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  • Home
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  • How to Train a Great Pyrenees to Stay in the Yard

How to Train a Great Pyrenees to Stay in the Yard

How to Train a Great Pyrenees to Stay in the Yard
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon1-8 Weeks
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

There are few dogs that can match the mighty size of your Great Pyrenees. But while some people want to come over and say hello, others look slightly on edge and even frightened. Their size also makes them intimidating to other pets too. Unfortunately, your Great Pyrenees recently escaped your yard and caused quite a stir. There is a park close by that children play in and several actually ran away. Now you know your big pooch is harmless, but other people don’t.

Therefore, training your Great Pyrenees to stay in your yard is essential. No longer will you have neighbors and locals coming to your door to complain if he escapes. You also won’t have to panic as soon as you lose sight of him. Finally, increasing your control like this will help you get a handle on any other bad habits they may have.

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Defining Tasks

Fortunately, training your Great Pyrenees to stay in your yard is much easier than many people realize. Firstly, you will need to take a number of steps to deter them from leaving the yard in the first place. You then need to introduce some incentives for keeping them within the confines of your yard. Training will also require making sure all their needs can be met outside.

If your dog is just a puppy then you could see results in just a week or so. However, if they are older, stubborn and with a lifetime of running away under their collar, then you may need a month or two. Get this training right and you can relax in the knowledge that your Great Pyrenees is always safe and secure outside in the yard. It also means you’ll have a fantastically effective guard dog and burglar deterrent.

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Getting Started

Before you get to work you will need to get your hands on a few bits. You will need a long leash and some secure fencing.

You will also need some toys, food puzzles and a decent stockpile of treats. Alternatively, you can break their favorite food into small pieces. Try and set aside 10 minutes each day for training. You will, of course, also need constant access to the yard you want to keep them in.

After you have ticked all those boxes, just bring patience and a can-do attitude, then work can start!

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The Prevention Method

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Long leash

The first thing you need to do is try and discourage your Great Pyrenees from escaping the yard in the first place. So try tethering them with a long leash in the yard, this should remove the running away temptation and get them used to staying put.

2

Obscure their view

Your dog may want to escape because they can see lots of interesting and wonderful things outside the yard. Simply obscuring their view with fencing or bushes can remove that temptation.

3

Outdoor shelter

Fido needs to have somewhere safe and secure they can sleep in at night. An outdoor shelter can be bought or it can be made, but it will give them somewhere that feels like their own and that they can escape to when the weather is bad.

4

React

Whenever you do see them try to escape, go over and give a firm ‘NO’. At the same time take them by the collar and pull them back into the yard. You need to discourage any interest in leaving the yard.

5

Avoid punishment

If your Great Pyrenees does escape from the yard, don’t punish them. You want them to associate staying near you with positive consequences. Punishment may only fuel their desire to get far away.

The Environment Method

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Toys

If they are going to spend a lot of time in the yard and stay there then your dog needs to have everything they need. One of the things that will keep them occupied is a range of toys and amusements. Food puzzles, in particular, are a great way to keep them occupied for hours.

2

Exercise

If your Great Pyrenees is going to spend most of the time in the yard, they need to get a decent daily dose of exercise. They are big as well, so a long walk is definitely required. If they are tired they will be more content relaxing in the yard.

3

Encouragement

Go out and give them the odd treat when they are in the yard. This will get them associating the yard with food. To add to that, feed them their meals outside in the yard too.

4

Toilet

Make sure your dog is happy going to the toilet out in the yard or somewhere close. You can do this by regularly taking them to the toilet spot and giving them a reward whenever they go.

5

Attention

If you are leaving your Great Pyrenees in a yard all day, make sure they still get enough attention from you. So spend a few minutes each day playing around with toys, stroking them and giving them some affection.

The Full Package Method

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Obedience training

Teach your Great Pyrenees a range of basic commands, such as ‘sit’ and ‘stay’. This will channel their energy into something productive and make them associate the yard with somewhere they get attention from their owner and treats.

2

Be vigilant

Be ready to react whenever you see your dog moving towards the edge and looking like they may want to leave. When that does happen, call them over in a high-pitched voice.

3

Reward

Once they return to you, hand over a tasty treat or play with a toy for a few minutes. You want to show them that there are positives to staying within the yard. If you use a clicker when you train, you can also click whenever they move away.

4

Boundaries

Secure your dog to a leash each morning and evening and walk them around the perimeter of the yard. After a while this will make the yard feel like their territory, which they will want to stay in to defend.

5

Boundary without leash

After several days the boundaries should start to become ingrained. So now try doing the same walk each morning and evening but without the dog on a leash. Keep calling them close to your side if they start to wander off.

Written by James Barra

Veterinary reviewed by:

Published: 03/15/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Shep

Dog breed icon

pyreneese

Dog age icon

Two Years

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Question

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I just got 2 pyrenees dogs that are 2. I have had them a week and they are very loving. Yesterday we got a new neihhbor and they ha e a dog. My pyrs want to kill him. How do i stop .y pyrs from attacking this new dog whille allowi g them to do thier job protecting my property and animals?

Aug. 6, 2023

Shep's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I would hire a professional trainer with experience in this area to help you in person, or at least set up an appointment with a trainer remotely that can include video calling. There are a lot of questions that would need to be addressed to give accurate advise for this question. Are the yards fenced between? Is the other dog coming onto your property or your dogs leaving your property to go onto theirs? I expect a fencing system is needed, either a physical fence to keep the other dog out, or at least something like HALO GPS fence for your dogs, to keep them in. You might also need to work on desensitizing the dogs to each other on leash, one dog at a time from a distance with safety measures in place, to help the dogs not see the other dog as a threat - if your neighbor is willing to work with you. What type of dog and how large is the other dog? Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Aug. 23, 2023

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Unknown

Dog breed icon

Great Pyrenees

Dog age icon

One Year

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Hello, Five months ago I observed two great pyrenees dogs, who were guarding goats, with large chains around their necks which were bolted to wood 2 X 4 blocks about 18 inches long. The blocks hung at the height of the dogs knees, so when the dogs tried to walk or run, the blocks hit them in the knees. I was informed by a neighbor that this was a training tool used to keep the dogs from running away. I was appalled. I recently observed the dogs again, with the chains and wood still around their necks, their knees swollen, and clearly causing pain. Is this really training, or abuse?

Nov. 5, 2022

Unknown's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, I personally have not heard of that technique for teaching a dog not to run away. I don't agree with all techniques I hear of, but I have not even heard of that one. Generally you teach a dog where a specific boundary line is and the dogs are only corrected when they cross the boundary and are free and safe the rest of the time unless they choose to try to go over that boundary. If the goats are not kept in a central location but roam and they are trying to teach the dogs to stay only with the goats, then the dog would be taught to stay within a certain proximity to the goats in a clear way using a training leash to guide them back to the goats when they wander away, rewarding the dogs for staying with them, and only correcting if they wandered away from the animals they need to guard. Most of the time guarding is taught by simply raising the dogs with the goats as puppies so that they create a bond with the goats overtime and guard them out of protectiveness for what they view as their family. I would be curious if they skipped the proper technique for raising the animals together while young and are now trying to get adults to stay with the goats long enough to bond, in which case, keeping the dogs with the goats should be taught in a safer way and shouldn't be causing the dogs harm during the process. Even making the rope to the blocks longer and the allowing the blocks to rest on the ground would be much kinder than how they have things now. Good training should clearly communicate to the dogs what they are supposed to be doing so that the dogs understand the expectation, reward them for obeying the rules or commands, and correct when they don't obey when necessary; rather than correct continuously in order to teach or correct in a way that the animals don't understand and don't know how to avoid. The owners may have been told to train the dogs that way by someone who doesn't know a better method, and be genuinely attempting to train something by using the blocks; however, I would say its not a good way to teach that and even training that involves correction shouldn't cause physical damage to the dog - temporary discomfort to teach a dog to avoid something is not the same as something that damages the dog physically and could lead to the need to see a vet. There are far better, kinder ways to teach, that are also more effective. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

Nov. 7, 2022


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