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How to Train a Great Pyrenees to Stay in the Yard

How to Train a Great Pyrenees to Stay in the Yard
Medium difficulty iconMedium
Time icon1-8 Weeks
General training category iconGeneral

Introduction

There are few dogs that can match the mighty size of your Great Pyrenees. But while some people want to come over and say hello, others look slightly on edge and even frightened. Their size also makes them intimidating to other pets too. Unfortunately, your Great Pyrenees recently escaped your yard and caused quite a stir. There is a park close by that children play in and several actually ran away. Now you know your big pooch is harmless, but other people don’t.

Therefore, training your Great Pyrenees to stay in your yard is essential. No longer will you have neighbors and locals coming to your door to complain if he escapes. You also won’t have to panic as soon as you lose sight of him. Finally, increasing your control like this will help you get a handle on any other bad habits they may have.

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Defining Tasks

Fortunately, training your Great Pyrenees to stay in your yard is much easier than many people realize. Firstly, you will need to take a number of steps to deter them from leaving the yard in the first place. You then need to introduce some incentives for keeping them within the confines of your yard. Training will also require making sure all their needs can be met outside.

If your dog is just a puppy then you could see results in just a week or so. However, if they are older, stubborn and with a lifetime of running away under their collar, then you may need a month or two. Get this training right and you can relax in the knowledge that your Great Pyrenees is always safe and secure outside in the yard. It also means you’ll have a fantastically effective guard dog and burglar deterrent.

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Getting Started

Before you get to work you will need to get your hands on a few bits. You will need a long leash and some secure fencing.

You will also need some toys, food puzzles and a decent stockpile of treats. Alternatively, you can break their favorite food into small pieces. Try and set aside 10 minutes each day for training. You will, of course, also need constant access to the yard you want to keep them in.

After you have ticked all those boxes, just bring patience and a can-do attitude, then work can start!

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The Prevention Method

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Long leash

The first thing you need to do is try and discourage your Great Pyrenees from escaping the yard in the first place. So try tethering them with a long leash in the yard, this should remove the running away temptation and get them used to staying put.

2

Obscure their view

Your dog may want to escape because they can see lots of interesting and wonderful things outside the yard. Simply obscuring their view with fencing or bushes can remove that temptation.

3

Outdoor shelter

Fido needs to have somewhere safe and secure they can sleep in at night. An outdoor shelter can be bought or it can be made, but it will give them somewhere that feels like their own and that they can escape to when the weather is bad.

4

React

Whenever you do see them try to escape, go over and give a firm ‘NO’. At the same time take them by the collar and pull them back into the yard. You need to discourage any interest in leaving the yard.

5

Avoid punishment

If your Great Pyrenees does escape from the yard, don’t punish them. You want them to associate staying near you with positive consequences. Punishment may only fuel their desire to get far away.

The Environment Method

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Toys

If they are going to spend a lot of time in the yard and stay there then your dog needs to have everything they need. One of the things that will keep them occupied is a range of toys and amusements. Food puzzles, in particular, are a great way to keep them occupied for hours.

2

Exercise

If your Great Pyrenees is going to spend most of the time in the yard, they need to get a decent daily dose of exercise. They are big as well, so a long walk is definitely required. If they are tired they will be more content relaxing in the yard.

3

Encouragement

Go out and give them the odd treat when they are in the yard. This will get them associating the yard with food. To add to that, feed them their meals outside in the yard too.

4

Toilet

Make sure your dog is happy going to the toilet out in the yard or somewhere close. You can do this by regularly taking them to the toilet spot and giving them a reward whenever they go.

5

Attention

If you are leaving your Great Pyrenees in a yard all day, make sure they still get enough attention from you. So spend a few minutes each day playing around with toys, stroking them and giving them some affection.

The Full Package Method

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Obedience training

Teach your Great Pyrenees a range of basic commands, such as ‘sit’ and ‘stay’. This will channel their energy into something productive and make them associate the yard with somewhere they get attention from their owner and treats.

2

Be vigilant

Be ready to react whenever you see your dog moving towards the edge and looking like they may want to leave. When that does happen, call them over in a high-pitched voice.

3

Reward

Once they return to you, hand over a tasty treat or play with a toy for a few minutes. You want to show them that there are positives to staying within the yard. If you use a clicker when you train, you can also click whenever they move away.

4

Boundaries

Secure your dog to a leash each morning and evening and walk them around the perimeter of the yard. After a while this will make the yard feel like their territory, which they will want to stay in to defend.

5

Boundary without leash

After several days the boundaries should start to become ingrained. So now try doing the same walk each morning and evening but without the dog on a leash. Keep calling them close to your side if they start to wander off.

By James Barra

Published: 03/15/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Training Questions

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Training Questions and Answers

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Marshmellow

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Great Pyrenees

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1 Year

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Question

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We use a correction collar (electric dog fence) to keep her in out yard. She used to be really good about staying in our yard but now goes over the boundry and roams around others properties(neighborhood). We bought a new one due to the other one quit working. She still does the same thing. How can we get her to not leave the yard.

April 22, 2022

Marshmellow's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello Justin, For dogs who have learned to cross invisible fences, a physical barrier is needed. This fence doesn't have to be something super high or fancy if you build it two feet past where the current invisible fence is and use that in combination with it, to pup approaches the physical barrier, is corrected for getting to close, and learns to not even approach that physical fence. The physical fence makes it so that pup can't just bolt through the yard, speeding past that correction point though. If cost is an issue, if you google "inexpensive fencing ideas", there are some creative ways to build a fence yourself using less expensive materials like pine boards, welded wire fence, refurbished pallet wood (be careful what it's been treated or covered with), or even natural logs and branches on your property if you have woods. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

April 22, 2022

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Haven't decided

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Great Pyrenees

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9 Weeks

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Question

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My husband and I are going to possibly be getting a 9 week old great Pyrenees puppy. We have a yellow lab that is 10 years old but still very active and in great shape. Our yellow lab has to be the alpha when she comes in contact with other dogs. We are not completely sure how she will get a long with a puppy because she hasn't been around puppies. What is the best way to introduce them and how will we know if it is a good fit or not? Will our lab eventually get a long with the puppy and how will we know? Also we have an invisible fence. Can we train a great Pyrenees to stay in a yard with out a visible fence?

June 8, 2021

Haven't decided's Owner

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Caitlin Crittenden - Dog Trainer

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1133 Dog owners recommended

Hello, Check out the passing approach and Walking Together methods from the article I have linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/greet-other-dogs Try to do this in an area where a lot of other dogs haven't been since puppy hasn't been fully vaccinated yet - a private fenced in yard big enough to walk the dogs around, or just generally an area where other dogs don't frequent, since diseases like Parvo are most often transmitted through infected/unvaccinated dog's feces. Having pups meet on a walk with two people walking them and gradually decreasing distance as both get used to each other and are calm, then go on a walk together can set a great foundation for a calm interaction. If you have any friends with puppies, I highly recommend doing the Passing Approach and Walking Together methods with them on a walk before bringing pup home to see how your dog does with puppies. If you decide to add a puppy, once you add them, crate train pup, teach the dogs commands like Leave It, Out, and Place, and you be the one to make and enforce the house rules, like no hovering around while the other eats, no blocking or threatening each other, no stealing toys, no being pushy for your attention, ect...If your current dog is pushy or doesn't listen to you well right now, work on that first, so that there will be less of that with both dogs competing later, and so that the dogs are more willing to abide by your rules, instead of trying to make and enforce rules for the other dog themselves. When you cannot supervise the dogs together, puppy should either be crated or in an exercise pen with a dog food stuffed chew toy for entertainment and settling purposes. The confinement helps keep them safe from chewing things destructively, helps with potty training, but also ensures the dogs won't fight while getting to know each other still. You can also tether pup to yourself with a hands free leash (you can add a carabiner to a leash handle to make hands free), to ensure pup doesn't go over to your older dog and pester all the time. You want calm, peaceful co-existence. Don't expect a lot of play or being best friends, especially with the age difference. If they can peacefully co-exist, they will likely learn to enjoy each other's company with age, time, and puppy calming down. A middle of the road puppy that's not overly excitable will probably be the easiest for your current dog. Not the most dominant, exuberant pup, but also not the most submissive, timid one - who could be easily bullied. The middle of the road, a little on the submissive side puppy. Opposite sexes tend to do a little better than same sex, but individual personality will make the most difference. I would highly encouraging safely exposing your dog to some puppies, through a careful gradual process - to ensure puppy's safely, and observe your dog's body language when the puppy is in the area briefly and for longer amounts of time. Many older dogs who are well socialized with other dogs are a bit more tolerant of young puppies than they are with older dogs - there is a grace period many dogs will give until puppies are a certain age, but those dogs who lack social skills can lack the patience and impulse required for a puppy, and view the puppy's antics as highly offensive and deserving of an attack. You need to know where your dog falls with that. Your dog may not be super interested in puppies, which is fine, but you want to make sure they are not out right aggressive toward them. Crate Training -Surprise method: https://wagwalking.com/training/like-a-crate Leave It method: https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bite Out - meaning leave the room/space - good for dealing with pushiness or hovering: https://www.petful.com/behaviors/how-to-teach-a-dog-the-out-command/ I also highly recommend feeding both dogs in separate closed crates or rooms, to avoid the potential for food fights, or stress of competing for food which could later lead to food aggression with a more dominant dog. Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

June 9, 2021


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