How to Train a German Shepherd to Listen to You

Easy
1-3 Days
General

Introduction

Sometimes, dogs can be stubborn. Whether it’s because Fido is easily distracted or is just bored, it can be difficult to get his attention in order to teach him the behaviors you’d like for him to learn. You know he’s smart. You know he can do it. If you could only get him to pay attention to you for just a few seconds in order to teach him!

German hepherds, though generally known for being great at obedience of any kind, can sometimes develop some bad habits. With highly intelligent dogs sometimes comes the capacity to be bored or more interested in something else entirely. German shepherds can also be capable of some pretty high prey drives. Try getting your dog’s attention when a peppy little squirrel darts by. It can sometimes be impossible! But there are a few tips and tricks to get your dog to be more interested in you and what you have to say rather than whatever interesting smell might be lingering in the dirt a few feet away.

Defining Tasks

Getting your German shepherd to listen to what you have to say doesn’t have to be so difficult. Being able to communicate effectively with your dog is the number one way to practice proper obedience. Remember that dogs don’t always understand the methods of communication that humans tend to use. Using his name over and over with no response will often just teach him to tune you out. Your dog prefers to use body language to communicate or prefers to respond when there is a reward to be had. This is where positive reinforcement comes in.

Teaching your dog to listen can begin at any age, young or old. Stubborn or not, German shepherds are intelligent and willing to work with the right motivation. Grabbing his focus reliably can take as little as one day, but can take up to maybe three for a particularly disinterested pup. His rate of improvement will depend heavily on what you offer in exchange for his attention.

Getting Started

You’ll want to begin by determining what motivates your dog. Most of the time, it’s treats. But it can also be toys or other rewards. Make sure these rewards are high in value, meaning that your dog only receives them on “special occasions”. Good treats to use are bits of real chicken or other dog-safe meats, cheese, peanut butter (without xylitol), frozen beef or chicken broth, or any type of human food that is safe for your dog to eat. Be sure to double check and research that the snack is healthy for your pup!

Once you’ve gotten together some fun and tasty rewards, then you can get your dog into an area free of distractions. The less distracted he is at the beginning of your training, the more likely he’ll be able to listen to you later on when there are more things that may try to grab his attention.

The Focus Method

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Step
1
Use a treat
Pick a treat that is high in value. Feel free to rotate them out occasionally to keep the rewards fresh and new.
Step
2
Hold the treat up
Hold the treat where your German shepherd can see it. Keep close to him if necessary to let it grab his attention.
Step
3
Use your dog’s name
Say your dog’s name once and only once. A repeated use of his name will only get him to start ignoring you.
Step
4
Use a verbal command
Use a phrase like ‘look at me’ or ‘focus’ as soon as you have your dog’s attention. This command will later be used to get his attention at any time.
Step
5
Reward
Offer the treat as soon as your dog looks at you. It should be an immediate reward, not a second too late.
Step
6
Repeat
Repeat this a few times a day, but only if you have a treat in hand. Over time, you can begin to wean your dog off of the treat, but stay consistent at the beginning. He should get used to being rewarded when he offers you his attention.
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The Timing Method

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Step
1
Catch the behavior
Keep an eye on what your dog is doing. Do not acknowledge her until she turns to look at you for any reason.
Step
2
Have a reward ready
Have your reward in hand whenever you are training. This method is all about catching your German shepherd at the exact moment when her focus is on you.
Step
3
Use a command when you see the behavior
Use a verbal command to mark the behavior, which you will begin to call it later.
Step
4
Reward right away
Let her take the reward immediately after the verbal command. This will teach her to routinely look back to you whenever the words are said.
Step
5
Practice being quick
Catching when your dog is looking as you is sometimes like catching lightning in a bottle. Be quick to mark the behavior with your verbal command and reward. Do this regularly and getting her attention should become easier over time.
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The Play Method

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Step
1
Use a toy
An interesting toy is best for this method. Something that is colorful, smells interesting, or has a squeaker can all be good traits for a toy that can grab your dog’s attention.
Step
2
Be energetic
Your German shepherd is much more likely to pay attention to you if you’re energetic and all over the place. Jump up and down, make some high pitched noises, and get your dog excited.
Step
3
Run away
Dogs like to chase. Running in the opposite direction can convince yours to go after you with enthusiasm, especially if you have the toy in hand.
Step
4
Reward for response
Reward your dog with the toy when he catches up to you. Have some play time and continue the upbeat energy. The play time with the toy is the reward for wanting to be around you and focusing on where you are.
Step
5
Be consistent
Your German shepherd will only form a habit of paying attention to you if you are consistent in your rewards. Never forego the play time with the toy if your dog isn’t reliable enough to do so. This will often cause a step backwards.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Shadow
German Shepherd
1 Year
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Shadow
German Shepherd
1 Year

he will not respond to his name at all and will not listen and he chews on everything what do i do?

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Elsie
German Shepherd
2 Years
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Elsie
German Shepherd
2 Years

Elsie is aggressive with other dogs. Recently on holiday we were fortunate enough to be in a secure field when the owners dog came to the gate. Elsie immediately ran to the fence and became aggressive. She completely ignores my attempts to catch her and runs to try and get to the dog another way. I find this very stressful and am afraid that she might be hurt or hurt another dog. Please help!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Linda, First, check out Thomas from the Canine Educator and Jeff Gellman from SolidK9Training on YouTube. They both have YouTube channels and specialize in aggression. I would start with building a good foundation of trust and respect for you - that will help a lot in dealing with the aggression. Check out the following videos and articles for things to work on with pup to help in those areas. Teach him a Place command and work on him staying on place for up to an hour, even when you walk into the other room for a minute. Practice crate manners. Work on teaching a structured Heel. Forget about getting places during a walk for a while right now, instead go somewhere open, like your front yard, a park, or culdesac and practice a heel where his nose does not go past your leg. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Working method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Come command - The Reel In method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-whippet-to-recall You need to hire a trainer to help you with the aggression and you need someone who uses a lot of boundaries, positive reinforcement and fair discipline tactfully. Look for someone who is very experienced with aggression and different types of aggression - many trainers are only experienced with fear based aggression and you likely have some dominance- based or possessive aggression going on too, and they are treated a bit differently than fear. Also, look for someone who has access to other well behaved dogs - like a larger training group that specializes in behavior issues and aggression, so that the training can be practiced around other dogs in a controlled environment, where things like distance between the dogs can be adjusted and safety measures in place. You may need an e-collar off-leash Come as well. That has to start with using the Reel In method to teach an on-leash, long leash come, then the e-collar is added to that training once pup knows the Come command reliably around distractions on leash. There is a very specific way e-collar training has to be done to work effectively and safely, so if you do get into e-collar training seek the help of a qualified trainer for that part of training. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Tank
German Shepherd
9 Months
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Question
1 found helpful
Tank
German Shepherd
9 Months

Tank is very smart and listens when I have treats. But, when he is being naughty he bites me as I take him away from what he is doing. I have tried yelping/crying, pinning him to the ground until he relaxes, and a shock collar.With these efforts he is still very aggressive and has broken my skin from bites. Feeling overwhelmed.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Emily, It sounds like it's time to hire professional help. A lot of what I would encourage you to do could lead to a bite if it's not done carefully - because he is biting whenever you make him do anything he doesn't want to do. He needs a strict obedience protocol, to work for everything he gets in life by having to do a command first - such as Sit before being petted, Down before being fed, Wait before being taken for a walk, ect...He needs to practice commands that build impulse control, teach boundaries, and earns his respect without hitting up against his defense drive - a defense drive simply put is something that causes certain dogs like Shepherds to fight back harder instead of submit or retreat when you apply pressure. You have to earn his respect through obedience commands, structure, and having him work in life - basically by dealing with his mind not just applying physical pressure. Have a trainer help you with the following things - again, I don't suggest doing this on your own because you will probably be bitten if not really careful. A basket muzzle may also be needed when first working with him. At this age this sounds more like a respect issue than just playful puppy mouthing. Place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omg5DVPWIWo Crate manners: https://thegooddog.net/training-videos/free-how-to-training-videos/learn-to-train-the-good-dog-way-the-crate/ Thresholds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-w28C2g68M Heel article - The turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Heel Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTiKVc4ZZWo Working and Consistency methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you E-collars are a great tool for working with aggression in dogs many times, because they allow you to modify behavior without having to physically touch a dangerous dog, BUT you cannot simply put the collar on and start correcting the dog with it whenever they do something you don't like. That can make aggression worse sometimes. You have to lay a foundation of obedience, determine what level is appropriate for the dog and use the right level. You have to choose a high quality collar - typically garmin, e-collar technologies, dogtra, or sportdog - something with at least 60 levels. You have to give verbal corrections so that the dog understands that he did something wrong, like "Ah Ah" or "No", reward for good behavior to teach the dog what to do correctly, and you have to collar condition - which means teaching the dog how he should respond to avoid the corrections. For example, when teaching a dog to Come with an e-collar, you first teach the dog to Come without the e-collar, you use a long leash the teach the dog to come even around distractions and use positive reinforcement, then you put the e-collar on the dog, find the correct level, get the dog used to the collar, and use the long leash to guide the dog to you when they feel the e-collar correction for not coming - stopping the correction as soon as the dog starts coming toward you, praising and rewarding the dog for coming really well without having to correct them. The guidance of the leash teaches the dog how to avoid the correction - by coming to you; instead of just stressing the dog out and causing them to run away faster because they are uncomfortable and don't know how to make it stop when first learning. The correction is probably also a WAY lower level than what a cheap collar gives. Look for a trainer who specializes in behavior issues, has lots of experience with aggression, has experience with Shepherds and their defense drive, uses both fair corrections and positive reinforcement, comes well recommended by their previous clients who dealt with aggression issues with their dogs, and whose training methods make sense to you are logical - good training isn't a lot of weird wolf theories, it should feel like common sense why it works when you ask for an explanation. If you are going to be working with an e-collar, the trainer should also be very experienced with that and only use high quality e-collars and know what a dog's "Working level" is - which is the lowest level that a dog indicates they feel the collar stimulation, which is the level most often used during training for that dog. Not all dogs have the same working level - it's individual for the dog so needs to be determined. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Dollar
German Shepherd
2 Months
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Dollar
German Shepherd
2 Months

My puppy is 2 months old but he does not obey me and dont listen to me even i call him by his name.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mukul, At this age pup doesn't know any human words and doesn't even realize that you are speaking to him when you call his name. Check out the free PDF e-book, AFTER You Get Your Puppy that can be downloaded at the link below. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Work on teaching pup to respond to his name using treats, and teach pup some basic commands using rewards, one command at a time. The Reinforcement method https://wagwalking.com/training/know-his-name Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Bear
Sherman sheperd
5 Months
1 found helpful
Question
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Bear
Sherman sheperd
5 Months

So Bear has some problems listening and when I walk him he has problems stay by my side. He does do what I say like sit and lay down. But I can never get his attention half of the time. what do I do?

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Skylar, First, know that he is young and focus and attention is a skill that a dog or puppy has to learn - like come and sit. Just like how an off-leash come requires a lot of practice and working up to harder situations and being able to come around distractions, focus starts with practicing training in less distracting locations and practicing until pup can focus there, then moving onto a more distracting location, then a more distracting location and so forth. Enrolling in a well recommended Intermediate Obedience class (depending on how his obedience is now). First work on obedience somewhere like a fenced in yard until pup can do it reliably there. As pup improves, move somewhere like a cul-de-sac, then other parts of the neighborhood, calm parks, busier parks, outside of dog parks (not in the fence with the dogs - just where pup can see them), pet stores, outdoor shopping areas, farmers markets, ect... Practice the training at a certain difficulty level until pup can obey in that location around those distractions, then move onto the next difficulty level as they show they are ready, then the next and the next - until finally pup is reliable in all situations. This takes a lot of repetition and trips out to places. It's also important to motivate pup well and that doesn't always mean food. When you give pup a command, pay attention to your tone and body language. Are you enthusiastic when calling Come? Are you calm when saying Heel? Are you focused on them to get your timing right? Do you sound confident and sure? What are you rewarding? Are you giving a treat when pup does especially well, are you only allowing forward movement when pup is heeling, are you letting pup go sniff something if they come and focus FIRST, are you waiting until they sit before you let them outside - so they are focused and calm to begin with. Does pup know that you mean what you say? When you give a command do you enforce it? This might mean not letting pup walk away until they Sit if you command them to - even if you have to wait fifteen minutes. Practicing Come on a long leash or using a vibration or stimulation e-collar so you can enforce the command if they disobey it once you know that they understand, not letting pup eat or go outside until they are calmly waiting or sitting, ect... Heel -the turns method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Malia
German Shepherd
One Year
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Question
1 found helpful
Malia
German Shepherd
One Year

Hi,I have been training my GSD to do basic commands. But recently she has been ignoring me to "sit' she will get up two seconds after I say the command along with "leave it" I was wondering if maybe I should maybe get a clicker just to see if then I would get a different responds then just rewarding her with treats because she's not allows wanting the treats when rewarded. this isn't all the time its just sometimes.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Katelyn, A clicker is a wonderful tool. A clicker simply improves timing and helps the dog associate the sound of the clicker with good things. Improving our training skills is always good, so it can't hurt. I would say though it sounds like pup is more in need of proofing their skills though. Proofing is the process where pup learns that commands aren't optional and how to perform those commands around distractions. A good intermediate obedience class will work on those types of skills. Incorporating those commands into daily life more can also help, and using "life-rewards" to motivate pup. For example, tell pup to Sit Stay before opening the door to begin a walk. Wait until pup sits before you open the door. As soon as the door starts opening, if pup stands up without being told to, close the door again until pup is sitting again, when pup stands up also say "Ah Ah" so they know they did something wrong and that was why the door closed again. When pup is sitting again, start opening the door again, if pup stays this time, open it all the way, step out the door - if pup jumps up then, quickly step back inside and close it again. Practice this until you can step outside with the door open and pup won't get up until released with a word like "Okay!". This takes patience but that's what real world training is all about. Pup learns that to get what they want, they have to obey first, and listening becomes habit. This also build pup's respect for you gently - which is important especially for certain breeds, like working breeds and really intelligent breeds - such as German Shepherds. You can do this type of training with almost anything - use a long leash to practice come - pup has to come before they are allowed to go sniff something new - you either reel them in with the long leash or wait until they give in and come, then give them a release word and enough slack in the leash to sniff the new thing (if it's safe). Pup worked for that sniff and learned to come before wandering over to something new. Have pup hold a Down stay before you put their dinner down. Anytime pup gets up, food goes behind your back again, until pup will stay until released and be given the food. To get somewhere they want to get to, pup has to stay in the heel position. If pup moves ahead of you, you turn the other way and pup has to follow - pup earns forward movement toward new things by staying in heel, ect... Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Rocco
German Shepherd
3 Months
1 found helpful
Question
1 found helpful
Rocco
German Shepherd
3 Months

I’m trying to get him to learn his name and it’s hard. But my main problem is how to stop him chewing on stuff, and how to get him to come to me cause he don’t know his name. I’m trying to train him to sit and stay. But I can’t get his attention

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Very cute! Is Rocco getting lots of walks and playtime outside? This may help with the chewing. Make sure that he has lots of chew toys to keep him stimulated mentally. Interactive feeders and food puzzles are great for having them work for reward. Getting Rocco to listen to you and learn his name is easily achieved at dog training classes. I would start him right away because it helps with the socialization, too. Look into training in your area. As well, try these methods for helping Rocco listen: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you/. For teaching Rocco his name: https://www.battersea.org.uk/pet-advice/dog-care-advice/how-teach-dog-its-name. Good luck and enjoy!

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Duke
German Shepherd
6 Months
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Question
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Duke
German Shepherd
6 Months

Duke
I got him when he was 3 mo. He has been a good dog despite some problems. He's almost 6 mo now. I have tried teaching him a lot of commands (not at the same time, obviously) like sit, stand, stay, quiet, speak, no and go (as in yes). He seems to understand most of them, but just doesn't obey. He's definately smart enough, as he has proven at times; so, that's definately not the reason. Then I thought that maybe I'm just not training him well enough, so watched a lot of YouTube videos and did some research, but to no avail. The puppy biting has reduced overtime, but his aggression towards our three house-helps remains constant, while doing nothing to the fourth. Also, he seems especially agressive towards the receptionist of our business, despite him having done nothing to him. He has been seeing all these people for about 3 months now, but no change. Also, he is aggressive towards strangers and barks incessantly (barking's not a problem, but he won't stop, no matter what). Having said this he has never been agressive towards any of the family members, and is very loving like that. It's just that he doesn't obey what we tell him.

Sorry for the long post, but I'm genuinely worried, and would appreciate any suggestions.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, sorry for the delay in response. I would call in a trainer who is used to working with aggressive dogs. The trainer can assess Duke and put in place tools to help you deal with the issues. Perhaps sending him to a board and train program could help. It is really hard to say without first-hand knowledge of Duke - but the fact that you are dealing with it now will help. Have you taken Duke to any obedience classes yet? This is essential to a well-behaved dog as they feel more at ease when they have leadership. In the meantime, take a look here at tips: https://wagwalking.com/training/not-attack-strangers. And there may be helpful videos here, as well as the opportunity to consult a trainer: https://robertcabral.com/. All the best!

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Ruger
German Shepherd
6 Months
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Ruger
German Shepherd
6 Months

My 6 month puppy Ruger is extremely stubborn. He won't sit or come to his name at all. I've tried food, toys and pets as motivation. Hell just look right at me and walk off. He pretends he doesn't hear me and ignores all commands.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, this is the ideal time to enroll Ruger in obedience classes. If he has a bit of an attitude about not listening now, it will only get worse. Attending obedience classes will give you the tools you need to learn how to teach your puppy to listen. Ruger will also learn his place in the home and have the excellent example of other well-behaved dogs in the class. I really think this is the best option. Remember, Kruger will only get bigger and you have to know how to handle him in all situations, like the dog park and when on walks. In the meantime, practice his obedience commands 20 minutes a day. Reward him with a treat when he has success. Be consistent. and always end on a good note. Try these steps here: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-great-dane. Also, when walking Ruger, work on the Heel command. Try the Turns Method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel. This will get him used to listening to you. But as well, the formal training is a must. Good luck!

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Eury
German Shepard / Husky
5 Months
0 found helpful
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Eury
German Shepard / Husky
5 Months

We have taken in a rehome dog that is 5 months old and they had zero rules for the dog. It is a smart dog, and we are going to be consistent with our training, but getting her attention is difficult and I am just looking for advice. We are not new to dogs and raising puppies, but they were a boxer and a labrador.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! So you have a mix of two pretty powerful breeds. Both mentally and physically. Both breeds need a lot of mental stimulation and physical exercise or you can count on her to continue to zone you out. A good place to start is to exercise her before you work on training commands. That will get the commands learned a bit faster than if you were to try to just work on commands alone. She will probably give you a good 5 minutes and then be done. So set aside about 45 minutes. Get a good 25-30 minute walk in. Then get some tasty treats and work on commands for about 15 minutes. I wouldn't try to push past that 15 minute mark until she is a little older and has calmed down a bit.

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Zeus
German Shepherd
9 Weeks
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Zeus
German Shepherd
9 Weeks

Zeus seems to only want to listen at times. He knows his name and he understand sit and come but he only responds about half of the time. How would I get him to respond 100%?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Ah what a cute puppy! He is adorable. As far as listening 100% of the time, that won't be a realistic expectation until he is getting closer to 6 months of age. Dogs learn in stages. They will perform commands consistently for a while, then they regress, they plateau, and then seem to finally get the learned behaviors locked in. This is a normal part of their growth and development. The best thing you can do to speed this process along is to be consistent with your training, and provide lots of positive reinforcement. At this age, you can spend 10 minutes a time, 3x a day working on training commands. As he ages, you can increase the time up to about 45 minutes. You will fall into a nice routine that works best for your dynamic. These are just basic guidelines.

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Storm
German Shepherd
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
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Storm
German Shepherd
1 Year

Barks a lot. Loves to ride but barks at everyone and the same at home when people are walking by

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! It sounds like he has some fear based anxiety going on. Coupled with the excitement of walks, you have your hands a little full! Your dog needs to learn new behaviors to quell his fear. First we reduce his fear around people on walks, and then we begin adding cues such as “watch me” or “sit.” Research tells us that most leash reactivity is caused by fear, not by aggression. Dogs bark and lunge at other dogs or people to warn, “Go away! Go away!” Dogs fear other dogs or people because of genetic reasons, fights when they were puppies, or any scary (to the dog) interaction with other dogs. Sometimes it's just a simple case of lacking proper socialization as a puppy. Which most dogs in a typical household lack proper socialization. Dogs need to be introduced to hundreds of different settings as a puppy (by the age of 20 weeks) to be "properly" socialized. Most of us are not able to do that. So we will be playing a bit of catch up! Keep in mind before starting, that punishing him while he's in this state of emotion isn't ideal. Doing so will make his concerns even bigger. Dogs learn by making associations, and you want your dog to associate strangers with pleasant things — never punishment. The first step is to reframe what a stranger means to your dog. From a safe distance — your dog determines the distance, not you — have your leashed dog view another dog. As someone comes into view, drop a lot of enticing meat treats just in front of your dog’s nose. Ignore any hysterics for now, but back up and create more space if your dog is unwilling to eat. This part is hard for humans — I understand. It helps to see your dog’s behavior for what it most likely is: fear vs. disobedience. The training reinforcer MUST be a great one, such as real meat. It is critical that the appearance of the stranger causes meat to fall from the sky. When the stranger is out of your dog’s view, all treats stop. We want your dog to predict that other dogs near him means that YUMMY FOOD will appear! Consider not walking your dog for 30 days as you reprogram his opinions of strangers. Instead, sit on your front porch or in your garage with your dog on leash, and practice treating every time someone comes into your dog’s line of sight. During this time, engage your dog’s mind with mind puzzles, obedience work, and fun stuff like games in the house or yard. You know you have made great progress when your dog sees a stranger, and he turns his head away from the once-threatening person and looks into your eyes, expecting a treat. Once your dog is looking at his (former) trigger and then looking expectantly up at you for a treat, you can begin to put this skill on cue. Tell the dog, "sit" or "watch me" or whatever command you want to use for this setting. After he starts automatically sitting or watching you when he sees a stranger approaching, you know you have success! Remember to go slowly! It could take up to a month or longer of consistent practice before you see an improvement with his behavior.

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Cammil
german sheperd
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
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Cammil
german sheperd
1 Year

My dog doesn't focus to me and it's hard to get her attention.. what should I do

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello, First, practice teaching pup to look at you when you say their name. When pup is watching, show them a piece of kibble, then hold it up to your eye and say their name. When they make eye contact (because they are watching the kibble), praise and give them the treat. Repeat this often. Once pup knows to look toward your eye, practice randomly throughout the day or evening when pup isn't expecting it with the kibble. Next, keep the kibble in your other hand behind your back, and pretend to hold a piece next to your eye with your other hand while saying pup's name. Praise and reward with the kibble from behind you back when they look at your eye/hand there. Practice in training sessions then periodically throughout the the day until pup has mastered looking then too. Next, simply point to you eye and practice the above, rewarding with a treat from behind your back when they look at your eye. Next. simply say pup's name and reward with a treat when they look at your eye when they hear you. Practice in training sessions and throughout the day randomly, pointing to your eye as a hint if they won't look you in the eye after you have waited 7 seconds. Do this until they can consistently look at you without the hint when you say their name randomly. Check out the three methods found in the article linked below for further ways to build pup's respect - which can be another reason pup won't listen. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you Finally, make sure that you have proactively practiced the commands pup is ignoring, and pup has the skills to obey what you are asking - whether that means understanding what Sit means, or practicing sit around enough different types of distractions they are also able to sit around distractions (that's a more advanced skill that has to be worked up to, opposed to sitting in your living room when its calm). If you are not 100% confident pup understands and has the skills to obey, work on teaching those commands proactively some more. Youtube or www.wagwalking.com/training are great resources to learn how to teach specific commands, or join a class or hire a trainer to help with an obedience course. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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blaze
german shephard
8 Weeks
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blaze
german shephard
8 Weeks

he does not listen to his name and what can i do to correct a bad habbit from him. e.g poo on the floor of the sitting room and i want him to go to use the convenience or toilet

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on potty training, as well as crate training just in case you decide to use a crate to help with potty training. Potty training: Know Your Pup. As you spend time with your puppy, learn your puppy’s love language. Just as some people prefer gifts, touch, or time spent together, puppies can be the same way. Some puppies love praise or pets, while others prefer treats. As you get to know your puppy, consider what reward your puppy loves the most. Create a Daily Schedule. It is best to have a routine for your puppy. A schedule helps them understand when to eat, play, and “go to the bathroom.” Your puppy should go out frequently and the routine should be the same every time. When? Start the day by taking your puppy outside, and repeating based on age and ability. They should also go out after napping, chewing, playing, and within 10 to 15 minutes of eating. Although some puppies can sleep for seven hours, it is important to set an alarm and take your pup out during the night. When you do, don’t make a fuss about it. Quietly take them outside with minimal stimulation and light. Praise them if they go to the bathroom and gently return them to their bed or crate. You don’t want them to get stimulated and ready to play in the middle of the night! As you get to know your puppy, you will become aware of their individual habits. Click here to learn more about house training schedules for puppies. Where? Take your puppy to a specific area to urinate or defecate. Be consistent. You can create an area by using urine-soaked paper or bowel movements to help create an aroma to stimulate your puppy. How? Take your puppy out on a leash so they can focus on the desired activity. This will help prevent them from wandering off to play. Once your puppy is in the selected area, use your verbal cue, such as “Hurry Up,” “Poopies,” “Go tinkle,” or any phrase your puppy responds to. What? Know the signs that your puppy has to go to the bathroom. Every animal may have a different “I gotta go” gesture, which often include restlessness, sniffing around, circling, scratching at the door, barking, and, eventually, squatting. At the first sign that your pup has to go, calmly and quickly take them outside to their bathroom spot. Deal with Accidents. Accidents are a normal part of house training a puppy. What to Do If you see your puppy in the process of urinating or defecating inappropriately, calmly and quickly interrupt them in the act. Tell them to stop (either by a jarring sound or command), and immediately take them to an appropriate location for elimination. After your puppy goes to the bathroom, lavishly praise them and offer a treat. Thoroughly clean up accidents, so your puppy is not attracted to this area again. Create a consistent feeding and watering schedule. Depending on the age of your puppy, they will eat three to four times a day. A consistent feeding routine can create a regular bathroom schedule. Take away water about 2 hours before bedtime. Learn more about ideal dog schedules here. What NOT to Do Don’t punish your puppy when they have an accident. At that point, it is too late. When a puppy has an accident in the house and they walk away, within seconds they have already forgotten about what they did. Taking them to the scene of the crime and yelling and/or rubbing their nose in it does not help and, in fact, can harm your puppy! Supervise. The best thing you can do is to prevent accidents and the best way to do this is to supervise your puppy at all times. You can tether your puppy to your waist with a five or six-foot leash and carefully observe them for signs that they need to go to the bathroom. If you can’t supervise, then crate or confine your puppy. The more accidents your puppy has in the house, the more confusing it will be for them and this can delay house training. Reward, Reward, Reward. It is important to give your puppy a reward for their good behavior. This can be for commands such as sitting and coming to you, or for appropriately eliminating outside. In a puppy, a reward can be a couple kibbles of puppy food or a treat, such as a small piece of meat. The treat should be exciting for them and only available as a result of good behavior. Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at their leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away. If yours isn't one of them: Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them. Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter. Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If they aren’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days. Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate. Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat their meal, you can close the door while they’re eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as they finish their meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until they’re staying in the crate for 10 minutes or so after eating. If they begin to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving them in the crate for a shorter time period. If they do whine or cry in the crate, don’t let them out until they stop. Otherwise, they'll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so they'll keep doing it. Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home. Call them over to the crate and give them a treat. Give them a command to enter, such as "crate." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand. After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat and close the door. Sit quietly near the crate for five to 10 minutes and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time and then let them out. Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave them in the crate and the length of time you're out of sight. Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving them crated when you're gone for short time periods and/or letting them sleep there at night. This may take several days or weeks. Step 4, Part A: Crate your dog when you leave After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house. Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate. Vary the moment during your "getting ready to leave" routine that you put your dog in the crate. Although they shouldn't be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate them anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving. Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate and then leave quietly. When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they don't associate crating with being left alone. Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs should also initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation. Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Potential problems Whining: If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to eliminate. If you've followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn't been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from their crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse. If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to eliminate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you're convinced that your dog doesn't need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore them until they stop whining. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want. If you've progressed gradually through the training steps and haven't done too much too fast, you'll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again. Separation anxiety: Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counterconditioning and desensitization procedures.

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Millie
German Shepherd
7 Weeks
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Millie
German Shepherd
7 Weeks

How do I get her to listen to me! She chews on all the shoes! She bites everyone in the house but me how do I get her to stop biting the family!! And she is mostly trained but she will be sassy and poop in the house but never pees in the house!!

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nakesia, First, know that all of these behaviors are normal at this age for a puppy. Check out the free PDF e-book, AFTER You Get Your Puppy, which can be downloaded at the link below. www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads Second, for the biting, Check out the article linked below. Starting today, use the "Bite Inhibition" method. BUT at the same time, begin teaching "Leave It" from the "Leave It" method. As soon as pup is good as the Leave It game, start telling pup to "Leave It" when he attempts to bite or is tempted to bite. Reward pup if he makes a good choice. If he disobeys your leave it command, use the Pressure method to gently discipline pup for biting when you told him not to. The order or all of this is very important - the Bite Inhibition method can be used for the next couple of weeks while pup is learning leave it, but leave it will teach pup to stop the biting entirely. The pressure method teaches pup that you mean what you say without being overly harsh - but because you have taught pup to leave it first, pup clearly understands that you are not just roughhousing (which is what pup probably thinks most of the time right now), so it is more effective. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Another important part of this is puppy learning bite inhibition. Puppies have to learn while young how to control the pressure of their mouths - this is typically done through play with other puppies. See if there is a puppy class in your area that comes well recommended and has time for moderated off-leash puppy play. If you can't join a class, look for a free puppy play group, or recruit some friends with puppies to come over if you can and create your own group. You are looking for puppies under 6 months of age - since young puppies play differently than adult dogs. Moderate the puppies' play and whenever one pup seems overwhelmed or they are all getting too excited, interrupt their play, let everyone calm down, then let the most timid pup go first to see if they still want to play - if they do, then you can let the other puppies go too when they are waiting for permission. Finding a good puppy class - no class will be ideal but here's what to shoot for: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/puppy-classes-when-to-start/ When pup gets especially wound up, he probably needs a nap too. At this age puppies will sometimes get really hyper when they are overtired or haven't had any mental stimulation through something like training. When you spot that and think pup could be tired, place pup in their crate or an exercise pen with a food stuffed Kong for a bit to help him calm down and rest. Finally, check out the PDF e-book downloads found on this website, written by one of the founders of the association of professional dog trainers, and a pioneer in starting puppy kindergarten classes in the USA. Click on the pictures of the puppies to download the PDF books: https://www.lifedogtraining.com/freedownloads/ Know that mouthiness at this age is completely normal. It's not fun but it is normal for it to take some time for a puppy to learn self-control well enough to stop. Try not to get discouraged if you don't see instant progress, any progress and moving in the right direction in this area is good, so keep working at it. For the chewing, check out the article linked below. https://www.petful.com/behaviors/train-dog-not-to-chew/ For the accidents, check out the Tethering and Crate Training methods from this article below: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-german-shepherd-puppy-to-poop-outside Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Igor
German Shepherd
2 Months
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Igor
German Shepherd
2 Months

Can i sart leash walking training

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Akash, You can! At this age, pup will being by just getting used to the leash and learning to walk in a straight line and not bite everything that moves. This is a great age to start, just understand that it will take a lot of patience and practice, but pup is still learning. I recommend starting with introducing the leash if you haven't already: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-your-puppy-to-accept-leash Next, check out the Turns or Treat Lure methods: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-poodle-to-heel Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Max
German Shepherd
9 Weeks
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Max
German Shepherd
9 Weeks

Won’t listen doesn’t stay quite when told

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Max is vocal and full of energy just like all puppies at his age. He'll learn - and you can have lots of fun training him as you get to know him. Start here: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-pitbull-puppy-to-be-obedient. Read the guide in its entirety for excellent tips, including reminders to give Max lots of exercise. This is one of the best things to do when training. Puppies need mental stimulation in the form of feeder toys, teething toys, and fresh air to learn about the world. You can also work on the "quiet command" as described here, to teach Max when it's appropriate to not bark: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark. All the best and enjoy your puppy!

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Max
German Shepherd
3 Months
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Max
German Shepherd
3 Months

Ever since I got my puppy he likes to bite everything. When I say everything, he also likes to bite hands, legs, and clothes when you are just petting him or next to him. He doesn't listen to my sisters and I most of the time, he only listens to my parents even though we are the ones who take care of him the most. He sometimes becomes so disobedient, we can not get time to listen to us. We have tried many things to try to train him and make him listen, but nothing at the moment has worked. He also tends to play really rough with my younger brother as he runs and bites him really hard.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

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Lily
German Shepherd
2 Years
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1 found helpful
Lily
German Shepherd
2 Years

To start, she is a German Shepherd/Husky mix. She is trained off leash, knows basic commands such as Here, Stay, Sit, Down, Easy, door manners, and even knows some other commands in Hindi. All of a sudden she is reverting back to how she was before all the training, high energy, pushing boundaries, and when given a command no immediate response. Why is she behaving this way when we haven't changed anything? What can I do to stop the bad behavior and get her back to the well trained dog?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hi there. Dogs tend to go through phases like this with no known cause. My assumption is fluxuations within their body, similar to our hormonal changes. The best thing you can do is to spend about 10 minutes a day, refreshing the training commands your dog knows. Do this with treats, and run through the commands and make it fun and exciting.

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Rocky
German Shepherd
2 Years
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Rocky
German Shepherd
2 Years

My dog only listens to me when I have a treat, if I don't have one he won't listen to any commands. When we go outside he doesn't listen to me at all, no matter if I have a treat.

Darlene Stott
Darlene Stott
Dog Trainer and Groomer
104 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would start back at the basics as far as obedience goes: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-labrador-retriever. Read the ENTIRE guide and put the excellent concepts to good use. Practice those, but along with that, I highly recommend that you take Rocky for obedience classes. The transformation you will see in your dog is so worth the time and effort. A month of courses can change Rocky from a dog who does not listen to a dog you can take anywhere. Please consider it. As well, remember to read the link I sent you above, along with this guide for simple commands to work on before you start classes: https://wagwalking.com/training/obedience-train-a-whippet. Good luck and happy training!

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Luna
German Shepherd
10 Weeks
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Luna
German Shepherd
10 Weeks

Luna doesn’t bite me, my mom or my dad anymore only when we play with her she sometimes does it on accident. But she never stops biting my younger sister. My sister has even stopped trying to say “no” instead she’s running away in fear... what do we do to help both ?

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Hello! Here is information on puppy nipping/biting. Nipping: Puppies may nip for a number of reasons. Nipping can be a means of energy release, getting attention, interacting and exploring their environment or it could be a habit that helps with teething. Whatever the cause, nipping can still be painful for the receiver, and it’s an action that pet parents want to curb. Some ways to stop biting before it becomes a real problem include: Using teething toys. Distracting with and redirecting your dog’s biting to safe and durable chew toys is one way to keep them from focusing their mouthy energies to an approved location and teach them what biting habits are acceptable. Making sure your dog is getting the proper amount of exercise. Exercise is huge. Different dogs have different exercise needs based on their breed and size, so check with your veterinarian to make sure that yours is getting the exercise they need. Dogs—and especially puppies—use their playtime to get out extra energy. With too much pent-up energy, your pup may resort to play biting. Having them expel their energy in positive ways - including both physical and mental exercise - will help mitigate extra nips. Being consistent. Training your dog takes patience, practice and consistency. With the right training techniques and commitment, your dog will learn what is preferred behavior. While sometimes it may be easier to let a little nipping activity go, be sure to remain consistent in your cues and redirection. That way, boundaries are clear to your dog. Using positive reinforcement. To establish preferred behaviors, use positive reinforcement when your dog exhibits the correct behavior. For instance, praise and treat your puppy when they listen to your cue to stop unwanted biting as well as when they choose an appropriate teething toy on their own. Saying “Ouch!” The next time your puppy becomes too exuberant and nips you, say “OUCH!” in a very shocked tone and immediately stop playing with them. Your puppy should learn - just as they did with their littermates - that their form of play has become unwanted. When they stop, ensure that you follow up with positive reinforcement by offering praise, treat and/or resuming play. Letting every interaction with your puppy be a learning opportunity. While there are moments of dedicated training time, every interaction with your dog can be used as a potential teaching moment.

have her be brave so the dog wont think it okay to bithg also im a kid with a BIG sheperd so just because i kid dont mean i dont know.

also she mitgh be play fithging

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luna
German Shepherd
8 Months
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luna
German Shepherd
8 Months

sometimes listens
doesn’t understand commands

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Mariah, It sounds like pup may need to go back to the basics with some commands and work on teaching those words, then set up training scenarios where you practice those commands in gradually more and more distracting environments on leash, to help pup's ability to focus around distractions grow. You want this process to be gradual so that pup isn't so distracted they can't learn. Check out the Obedience method from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-doberman-to-listen-to-you On www.wagwalking.com/training you can also find more articles on how to teach various individual commands like Sit, Down, Come, Heel, ect...I recommend making a list of commands you want pup to learn right now and finding an article on how to teach each command. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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buchi
East European Shepherd
7 Months
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buchi
East European Shepherd
7 Months

sometimes when she playing with my another dog or getting angry she doesnot listening to me today he attacked liitle pig becouse it came to my yard i know this dogs are so owner but she always getting out of control when she sees something like chicken or pig in my yard

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
833 Dog owners recommended

Hello Nika, Check out James Penrith from TaketheLeadDogTraining. He has a Youtube channel. He works with dogs that chase and sometimes will kill livestock. Day 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgNbWCK9lFc Day 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpf5Bn-MNko&t=14s Day 3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj3nMvvHhwQ Day 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxrGQ-AZylY Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Luna
German Shepherd
8 Months
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Luna
German Shepherd
8 Months

She jumps on everyone and doesn’t listen when we try to get her to come inside or to get her into her kennel. We’ve tried using treats and toys but they don’t work anymore.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
225 Dog owners recommended

Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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