How to Train a Great Pyrenees to Stay in the Yard

Medium
1-8 Weeks
General

Introduction

There are few dogs that can match the mighty size of your Great Pyrenees. But while some people want to come over and say hello, others look slightly on edge and even frightened. Their size also makes them intimidating to other pets too. Unfortunately, your Great Pyrenees recently escaped your yard and caused quite a stir. There is a park close by that children play in and several actually ran away. Now you know your big pooch is harmless, but other people don’t.

Therefore, training your Great Pyrenees to stay in your yard is essential. No longer will you have neighbors and locals coming to your door to complain if he escapes. You also won’t have to panic as soon as you lose sight of him. Finally, increasing your control like this will help you get a handle on any other bad habits they may have.

Defining Tasks

Fortunately, training your Great Pyrenees to stay in your yard is much easier than many people realize. Firstly, you will need to take a number of steps to deter them from leaving the yard in the first place. You then need to introduce some incentives for keeping them within the confines of your yard. Training will also require making sure all their needs can be met outside.

If your dog is just a puppy then you could see results in just a week or so. However, if they are older, stubborn and with a lifetime of running away under their collar, then you may need a month or two. Get this training right and you can relax in the knowledge that your Great Pyrenees is always safe and secure outside in the yard. It also means you’ll have a fantastically effective guard dog and burglar deterrent.

Getting Started

Before you get to work you will need to get your hands on a few bits. You will need a long leash and some secure fencing.

You will also need some toys, food puzzles and a decent stockpile of treats. Alternatively, you can break their favorite food into small pieces. Try and set aside 10 minutes each day for training. You will, of course, also need constant access to the yard you want to keep them in.

After you have ticked all those boxes, just bring patience and a can-do attitude, then work can start!

The Prevention Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Long leash
The first thing you need to do is try and discourage your Great Pyrenees from escaping the yard in the first place. So try tethering them with a long leash in the yard, this should remove the running away temptation and get them used to staying put.
Step
2
Obscure their view
Your dog may want to escape because they can see lots of interesting and wonderful things outside the yard. Simply obscuring their view with fencing or bushes can remove that temptation.
Step
3
Outdoor shelter
Fido needs to have somewhere safe and secure they can sleep in at night. An outdoor shelter can be bought or it can be made, but it will give them somewhere that feels like their own and that they can escape to when the weather is bad.
Step
4
React
Whenever you do see them try to escape, go over and give a firm ‘NO’. At the same time take them by the collar and pull them back into the yard. You need to discourage any interest in leaving the yard.
Step
5
Avoid punishment
If your Great Pyrenees does escape from the yard, don’t punish them. You want them to associate staying near you with positive consequences. Punishment may only fuel their desire to get far away.
Recommend training method?

The Environment Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Toys
If they are going to spend a lot of time in the yard and stay there then your dog needs to have everything they need. One of the things that will keep them occupied is a range of toys and amusements. Food puzzles, in particular, are a great way to keep them occupied for hours.
Step
2
Exercise
If your Great Pyrenees is going to spend most of the time in the yard, they need to get a decent daily dose of exercise. They are big as well, so a long walk is definitely required. If they are tired they will be more content relaxing in the yard.
Step
3
Encouragement
Go out and give them the odd treat when they are in the yard. This will get them associating the yard with food. To add to that, feed them their meals outside in the yard too.
Step
4
Toilet
Make sure your dog is happy going to the toilet out in the yard or somewhere close. You can do this by regularly taking them to the toilet spot and giving them a reward whenever they go.
Step
5
Attention
If you are leaving your Great Pyrenees in a yard all day, make sure they still get enough attention from you. So spend a few minutes each day playing around with toys, stroking them and giving them some affection.
Recommend training method?

The Full Package Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Obedience training
Teach your Great Pyrenees a range of basic commands, such as ‘sit’ and ‘stay’. This will channel their energy into something productive and make them associate the yard with somewhere they get attention from their owner and treats.
Step
2
Be vigilant
Be ready to react whenever you see your dog moving towards the edge and looking like they may want to leave. When that does happen, call them over in a high-pitched voice.
Step
3
Reward
Once they return to you, hand over a tasty treat or play with a toy for a few minutes. You want to show them that there are positives to staying within the yard. If you use a clicker when you train, you can also click whenever they move away.
Step
4
Boundaries
Secure your dog to a leash each morning and evening and walk them around the perimeter of the yard. After a while this will make the yard feel like their territory, which they will want to stay in to defend.
Step
5
Boundary without leash
After several days the boundaries should start to become ingrained. So now try doing the same walk each morning and evening but without the dog on a leash. Keep calling them close to your side if they start to wander off.
Recommend training method?

Success Stories and Training Questions

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd