How to Train Your Dog to Stop Chasing Shadows

How to Train Your Dog to Stop Chasing Shadows
Easy difficulty iconEasy
Time icon5-14 Days
Behavior training category iconBehavior

Introduction

You and your partner settle down with a well-deserved glass of wine and this week's episode of your favorite show. Only your dog has developed a somewhat irritating habit of going berserk at the sight of his own shadows and chasing them around until his energy is spent. It makes for just about the least relaxing atmosphere to watch TV in. It’s the same when you have guests over, he charges around the room causing havoc. It was entertaining to begin with, but now it’s time to stop.

Getting this training right won’t just be good for your sanity, it will also help his too. The shadows may actually scare him and he could be working himself up into a terrified state each evening. A happy dog is a healthy dog!

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Defining Tasks

Thankfully, you can train this bizarre behavior out of your dog relatively easily. The main thing you need to do is motivate him to be calm around shadows. You need to show him with food and a variety of other things that he’s safe around shadows and so can relax. If he’s a puppy and this habit is new, then getting a handle on it could take just 5 days or so. If he’s older and been chasing shadows for many years then you may need a couple of weeks to fully break the habit.

Succeeding with this training is essential if you want your evenings back. You also need to do it for his benefit too. If he’s getting worked up and stressed out by these shadows it could have an adverse effect on his health. You don’t want any expensive vet bills to contend with.

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Getting Started

Before you can get going with training you need to collect a few bits. You’ll need his favorite food broken into small pieces and some mouth-watering treats. You’ll also need to get a couple of new and enticing chew toys. These will all help to distract him when shadows make an appearance.

You’ll also need some quiet time to practice training. Take him to a quiet room where you won’t be distracted by a noisy household.

The only other things you need are patience and a positive attitude. With all of that, you can get to work!

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The Keep Calm Method

Most Recommended

3 Votes

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Most Recommended

3 Votes

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1

Get him settled

Gently play with him. You need to get him calm and subdued before the shadows arrive. That means be soft and quiet, don’t get him over excited--this will just make the chasing worse.

2

Regular treats

To keep him calm, reward him for good behavior. While he remains lying calmly with you, give him the odd treat to reinforce the behavior. He will quickly associate being calm with getting tasty rewards.

3

Obedience commands

If he does start going crazy and chasing shadows, instruct him to ‘sit’ or ‘wait’. By making him work you are channeling his energy into something productive while also distracting him from the shadows.

4

Don’t punish him

If you shout at him or shut him away you may only add to the problem. He may already be scared of the shadows, so needs your support. If you desert him he may become even more agitated and the problem will be heightened.

5

Tackle the problem every day

You need to follow the steps above consistently until the problem subsides. To fully break the habit,you need to be persistent; any lapse days will simply set the end result back further.

The Surroundings Method

Effective

5 Votes

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Effective

5 Votes

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1

Spend time in rooms with less lights

If left to develop, the shadows habit can only get worse, so try and address his surroundings to limit the problem. One of the first things you can do is to spend time in a room in the evenings with less lights.

2

Dark curtains

Hanging dark curtains in the rooms he uses most can make a big difference. With half the shadows to chase, the problem is halved straight away.

3

Store reflective items

Until you’ve got the problem under control, store particularly reflective items out of the way. Again this will reduce the shadows in his environment, which will reduce the stress and the chasing behavior.

4

Distract him

When you can see shadows appearing, keep him distracted with a new toy. Get him excited by playing in an animated voice and playing tug of war. If you tire him out with play he’ll have less energy to spend chasing shadows.

5

Exercise

Up his daily exercise intake. A lot of dogs that chase shadows are particularly energetic, so tackle that through out the day. Give him an extra or longer walk. Alternatively, play fetch on the walk. These short sprints will leave him napping for the rest of the day rather than chasing shadows.

The Eyes Up Method

Least Recommended

1 Vote

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Least Recommended

1 Vote

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1

Quiet room

Head for a quiet room with a pocketful of treats. You’re going to incentivize him to keep his eyes up. That way the shadows should feature less in his vision and be less of a problem.

2

Hold a treat at just above his head height

Make sure you hold it at a height. That means he has to slightly look up to focus on it properly. Make sure it’s just out of his reach, for now you just want to hold his attention with it.

3

‘Eyes up’

Issue the command at the same time you hold the treat up. He will learn to associate this cue with looking away from the shadows. You don’t have to use that exact phrase, you can use any word or phrase you like.

4

Reward

As soon as he does look up, give him the treat and some verbal praise. Really show him how happy you are that he’s done the right thing. This will make him more likely to repeat the behavior next time. Practice this for 5 minutes each day.

5

Increase the time

Over the next few days, increase the length of time he has to look up before you give him the treat. Keep practicing this until he swiftly looks up for as long as you leave him to. Now you can use this command whenever he starts to get agitated by the shadows. Working for the food will be a productive distraction and he’ll soon stop caring about the shadows.

By James Barra

Published: 11/02/2017, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Luna

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Pit bull

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2 Years

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Question

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0 found helpful

My dog saw something out of the living room window two days ago. Now she constantly runs through the house sniffing, scratching and looking at the walls, windows, and couches. How do I get her to relax and this behavior to stop? She doesn't listen when we tell her no or to lay down. This goes on all day and all night, she doesn't even want to sleep.

July 12, 2022

Luna's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Joe, Do you think she saw something real outside or just light or shadow? If pup saw something real and it was outside, I would first carefully take her outside on a very secure leash (using a no pull device and potentially back up leash to make sure she can't run off or pull the leash away from you), to let her investigate the yard and see that the animal is now gone so she will keep obsessing. If the obsession is shadow or light based, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who has experience with remote collar training (e-collar training) and obsessive compulsive behavior. Shadow chasing is an obsessive compulsive behavior. Often the behavior needs to become unpleasant for the dog, interrupting the fixation without over stressing the dog, and ideally without pup associating the correction with you but with their own behavior instead. Once it’s interrupted, then the behavior needs to be replaced with more appropriate outlets through reward based training and teaching things that help stimulate pup mentally and exercise their brains in appropriate ways, to help pup redirect that obsessive energy to better outlets. If anyone has ever used a laser pointer with pup, also stop using that. The use of laser pointers tends to contribute to dogs who are prone to developing such obsessions, beginning to chase lights and shadows too. Giving pup mental stimulation through small jobs, regular training practice, incorporating training into things like fetch or walks or earning what pup wants throughout the day by obeying commands first, puzzle toys/dog food stuffed kongs/working for food, or canine sports once the behavior is interrupted will be especially important for your dog. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

July 12, 2022

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Digby

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Dachshund

Dog age icon

1 Year

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Question

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When Digby was around 9months my husband had a laser measuring tape, not trying to tease Digby but he was fixated on it straight away. Ever since Digby won’t settle as soon as he’s let out of his cage. He stands over shadows crying at them and clawing at the floor. If a phone reflection etc he goes crazy chasing it around and waiting for it to come back. We’ve tried treats to distract him but he’s not interested as he’s so fixated on the shadow/light. It’s so upsetting to see how he cannot un-focus on it to play and sometimes sit to eat. Help or tips greatly appreciated!

May 8, 2022

Digby's Owner

Expert avatar

Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Olivia, I recommend hiring a professional trainer who has experience with remote collar training (e-collars) and obsessive compulsive behavior. Shadow chasing is an obsessive compulsive behavior. Often the behavior needs to become unpleasant for the dog, interrupting the fixation without over stressing the dog, and ideally without pup associating the correction with you but with their own behavior instead. Using remote collar training on pup's working level is one way to do that without pup associating the correction always with you. Once it’s interrupted, then the behavior needs to be replaced with more appropriate outlets through reward based training and teaching things that help stimulate pup mentally and exercise their brains in appropriate ways, to help pup redirect that obsessive energy to better outlets. Giving pup mental stimulation through small jobs, regular training practice, incorporating training into things like fetch or walks or earning what pup wants throughout the day by obeying commands first, puzzle toys/dog food stuffed kongs/working for food, or canine sports once the behavior is interrupted will be especially important for your dog. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

May 9, 2022


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