line - as soon as pup gets back on the correct side of the boundary line, the correct stops and pup is praised. When pup begins to avoid going over the boundary line, you can also give treats for staying on the correct side. This will involve a lot of walking. Pup will need to do this a lot at first around the entire property line to help them commit it to long term memory. Once pup has learned the lesson well, you can go for a walk near the boundary line with the dog off-leash and correct with the remote training collar if they cross the boundary during the walk - showing them that they still can't cross while off leash either. While you are still training the dog you will need to physically keep them on your property using leashes and such so that they aren't running across the boundary line when you aren't ready - that will ruin your training. They need to be corrected consistently for crossing the boundary lines while you show them what they are supposed to be doing using the long leash (if you just correct and skip the long leash part they will likely run away from you and not toward you because they won't understand at first why they are being corrected - reeling them in with the leash and stopping the correction as soon as they are on the correct side of the boundary helps them learn to come back over to your side of the line). Another, easier option that will likely be even more effective if it's an option financially will be installing an electric fence around your property. You will still need to walk them around the boundary using a long leash and reel them back to your side of the boundary line when they cross to show them how to stop the correction - but the collar from the electric fence will enforce the correction for you and will be very consistent in correcting pup for crossing the boundary when you aren't around - making the training more effective and probably quicker for you. With electric fences, use flags to mark the boundary also and because your property is large, don't remove the flags later - keep them in place a s a reminder since you don't have a physical fence to remind pups. Don't skip walking the boundary with pup and teaching pup to avoid the electric fence - many people skip that part and it can ruin training for electric fences because dogs cross, then run and don't know how to stop the correction by returning, and they need to learn to return to make the correction stop so that they understand how to avoid the correction by not crossing the boundary. Reward pup with treats for not crossing. I also recommend practicing things like walking around with pup on a long leash (20'-40' foot - be careful not to let pup pick up speed and hit the end of it if they tend to do that though - start with less leash at first if so)and randomly changing directions without saying anything. When pup turns toward you or catches up because they felt the end of the leash or choose to follow, give a treat and praise for their good choice. Practice often until pup is paying more attention to where you are, checking in often, and following more closely when you are outside - in hopes of a treat, and because they associate your presence with good things. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tobi
Boxer
1 Year
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Tobi
Boxer
1 Year

We are moving in today to a new home, how do I get my dog to not run away if I want him to go outside and run?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Caylin, Are you wanting pup to stay close while you are outside with them or while they are alone? Assuming you will be outside with them, first, start by working on a reliable Come. Check out the Reel In method from the article linked below. Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall More Come - pay attention to the PreMack Principle and long leash training sections especially once pup has learned what Come initially means. These need to be practiced around all types of distractions like dogs and kids at the park to ensure pup is reliable before attempting true off leash. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Another activity you can practice is walking around places like your yard or a field with pup on the long training leash and changing directions frequently without saying anything. Whenever he takes notice (at first because the leash finally tugs, but later just because you moved), then toss a treat at him for looking your way or coming over to you - without calling him; this encourages him to choose to pay attention to where you are and associate your presence with good things on his own, so he will want to be with you. , Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Alex
pit bull lab mix
1 Year
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Alex
pit bull lab mix
1 Year

She stays in the yard most of the time but lately she has been interested in watching the cars from the other side of the bank(near the road). She watches cars from the windows in our house all day. How is an effective way to teach her to stay in the yard?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Gracie
Labrador Retriever
5 Years
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Gracie
Labrador Retriever
5 Years

I moved to a townhouse a few months ago. The next
door neighbor doesn't want my dog in their yard.I need to train her to stay in our side only.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Apryl
Dalmatian
7 Months
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Apryl
Dalmatian
7 Months

I have a un-fenced yard and I want to teach her boundaries around my yard I have a medium sized yard so she will have a good amount of roaming space but i want to teach her to stay on the grass and not to step on the sidewalk. Essentially not to step off the grass.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Shadow
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks
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Shadow
Labrador Retriever
8 Weeks

What age do you start training your dog to stay in the yard?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. And you can start at any age. The sooner the better. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Harvey
English Mastiff
3 Years
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Harvey
English Mastiff
3 Years

I recently moved and my new house now borders a public walking trail. The fence only goes so far then the road appears. My dog seems to think his property is the walking trail so when he sees people walking he runs on the trail and stops people. He is very protective. How do I spot this? The minute he sees people on the trail he runs to cut them off. I live in the country on 3 acres so a fenced yard isn't in the budget....

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it may be worth it for his safety to fence off a very large section of the property for an exercise run for Harvey. Other times when he is outside, he can be on a leashed walk. If this is not feasible, you can work on teaching Harvey about boundaries. Try the 5-step Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-in-the-yard and the Reinforcing Boundaries Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-within-boundaries. Using flags to define the boundaries may prove useful but make sure that every family member is on board with the training. I would also make sure that Harvey has a rock-solid recall so that if he does head toward walkers on the trail, he comes back when called and before he reaches the walkers. Take a look here for excellent recall training: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-come-back and to not chase: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-not-chase. Good luck!

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Maggie
We think she is a mix but we dont know what breeds
2 Years
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Maggie
We think she is a mix but we dont know what breeds
2 Years

Maggie is a rescue dog who was wandering around our neighborhood. She adopted us but, we have noticed that she has a VERY bad habit of wandering into our pasture and not coming back for hours and doesn't come back when her name is called when she's on her way to wherever she want's to wander that day. We are considering putting her up for adoption if we cannot stop her wandering habit soon in concerns of having our new puppy who is about 5 months wander with her and get hurt. We've tried a shock collar but it didnt do anything for either of them. She will either run away when called while being outside ready to wander or will simply lay somewhere till approched. We don't have a fenced in yard and live very deep in the country. Hunting season is scary with her wandering about as she wishes to. She Is said to be about 2 or 3 years and her breed is unknown. She is the sweetest dog you could ever meet and can be afraid of certain things and we think she wad abused.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Ruger
Boykin Spaniel
11 Months
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Ruger
Boykin Spaniel
11 Months

My male boykin spaniel, Ruger will not stay in our yard unless on a lease.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Duke
Great Pyrenees
2 Years
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Duke
Great Pyrenees
2 Years

We live on 5 acres, Duke likes to roam and won’t stay home. When we go to work and come home he’s always down the road at the neighbors. He won’t listen.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Duke is a working dog by instinct and it's near impossible to keep him home when there is no one around all day. I think the safest solution is to invest in a very large enclosure for Duke where he has the room to run and get exercise but is also safely confined. Ensure that he has shelter from the sun and the rain. Provide him with water and a few toys like a frozen Kong (made for big dogs) stuffed with a bit of moistened kibble. When you get home from work, you can try to work on a few of the pointers described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-great-pyrenees-to-stay-in-yard. As well, you can work on boundary training: https://wagwalking.com/training/stay-in-an-unfenced-yard (the Boundary Method and the Perimeter Method). Train and train to see if Duke will stop roaming but without anyone home all day, the safest route is the large enclosure. All the best to Duke!

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Inti
Don't know. Just rescued a week and a half ago.
1 Year
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Question
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Inti
Don't know. Just rescued a week and a half ago.
1 Year

We live at the countryside and just got this beautiful dog rescued by my daughter. this week I am on vacation and I'm staying home to help Inti to get aquanted to his new home. Eventually, I'll have to leave for a few hours to work in the city.
Our house is a loft and the yard is all the countryside around us. Inti was rescued also at the countryside, but somewhere else. He was hungry and sick. So we asume he's used to move around in this environment. All our neighbours own dogs and Inti has already made their aquaintance in these few days.
So my question is: how safe is it to leave him alone outside when I go to work? How should I train him to stay near the house?

Thanks for your help,

Cecilia
So my question is: ho

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Nala
Kelpie
8 Weeks
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Nala
Kelpie
8 Weeks

Just got a female kelpie pup. We are on 7 acres but property not fully fenced. Want to train her to stay on our property

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Moochie
Chihuahua
5 Years
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Moochie
Chihuahua
5 Years

he doesn’t get along with bigger dogs. he was a stray dog my aunt found around her house multiple times (she has a big dog) so she asked us if we would talk care of him. at first him and my aunts dog got a long but once we had him in our house for a while and her dog would come over they got into it and from now on his hair always sticks up and growls when her dog comes over with her.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It sounds like you may have some territorial aggression going on. Because this is a complex issue, I am going to direct you to a wonderful article for you to read which will help you solve this problem. https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-behavior-training/inter-dog-territorial-aggression/

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Woody
Standard Poodle
1 Year
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Woody
Standard Poodle
1 Year

I want to teach Woody to stay in my front yard unleashed, but I also take him on walks to the park (on a leash) and we walk on the sidewalk through the front yard to start the walk to the park.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kent, To help pup learn they can go for a walk with you sometimes, but must stay at other times, in addition to teaching pup to stay in the yard, also practice teaching pup a command that let's them know it's okay to leave the yard. To do this, first teach pup to stay in the yard. Next, with pup on leash, approach the boundary line where the sidewalk is and tell pup something like "Free" and walk pup across the boundary line. Practice a few times until pup isn't hesitating to go across when you say "Free". Each time pup tries to go across when you haven't said free, step in front to block pup's way, or hold pup back with the leash if you can't get in front of them in time (stepping in front often is often easier for pup to understand). Practice approaching the boundary line and sometimes saying Free and letting pup come with you, other times stopping and seeing if pup tries to cross without you, then blocking or stopping them if they do, then walking across the boundary line without stopping and without saying Free, and quickly turning to block pup from crossing the boundary if they don't stop on their own - since you haven't given permission. All of this will need to be practiced often, and you will need to stay consistent about only letting pup out of the yard when they are on a leash, with you, and you have said Free (or your similar command word of choice). Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Joy
Australian Shepherd Dog
6 Months
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Joy
Australian Shepherd Dog
6 Months

My 2 dogs are trained to stay in our unfenced yard, but after taking them on walks when we leave from the driveway, they begin to cross their boundary for the next few days. We usually take them on walks after driving somewhere first to deal with this.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kyle, Whenever you allow pup to leave the yard, be sure to give pup a command that lets them know it's okay to cross, like Free, and giving a visual signal like pup being on leash (at least to cross the boundary if off-leash trained), before taking the leash off further into the walk. Practice that cue word and pup being leashed and crossing, then immediately practice you leaving the yard without those things in place and correcting pup if they start to cross with you without their word or leash. This takes repetition of both for pup to begin to understand clearly when it's okay and when it's not. A remote training collar with a tone and vibrate setting can also help. You can practice crossing the boundary and each time pup starts to follow you across without their leash or command, hit the tone or vibrate button as a warning. After each walk practice this routine a couple of times just to remind them that the invisible "fence" is back up. Quickly walking out the yard and hitting the tone button on the collar if they try to follow a few times until they don't follow when you cross. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Findlay
Golden Retriever
4 Months
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Findlay
Golden Retriever
4 Months

Having house training problems. He is going to puppy school. Very good on leash. But, ignores clicker and treats off lease

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Pup will need to be worked up to off leash training gradually. Generally obedience training starts with Basic Obedience (the puppy class), then Intermediate (same commands but practicing on leash around high distractions like outdoor walls, farmers markets, places with lots of dogs, ect...), then advanced, which involves the use of long training leashes and practice around high distractions, where pup feels off leash on the long training leash, but you can reel them in an enforce training if they do decide not to come, until they are reliable enough for true off leash. Check out the articles on Come below. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ Reel In method for come: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall Also, check out James Penrith for more information on working up to off-leash training. https://www.youtube.com/user/taketheleadvideo/search?query=beginning%20training When you do clicker training, did the trainer teach you how to "front load" or "preload" the clicker? This is where you teach pup what the sound of the clicker means, simply by clicking and giving a treat, over and over again for about a week, so pup learns that the click means Good job! Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Milan
Border Collie
1 Year
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Question
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Milan
Border Collie
1 Year

He loves to go to neighbors houses and nothing we do is keeping him from leaving and he can’t stop trashing the garbage drone

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
236 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Training your dog to stay inside a boundary is quite simple. To get started you will need to purchase marker flags from your local hardware store. These are generally found in the garden section. You will also need high value treats for your dog. I like to use grilled chicken, roast beef, or cheese cut into very small pieces. Look for a treat your dog will go crazy over, and only use this special treat for boundary training. I prefer to use a clicker as a marker for training this behavior. The clicker is a reward marker communicating to your dog that she did the right thing and will get a reward. You will start inside your house with your dog. Show your dog the flag, when she touches it with her nose click the clicker and give her a treat. This will teach her that touching the flag is what gets her the reward or treat. Next, place the flag a few feet away from you. Have your dog touch the flag; when she does this again you will click. She should then return to you to get her treat. Move the flag further way and practice having your dog go to the flag, click and give her a treat when she returns to you. By doing this, you will be conditioning your dog to move away from the flag. Before moving the training outside, I like to work with my dogs for about a week to make sure they understand they are to move away from the flags. Remember to always use a clicker and a treat to reinforce this. Once your dog understands they get rewarded for moving away from the flags, it is time to take the training outside. Place flags along your boundary line every 8-10 feet. Using a 15 to 20 foot long line, walk your dog around the boundary of your yard. She should go to the flags and touch them. After this happens you will click and your dog should return to you for her treat. Remember to continue to use your clicker and click and dispense a treat every time she touches the flags. For the best success practice this several times a day. You are classically conditioning your dog to return to you when she sees the flags. The flag become the cue to return to you, this becomes an involuntary response to the dog. Practice as often as you can, 8 to 10 weeks of practice will help make this a very solid behavior. The more you practice the more solid the behavior will be. As your dog gets better at returning to you, increase the length of the long line to 40 or 50 feet. You can also introduce some low level distractions to the training. This increases the difficulty of the behavior so make sure your dog gets a lot of praise and reinforcement for returning to you. Gradually increase the level of the distractions. If your dog is having trouble with this part of the training, make sure your distractions are not too high level. The last step is working with your dog off-leash. Make sure you are supervising your dog during this part of the training. Reinforce your dog often during the off lead sessions. Be aware of what is going on outside your yard and if you feel the distractions are too much for your dog to handle put her back on the lead. You will also want to make sure your yard is a fun environment for your dog. The yard should be a place where your dog feels safe and happy. One last tip; Do not punish your dog if she goes out of her boundary. Simply call her back and praise her when she returns. This will teach her that being inside the boundary is always rewarding and good things happen whenever she is inside the boundary.

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Reece
Golden Retriever
9 Months
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Question
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Reece
Golden Retriever
9 Months

Recall training outside. Inside she is great, outside she runs away. I do not want to keep her on leash or a long line always.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
916 Dog owners recommended

Hello Patrick, Check out the article I have linked below. Even though the goal is to have pup off leash, you will need to start on leash to get that reliability. The article I have linked below mentioned using a long training leash to gradually work pup up to reliability on around harder and harder distractions on leash. Once pup can handle all distractions on the "field trips" you take pup on, then instead of a more durable 20 foot training leash, transition to using a super lightweight but strong 40 or 50 foot leash. Often the thin cord used for climbing accessories with several hundred pounds of load bearing strength can make a super light yet strong training leash. I personally wear gloves for this part of the training to avoid a rope burn from such a thin leash. You want pup to feel like they aren't on leash, while still being able to reel them in when they are a bit inconsistent at times. When pup is 100% reliably on that leash from a distance, you can either transition to fully off leash in a safe environment like a large fenced area or field away from any traffic, as long as you know pup is completely reliably, and then have the long training leash drag at times so you can still go pick it up to reel pup in when needed, or you can transition to remote collar training for dogs who are especially bent on pushing boundaries. If you go the e-collar route, check out James Penrith from take the lead dog training on youtube. Basic outline of using a long training leash - Reel in method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall More come: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-to-come-when-called/ James Penrith on teaching Come: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtJxSXu4rfs&t=52s Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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