How to Train a German Shepherd to Listen to You

Easy
1-3 Days
General

Introduction

Sometimes, dogs can be stubborn. Whether it’s because Fido is easily distracted or is just bored, it can be difficult to get his attention in order to teach him the behaviors you’d like for him to learn. You know he’s smart. You know he can do it. If you could only get him to pay attention to you for just a few seconds in order to teach him!

German hepherds, though generally known for being great at obedience of any kind, can sometimes develop some bad habits. With highly intelligent dogs sometimes comes the capacity to be bored or more interested in something else entirely. German shepherds can also be capable of some pretty high prey drives. Try getting your dog’s attention when a peppy little squirrel darts by. It can sometimes be impossible! But there are a few tips and tricks to get your dog to be more interested in you and what you have to say rather than whatever interesting smell might be lingering in the dirt a few feet away.

Defining Tasks

Getting your German shepherd to listen to what you have to say doesn’t have to be so difficult. Being able to communicate effectively with your dog is the number one way to practice proper obedience. Remember that dogs don’t always understand the methods of communication that humans tend to use. Using his name over and over with no response will often just teach him to tune you out. Your dog prefers to use body language to communicate or prefers to respond when there is a reward to be had. This is where positive reinforcement comes in.

Teaching your dog to listen can begin at any age, young or old. Stubborn or not, German shepherds are intelligent and willing to work with the right motivation. Grabbing his focus reliably can take as little as one day, but can take up to maybe three for a particularly disinterested pup. His rate of improvement will depend heavily on what you offer in exchange for his attention.

Getting Started

You’ll want to begin by determining what motivates your dog. Most of the time, it’s treats. But it can also be toys or other rewards. Make sure these rewards are high in value, meaning that your dog only receives them on “special occasions”. Good treats to use are bits of real chicken or other dog-safe meats, cheese, peanut butter (without xylitol), frozen beef or chicken broth, or any type of human food that is safe for your dog to eat. Be sure to double check and research that the snack is healthy for your pup!

Once you’ve gotten together some fun and tasty rewards, then you can get your dog into an area free of distractions. The less distracted he is at the beginning of your training, the more likely he’ll be able to listen to you later on when there are more things that may try to grab his attention.

The Focus Method

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Step
1
Use a treat
Pick a treat that is high in value. Feel free to rotate them out occasionally to keep the rewards fresh and new.
Step
2
Hold the treat up
Hold the treat where your German shepherd can see it. Keep close to him if necessary to let it grab his attention.
Step
3
Use your dog’s name
Say your dog’s name once and only once. A repeated use of his name will only get him to start ignoring you.
Step
4
Use a verbal command
Use a phrase like ‘look at me’ or ‘focus’ as soon as you have your dog’s attention. This command will later be used to get his attention at any time.
Step
5
Reward
Offer the treat as soon as your dog looks at you. It should be an immediate reward, not a second too late.
Step
6
Repeat
Repeat this a few times a day, but only if you have a treat in hand. Over time, you can begin to wean your dog off of the treat, but stay consistent at the beginning. He should get used to being rewarded when he offers you his attention.
Recommend training method?

The Timing Method

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Step
1
Catch the behavior
Keep an eye on what your dog is doing. Do not acknowledge her until she turns to look at you for any reason.
Step
2
Have a reward ready
Have your reward in hand whenever you are training. This method is all about catching your German shepherd at the exact moment when her focus is on you.
Step
3
Use a command when you see the behavior
Use a verbal command to mark the behavior, which you will begin to call it later.
Step
4
Reward right away
Let her take the reward immediately after the verbal command. This will teach her to routinely look back to you whenever the words are said.
Step
5
Practice being quick
Catching when your dog is looking as you is sometimes like catching lightning in a bottle. Be quick to mark the behavior with your verbal command and reward. Do this regularly and getting her attention should become easier over time.
Recommend training method?

The Play Method

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Step
1
Use a toy
An interesting toy is best for this method. Something that is colorful, smells interesting, or has a squeaker can all be good traits for a toy that can grab your dog’s attention.
Step
2
Be energetic
Your German shepherd is much more likely to pay attention to you if you’re energetic and all over the place. Jump up and down, make some high pitched noises, and get your dog excited.
Step
3
Run away
Dogs like to chase. Running in the opposite direction can convince yours to go after you with enthusiasm, especially if you have the toy in hand.
Step
4
Reward for response
Reward your dog with the toy when he catches up to you. Have some play time and continue the upbeat energy. The play time with the toy is the reward for wanting to be around you and focusing on where you are.
Step
5
Be consistent
Your German shepherd will only form a habit of paying attention to you if you are consistent in your rewards. Never forego the play time with the toy if your dog isn’t reliable enough to do so. This will often cause a step backwards.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Kelly
German Shepherd
3 Months
0 found helpful
Question
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Kelly
German Shepherd
3 Months

I can feel something on his dick and it makes him piss anyhow

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
943 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mr. Mayowa, It sounds like you may have a medical concern. I recommend speaking with your vet. Under the medical articles section of wagwalking, there is also an ask a vet section. You could also try asking your question there. I am not a vet, so am not qualified to answer any medical concerns. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Luna
German Shepherd
8 Months
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Question
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Luna
German Shepherd
8 Months

She jumps on everyone and doesn’t listen when we try to get her to come inside or to get her into her kennel. We’ve tried using treats and toys but they don’t work anymore.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
239 Dog owners recommended

Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Question
buchi
East European Shepherd
7 Months
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Question
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buchi
East European Shepherd
7 Months

sometimes when she playing with my another dog or getting angry she doesnot listening to me today he attacked liitle pig becouse it came to my yard i know this dogs are so owner but she always getting out of control when she sees something like chicken or pig in my yard

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
943 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nika, Check out James Penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining. He has a Youtube channel. He works with dogs that chase and sometimes will kill livestock. Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
luna
German Shepherd
8 Months
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
luna
German Shepherd
8 Months

sometimes listens
doesn’t understand commands

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
943 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mariah, It sounds like pup may need to go back to the basics with some commands and work on teaching those words, then set up training scenarios where you practice those commands in gradually more and more distracting environments on leash, to help pup's ability to focus around distractions grow. You want this process to be gradual so that pup isn't so distracted they can't learn. Check out the Obedience method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you On www.wagwalking.com/training you can also find more articles on how to teach various individual commands like Sit, Down, Come, Heel, ect...I recommend making a list of commands you want pup to learn right now and finding an article on how to teach each command. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Luna
German Shepherd
10 Weeks
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Luna
German Shepherd
10 Weeks

Luna doesn’t bite me, my mom or my dad anymore only when we play with her she sometimes does it on accident. But she never stops biting my younger sister. My sister has even stopped trying to say “no” instead she’s running away in fear... what do we do to help both ?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
239 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

have her be brave so the dog wont think it okay to bithg also im a kid with a BIG sheperd so just because i kid dont mean i dont know.

also she mitgh be play fithging

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