How to Train a Boston Terrier to Not Jump

Medium
3-6 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

When your Boston Terrier jumps up to greet you, she's excited that her favorite person has finally returned. Her goal is to get as much attention as soon as she can, and jumping on you helps her gain an advantage. While her intentions are sweet, jumping up on you can be an annoying habit at best, and potentially dangerous for children and older adults who might be frighted or knocked off balance. It's important to teach your Boston Terrier not to jump on people if she wants attention.

It might seem like a tiny Boston Terrier jumping isn't as troubling as a big dog like a Lab, but the underlying rules are the same. It doesn't matter how big your dog is, teaching them not to jump is good manners and helps to establish rules and boundaries that all dogs crave. Teaching your Boston Terrier to not jump on people is a good practice.

Defining Tasks

Boston Terriers are unique dogs, and unless you show them otherwise, they will think they are the leaders of the pack. It's easy to let your sweet girl get away will little things like jumping, but bowing to her demands for attention is only reinforcing that she makes the rules. By teaching her manners like not jumping, you are re-establishing yourself as a pack leader. Dogs like Boston Terrier thrive on rules and structure. Taking the time to teach her basic commands like 'sit' and 'stay', as well as manners like waiting and not jumping, you're giving her a framework she needs and deepening your bond.

Jumping up is a rude behavior no matter no matter how small your dog is. Your friends and family might not be as dismissive as you are. Taking time to teach her that jumping up isn't the way to get what she wants will benefit not only your relationship with your dog, but with friends and family too. when your dog is respectful of company, no one will dread coming to your house.

Getting Started

Teaching your Boston Terrier to not jump on you for attention will take a lot of patience and consistency, especially if she has been allowed to do it for a while. The best way to teach her a new habit is to completely stop the old one. Below are three methods to try. Read through them and pick the best one for you and your dog. Once you have a plan, make sure to have these items on hand to help you accomplish the goal.

  • Treats that she loves
  • A leash and dog collar
  • A friend
  • A bit of determination

With patience and training, your little cutie will greet you with a tail wag instead of a jump.

The Turn Your Back Method

Effective
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Step
1
Walk out the door
Pick up your keys and wallet and act like you are about to walk out the door. Let her know you plan on leaving and then walk out. If she's already jumping on you, just ignore her.
Step
2
Walk back in
After a few minutes walk back into the house. Make sure she knows you have returned, but don't call her name.
Step
3
Turn your back
When she starts to jump, turn your back to her and don't give her any attention. Lift up your hands so she can't touch them.
Step
4
Give her praise
As soon as she stops, say "good girl" and give her a pat. If she starts to jump, turn your back to her again.
Step
5
Practice turning your back
Anytime she starts to jump on you, turn your back on her and stop giving any attention. Don't give her attention until all of her paws are firmly on the floor. Keep practicing each time you walk in the door.
Step
6
Reinforce the habit
When she stops jumping on you when you walk in the door, you're ready to move this habit to other places she likes to jump. This could be during mealtimes, when she wants to go up on the couch, or when she wants attention from friends. Simply ignore her until she stops jumping and she'll learn that jumping never gets her what she wants.
Recommend training method?

The Leash Method

Effective
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Step
1
Use the leash
Put your dog's leash on and hold her a few feet away from the door.
Step
2
Have your friend walk in
When you're in position, have your friend walk in the door.
Step
3
Keep your dog away
When your dog starts to jump or bark at your friend, tell her to sit.
Step
4
Let your friend move closer
Let your friend move closer to your dog. If she breaks the 'sit' and starts to jump, tell your friend to move a step back and ask your dog to sit.
Step
5
Reward the calm
Let your friend continue to move toward your dog, and ask her to stop and move back a step each time your dog starts to jump or strain the leash. When your dog stays calm, your friend can pet her.
Step
6
Switch
When she is comfortable not jumping on your friend, switch places with your friend. Have your friend hold your dog inside, and you practice walking in and only petting her when she is calm. Practice with anyone who comes over.
Step
7
Lose the leash
When she's consistently not jumping on anyone who walks in the door, practice without the leash. Eventually, keeping her paws planted will be her new habit.
Recommend training method?

The Sit and Treat Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Load your pockets
Load your pockets with her favorite treats before heading out the door.
Step
2
Keeps your hands in your pockets
When you walk in the door, keep your hands in your pockets. Don't reach down to pet her when she starts to jump.
Step
3
Tell her to sit
Tell her to sit in a stern voice.
Step
4
Give her a treat
When all four paws are on the floor in a sit, give her a treat. If she jumps up before you treat her, tell her to sit again.
Step
5
Practice makes perfect
Keep practicing this anytime she starts to jump. Ask her to sit and give her a treat.
Step
6
Sit instead of jump
Don't ever pet her when she jumps up, instead ask her to sit. You can start weaning her off the treats and give her a quick pet. Soon she'll replace jumping with sitting.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

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