How to Train Your Dog to Stop Barking on Walks

Medium
2-16 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Taking your pooch for a walk should be a relaxing experience. Imagine yourself walking down a country lane with your family and friends, wind in your hair, relaxing noises of the birds and trees. But uh-oh, wait a minute, relaxing noises of the birds?! Your pooch hears them too-- he's a serial barker and won't stop! 

Suddenly, all the birds disappear and all you’re left with is the horrible whiney noise of your pooch barking non-stop. Not only is this a massive headache and all that you can now hear is your naughty pup barking and scaring the wildlife, your friends and relatives comment on how badly behaved he is--how embarrassing. To stop situations like this one occurring, read on for a few simple steps you can take to stop your pooch from ruining walks and days out.

Defining Tasks

Training your dog not to bark on walks will teach him some well-needed manners and obedience and make your life a lot less stressful. There are benefits to other animals as well, such as not disrupting wildlife and cats, which could become quite stressed at your dog's barks. Other dogs might also see this barking as a sign of aggression, especially when in close proximity to them. Another dog could snap and cause a fight with your pooch, potentially causing some serious injuries requiring veterinary attention. 

It is best to catch them early and teach your dog to stop barking on walks as soon as they have been vaccinated and the appropriate time has elapsed for their immune systems to process the vaccine, normally 1 week after the final vaccination of the course. This will be when they are able to start walking and be taught walking etiquette, including not barking constantly. Adult dogs can also be trained, however, this can be more difficult as this behavior could have been going on unchecked for years. Therefore, depending on the dog, this training can take weeks to months to learn.

Getting Started

To get started, teaching your dog the ‘heel’ command first can be useful, so that he walks in an orderly fashion at your heel to begin with, so they know that you’re the boss and what you say goes. This will help enforce your training and commanding them to stop barking. Treats are necessary, so that your pet has a tasty reward when he behaves himself and keeps quiet or stops the barking at your say so. Clickers are also good to signify to your pooch that he has performed the correct behavior, remember to give him a treat as well though. Make sure you have a collar or harness and lead that are appropriate for your pup's age and size before you get started.

The Under Control Method

Most Recommended
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Step
1
Get the right gear
Make sure your pooch's collar or harness fit well and is secure. This will help you to keep better control of your pup, especially if he tends to lunge. You can get special harnesses that don’t pull on your pup when he does this.
Step
2
Firm but not too tight
Holding your pooch too tightly will make him more likely to bark and lunge.
Step
3
Get him to heel
Getting your dog to heel will be a distraction from the barking behavior he's about to engage in. Controlling their movements often also controls their vocal cords.
Step
4
Reward for heeling
Give him a treat, and a click if you’re clicker training, for heeling and being quiet.
Step
5
Give him a challenge
If you add in challenges such as varying your speed, walking around obstacles and up and down stairs for example, this will get your dog to concentrate on what he’s doing and reduce barking.
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The Desensitize to Dogs Method

Effective
1 Vote
Step
1
Know his trigger
Although other dogs are the usual cause of barking on walks, know the trigger for your dog. This method is only useful if other dogs are the main issue.
Step
2
Use a barrier
When your pooch sees another dog and starts to play up, use yourself or another object as a barrier between your pooch and the dog of interest.
Step
3
Click and treat good behavior
Give your dog treats and a click if he notices another dog but doesn’t start barking.
Step
4
Desensitize him
Now he knows he’s rewarded for not barking at other dogs. Gradually move your dog closer to the other dog, giving treats every time you get closer and he doesn’t bark. This is best done with a friend or neighbor’s dog who you know is friendly.
Step
5
Keep at it
Be sure to practice in short, sharp bursts of no more than 15 minutes per day.
Recommend training method?

The Distraction Method

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1 Vote
Step
1
Get his attention
When you see your dog about to start barking, capture his attention and stop him by calling his name and drawing him towards you, you can also use the command such as ‘look’, then give him a click and treat when he does this. It should take his attention off whatever was making him bark.
Step
2
Be consistent
Make sure if anyone else walks him, as he’s about to bark, they also use the ‘look’ command or call his name and give him a treat or he’ll slip back into bad habits in no time.
Step
3
Use open spaces
Somewhere open and uncrowded, quiet and free from distractions will be a better place to walk your pooch and will likely result in less bad barking behavior.
Step
4
Walk away from the distraction
Whether it’s a dog, cat, bird or person, walk in the opposite direction of the distraction and the barking should subside.
Step
5
Bring his favorite squeaky
Distract him when he’s about to bark with his favorite squeaky toy. For this step it is important that you recognize his triggers and do this before he starts barking or you will be rewarding bad behavior.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Catherine Lee-Smith

Published: 12/08/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Nikota
german sheperd
4 Months
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Nikota
german sheperd
4 Months

She constanly barks at people and dogs when going for a walk and has her back hair up i keep saying leave them but to no avail

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, first I would contact an obedience trainer and get Nikota registered for classes. You have to get her socialized while she is still young or the issue will develop into a real problem. You will have to work on a few things while walking: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs and for her friendliness skills, these are excellent tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-be-friendly. Of course, you will want to avoid encounters with people and dogs until the problem is under control. Also: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-strangers and https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-other-dogs. This is lots of reading for you but there is tons of great information to get you started. Good luck!

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Mia
Australian Eskimo
6 Months
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Mia
Australian Eskimo
6 Months

I have been teaching my puppy "quiet" when we're at home and it's slowly working, but has no affect on her outside. When out in public (mostly on walks), she always barks at other dogs and people. It's very obnoxious and embarrassing. I also know I need to get her more socialized with other dogs, but it seems that she's a little scared of them once she actually encounters one. I would eventually like to teach her to speak on command as well. She wears a harness which has helped a bit with her pulling, but she still walks very quickly and excitedly. I know she's still young too, but do you have any suggestions?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Marissa, I suggest working on desensitizing her to the things he is afraid of and barking at. Continue working on Quiet because just like any other command she needs to work up to being able to do it around distractions, so she needs to practice it around gradually harder and harder distractions - starting with easier distractions first. Desensitization 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp_l9C1yT1g&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a Desensitization 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5BjvNScFPs&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a&index=2 Desensitization 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY7JrteQBOQ&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a&index=3 Desensitization 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXCELHDT2fs&list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a&index=4 Desensitization 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxPrNnulp5s You can use the Quiet method from the article linked below to teach him Speak also. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark The fact that she is nervous around other dogs suggests she needs more socialization, I suggest reaching out to any friends with puppies and setting up play dates with as many different puppies as you can under close supervision (doesn't have to be with the same puppies each time). Interrupt their play if one seems overwhelmed or one is trying to bully another, give them a break, then let the overwhelmed puppy go and see if they initiate playing again. If they do, let the other puppies go back to playing too. At first, expect you pup to be very nervous and maybe even hide behind you. Let her curiosity get the better of her until she decides to try to play. If you can arrange for two friend's puppies to play together that can also help by letting her watch others play and making her want to join in and overcome her fear. You can also do three second greetings with friends' calm, well behaved dogs. I suggest avoiding meeting potentially aggressive, reactive, or overly excited dogs though because a bad interaction could make things worse. Also, a dog park is not a good place for a puppy to learn all of this. Puppies play differently than older dogs and dog parks are more likely to involve fights. Some places, like Petco and Petfood Express offer free puppy play groups once a week. Call and see if they will let her join at her age - she may be too old but maybe not. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Winnie
Border Terrier
16 Weeks
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Winnie
Border Terrier
16 Weeks

Hi, my border terrier puppy is very young and she loves attention and people that come into the house. She very rarely barks in the house but does sometimes in the garden. Although, when we go on a walk she does not stop barking. She barks at everything, people, cars, wind, trees... literally anything. At some point it seems aggressive and it’s becoming hard to deal with. What can we do to overcome this?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ben, At her age I suspect the barking is a combination of fear and excitement. She likely needs more positive experiences with the things that are new to her, like strangers, other dogs, cars, leaves, ect...All the things that are getting a reaction out of her now. Check out the video linked below and the second video channel with additional details on desensitizing to specific things: Barking on a walk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY7JrteQBOQ Barking video series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a I also suggest reading the free PDF e-book download AFTER You Get Your Puppy, written by the co-founder of the association of professional dog trainers: www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chip
Mini Dachshund
1 Year
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Chip
Mini Dachshund
1 Year

Chip is an amazing dog however he will bark at everything on a walk or out of the window at home. He begins to growl and his hackles come up if he sees the person/dog coming. I try to get his attention at this point but he is too interested in them. When they go past he’ll bark at them. I no it’s not aggression and he’s nervous. Sometimes if we’ve been in a very public busy place he won’t do anything and just looks very scared.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Jessica, If the barking is fear based and not simply because it's a fun habit (which can be the case with barking), I suggest working on desensitizing pup to the triggers to overcome the fear that's underneath it, and teaching the Quiet command. Quiet method for teaching Quiet command: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Check out the Youtube channel linked below and the series of barking videos, which shows how to desensitize to different types of barking triggers. The Barking at door video is a good introduction to the concepts that the trainer is using around different triggers - like dogs, strangers, noises, ect... Barking at doors/guests: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA Youtube series on barking and desensitizing: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Patsy
Tibetan Terrier
1 Year
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Patsy
Tibetan Terrier
1 Year

Patsy whines/barks/yelps whenever we are out a walk and need to wait to cross a road. It seems as if she is impatient. She will sit while we wait to cross the road, however she just makes so much noise! How do I go about correcting this behaviour?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I think that Patsy would benefit from the Teach Quiet Method explained here: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-barking-3. It is good that she sits patiently when you are waiting to cross - you just need to take a step further and initiate the training for quiet. You can also work on her heeling skills which will keep her focused while on walks. Then you can use any of the methods here to keep her busy and training while you wait for the opportunity to cross: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel/. Happy training!

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Benny
cockapoo
9 Months
1 found helpful
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1 found helpful
Benny
cockapoo
9 Months

At home, our 9-month-old cockapoo behaves perfectly; however, on a walk, he turns crazy. Whenever we encounter another dog, he becomes out of control. He cannot focus on anything other than the dog, and screeches and jumps around. When allowed to stop and sniff the other dog, he calms down and it seems as though he just wants to say hello. However, we cannot always spend time meeting the other dogs, and quite frankly, the walks are becoming unenjoyable for both of us.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ellie, Check out the videos below explaining leash reactivity and demonstrating how to work with a dog. (This trainer can be a bit blunt with his people teaching style, but he has a lot of experience with highly reactive and aggressive dogs). The behavior you are dealing with would be called leash reactivity (which is different than leash aggression since it doesn't lead to fights on his end): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXLPwyKEjHI&t=14s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGofhEc1YPg&t=305s Note, that the fixated, aroused mindset is interrupted very early on, before the dog explodes, as soon as he starts to fixate. The entire walk is also structured so that the dog is working to focus on their person and not on other things they shouldn't be reacting towards. Starting the walk off right and having the dog walk slightly behind you puts the dog into a following mindset, calms them down, and prevents him from constantly scanning the area looking for dogs and working himself up during the walk. Finally, I do not recommend nose to nose greetings right now. Tell others that you are "in training" if they ask to let the dogs meet. Instead, join a dog walking group, walk with friends and their well behaved dogs with the dogs in a structured heel, or join an obedience class, to practice calmness around other dogs and not over arousal and extreme excitement. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Lady
German Shepherd
7 Months
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Question
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Lady
German Shepherd
7 Months

Every time we leave the house to go on a walk, her hackles are raised and she constantly barks until we are out of the cul de sac. How do I stop this?

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Prince
German Shepherd
11 Weeks
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Question
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Prince
German Shepherd
11 Weeks

My pup barks sometimes when he sees some dogs but other dogs he doesnt. He hasnt had a bad experience but im not sure how to get him to stop barking and no to be as scared?

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thank you for the question. Soon you will be able to take Prince to obedience classes and that will help him a lot. The socialization will go a long way to making Prince more comfortable around other dogs. Taking a pup to dog training, or having an in-home trainer come to you also helps build confidence. Ideally, allowing Prince to play with other dogs his age and size will help him learn the proper behavior. Ask your vet when this will be okay (in regards to vaccines). Take a look at these articles: https://wagwalking.com/training/stop-barking-on-walks and https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-not-bark. Good luck and work on these methods every day - you will see results!

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Boo
West Highland White Terrier
1 Year
0 found helpful
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Boo
West Highland White Terrier
1 Year

When I take my dog for a walk every time she sees another dog she starts barking and when the dog has gone she will still be bark for another 5mins and anytime she see a person she will do a bark but not as bad as the dogs. She’s friendly and loves people and we have another dog which is a french bulldog and she doesn’t do any of that at home

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rebecca, It sounds like pup is getting overly-aroused and staying in that state for a while even after the dog has left. I recommend desensitizing pup to the things that trigger the barking. Check out the videos linked below for different examples of desensitizing a dog to barking triggers - practice those types of methods in relation to dogs, starting with dogs far enough away that she is less excited and working up to dogs being closer and pup staying calm. Do the same thing with people. Barking playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlZmJlllP7Y&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a Barking on walks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXCELHDT2fs&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=11 Barking at people; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXCELHDT2fs&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=11 Barking at dogs behind fences: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n_fPKPLA2g&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=10 Reactivity - strangers and dogs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbhM4oKZjsE&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=15 I also suggest teaching pup the Quiet command. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Piper
Pomeranian
3 Years
0 found helpful
Question
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Piper
Pomeranian
3 Years

We are having difficulty taking Piper on walks. She goes hysterical, especially at the beginning of the walk, usually once we set foot off our property. She screams, tugs, and bunny hops. This behavior gets especially awful when we walk alongside backyards where there may be dogs. I am not sure how to stop it. She usually calms down once we are further into the walk or past the fences with other dogs. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Regina, I suggest working on the structure of your walk first. You want pup to be working during the walk - having to stay behind you, focus on you, and perform commands periodically, and not have her mind on scanning the area in search of other dogs. The walk should start with her having to exit your home very calmly, performing obedience commands at the door if she isn't calm. She should wait for permission ("Okay" or "Free" or "Let's Go") before going through the door instead of bolting through if that's an issue. When you walk she should be in the heel position - with her head behind your leg. That position decreases her arousal, reduces stress because she isn't the one in charge and the one encountering things first. It prevents her from scanning for other dogs, staring dogs down or being stared down, and ignoring you behind her. It also requires her to be in a more submissive, structured, focused, calmer mindset - which has a direct effect on how aroused, stressed, and aggressive she is - it makes her feel like the responsibility is on your shoulders not hers around other dogs. Additionally, when you do pass other dogs, as soon as she starts staring them down, interrupt her. Don't tolerate challenging stares - even if she is stressed. Remind her with a gentle correction that you are leading the walk and she is not allowed to break her heel or stare another dog down. It is far easier to deal with reactivity when you interrupt a dog early in the process - before they are highly aroused and full of adrenaline and cortisol, and to keep the dog in a less aroused/calmer state to begin with. This also makes the walk more pleasant for her in the long-run. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Check out the videos linked below for examples of a structured walk and interrupting pup when they start to get aroused, then redirecting the attention back on you by having pup do obedience commands. Reactive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Aggressive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Outside of the walk you can work on building pup's trust and respect for you in other ways too. The following commands and exercises are also good for that: Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O75dyWITP1s Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Generally building respect at home: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bertie
Cockerpoo
6 Years
0 found helpful
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Bertie
Cockerpoo
6 Years

At the age 2 Bertie started to run around in circles and bark excitedly when we release him from his lead or as we enter a new field/area. He can keep it up for 25-30 spins! It’s like he’s over excited or expecting a ball to be thrown even if he’s well aware a ball is not on offer. I’ve tried ignoring the behaviour, turning my back on him and shouting but he’s far to excited to take any notice. Please help!

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Thanks for the cute picture of Bertie. If he has been doing this behavior for 4 years, it can be changed but will take time. If Bertie is looking for a ball to play with, why not bring one along? Having a toy to play with may be just the thing to change the behavior. Is Bertie getting a lot of exercise every day? He is the combination of two breeds that like mental and physical stimulation so even when Bertie is not exercising, providing a toy that challenges him mentally may make him calmer when he starts his excited behavior. Unless the behavior bothers you, I wouldn't worry about it. However, if it does, work on these exercises for calming him when you are out: https://wagwalking.com/training/be-calm. As well, when walking to the park or field, work on commands like heel to exercise his brain along the way and give him focus, too. Work on the Turns Method here:https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Good luck and enjoy training!

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Woody
Cock-A-Tzu
3 Years
0 found helpful
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Woody
Cock-A-Tzu
3 Years

He barks a lot when out walking ie cars and others. Good off lead but if dog comes near very timid

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Eddie
Dachshund
10 Months
0 found helpful
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Eddie
Dachshund
10 Months

We,ve come out of lockdown and apart from the other 2 dogs in the house , when he’s on a walk he bark relentlessly when he sees another do . He has been known to have a nip too. Not always but it has happened twice. any recommendations?

Nicci x

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would work on a few things. Keep Eddie focused as he walks by teaching him to heel. When another dog approaches, you have Eddie in Heel mode, and he should stay by your side. Practice and practice, every time you are out. Try the Turns Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Take Eddie to group obedience classes for socialization, too and that will solve the problem, along with teaching him essential obedience skills. This breed loves to learn, so obedience classes will be a welcomed way to have fun and use the brain. Lastly, work on the Passing Approach Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs. Good luck!

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Parker
Lurcher
5 Months
1 found helpful
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1 found helpful
Parker
Lurcher
5 Months

Hi, my pup loves people and other dogs, however he has started barking out on walks for people/dogs to give him attention, if we are on our own with no one about he does not bark at all. How can I get him to listen to me and stop barking when's he's so excited about greeting people?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Helen, At his age I suggest first teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below: Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Teach him Quiet so that you can tell him Quiet and he will understand what you mean, then if you have to give a small leash correction to get his attention back on you, the leash correction is for disobedience and not just the appearance of another dog - this helps him understand and learn better. Next, go tons of places with other people and dogs in the distance and work on a structured heel and other obedience commands with people and dogs in the background. You want him to get so used to being around others without anything super exciting or scary happening that they become almost boring to him and he becomes less reactive. Working on obedience while around people puts him in a calmer, more focused state which helps him associate people and other dogs with being in a calmer, more focused state also. Think about Service Dogs. They play with tons of puppies and meet tons of people while young, but as they get older their socialization starts looking like being around tons of dogs and people in a calmer way, like passing people on the street while in heel, or doing a down-stay next to another dog instead of always roughhousing. You don't want your pup to be isolated from other people and dogs, and you don't want him to associate people and dogs with a super excited state and rough play all the time either. Calmness, pleasantness, and focus on you should be what you work toward. Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tucker
Kelpie/border collie
9 Months
0 found helpful
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Tucker
Kelpie/border collie
9 Months

Whenever he sees a person/dog that he is not familiar with the hairs on his back rise and he starts barking, I know it’s mostly fear but I don’t know how to get him to stop. This mostly happens when we’re on walks or he sees the neighbours and it’s very embarrassing.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! That sounds frustrating. The advice I am going to give you will help you gain control of Tucker, and also desensitize him to the dogs he is reacting to. This type of behavior modification takes about 90 days to get full results. You will start seeing changes fairly soon, but please keep in mind it can be 3 months or so before he starts to be consistent. So the best place to start is to work on conditioning his brain to associate positive feelings with these other dogs. The best way to get that positive association across is food. You can use treats. Or if you aren't big on the idea of treat training, you can always put his meal in a bag and take him out and use his meal as treats. You will want to put him on leash, take her to a fairly busy area within your neighborhood. Every time he sees another dog, you will want to say "watch me". You will take the treat from her nose, to your eye or face, and when he looks at you, give him the treat. You will repeat this process until he stops reacting as excited to other dogs. If he knows sit, you can also have him in a sit stay. Continue socializing him and have him around other dogs. He needs to become a bit more confident in himself. And the best way for him to figure out where he fits into this world is to be around dogs of varying personalities. This is a very basic plan, but this method of associating positives with the other dogs is the best route to go. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Benny
Shetland Sheepdog
2 Years
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Benny
Shetland Sheepdog
2 Years

He barks at everything and pulls hard when we walk. Its not his typical bark but like a scream yelp. He is not aggressive to people/animals but very anxious when meeting them. How do we get him to stop barking/ pulling?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It sounds like he has some fear based anxiety going on. Coupled with the excitement of walks, you have your hands a little full! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around new dogs, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes it's just a simple case of lacking proper socialization as a puppy. Which most dogs in a typical household lack proper socialization. Dogs need to be introduced to hundreds of different settings as a puppy (by the age of 20 weeks) to be "properly" socialized. Most of us are not able to do that. So we will be playing a bit of catch up! Keep in mind before starting, that punishing him while he's in this state of emotion isn't ideal. Doing so will make his concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what he is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram his opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell the dog, "sit" or "watch me" or whatever command you want to use for this setting. After he starts automatically sitting or watching you when he sees another dog, you know you have success! Remember to go slowly! It could take up to a month or longer of consistent practice before you see an improvement with his behavior.

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Ruby
Cairnoodle
3 Years
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Ruby
Cairnoodle
3 Years

When walking Ruby alone she is quiet, well behaved and non reactive around other dogs but if I walk with her 2 year old brother she barks excessively for the first 5-10 mins, pulls and barks noisily at every dog we encounter. This is a fairly new problem which has got worse over the last 6 months. I usually end up having to walk them separately which is time consuming and not always convenient.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would keep trying to walk them together, while working in the Quiet command at home. It is well explained here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark. Teach both dogs it can come in handy in lots of situations. You may be able to modify the Desensitize Method for walks as well. As well, this guide may help you train Ruby to be less reactive. All of the methods are good but again, this guide has an excellent take on the Desensitization Method. Please read the guide through and choose a solution that you think will suit Ruby. Practice training her 10-20 minutes a day, and if that is not manageable 5 minutes is better than no training. Because she behaves so well on her own, I am sure you can conquer this other issue. Good luck!

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Pipi
Fox Terrier mix
4 Years
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Pipi
Fox Terrier mix
4 Years

my dog doesn't really like walkingon the street but whenever she does she gets very anxious about loud noises and people but mainly dogs. she will bark a lot.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would give Pipi a job to do when you are out on walks to help her focus on you and enjoy the walk - and stop stressing about other dogs out there. These methods are all good - Pipi has a keen mind and will enjoy the training. You'll see a big change in her personality as she walks: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. You can also work on the Passing Approach Method as described here: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs. Pipi will learn that passing other dogs in a calm manner brings reward. Take Pipi for walks often using these techniques and before you know it, the outing will be pleasurable for both of you. All the best!

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mIKA
Doberman Pinscher
7 Years
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mIKA
Doberman Pinscher
7 Years

Mika barks at neighbours, visitors at home and sometimes other dogs when we are out walking and most people - definitely joggers and cyclists, though sometimes she is as good as gold and I do give her lots and lots of praise. She is such a lovely dog and we love her dearly - we also have another Doberman, Denzel, who loves everyone but Mika seems to dislike most people. She is very protective of me but this isn't the reason she barks and runs at some people/dogs

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, it is never too late to take a dog to obedience classes. Doing so will help Mika learn to listen to you and it will also give her exposure to other dogs in an environment that is safe and controlled. Let the trainer know beforehand of Mika's personality. If you do not think a class environment will work, then consult a private trained for assessment and help in the home setting. It will be worth the effort and the expense to have a dog you can manage on every walk. Until then, work on teaching Mika to Heel while you are on walks: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Also work on basic commands: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-whippet. You will find more tips here: https://wagwalking.com/training/be-calm-around-strangers. This is lots of reading but may prove helpful. All the best and happy training!

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Lily
Chihuahua
5 Months
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Lily
Chihuahua
5 Months

My puppy is barking at people and other dogs while on a walk. I have tried treats and toys to distract her but it doesn’t seem to be working. I have no idea what else to do. I want her to be a good dog and not to be afraid of people and kids

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rebecca, First, check out the article linked below. As soon as possible, I suggest finding a puppy class to join for socialization. I suggest joining as soon as possible. 6 months is often the cut off for any off leash play during class, which can help with socialization. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ Second, check out the Passing Approach and Walk Together methods. See if you can recruit friends with well behaved friends to practice those methods with, rewarding pup for calmness, obedience, and focus on you. The repetitive passing of the other dogs should help pup get to the point where they can pass calmly enough to be able to reward them. The first few passes pup will probably be distracted like they are with strangers, but the repetitive passes should help. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bandit
Black Lab
6 Months
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Bandit
Black Lab
6 Months

Isn’t listening as good and pulls on walks and barks at everything

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sky, At this age, your dog is the equivalent of a dog teenager. They are testing boundaries, wanting to explore and do their own thing, and have a lot of hormones and changes in their brains happening. This is an age where obedience practice and consistency is very important and it can seem like you are constantly working on the same behaviors but often practice will pay off with time if you can be consistent and patient. This is also a common age for some fear and aggression to crop up a bit if pup is not being socialized well, so ensure that pup is having frequent pleasant encounters with new things, where they work on greeting others calmly, like sitting for petting, going on heeling walks with others and their friendly dogs or participating in an obedience class with other dogs, and receiving rewards for responding calmly and obediently with you around distractions. Listening in general - especially the Obedience and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Turns method for heeling: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Barking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eo-L2qtD7MQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY7JrteQBOQ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Donal
Shih Tzu
7 Months
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Donal
Shih Tzu
7 Months

My puppy barks and lunges at every dog and person that he sees during walks. I have tried all types of distraction but it seems to be getting worse. I assume because I’ve never had a dog before that I’m doing something wrong behind the lead and haven’t been able to help him properly but I’m worried he’s going to always be aggressive and I’ll forever fear walks with him. I’m very stressed and worried as I can’t work out the reason for his barking too, I’m not sure if it’s fear or frustration and wanting to play. He was born in February this year and we got him in April but we couldn’t walk him for a few weeks because he didn’t have his injections yet. Is there a way I can figure out why he’s barking and how can I help him feel more secure?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around new dogs, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make her concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Neo
Havanese
3 Months
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Neo
Havanese
3 Months

Hi! My puppy neo isn't fully vaccinated to go on walls yet but we take him outside on our front porch so he can get a bit more familiar with people walking around and cars going. HE is fine with cars and vehicles but he starts barking at almost any person that's somewhat close to our house. I think it is because he loves people and he wants to meet them because when they walk away he gets a little bit sad. Do you have any tips on how to quiet him down and make him not bark?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! The best way to solve this issue is to teach him to perform a command when he is in this situation. Naturally, sit is great because this also teaches him to sit as people are approaching and in the future, he will be seated nicely for petting instead of jumping. So as people are walking by, ask him to sit. Reward him with treats and praise, and practice this on repeat until it becomes automatic.

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Bennie
Miniature Goldendoodle
4 Years
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Bennie
Miniature Goldendoodle
4 Years

We have two mini doodles who are brothers, Winnie and Bennie. Winnie is a perfect walker, but Bennie pulls, walks then just bursts forward, and the worst part is that he barks at everything! Sometimes, at the beginning of the walk, I think he is so excited or nervous, he barks at nothing! I try holding him close to me, making him heel every time he pulls, telling him to come back, pointing to where he should be walking, etc. Sometimes, when another dog is walking by, one of us will cross the street and I will hold him in place and just pet him, trying to calm him and say it's ok. But he still barks. When we're at home, he's very calm and just follows me around. Although, if he does see a dog out the window, he does bark. Any suggestions? thanks!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Michelle, Check out the article linked below and practice the Turns method with just him at first - once he is good at that, you can walk the dogs together again too. Heel- Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel For the barking, check out the desensitization and Quiet methods from the article linked below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Once pup knows all of that, check out the videos linked below for an example of leading the walk calmly and confidently yourself, and interrupting pup early when they start to get aroused. Thresholds - require pup to exit your home calmly at the threshold before the walk even begins, to start the walk with pup in a calmer, more respectful, focused mindset. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Reactive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bucky
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
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Bucky
Labrador Retriever
2 Years

When our dog walker comes to the house to walk the dogs, Bucko barks like a maniac the entire time she is trying to hook the dogs up and continues until they start walking down the sidewalk. He does not do this when i walk him. How can we get him to stop?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Lindsey, I suggest practicing the video protocol from the link below with the walker. Pay your walker to come at some times when you are home and can practice the training together during the paid walk session, instead your walker taking pup on a walk during the walk session. Expect this to take more than one sessions though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Duke
Cocker Spaniel
4 Years
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Duke
Cocker Spaniel
4 Years

My sister bought Duke when he was a puppy just barely old enough to leave his mom and has been with my sister since then. My 3 children and myself have had duke come and spend the weekends with us since he was a baby. Recently, about two months ago duke came to live with us in our apartment. It has been a joy to have Duke with us. Duke is very loving, especially with children. Dukes listens very well. My biggest obstacle right now is taking duke for walks. Duke barks at everyone and everything very loudly and its very hard to calm him down. He has never tried to bite anybody. Duke has a very deep bark, you would think that this bark is coming from a rather big dog. Duke is about 25 30 lbs. When Duke was living with my sister, he was a house dog. My sister never took duke for walks, he just went around the yard. duke pretty much just stayed at home and that is all he has known. Now that duke is living with us and we live in an apartment, we have to take duke on frequent walks and to go potty. Because of all the crazy barking and not being able to control this behavior, my children and myself hesitate when its time to walk or go potty. Any suggestions?

Thank you for your time

Sandra Groom

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Sandra, It sounds like he may be overly suspicious or fearful due to a lack of socialization. I would work on desensitizing him and helping him overcome fears. Check out the video series linked below and the desensitization method from the article I have linked below. Desensitization method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Barking series - especially "Barking at noises"," dogs behind fences", "strangers", and "scary objects" I would recommend for you https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Buddy
Jack Russell Terrier
7 Months
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Buddy
Jack Russell Terrier
7 Months

Hello my issue is every time I take buddy on a walk soon as I leave the house he’s whining and barking and soon as I see someone he will bark even more iv tried with heel and rewarding him but he dose not seem to listen iv tried shortening his lead And that has not worked either my other problem is when I’m in the house I leave him in the living room and he will whine and while till I come back even if there is someone else In there with him he will still carry on how can I stop this

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around new dogs or people, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” The tips below can be used towards dogs, humans, or anything else he may be reactive to. Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make his concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at her (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Ellis Patten
malshipoo
9 Months
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Ellis Patten
malshipoo
9 Months

She is the perfect puppy in every way, responsive, obedient and so gentle with people and dogs. The only issue we have is she has taken to barking almost constantly on walks in our local area. (She doesn’t bark nearly at much when we venture to new areas)This can be at people or dogs or a random noise and when she starts she won’t stop. We’ve tried the distraction with treats method and the attempt at making her do a trick (she can do middle very well). It isn’t every dog or person though it’s just random - she can see them from a mile away and still react so it’s not as though they startle her. I just need to find a way to get her out of the habit as it is becoming embarrassing when she is such a good dog in every other way. Please if you could offer any advice or training methods that may help stop this behaviour, I would be so grateful. Thanks Ellis & Coco x

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Ellis, I would try one of two things. First, check out the video linked below. If she will take treats during these times, work on desensitizing her to the triggers, like people. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY7JrteQBOQ Second, if you can't get pup to stop barking long enough to even reward, you will need to interrupt the barking first. Once the barking is interrupted and she is quiet, then you can work on desensitizing like the video above. To interrupt, I recommend first teaching pup a Quiet command. Practice that at home. Once pup knows that command well, when she starts to bark, command quiet, and if she doesn't stop, briefly spray a small puff of air from a pet convincer at her side using the unscented air ones (not citronella, its too harsh, and Never in the face!). After she gets quiet for a second due to the surprise of the convincer, quickly start practicing obedience with her to get her focus back on you and what to do, and reward heavily for being in a calmer mindset again, focusing back on you, and staying quiet around people and other triggers. A good obedience exercise to practice is heeling with lots of turns and changes in pace quickly for a few minutes. You want it to be enough changes quickly that pup has to focus on keeping up with you and not on other things for a few minutes. Turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Beau
Schnoodle
17 Weeks
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Beau
Schnoodle
17 Weeks

She's amazing for everything thing else really fast learner however soon as I open the door she barks and barks. My friends and family say she's got to stop barking, as its not just at dogs its people and bikes to. And if a person stops to say hello she growls and runs away. We've tried everything from her favourite treats to cooked chicken, distracting it isn't working. Its really embarrassing. Id love to have her well focused, trained and be allowed to be off lead, Thankyou

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Becky, First, for the barking, I suggest combining a few things in your case. You need a way to communicate with her so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark In situations where you know pup will bark or is already barking (catch them before they bark if you can), command "Quiet". If they obey, reward with a treat and very calm praise. If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward then. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Once pup is calmer in general after the initial training, practice exposing her a lot to the things that trigger the barking normally (make a list - even if it's long). Whenever she DOESN'T bark around something that she normally would have, calmly praise and reward her throughout the day to continue the desensitization process. I also recommend joining a puppy class with her. It sounds like pup is also in need of a lot of socialization and is barking because she is overly excited or more likely fearful of the new things outside. Focus a lot on taking pup new places, having friends and family toss her treats from a distance she is comfortable with when she is quiet for even a second, and getting outside a lot with her, to help the newness of the outside world become more normal. Right now, you might want to look for a puppy class held in a fenced area outside in your city. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Chester
German Shepherd
12 Weeks
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Chester
German Shepherd
12 Weeks

When out for walks my puppy barks alot at strangers, we have tried to walk past and ignore them and we have also tried the person stroking him but he really barks at everyone

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It sounds like he has some leash anxiety/aggression going on. Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around people on walks, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs or people to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs or people because of genetic reasons, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes it's just a simple case of lacking proper socialization as a puppy. Which most dogs in a typical household lack proper socialization. Dogs need to be introduced to hundreds of different settings as a puppy (by the age of 20 weeks) to be "properly" socialized. Most of us are not able to do that. So we will be playing a bit of catch up! Keep in mind before starting, that punishing him while he's in this state of emotion isn't ideal. Doing so will make his concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate strangers with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what a stranger means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As someone comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the stranger causes meat to fall from the sky. When the stranger is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram his opinions of strangers. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time someone comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees a stranger, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening person and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell the dog, "sit" or "watch me" or whatever command you want to use for this setting. After he starts automatically sitting or watching you when he sees a stranger approaching, you know you have success! Remember to go slowly! It could take up to a month or longer of consistent practice before you see an improvement with his behavior.

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Pierce
Vizsla
21 Months
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Pierce
Vizsla
21 Months

When walking on lead, Pierce will lunge and bark at people alone, dogs alone or both. I try not to feed into his energy, but redirecting his attention is futile as his brain is just on “get ‘em!” I need to move him off the path (he can be very strong, so holding him is hard) until the target is gone. Then he’s a fairly calm dog. He is getting better walking beside me but we are not loose-leash yet. Thank you for your input. Obedient classes are not offered here in Winnipeg, MB, Canada, until COVID is more under control.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around new dogs, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make her concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Jenna DiMisa
German Shepherd
8 Months
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Jenna DiMisa
German Shepherd
8 Months

She gets so excited to see people that she will not stop barking at them on walks. She loves food but she loves people more so the treat doesn’t distract her for long. She doesn’t stop barking until the people are out of sight

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, your little Shepherd is at the perfect age for obedience training classes. This will secure the bond you two are building and will also socialize her to both people and dogs so that she learns how to behave properly around them. That is the best place to start. In the meantime, work on the Turns Method and the Stop and Go Method here when out on walks: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. Giving your dog a job to do when walking will put the focus on you as opposed to what is around her. The guide also mentions the Treat Lure Method, which you can try since she loves treats, These guides are excellent for training her before you start classes: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-small-dog-basic-obedience and https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-small-dog-operant-conditioning. There is lots of reading and advice here for you. Good luck and happy training!

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Major
German Shepherd
6 Months
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Major
German Shepherd
6 Months

When he was younger we couldn't take him out cos he had mange, so no walking from a young age off,Which also means no socialisation at a young age, we tried with my friend's pup but it didn't go well,he's better now and I want to take him on more frequent walks, if the neighborhood is quiet he listens quite well, I first start by gaining his attention when outside the yard and then let him sniff a bit and we go on our walk, along the way I gain his attention and ask him basic commands, sit and down and he listens very well, but now when the neighborhood dogs start barking he starts too, and I struggle to keep him at my side as he lunges, so I can't gain his attention to give him the command, and I trip over him, I manage sometimes to get his attention but it's a struggle. We can't get to a quiet place without going through the neighborhood because we live at the very end of the neighborhood and we have to walk through to get to a quiet place

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around new dogs, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs because of genetic reasons, lack of socialization, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes having low thyroid levels contributes to unwanted canine behavior. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make her concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Luna
Pomeranian poodle
3 Years
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Luna
Pomeranian poodle
3 Years

My 7lb pomapoo cannot seem to control her barking when on walks. She goes absolutely ballistic when she sees another human or dog. Screaming barking at the top of her lungs. I try to stop her and make her sit, but she fights and continues to freak out. She loves people and other dogs, so it seems like she’s trying to get their attention since she’s so little. It’s unmanageable and extremely embarrassing and a nuisance to neighbors. Treats or distractions don’t seem to work. Besides this problem, she’s an angel.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell her excitement. First we reduce her excitement around new dogs or people, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by anxiety, not by aggression. Somewhere along the lines, they just forgot how to socialize. During this time, avoid any punishment for reactivity. Doing so will make her concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate other dogs or people with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what an oncoming dog means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As the new dog comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the new dog causes meat to fall from the sky. When the other dog is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! As you are reframing your dog’s opinion of seeing other leashed dogs, be careful where you take your dog, and be protective of what she is exposed to. One fight can create a reactive dog. Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram her opinions of other dogs. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage (or somewhere out of the way if those two options aren't possible) with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time another dog comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees another dog, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening dog and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at her (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell your dog "watch me" every time you see another dog approaching. Your end goal is for your dog to see another dog, and remain calm, looking at you for guidance. And this will be either continuing your walk, or being allowed to interact with the other dog. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thanks for writing in!

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Clyde
Westie cross
11 Months
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Clyde
Westie cross
11 Months

Constant barking when out on walks

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Your best bet here is to reward him greatly for being quiet. Make being quiet when other dogs ignore him far more valuable than the attention he gets from barking at them. In the same vein, do you have a "focus" or a "look" command? If not, it's a good time to start working on one. That way, you ask him to focus on you, or look at you, then he'll be quiet and you reward that. Eventually he'll be looking at you all the time, just checking in on his own, asking you for guidance.

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Rocco
Pomchi
10 Months
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Rocco
Pomchi
10 Months

I have tried everything to try and reduce my dogs barking on our walks, but when he sees a person or dog etc I try and get his attention or show him a treat and he takes no notice what so ever

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Keeley, If you are tried various methods on your own and are not seeing improvement, I recommend hiring a private professional trainer at this point. I recommend finding someone who specializes in behavior issues like aggression, fear and reactivity, since pup likely has one of those issues underlying the barking, and in order for the barking to improve significantly the reactivity, aggression, or fear also needs to be addressed. Check their referrals and ask a lot of questions about experience and how they train. You will want someone who knows how to interrupt the behavior, to counter condition and desensitize, and use structured obedience to build pup's overall respect, trust and focus on you. Check out trainers like Sean O' Shea on Youtube, for some videos of reactivity and barking being addressed in some ways not involving only the use of treats. Many dogs won't take treats while stressed, so the level of stress either needs to be reduced during practice, the behavior interrupted first to help pup feel less aroused before they will take food later, or a different method not involving food be used. Food may still be an option but the training process probably needs to be adjusted or food used later in the training process after other training has taken place first. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Arlo
Pomsky
2 Years
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Arlo
Pomsky
2 Years

When walking, he barks a lot when he sees people but goes absolutely crazy when seeing a person walking a dog. It is impossible to get his attention, he just focuses on the dog until its out of eyeshot.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Janette, Check out the Quiet and Desensitize methods from the article linked below. I recommend teaching pup the Quiet command, and following the Desensitize method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Also, check out the video linked below for an example of desensitizing pup to things they are reactive toward. Reward pup for good responses, working at a distance pup can stay calm at to give you opportunities to reward, reminding pup with the Quiet command as needed, and gradually decreasing the distance as pup improves over several sessions of practice. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY7JrteQBOQ Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tilly
cockapoo
4 Years
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Tilly
cockapoo
4 Years

Over the last couple of years Tilly has started barking intolerably on walks when we let her off her lead It seems like out of control excitement, she runs away then back to us really barking hard and it is ruining our walks. She is a lead tugger as well, but when on the lead she does not bark. I have tried a number of things, ignoring turning backs to her. If she has a ball she is OK, but still quite barky and generally looses the ball. Can you help please its driving us mad! Thanks

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello David, It sounds like pup may be barking as a way to release her excitement when highly aroused during the exercise - she may also be trying to control your movement or initiate play with you. First, you need a way to communicate with her so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Practice having pup on a long training leash, like 20 or 30 foot and a padded back clip harness for safety and so you can enforce commands consistently. Next, with pup on the long leash, once pup understands what Quiet means from previous practice, choose an interrupter such as a vibration collar or unscented air pet convincer. Command Quiet. If pup gets quiet and stays quiet for a moment, reward pup. If pup continues barking or stops but starts again right away, calmly interrupt pup by saying "Ah Ah" and correcting with your interrupter. When pup is overly aroused also pause your walk or work her through some obedience commands like Sit, Down, Stand and Heel in quick but calm succession, to help pup refocus again. I would work on teaching pup some directional commands too, like Heeling off leash, or going certain directions on the trail ahead of you, and returning to your side, to also help pup focus more on a job to help with the excess mental energy she needs to release. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Braleigh
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
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Braleigh
Labrador Retriever
2 Years

my dog barks at cars, people and other dogs on a walk. I have tried the training whistle and rewards for not barking but she ignores it to continue to bark. She will bark even when she knows the house contains a dog no matter if I walk across the street and try to distract or try to use rewards in attempt to keep her from barking and getting the dog to bark. I don't know what to do? Dog is part lab, part blue lacy.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Tina, How does pup do with other people and animals? If pup is generally fearful or aggressive toward them, then the fear or aggression that's underneath the barking will also need to be addressed. I recommend working with a professional trainer who comes well recommended and is very experienced with those types of temperament traits. If pup is simply excited, overly sensitive to those things, barking out of enjoyment (some dogs find pleasure in barking), or barking for another reason that's not rooted in something like fear or aggression, then with the help of a trainer, I recommend teaching pup the Quiet command, interrupting the barking, while also rewarding quiet. I would recruit friends with well mannered dogs to help you, and practice passing the same dog over and over again from a distance during practice so that it isn't a new trigger pup is just as excited to see each time, but through repetition becomes boring and pup can calm down enough to make progress with the passes. Again, if there is aggression, pup has ever shown any form of aggression toward you, or you have any reason to believe pup could respond aggressively, hire professional help. A dog that is aroused due to aggression can transfer that aggression to whoever is closest and bite you when interrupted. In those cases, a basket muzzle and dealing with the underlying aggression first will be needed, and the training handled more carefully by someone who is trained to read pup's body language well and take safety measures. Always be careful when dealing with aggression or potential aggression. You need a way to communicate with him so I suggest teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below - don't expect this alone to work but it will be part of the puzzle for what I will suggest next. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Next, once pup understands what Quiet means you will choose an interrupter - neither too harsh nor ineffective. A Pet Convincer is one example of an interrupter. A pet convincer is a small canister of pressurized, unscented air that you can spray a quick puff of at the dog's side to surprise them enough to help them calm back down. (Don't use citronella and avoid spraying in the face!). In situations where you know pup will bark or is already barking (catch them before they bark if you can), command "Quiet". If they obey, reward with a treat and very calm praise. If they bark anyway or continue to bark, say "Ah Ah" firmly but calmly and give a brief correction. Repeat the correction each time they bark until you get a brief pause in the barking. When they pause, praise and reward then. The combination of communication, correction, and rewarding - with the "Ah Ah" and praise to mark their good and bad behavior with the right timing, is very important. Once pup is calmer in general after the initial training, practice exposing him a lot to the things that trigger the barking normally (make a list - even if it's long). Whenever he DOESN'T bark around something that he normally would have, calmly praise and reward him to continue the desensitization process. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Betty
Border Terrier
2 Years
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Betty
Border Terrier
2 Years

Betty barks and squeals when we play fetch. Its really loud and relentless. Really embarrasing too. I'm sure its just excitement but Is ruining our walks totally. Please help?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Gaynor, I recommend desensitizing pup to the excitement of fetching, or teaching pup a Hold command and having them hold a second toy in their mouth while they run after the first toy, to help them learn a new habit of not barking. Check out the video channel linked below that has several videos showing how to desensitize to various things that excite a dog. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a I would also teach pup the Quiet command and make that a requirement before you throw a toy, starting with throws just a couple of feet, until pup can stay quiet then, and adding more distance to your throw as pup masters staying quiet to earn the throw with more and more excitement gradually, until you have worked back up to your regular game of fetch. The goal here being more calmness and a bit boring in the game while pup is practicing and increasing the game's excitement to the degree that pup's self-control has also increased. Quiet method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Eddie
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
5 Years
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Eddie
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
5 Years

Eddie’s barking is always in excitement, starting when I put his lead on, then at birds, animals, waves, woods - anywhere that smells exciting. But especially when I walk with other people & he tries to get my attention. Some walks he is silent & the next time in exactly the same location he starts barking again.

I have tried the same command holding his head, getting eye contact & saying ‘stop barking’. This has worked until the next exciting smell. I have started pushing his nose down while holding his collar & saying ‘be Quiet’ in a firm quiet voice.
He is still exactly the same & I have stopped taking him to on walks with friends now & would not take him to anyone’s house. He came to us as a puppy barking his head off but I thought I could train it out of him!
Ps It has got worse during lockdown as I’ve been home all day long & he’s started getting separation anxiety.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Barking and excitability can be a challenging behavior to turn around. Because it is so complex, I am sending you an article full of great information that can help you. https://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/pet-behavior-training/excessive-barking-in-dogs/

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Jack
German Shepherd
4 Years
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Jack
German Shepherd
4 Years

Jack barks so much on walks, and when he does we would stop walking and not start again until he stopped. So we stop a lot. We have three dogs and sometimes he’ll chomp on one of them after or in the middle or barking. I think he’s just overly excited, but my wife is getting very upset with my inability to improve his behavior. I’m desperate for something to work. I’m going to try to take them on more walks, so they hopefully get used to it act a little less crazy. I’ll also start bringing along treats to reward them as well as to steer them away from possible triggers. I’ve kind of mashed together some of the above tactics, but please let me know what else to try. Thanks.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Patrick, Pup biting your other dog is called redirecting. When pup is highly aroused, pup feels the need for a release of that frustration so he directs it to whoever is closest - your other dog. If your other dog wasn't there, pup may direct it toward you, so for training you will need to work with pup walking them alone at first, before adding in the other dog again, and pup may need to be desensitized to wearing a basket muzzle to prevent pup from directing it toward you instead, so you can safely make progress with pup through practice. To introduce the muzzle, first place it on the ground and sprinkle his meal kibble around it. Do this until he is comfortable eating around it. Next, when he is comfortable with it being on the floor with food, hold it up and reward him with a piece of kibble every time he touches or sniffs it in your hand. Feed him his whole meal this way. Practice this until he is comfortable touching it. Next, hold a treat inside of it through the muzzle's holes, so that he has to poke his face into it to get the treat. As he gets comfortable doing that, gradually hold the treat further down into the muzzle, so that he has to poke his face all the way into the muzzle to get the treat. Practice until he is comfortable having his face in it. Next, feed several treats in a row through the muzzle's holes while he holds his face in the muzzle for longer. Practice this until he can hold his face in it for at least ten seconds while being fed treats. Next, when he can hold his face in the muzzle for ten seconds while remaining calm, while his face is in the muzzle move the muzzle's buckles together briefly, then feed him a treat through the muzzle. Practice this until he is not bothered by the buckles moving back and forth. Next, while he is wearing the muzzle buckle it and unbuckle it briefly, then feed a treat. As he gets comfortable with this step, gradually keep the muzzle buckled for longer and longer while feeding treats through the muzzle occasionally. Next, gradually increase how long he wears the muzzle for and decrease how often you give him a treat, until he can calmly wear the muzzle for at least an hour without receiving treats more than two treats during that hour. Muzzle introduction video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJTucFnmAbw&list=PLXtcKXk-QWojGYcl1NCg5UA5geEnmpx4a&index=6&t=0s The walk should start with him having to exit your home very calmly, performing obedience commands at the door if he isn't calm. He should wait for permission ("Okay" or "Free" or "Let's Go") before going through the door instead of bolting through if that's an issue. When you walk he should be in the heel position - with his head behind your leg. That position decreases his arousal, reduces stress because he isn't the one in charge and the one encountering things first. It prevents him from scanning for other dogs, staring dogs down or being stared down, and ignoring you behind him. It also requires him to be in a more submissive, structured, focused, calmer mindset - which has a direct effect on how aroused, stressed, and reactive he is. With the help of a trainer and pup wearing a basket muzzle, when you do pass other dogs, as soon as he starts staring them down, interrupt him. Remind him with a gentle correction that you are leading the walk and he is not allowed to break his heel or stare another dog down. It is far easier to deal with reactivity when you interrupt a dog early in the process - before they are highly aroused and full of adrenaline and cortisol, and to keep the dog in a less aroused/calmer state to begin with. Staying in a calmer mindset also makes the walk more pleasant for him in the long-run. Once pup can walk past other dogs more calmly, you can carry small, soft treats hidden in a treat pouch or plastic bag in your pocket. When pup's body language stays calm, they remain focused on you, or are very obedient when other dogs are within sight, reward pup with a treat and very calm - almost monotone praise (too much excitement can make the situation harder for pup). Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel If he barks, I suggest also teaching the Quiet command from the Quiet method in the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Once pup is calmer in general after the initial training, practice exposing him a lot to the things that trigger the barking normally (make a list - even if it's long). Whenever he DOESN'T pull/bark/get tense/react to something that he normally would have, calmly praise and reward him to continue the desensitization process. Finally, if pup is friendly with other dogs up close and isn't aggressive, work on calm socialization, and don't skip rewarding pup for calmness around other dogs once he is doing better on walk and is calm enough to reward it! That can help ultimately. For socialization, do things like joining obedience classes, trainings clubs, group dog hikes and walks, canine sports, ect...Your goal right now should be interactions with other dogs that have structure and encourage focus on you, calmness around the other dogs, and a pleasant activity with other dogs around - opposed to roughhousing or tense environments with tons of unpredictable dogs loose which increases adrenaline. Recruit some friends with well mannered dogs to go on walks with you and your dog, following the Passing Approach method and Walking Together method to help the dogs learn how to be calm around each other, while also continuing socialization. Passing Approach and Walking Together methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Coal
Lab shepard
4 Months
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Coal
Lab shepard
4 Months

I live on a college campus and when we go on walks (obviously) there are other people outside but he can’t bark at other people because eventually he’s going to be huge. How do I get him to stop barking at people passing by??
Also, I need him not to bark when I leave the room. How do I stop that. I’ve been working on saying quiet then walking away for a few seconds more every time. If he barks I say no and spray him with water, if he doesn’t I reward him. He’s doing better but I need him to be okay with not barking for an hour. We’re only at about 5 minutes.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Kira, Check out the barking video channel I have linked below, and the Quiet and Desensitize methods from the article I have linked second. Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA4pob0Wl0W2agO7frSjia1hG85IyA6a Quiet and Desensitize methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark For the inside barking, that can take time to work up to. If you are seeing progress I would stay consistent, but I would also add in teaching Quiet mentioned above for that too, as well as practicing the Surprise method from the article I have linked below while pup is in a crate or exercise pen and you leave the room. Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bella
Jack Chi
2 Years
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Bella
Jack Chi
2 Years

Everyone we go for a walk she is always barking at people dogs ect... And tries to lunge out and her haors go up. It's really upsetting especiall yfor my wife as she feels embarrassed

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
831 Dog owners recommended

Hello Peter, I suggest working on the structure of your walk first. You want pup to be working during the walk - having to stay behind you, focus on you, perform commands periodically, and not have her mind on scanning the area in search of other dogs. The walk should start with her having to exit your home very calmly, performing obedience commands at the door if she isn't calm. She should wait for permission ("Okay" or "Free" or "Let's Go") before going through the door instead of bolting through if that's an issue. When you walk she should be in the heel position - with her head behind your leg. That position decreases her arousal, reduces stress because she isn't the one in charge and the one encountering things first. It prevents her from scanning for other dogs, staring dogs down or being stared down, and ignoring you behind her. It also requires her to be in a more submissive, structured, focused, calmer mindset - which has a direct effect on how aroused, stressed, and aggressive she is - it makes her feel like the responsibility is on your shoulders not hers around other dogs. Additionally, when you do pass other dogs, as soon as she starts staring them down, interrupt her. Don't tolerate challenging stares - even if she is stressed. Remind her with a gentle correction that you are leading the walk and she is not allowed to break her heel or stare another dog down. It is far easier to deal with reactivity when you interrupt a dog early in the process - before they are highly aroused and full of adrenaline and cortisol, and to keep the dog in a less aroused/calmer state to begin with. This also makes the walk more pleasant for her in the long-run. Leading the walk this way can actually boost a dog's confidence in the long run around other dogs because the dog feels like you will handle the situation so they can relax. Protect her from other dogs. If she feels nervous and someone wants to let her meet their rude, excited dog, tell the other person no thank you. A simple "She's in training" tends to work well. Be picky about who and how she meets other dogs. Avoid dogs that don't respect her space, pull their owners over to her, and generally are not listening well - those dogs are often friendly but they are rude and difficult for a nervous dog. Also, avoid greeting dogs who look very tense around your dog, who stare her down, who give warning signs like a low growl or lip lift, who look very puffed up and proud - that type greeting with a dog is likely to end in a fight since your dog doesn't know how to diffuse that situation. A stiff wag is also a bad sign. A friendly wag looks relaxed and loose with relaxed body language overall. A tense dog with a very stiff wag, especially with a tail held high is a sign of arousal and not always a good thing. Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Examples of providing calmness and confidence during the walk: Reactive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY8s_MlqDNE Severely aggressive dog – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfiDe0GNnLQ&t=259s Aggressive dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Outside of the walk you can work on building pup's trust and respect for you in other ways too to help her confidence. The following commands and exercises are also good for that: Agility/obstacles for building confidence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elvtxiDW6g0 Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Any tricks that challenge her mentally, require impulse control, and equal her learning new things successfully. A long down stay around distractions is a good thing to practice during walks periodically. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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